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  Subjects -> ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE (Total: 106 journals)
Showing 1 - 15 of 15 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acupuncture & Electro-Therapeutics Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Acupuncture in Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Advanced Herbal Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Traditional Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
African Journal of Traditional, Complementary and Alternative Medicines     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Akupunktur & Aurikulomedizin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Allgemeine Homöopathische Zeitung     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Alternative & Integrative Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Alternative Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Alternative Medicine Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Anales de Hidrología Médica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ancient Science of Life     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Arteterapia. Papeles de arteterapia y educación artística para la inclusión social     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Asian Journal of Plant Pathology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Australian Journal of Acupuncture and Chinese Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Journal of Herbal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Journal of Music Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Avicenna Journal of Phytomedicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
AYU : An international quarterly journal of research in Ayurveda     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
BMC Complementary Medicine and Therapies     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Chinese Herbal Medicines     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Chinese Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Chinese Medicine and Culture     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cognitive Neuroscience     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Complementary Therapies in Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Deutsche Heilpraktiker-Zeitschrift     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Erfahrungsheilkunde     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
European Journal of Medicinal Plants     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 22)
Experimental and Therapeutic Medicine     Full-text available via subscription  
Fitoterapia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Focus on Alternative and Complementary Therapies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Global Journal of Integrated Chinese Medicine and Western Medicine     Open Access  
Global Journal of Traditional Medicine     Open Access  
Herba Polonica     Open Access  
Herbal Medicines Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian Journal of Ayurveda and lntegrative Medicine Klue     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Indian Journal of Research in Homoeopathy     Open Access  
Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge (IJTK)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Innovare Journal of Ayurvedic Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Intas Polivet     Full-text available via subscription  
Integrative Medicine Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of High Dilution Research     Open Access  
International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-Being     Open Access   (Followers: 21)
International Journal of Yoga     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
International Journal of Yoga : Philosophy, Psychology and Parapsychology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Ipnosi     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Acupuncture and Tuina Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Applied Arts and Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Applied Research on Medicinal and Aromatic Plants     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Asian Natural Products Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Ayurveda     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Ayurveda and Integrative Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Ayurveda Case Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of AYUSH :- Ayurveda, Yoga, Unani, Siddha and Homeopathy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Complementary and Alternative Medical Research     Open Access  
Journal of Dance Medicine & Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Drug Research in Ayurvedic Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Evidence-Based Integrative Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Fasting and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Ginseng Research     Open Access  
Journal of Health Science and Alternative Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Health Sciences Scholarship     Open Access  
Journal of Herbal Drugs (An International Journal on Medicinal Herbs)     Open Access  
Journal of Herbal Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Herbal Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Integrative Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Integrative Medicine & Therapy     Open Access  
Journal of Manual & Manipulative Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Journal of Medicinal Plants for Economic Development     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Medicinally Active Plants     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Natural Remedies     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Nutraceuticals and Herbal Medicine     Open Access  
Journal of Palliative Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51)
Journal of Research in Ayurvedic Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of the Australian Traditional-Medicine Society     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Traditional and Complementary Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Traditional Chinese Medical Sciences     Open Access  
Médecine Palliative     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Medical Acupuncture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Medicines     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Mersin Üniversitesi Tıp Fakültesi Lokman Hekim Tıp Tarihi ve Folklorik Tıp Dergisi     Open Access  
Muller Journal of Medical Sciences and Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Natural solutions     Full-text available via subscription  
Natural Volatiles & Essential Oils     Open Access  
Nigerian Journal of Natural Products and Medicine     Full-text available via subscription  
OA Alternative Medicine     Open Access  
Oriental Pharmacy and Experimental Medicine     Partially Free   (Followers: 2)
Research Journal of Medicinal Plant     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Research Journal of Pharmacognosy     Open Access  
Revista Internacional de Acupuntura     Full-text available via subscription  
South African Journal of Plant and Soil     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Synfacts     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Traditional & Kampo Medicine     Full-text available via subscription  
Traditional Medicine Journal     Open Access  
World Journal of Acupuncture - Moxibustion     Full-text available via subscription  
World Journal of Traditional Chinese Medicine     Open Access  
Yoga Mimamsa     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Zeitschrift für Orthomolekulare Medizin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)

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Acupuncture in Medicine
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.702
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 16  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0964-5284 - ISSN (Online) 1759-9873
Published by BMJ Publishing Group Homepage  [62 journals]
  • Electroacupuncture for blindness in age-related macular degeneration: a
           case report

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      Authors: Zixiang Geng, Lele Ling, Bingrong Li, Long Yuan, Bimeng Zhang
      Abstract: Acupuncture in Medicine, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Acupuncture in Medicine
      PubDate: 2022-06-29T07:04:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09645284221105528
       
  • Cessation of group battlefield acupuncture visits due to COVID-19: a pilot
           study

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      Authors: Cynthia F McNamara, Jeffrey D Kravetz, Daniel G Federman
      Abstract: Acupuncture in Medicine, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, battlefield acupuncture (BFA) was offered to veterans with chronic pain in multidisciplinary group visits.Objective:We aimed to assess the impact of cessation of BFA due to COVID-19 and to determine the utility of different aspects of the group visits for chronic pain management.Methods:Participants who had attended at least three BFA group visits completed questionnaires assessing the impact of treatment interruption on pain, overall function and desire to resume treatment.Results:Thirty-nine veterans were surveyed; 49% responded to the questionnaire. Ninety percent (17/19) agreed that BFA was an important part of pain management and that their pain had worsened after treatment interruption. Seventy-four percent (14/19) responded that they were taking more pain medications since BFA had ended. Ninety-five percent (18/19) responded that BFA improved daily function; 79% (15/19) agreed that BFA improved their sleep. Ninety-five percent (18/19) were interested in resuming BFA. Camaraderie was mentioned as the most helpful aspect of the group by 8/19 (42%) of participants. Participation of health psychology and nutrition were each mentioned as a most helpful aspect of the group by 5/19 (26%) of participants.Conclusion:Our results suggest that participants may have believed that BFA, camaraderie, and input from nutrition and health psychology services were important contributors to their pain control. The results also suggest that veterans may have suffered worsening pain, used more pain medications, and had worsening quality of sleep and daily function during the COVID-related clinic disruption, and that they were interested in resumption of the program.
      Citation: Acupuncture in Medicine
      PubDate: 2022-06-29T06:59:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09645284221104833
       
  • Changes in stiffness at active myofascial trigger points of the upper
           trapezius after dry needling in patients with chronic neck pain: a
           randomized controlled trial

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      Authors: Juan Antonio Valera-Calero, Sandra Sánchez-Jorge, Jorge Buffet-García, Umut Varol, César Fernández-de-las-Peñas, Javier Álvarez-González
      Abstract: Acupuncture in Medicine, Ahead of Print.
      Background/objective:Since, to our knowledge, the effects of dry needling (DN) on active myofascial trigger point (MTrP) stiffness have not been analyzed previously with shear wave elastography (SWE), our aim was to compare the effects of a single session of DN and sham DN applied to the most active MTrP located in the upper trapezius muscle on clinical outcomes.Methods:A randomized, double-blinded sham-controlled trial was conducted; 60 patients were randomized into an experimental (DN) or sham (sham DN) group. Baseline data including sociodemographic and clinical characteristics were collected. SWE and pain pressure thresholds (PPTs) at the MTrP and a control point located 3 cm laterally were the main outcomes assessed before and 10 min after the interventions.Results:Patients receiving DN interventions experienced greater increases in the control point PPTs immediately after receiving the intervention compared with sham DN (p < 0.05), but no differences were found for the MTrP (p> 0.05). Post-intervention PPT improvements were found at both locations for both groups (p < 0.01). No significant changes for either MTrP or control locations were found for SWE outcomes in either group (all ps> 0.05). No significant within-group SWE differences were found in the DN or sham DN groups (p> 0.05).Conclusion:A single session of DN or sham DN applied to active MTrPs located in the upper trapezius muscle produced no detectable changes in stiffness at the MTrP or control locations. Real DN induced an immediate analgesic response at both MTrP and control locations, while sham DN induced an immediate MTrP response.Trial registration number:NCT04832074 (ClinicalTrials.gov).
      Citation: Acupuncture in Medicine
      PubDate: 2022-06-29T06:57:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09645284221104831
       
  • The effectiveness and safety of acupuncture/electroacupuncture for
           chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy: a systematic review and
           meta-analysis

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      Authors: Li-Xia Pei, Yue Yi, Jing Guo, Lu Chen, Jin-Yong Zhou, Xiao-Liang Wu, Jian-Hua Sun, Hao Chen
      Abstract: Acupuncture in Medicine, Ahead of Print.
      Objective:Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is a dose-limiting adverse effect of anticancer agents with virtually no effective treatment. Safe and effective therapies are needed urgently. Acupuncture shows therapeutic possibilities in this regard but needs to be further evaluated.Methods:A systematic search was conducted in seven databases from their inception to April 2020. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) focused on acupuncture/electroacupuncture (EA) for the treatment of CIPN were included. Revman 5.3 software was used for meta-analysis if there was no significant heterogeneity. Otherwise, qualitative analysis was utilized.Results:Nine studies involving 582 patients were included in this review. Most of the studies exhibited unclear risk of bias because some details were not mentioned. As the clinical heterogeneity was significant, qualitative analysis was performed to describe nerve conduction velocity, effective rate for motor neuropathy, pain scores, quality of life and adverse events. Meta-analysis was performed on four studies to analyze the effective rate for sensory neuropathy due to inconspicuous heterogeneity. The results indicated that acupuncture may generate a better effect on sensory neuropathy than vitamin B (risk ratio = 1.60, 95% confidence interval = 1.31–1.95, I2 = 0%, p < 0.00001). The efficacy of EA plus glutathione (GSH) appeared to be better than that of GSH alone in alleviating sensory neurotoxicity and in improving nerve conduction velocity. Acupuncture plus methylcobalamin showed more favorable effects than methylcobalamin alone in relieving neuralgia, restoring nerve conduction velocity and improving quality of life. In terms of pain relief and improved CIPN-specific quality of life, acupuncture plus standard care was better than standard care alone. In terms of pain relief, EA was more effective than usual care.Conclusion:Acupuncture may be effective and safe in the treatment of CIPN according to the analyzed studies. However, more studies with higher methodological quality are warranted in order to be able to draw firmer conclusions. Future rigorous RCTs will be necessary to confirm the effectiveness and safety of acupuncture for CIPN.
      Citation: Acupuncture in Medicine
      PubDate: 2022-06-13T05:17:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09645284221076512
       
  • Motor function and fALFF modulation in convalescent-period ischemic stroke
           patients after scalp acupuncture therapy: a multi-centre randomized
           controlled trial

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      Authors: Yijun Zhan, Jian Pei, Jun Wang, Qinhui Fu, Jia Xu, Minghang Yan, Yiwen Cai, Xiao Cui, Wencheng Ye, Mingxia Fan, Qiurong Yu, Jie Jia
      Abstract: Acupuncture in Medicine, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Scalp acupuncture has been found to be effective at improving motor function after ischemic stroke, but few studies examining its central mechanisms of action have been carried out. The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical effects of scalp acupuncture on motor dysfunction and changes in spontaneous brain activity in patients with ischemic stroke.Methods:This was an evaluator- and analyst-blinded, multi-center randomized controlled trial. A total of 108 convalescent-stage ischemic stroke patients with motor dysfunction were allocated to receive either scalp acupuncture combined with rehabilitation treatment (SR group) or rehabilitation treatment alone (RE group). Patients in both groups received treatment 5 times per week for 8 weeks. The primary outcome measure was the Fugl-Meyer assessment (FMA). Secondary outcome measures included the modified Barthel index (mBI), modified Rankin scale (mRS) and values of fractional amplitude of low frequency fluctuation (fALFF) acquired using a resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) technique.Results:Both groups showed significant improvements in motor function, daily life ability and degree of disability, as measured by FMA, mRS and mBI (p < 0.05), and the SR group showed a significantly greater improvement (p < 0.05). Compared with the RE group, the areas where the fALFF values increased in the SR group were located in the cerebellum, praecuneus, precentral gyrus, superior frontal gyrus and parietal lobe. The improvement in FMA scores had the strongest correlation with the baseline fALFF values of the ipsilateral precentral gyrus.Conclusion:Scalp acupuncture improved motor function in convalescent-period ischemic stroke patients, and effects were correlated with regulation of motor-relevant brain regions. The fALFF value of the ipsilateral precentral and postcentral gyri could be potential clinical indices for prognostication of motor dysfunction.Trial registration number:NCT03120650 (http://www.clinicaltrials.gov).
      Citation: Acupuncture in Medicine
      PubDate: 2022-06-08T06:43:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09645284221086289
       
  • Acupuncture treatment for tinea pedis of the foot in a Korean military
           hospital: a case report

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      Authors: Byunwoo Son, Hyeonhoon Lee
      Abstract: Acupuncture in Medicine, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Acupuncture in Medicine
      PubDate: 2022-06-07T07:19:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09645284221086290
       
  • A comparative study of treatment interventions for patellar tendinopathy:
           a secondary cost-effectiveness analysis

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      Authors: Daniel Fernández-Sanchis, María Pilar López-Royo, Carolina Jiménez-Sánchez, Pablo Herrero, Manuel Gómez-Barrera, Sandra Calvo
      Abstract: Acupuncture in Medicine, Ahead of Print.
      Objective:To compare the cost-effectiveness of three patellar tendinopathy treatments.Design:Secondary (cost-effectiveness) analysis of a blinded, randomised controlled trial, with follow-up at 10 and 22 weeks.Settings:Recruitment was performed in sport clubs. The diagnosis and the intervention were carried out at San Jorge University.Participants:The participants were adults between 18 and 45 years (n = 48) with patellar tendinopathy.Interventions:Participants received percutaneous needle electrolysis, dry needling or sham needling, all of which were combined with eccentric exercise.Main outcome measures:Costs, quality-adjusted life years and incremental cost-effectiveness ratio were calculated for each group.Results:The total cost per session was similar in the three groups: €9.46 for the percutaneous needle electrolysis group; €9.44 for the dry needling group; and €8.96 for the sham group. The percutaneous needle electrolysis group presented better cost-effectiveness in terms of quality-adjusted life years and 96% and 93% probability of being cost-effective compared to the sham and dry needling groups, respectively.Conclusion:Our study shows that percutaneous needle electrolysis has a greater probability of being cost-effective than sham or dry needling treatment.
      Citation: Acupuncture in Medicine
      PubDate: 2022-06-07T07:06:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09645284221085283
       
  • Acupuncture treatment for cold pain in the lower extremities: a case
           report

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      Authors: Guilong Zhang, Di Zhang, Yuquan Shen, Liang Gao
      Abstract: Acupuncture in Medicine, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Acupuncture in Medicine
      PubDate: 2022-06-07T02:02:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09645284221077109
       
  • Early intervention of surrounding needling technique in the treatment of
           herpes zoster: a case report

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      Authors: Qingqing Xiao, Peiyu Xiong, Zilei Tian, Yalan Liu, Qiao Wen, Lei Lan
      Abstract: Acupuncture in Medicine, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Acupuncture in Medicine
      PubDate: 2022-06-03T02:14:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09645284221086287
       
  • The use of acupuncture in patients with Raynaud’s syndrome: a systematic
           review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

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      Authors: Fangwen Zhou, Emma Huang, Elena Zheng, Jiawen Deng
      Abstract: Acupuncture in Medicine, Ahead of Print.
      Objective:To assess the effectiveness of acupuncture for the treatment of Raynaud’s syndrome by conducting a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs).Methods:Studies were identified from English and Chinese databases from their inception to September 2020. The outcomes of interest were remission incidence, number of daily attacks, incidence of positive cold stimulation tests and incidence of cold provocation tests. We conducted meta-analysis and network meta-analysis using meta and gemtc.Results:Six trials (n = 272 participants) were included in the meta-analysis. Pairwise meta-analyses show that acupuncture was associated with increased remission incidence (risk ratio (RR) = 1.21, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.10 to 1.34), decreased daily number of attacks (weighted mean difference (WMD) = −0.57, 95% CI = −1.14 to −0.01), and increased incidence of positive cold stimulation tests (RR = 1.64, 95% CI = 1.27 to 2.11). There was not enough evidence to associate acupuncture with decreased incidence of positive cold provocation tests. The network meta-analyses did not demonstrate significant results for the effectiveness of any acupuncture treatments (electroacupuncture or manual acupuncture ± moxibustion), compared with controls, in terms of remission incidence or daily number of attacks, possibly due to small sample sizes and a lack of statistical power.Conclusion:The use of acupuncture may be effective for the treatment of Raynaud’s syndrome in terms of increasing remission incidence, decreasing daily number of attacks and increasing incidences of positive cold stimulation tests. However, our findings should be interpreted with caution due to small sample sizes, very low quality of evidence and high risk of bias. Future large-scale RCTs are warranted.
      Citation: Acupuncture in Medicine
      PubDate: 2022-05-24T10:06:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09645284221076504
       
  • Manual acupuncture at ST36 attenuates rheumatoid arthritis by inhibiting
           M1 macrophage polarization and enhancing Treg cell populations in
           adjuvant-induced arthritic rats

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      Authors: Nannan Yu, Fuming Yang, Xue Zhao, Yongming Guo, Yuan Xu, Guangchang Pang, Yinan Gong, Shenjun Wang, Yangyang Liu, Yuxin Fang, Kun Yu, Lin Yao, Hui Wang, Kuo Zhang, Baohu Liu, Zhenguo Wang, Yi Guo, Zhifang Xu
      Abstract: Acupuncture in Medicine, Ahead of Print.
      Objectives:Acupuncture has been found to be effective at relieving many inflammatory pain conditions, including rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We aimed to assess the anti-inflammatory potential of manual acupuncture (MA) treatment of RA using adjuvant-induced arthritic (AIA) rats and to explore the underlying mechanisms.Methods:The anti-inflammatory and analgesic actions of MA at ST36 (Zusanli) in AIA rats were assessed using paw withdrawal latency and swelling, histological examination and cytokine detection by enzyme-linked immunoassay (ELISA). The cell–cell communication (CCC) network was analyzed with a multiplex immunoassay of 24 immune factors expressed in the inflamed joints, and the macrophage and Treg populations and associated cytokines regulated by MA were investigated using reverse-transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR), ELISA and flow cytometry.Results:MA markedly decreased heat hyperalgesia and paw swelling in AIA rats. MA-treated rats also exhibited decreased levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β) coupled with increased anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-10, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1) in the ankle joints at protein and mRNA levels. CCC network analysis confirmed that macrophages are of critical importance and are potential therapeutic targets in RA. Repeated treatment with MA triggered a macrophage phenotypic switch in the paws, with fewer M1 macrophages. Prominent increases in the Treg cell population and TGF-β1 in the popliteal lymph nodes demonstrated the immunomodulatory effects of MA. Furthermore, a selective TGF-β1-receptor inhibitor, SB431542, attenuated the anti-inflammatory effects of MA and MA-induced suppression of the levels of M1-released cytokines.Conclusion:These findings provide novel evidence that the anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects of MA on RA act through phenotypic modulation involving the inhibition of M1 macrophage polarization and an increase in the Treg cell population, highlighting the potential therapeutic advantages of acupuncture in controlling pain and ameliorating inflammatory conditions.
      Citation: Acupuncture in Medicine
      PubDate: 2022-05-19T05:50:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09645284221085278
       
  • Electroacupuncture for brachial plexus injury caused by fracture of the
           right greater tuberosity of the humerus and dislocation of the right
           shoulder joint: a case report

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      Authors: JianZhu Wang, LiJun Wei, GuangLin Li, YunFan Bao, YanDing Tang, Li Zhang, QiPing Zu, HanYu Zhou, Jing Wang
      Abstract: Acupuncture in Medicine, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Acupuncture in Medicine
      PubDate: 2022-05-17T12:53:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09645284221085578
       
  • Treatment of acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
           with acupuncture during hospitalization: a three-arm double-blinded
           randomized sham-controlled trial

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      Authors: Ilana Levy, Yotam Elimeleh, Sagi Gavrieli, Samuel Attias, Ariel Schiff, Arie Oliven, Elad Schiff
      Abstract: Acupuncture in Medicine, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD) are a healthcare burden. Acupuncture improves dyspnea in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) but, to the best of our knowledge, has not been tested in AECOPD. Here, we evaluated the efficacy and safety of true acupuncture added to standard of care (SOC), as compared with both sham procedure plus SOC and SOC only, for the treatment of AECOPD among inpatients.Methods:This double-blinded randomized sham-controlled trial was set in a tertiary hospital in Israel. Patients with a clinical diagnosis of AECOPD were assigned to true acupuncture with SOC, sham procedure with SOC or SOC only. The primary outcome was dyspnea improvement as measured daily by the validated modified Borg (mBorg) scale. Secondary outcomes included improvement of other patient-reported outcomes and physiologic features, as well as duration of hospitalization and treatment failure. Acupuncture-related side effects were evaluated by the validated Acup-AE questionnaire.Results:Seventy-two patients were randomized: 26 to acupuncture treatment, 24 to sham and 22 to SOC only arms. Baseline characteristics were similar in the three groups. A statistically significant difference in dyspnea intensity was found from the first day of evaluation after treatment (p = 0.014) until day 3 after treatment. Similar results were found for sputum production, but no statistical significance was found when comparing physiologic features between the three arms. Acupuncture was not associated with adverse events.Conclusion:Acupuncture seems to be efficacious in the treatment of AECOPD among inpatients hospitalized in internal medicine departments.Trial registration number:NCT03398213 (ClinicalTrials.gov)
      Citation: Acupuncture in Medicine
      PubDate: 2022-05-17T08:57:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09645284221086293
       
  • Efficacy and safety of acupuncture as a complementary therapy for sepsis:
           a systematic review and meta-analysis

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      Authors: Jin Xian, Ling Wang, Changyun Zhang, Jian Wang, Yushuo Zhu, Huijuan Yu, Xin Zhang, Qiwen Tan
      Abstract: Acupuncture in Medicine, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Sepsis is a life-threatening organ dysfunction caused by dysregulation of the host response to infection. Acupuncture is used for treatment of inflammatory diseases; however, its effectiveness and safety as a complementary therapy for sepsis has not been fully explored.Methods:Data were retrieved from eight databases. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that compared acupuncture plus conventional therapies versus conventional therapies alone were included. Pre-specified primary outcomes were mortality at 28 days and Acute Physiologic and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II scores.Results:A total of 17 studies with 1099 participants were included in this study. In terms of the primary outcomes, acupuncture plus routine therapy reduced mortality at 28 days (risk ratio (RR)): 0.69, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.52 to 0.91, p < 0.001) and APACHE II scores (mean difference (MD): −2.84, 95% CI: −4.09 to −1.58, p < 0.001) at day 7 after treatment compared with routine therapy alone. In terms of secondary outcomes, acupuncture plus routine therapy reduced white blood cell counts and levels of procalcitonin (PCT), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-6 and lactic acid and intra-abdominal pressure (IAP), and improved CD3+, CD4+ and monocytes of human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DR at day 7 after treatment compared with routine therapy alone. However, acupuncture plus routine therapy had no significant effects on levels of IL-10, C-reactive protein (CRP), CD8+ and CD4+/CD8+ ratios compared with routine therapy alone. Quality of evidence was low to very low for all parameters (GRADE).Conclusion:The available evidence showed that combination of acupuncture and routine therapy may have benefit for sepsis compared with use of routine therapy only. Due to the low degree of certainty regarding its effects, further research is required.Trial registration number:ICRD42019141491 (PROSPERO).
      Citation: Acupuncture in Medicine
      PubDate: 2022-05-17T08:53:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09645284221086288
       
  • Sensory and autonomic innervation of the local tissues at traditional
           acupuncture point locations GB14, ST2 and ST6

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      Authors: Jia Wang, Jing-jing Cui, Dong-sheng Xu, Yu-xin Su, Jie-ying Liao, Shuang Wu, Ling Zou, Ya-ting Guo, Yi Shen, Wan-zhu Bai
      Abstract: Acupuncture in Medicine, Ahead of Print.
      Objective:To visualize and compare the sensory and autonomic innervation of the local tissues at the sites of different traditional acupuncture points in the rat forehead and face by histochemical examination.Methods:GB14 (Yangbai), ST2 (Sibai) and ST6 (Jiache) were selected as the representative traditional acupuncture points in this study, and the local tissues at these sites were dissected in rats after perfusion followed by double or triple fluorescent histochemical staining. Here, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT) were used to label the sensory, sympathetic and parasympathetic nerve fibers, respectively.Results:The CGRP+ sensory, TH+ sympathetic and VAChT+ parasympathetic nerve fibers were simultaneously demonstrated in the local tissues at GB14, ST2 and ST6. Although the three kinds of nerve fibers ran in parallel or intermingled with each other, by the analysis from the view of three-dimensional reconstruction, it was clear that each of them distributed in an independent pattern to their corresponding target tissues including the blood vessels, hair follicles, arrector pili and subcutaneous muscles, as well as sebaceous glands.Conclusion:Our study demonstrated the sensory and autonomic innervation of the local tissues at GB14, ST2 and ST6, providing neurochemical evidence indicating that the CGRP+ sensory, TH+ sympathetic and VAChT+ parasympathetic nerve fibers form a neural network at these point locations that may respond to acupuncture stimulation.
      Citation: Acupuncture in Medicine
      PubDate: 2022-05-17T08:51:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09645284221085579
       
  • Influence of acupuncture needle physical–chemical properties on
           needling quality

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      Authors: Rafael Yamaguti Lenoch, Ari Ojeda Ocampo More, Patricia Ortega Cubillos, Li Shih Min, Ari Digiácomo Ocampo More, Carlos Rodrigo de Mello Roesler
      Abstract: Acupuncture in Medicine, Ahead of Print.
      Objectives:This study analyzed the physical–chemical properties of three different brands of acupuncture needle, classified by acupuncturists as high (A), medium (B) and low (C) quality.Methods:Experienced acupuncturists, rated, in terms of perceived needling quality, three acupuncture needle brands as high (A), medium (B) and low (C) quality. Next, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of the tip and surface finish of the needles of each brand were analyzed. A mechanical test was developed and performed to evaluate the compressive force required to insert the needles through a smooth surface (silicon). In addition, X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF) and dispersive energy spectroscopy (DES) were conducted to analyze the material composition of the needles and presence of oxidation.Results:SEM images revealed that needle brands A and B presented a sharper tip and a more regular surface finish in comparison to brand C. In the insertion test, needle brands A and B had similar performance characteristics, with A requiring less force to penetrate the silicon device when compared to B, while C failed to penetrate the silicon and complete the test. The XRF analysis did not reveal any differences in material composition between the three brands. However, brand C exhibited particles embedded on the needle surface and DES confirmed oxidation.Conclusion:This study demonstrates that perceived needling quality by acupuncturists can be correlated with physical–chemical properties of the needles, especially those related to finishing quality of the tip and the surface of the needles.
      Citation: Acupuncture in Medicine
      PubDate: 2022-05-17T08:49:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09645284221085576
       
  • Health professionals’ attitudes towards acupuncture/acupressure for
           post-operative nausea and vomiting: a survey and implications for
           implementation

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      Authors: Zhen Zheng, Wanda S Stelmach, Jason Ma, Juris Briedis, Raphael Hau, Mark Tacey, Jeannette Atme, Debra Bourne, Julie Crabbe, Catherine Fletcher, Paul Howat, Jenny Layton, Charlie C Xue
      Abstract: Acupuncture in Medicine, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose:Level 1 evidence supports the use of acupuncture/acupressure (A/A) to manage post-operative nausea and vomiting (PONV). This study aimed to survey healthcare professionals’ attitudes towards A/A, influencing factors and barriers to implementing this effective non-drug intervention into peri-operative care.Methods:A validated, anonymous survey with 43 questions was emailed or distributed as a hard copy at meetings to anaesthetists, midwives, nurses, obstetricians, gynaecologists and surgeons at a public hospital in Australia. Descriptive data were presented. Influencing factors were explored using chi-square analysis. Multinomial logistical regression was used to identify the influences of confounding factors.Results:A total of 155 completed surveys were returned, reflecting a response rate of 32%. The majority of participants were female (69%), nurses/midwives (61%) and aged between 20 and 50 years old (76%). Eighty-three percent of respondents considered A/A ‘clearly alternative’ medicine or ‘neither mainstream nor alternative’. Eighty-one percent would encourage patients to use acupressure for PONV if it was offered at the hospital. Previous personal use of A/A was the key factor influencing attitudes and openness to clinical use. The key barriers to implementation were perceived lack of evidence and lack of qualified providers and time.Conclusion:Hospital-based healthcare professionals strongly supported the evidence-based use of A/A for PONV despite considering the therapy to be non-mainstream and having limited A/A education or history of personal use, providing a positive context for an acupressure implementation study. Significant gaps in training and a desire to learn were identified.
      Citation: Acupuncture in Medicine
      PubDate: 2022-05-17T08:46:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09645284221085282
       
  • Antidepressant effects of acupuncture in a murine model: regulation of
           neurotrophic factors

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      Authors: Teruhisa Yamamoto, Jun Kawanokuchi, Nobuyuki Nagaoka, Ken Takagi, Torao Ishida, Tomoya Hayashi, Ning Ma
      Abstract: Acupuncture in Medicine, Ahead of Print.
      Background:GV20 and Yintang are important targets in acupuncture treatment for depression. In this study, we examined the antidepressant effects of simultaneous acupuncture stimulation at GV20 and Yintang.Methods:We compared the antidepressant effects of manual acupuncture (MA) stimulation at GV20 and Yintang, compared to acupuncture stimulation at two control point locations on the back of the mice (overlying the spinal column) and imipramine administration in a forced swimming (FS)-induced mouse model of depression, and examined the mRNA and protein expression of neurotrophic factors, including nerve growth factor (NGF), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), neurotrophin (NT)-3, and NT-4/5 in the brains by real-time polymerase chain reaction in two different experimental schedules – preventive (MA given alongside FS modelling) and therapeutic (MA given after FS-induced depression was already established).Results:MA at GV20 and Yintang significantly reduced the immobility time of mice with FS-induced depression in both preventive and therapeutic experimental designs, with effects that were comparable to those of imipramine administration. Immobility time following simultaneous acupuncture stimulation of the two control point locations overlying the spinal column was significantly suppressed only 2 weeks after the start of FS in the preventive effect experiment, and the suppressive effect was significantly lower than that of simultaneous acupuncture stimulation at GV20 and Yintang. In the therapeutic effect experiment, there was no change in the increase in immobility time after the end of FS. MA at GV20 and Yintang significantly increased the expression of BDNF and NT-3 in the preventive evaluation and NGF, BDNF, NT-3, and NT-4/5 in the therapeutic effect evaluation.Conclusion:Our findings suggest that simultaneous acupuncture stimulation at GV20 and Yintang is effective for the prevention and treatment of depression, and the effect likely involves modulation of the expression of multiple neurotrophic factors.
      Citation: Acupuncture in Medicine
      PubDate: 2022-05-17T08:43:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09645284221085279
       
  • Electroacupuncture attenuates ac4C modification of P16 mRNA in the ovarian
           granulosa cells of a mouse model premature ovarian failure

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      Authors: Zixiang Geng, Peng Liu, Jiajia Lin, Xiaoli Nie, Long Yuan, Kaiyong Zhang, Huiru Jiang, Bingrong Li, Te Liu, Bimeng Zhang
      Abstract: Acupuncture in Medicine, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Premature ovarian failure (POF) is a type of pathological aging, which seriously interferes with the fertility of affected women. Electroacupuncture (EA) may have a beneficial effect; however, its mechanism of action is unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of EA on ovarian function in ovarian granulosa cells (OGCs) in a cyclophosphamide (CTX)-induced mouse model of POF.Methods:Mice were divided into three groups: wild type (WT) group, CTX group and CTX + EA group. EA was administered under isoflurane anesthesia at CV4, ST36 and SP6 for 30 min every 2 days, 2–3 times per week for a total of 4 weeks. Effects of EA on ovarian weight and level of estrogen were examined. The mRNA and protein expression levels of cell cycle–associated proteins were detected and mRNA modifications were analyzed.Results:EA significantly increased ovarian weight and reduced the proportion of atretic follicles in mice with CTX-induced POF (p < 0.05). EA increased the level of estrogen in the peripheral blood of mice and inhibited the modification of total mRNA N4-acetylcytidine (ac4C). A significant increase in the expression of P16 and N-acetyltransferase 10 (NAT10) and a significant decrease in the expression of Cyclin D (CCND1) and cyclin-dependent kinase 6 (CDK6) were observed in the OGCs of POF mice (p
      Citation: Acupuncture in Medicine
      PubDate: 2022-04-27T12:14:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09645284221085284
       
  • Acupuncture in addition to usual care for patients with irritable bowel
           syndrome: a component network meta-analysis

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      Authors: Yu Gan, Shi-Le Huang, Meng-Qi Luo, Min Chen, Hui Zheng
      Abstract: Acupuncture in Medicine, Ahead of Print.
      Objective:The efficacy of acupuncture alone in the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is controversial, but the benefit of acupuncture added to usual care has rarely been studied. We aimed to examine the benefit of acupuncture added to usual care through network meta-analysis (NMA).Methods:PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) were searched from their inception to 1 July 2021, without any language restriction. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) testing the effect of acupuncture alone or acupuncture combined with usual care for IBS were included. The primary outcome was improvement of global IBS symptoms. Standard NMA was performed to compare differential combinations of acupuncture (including manual acupuncture (MA) and electroacupuncture (EA)), and component network meta-analysis (CNMA) was subsequently performed to determine whether acupuncture provided additional benefits to usual care. The effect size of an intervention was measured using relative ratio (RR).Results:We included 25 RCTs (n = 3041 participants) after screening 582 retrieved articles. Five RCTs were classified as low risk of bias. The results of standard NMA showed that MA combined with usual care ranked the most effective (sham acupuncture as common comparator; RR = 1.96 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.23 to 3.12)). The results of CNMA showed that MA was the most effective component (RR = 1.38 (95% CI, 1.12 to 1.70)) when added to usual care.Conclusion:Acupuncture provided additional benefits to usual care, and it might be considered as adjunctive therapy for patients who respond inadequately to usual care.
      Citation: Acupuncture in Medicine
      PubDate: 2022-04-19T06:57:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09645284221085280
       
  • Electroacupuncture reduces weight, skinfold thickness and waist
           circumference and increases skin temperature of the abdominal region in
           women: a randomized controlled trial

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      Authors: Isabella Gomes de Lima, Josie Resende Torres da Silva, Amanda Godoy da Silva, Alice de Sousa Andrade, Ligia de Sousa
      Abstract: Acupuncture in Medicine, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Acupuncture, as a complementary and alternative medical treatment, has shown some promise as a therapeutic option for obesity and weight control. The aim of the current study was to investigate the effects of electroacupuncture (EA) on body weight, body mass index (BMI), skin fold thickness, waist circumference and skin temperature of the abdominal region in non-obese women with excessive abdominal subcutaneous fat.Methods:A total of 50 women with excessive abdominal subcutaneous fat (and average BMI of 22) were randomly assigned to one of two groups: an EA group (n = 25) receiving 10 EA sessions (insertion of needles connected to an electrical stimulator at a frequency of 40 Hz for 40 min) and a control group (n = 25) that received no treatment. Outcome measures evaluated included waist circumference, supra-iliac and abdominal skinfolds, body composition and superficial skin temperature (measured by cutaneous thermography) before and after treatment.Results:Compared with the untreated group, women in the EA group exhibited decreased supra-iliac and abdominal skin folds (p < 0.001), waist circumference (p < 0.001), percentage body fat (p = 0.001) and percentage abdominal fat (p < 0.001). In addition, the EA group showed an elevated skin temperature at the site of the treatment. However, EA did not significantly impact body weight (p = 0.01) or BMI (p = 0.2).Conclusion:EA promoted a reduction in abdominal waist circumference, supra-iliac and abdominal skin folds, and percentage body and abdominal fat in women of normal BMI with excessive abdominal subcutaneous fat, as well as an increase in the superficial skin temperature of the abdominal region.Trial registration number:RBR-9tsmpp (Brazilian Registry of Clinical Trials).
      Citation: Acupuncture in Medicine
      PubDate: 2022-04-19T06:55:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09645284221077111
       
  • Efficacy of acupuncture in improving symptoms and quality of life of
           patients with acne vulgaris: a randomized sham acupuncture-controlled
           trial

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      Authors: Ruimin Jiao, Xu Zhai, Xuecheng Zhang, Zhiyi Xiong, Zhishun Liu
      Abstract: Acupuncture in Medicine, Ahead of Print.
      Objective:The aim of this study was to examine the effectiveness of acupuncture in treating the symptoms and quality of life (QoL) of patients with moderate or severe acne vulgaris (AV).Methods:Participants were randomly assigned (1:1) to receive 12 treatment sessions of acupuncture or sham acupuncture over 4 weeks with 24 weeks of follow-up. The primary outcome was the change from baseline in the Skindex-16 scale total score at treatment completion. Secondary outcomes included Skindex-16 subscale score, Dermatology Life Quality Index scale total score, total lesion count and inflammatory lesion count, and visual analogue scale scores for itch and pain evaluation.Results:There was no statistically significant between-group difference for the primary outcome or any secondary outcomes after 4 weeks of treatment and at 16 and 28 weeks of follow-up, except for the Skindex-16 emotions subscale at week 4 (p = 0.026). No serious adverse events occurred in either group.Conclusion:Acupuncture may not effectively relieve the symptoms of patients with moderate or severe AV, or improve QoL. Given the limitations of a relatively short treatment course compared to other studies and the likelihood that sham acupuncture is not inert, further studies with treatment durations of 12 weeks or longer and a waitlist (no treatment) control or Western medicine-treated control group should be considered to evaluate the effects of acupuncture on AV.Trial registration number:ChiCTR-1900023649 (Chinese Clinical Trial Registry)
      Citation: Acupuncture in Medicine
      PubDate: 2022-04-19T06:51:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09645284221076506
       
  • Acupuncture for insomnia after ischemic stroke: an assessor-participant
           blinded, randomized controlled trial

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      Authors: Yan Cao, Yin-Jie Yan, Jian-Yang Xu, Abulikemu Liwayiding, Yi-Ping Liu, Xuan Yin, Li-Xing Lao, Zhang-Jin Zhang, Shi-Fen Xu
      Abstract: Acupuncture in Medicine, Ahead of Print.
      Background:To date, there has been little focus on research into acupuncture for insomnia after ischemic stroke. Insomnia is one of the most common sequelae after ischemic stroke, and it is the most unrecognized modifiable risk factor.Objective:To evaluate the efficacy and safety of acupuncture for insomnia after ischemic stroke.Methods:In this assessor-participant blinded, randomized, controlled trial, 144 ischemic stroke patients with insomnia meeting Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (fifth edition, DSM-5) criteria were assigned to verum or sham acupuncture treatment (n = 72 per group) for three sessions per week over 4 weeks. The outcomes were the Insomnia Severity Index (ISI), Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), stroke-specific quality of life (SSQoL), and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) scores. Multiple objective sleep variables were recorded using actigraphy. Assessment was conducted at baseline, and thereafter once biweekly for the 4-week treatment and at 4 weeks of follow-up.Results:The verum acupuncture group had significantly greater improvements than the sham acupuncture group in sleep quality from 2 weeks into treatment throughout the follow-up, indicated by ISI scores and actigraphic variable SE (sleep efficiency). This greater improvement was also observed in the PSQI after 4 weeks of treatment throughout follow-up, as well as actigraphic variable TST (total sleep time), SSQoL and HADS scores at the end of treatment, and SSQoL and depression scores at follow-up. There was no significant difference between groups in the actigraphic variable SA (sleep awakenings). Adverse events were mild in severity, and their incidence was not significantly different between the two groups.Conclusion:Acupuncture appears to be efficacious, in terms of improving insomnia, related quality of life, and affective symptoms, for patients with ischemic stroke.Trial registration number:ChiCTR-IIC-16008382 (Chinese Clinical Trial Registry).
      Citation: Acupuncture in Medicine
      PubDate: 2022-03-23T05:50:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09645284221077106
       
  • Efficacy and safety of electroacupuncture for post-stroke depression: a
           randomized controlled trial

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      Authors: Wa Cai, Wen Ma, Yi-Jing Li, Guan-Tao Wang, Hong Yang, Wei-Dong Shen
      Abstract: Acupuncture in Medicine, Ahead of Print.
      Objective:The objective of this study is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of electroacupuncture (EA) treatment for post-stroke depression (PSD).Methods:This study was a single-center, single-blinded, parallel-arm randomized controlled trial. In total, 65 patients with PSD were randomly allocated into EA and sham EA groups. Treatment was administered at GV20, Sishencong, SP6, LR3 and BL18 in both groups. The EA group received EA treatment, while the sham EA group received sham EA treatment using the Park device. Treatment was given three times a week for 4 weeks. The primary outcome was the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRSD). Secondary outcomes included the Zung Self-Rating Depression Scale (SDS), National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS), Barthel Daily Living Index (BI) and depression scale of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). Primary and secondary outcomes were assessed at baseline, week 2 after treatment, week 4 after treatment and week 8 of follow-up. Safety assessment was conducted at each visit for 4 weeks of treatment.Results:Significant differences in HRSD, SDS, NIHSS, BI and TCM scale scores were found in the EA group before and after acupuncture treatment (all p < 0.001). Compared with the sham EA group, HRSD scores improved significantly in the EA group at the end of week 2 (F = 31.33, p < 0.001), week 4 (F = 35.58, p < 0.001) and week 8 after treatment onset (F = 25.03, p < 0.001). Similarly, significant improvements were observed in SDS, NIHSS and BI scores. Two participants in the EA group suffered a local hematoma, while no adverse events were reported in the sham EA group.Conclusion:EA appears to be an efficacious and safe treatment for PSD. According to our results, EA may alleviate depressive symptoms, and improve neurological function and capabilities with respect to activities of daily living (ADLs).Trial registration number:ChiCTR-IOR-17012610 (Chinese Clinical Trial Registry).
      Citation: Acupuncture in Medicine
      PubDate: 2022-03-02T09:59:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09645284221077104
       
  • Effects of electroacupuncture on DNA methylation of the TREM2 gene in
           senescence-accelerated mouse prone 8 mice

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      Authors: Jing Jiang, Hao Liu, Zidong Wang, Huiling Tian, Shun Wang, Jiayi Yang, Zhigang Li
      Abstract: Acupuncture in Medicine, Ahead of Print.
      Objective:To explore the mechanism by which electroacupuncture (EA) upregulates triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells 2 (TREM2) protein in the hippocampus of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) model animals from the perspective of TREM2 DNA methylation.Methods:In total, 24 eight-month-old senescence-accelerated mouse prone 8 (SAMP8) mice were divided into an (untreated) AD group (n = 8), donepezil group (receiving donepezil treatment, n = 8) or EA group (receiving an EA intervention, n = 8). A healthy control group comprising 8-month-old senescence-accelerated mouse resistant 1 (SAMR1) mice (n = 8) was also included. Western blotting, bisulfite sequencing, and oxidative bisulfite sequencing were applied to test the relative expression of TREM2 protein and the methylation levels of the TREM2 gene.Results:EA significantly upregulated the relative expression of TREM2 protein (p < 0.01), downregulated the 5-methylcytosine level (p < 0.01) and upregulated the 5-hydroxymethylcytosine level (p < 0.05) in the hippocampus.Conclusion:Downregulation of 5-methylcytosine levels and upregulation of 5-hydroxymethylcytosine levels in the TREM2 gene might be the mechanism by which EA promotes the expression of TREM2 protein.
      Citation: Acupuncture in Medicine
      PubDate: 2022-03-02T09:54:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09645284221077103
       
  • Preoperative electroacupuncture for postoperative nausea and vomiting in
           laparoscopic gynecological surgery: a randomized controlled trial

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      Authors: Juan Zhu, Sha Li, Wenzhong Wu, Jie Guo, Xiaoqiu Wang, Guang Yang, Zhigang Lu, Fangbing Ji, Rong Zou, Zhen Zheng, Man Zheng
      Abstract: Acupuncture in Medicine, Ahead of Print.
      Objective:We aimed to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of preoperative electroacupuncture (EA) on the incidence of postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV), and severity of postoperative pain, in gynecological patients undergoing laparoscopic surgery. The effects of EA administered at different preoperative time points were compared.Methods:A total of 413 patients undergoing elective laparoscopic gynecological surgery were randomly allocated into 4 groups receiving EA the day before surgery (Group Pre, n = 103), 30 min before (Group 30, n = 104) or both (Group Comb, n = 103), or usual care alone (Group Usual, n = 103). All acupuncture groups had usual care. The incidence of PONV and pain at 24 h were primary outcomes. Secondary outcomes included the severity of postoperative nausea, vomiting and pain, requirement for antiemetic medication and quality of recovery (QoR)-15 scores after surgery.Results:There were significant differences between the four groups in nausea and vomiting incidence (0–24 h), postoperative antiemetic use (0–48 h), and postoperative pain (0–6 h), with the EA groups recording the lowest levels. Regarding primary outcomes, incidence of nausea and vomiting at 6-24 h was 28/11/18/11% (p = 0.003) 23/5/8/9% (p < 0.001), respectively, for Groups Usual/Pre/30/Comb. Accordingly, EA reduced the incidence of nausea and vomiting at 6-24 h by 61/34/60% and 79/65/61% for Groups Pre/30/Comb, respectively. Regarding secondary outcomes, incidence of nausea and vomiting at 0-6 h was 20/9/11/7% (p = 0.013) and 17/7/9/6% (p = 0.021), respectively, for Groups Usual/Pre/30/Comb. Rescue antiemetics at 0–6 h were required by 18/4/11/4% (p = 0.001) in Groups Usual/Pre/30/Comb. The mean numerical rating scale (NRS) pain score (0–10) at 0–6 h was significantly different between groups (2.45/1.89/2.01/1.97 for Groups Usual/Pre/30/Comb, p = 0.024). There were no significant differences between the three EA-treated groups.Conclusion:In gynecological patients undergoing laparoscopic surgery and treated with multimodal antiemetic methods, one session of preoperative EA may be a safe adjunctive treatment for PONV prophylaxis. Optimal timing of EA requires further verification.Trial registration number:ChiCTR-INR-16010035 (Chinese Clinical Trial Registry).
      Citation: Acupuncture in Medicine
      PubDate: 2022-03-01T11:45:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09645284221076517
       
  • Electroacupuncture ameliorates neuroinflammation in animal models

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      Authors: Yue-yang Xin, Jin-xu Wang, Ai-jun Xu
      Abstract: Acupuncture in Medicine, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Neuroinflammation refers to a wide range of immune responses occurring in the brain or spinal cord. It is closely related to a variety of neurodegenerative diseases, for which it potentially represents a new direction for treatment. Electroacupuncture (EA) is one method of acupuncture treatment, which can be used as an adjuvant therapy for many diseases. This review focuses on molecular mechanisms of EA in the reduction of neuroinflammation, summarizes relevant basic research and outlines future directions for investigation.Findings:A growing body of basic research has shown that EA can ameliorate neuroinflammation centrally (in animal models of ischemic stroke, Alzheimer’s disease, traumatic brain injury, spinal cord injury, Parkinson’s disease and vascular dementia) and peripherally (e.g. after a surgical insult or injection of lipopolysaccharide) and that its effects involve different molecular mechanisms, including activation of the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor signaling pathway and P2 type purinergic receptors, inhibition of nuclear factor κB, and mitigation of damage secondary to oxidative stress and NOD-like receptor protein 3 inflammasome activation.Conclusions:EA is capable of regulating multiple cell signal transduction pathways to alleviate neuroinflammation in animal models. Although the findings of animal studies are encouraging, further prospective clinical trials are needed to verify the efficacy of EA for the treatment of neuroinflammation.
      Citation: Acupuncture in Medicine
      PubDate: 2022-03-01T11:37:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09645284221076515
       
  • Acupuncture intervention for acute pain in the Emergency Department trial:
           a consensus process

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      Authors: Arya Nielsen, Juli Olson, Megan Quesada, Chongbin Zhu, Erin Raskin, Bobbee Vang, Jeannette Painovich, Megan Scott, Vashir J Xiong, Jeffery A Dusek
      First page: 339
      Abstract: Acupuncture in Medicine, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose:This document describes the consensus process and intervention for a National Institutes of Health (NIH)-funded multi-site feasibility study utilizing acupuncture for ACUte paIn in The EmergencY Department (ACUITY). The acupuncture intervention is designed to be flexible and responsive to the most common Emergency Department (ED) scenarios, including trauma, acute pain of the low back, abdomen and/or musculoskeletal system, renal colic and headache.Background:Opioids remain a primary treatment for acute ED pain with attendant risk of adverse effects, addiction liability, diversion and death. Effective/safer options for acute pain are needed. Although acupuncture therapy has shown promise for acute pain in the ED alone or in conjunction with usual care, pragmatic trials are needed to obtain definitive and generalizable evidence.Methods:An Acupuncture Advisory Panel was convened that included nine acupuncture experts with 5–44 years of experience in practice and 2–16 years of experience in the acute pain care setting. A modified Delphi process was used with provision of a literature review, surveys of our panel members, three online discussions and email discussion as needed. The STandards for Reporting Interventions in Controlled Trials (STRICTA) checklist was used as a guide.Results:A responsive acupuncture intervention was agreed on for ACUITY. Session forms were fashioned in REDCap (Research Electronic Data Capture program to capture essential treatment data, assess fidelity and inform our design for a future pragmatic multi-site randomized controlled trial (RCT) of acupuncture in the ED, and for use by other future researchers.Conclusion:Development of a responsive manualization intervention provides the appropriate framework for conducting a future, pragmatic, multi-site, definitive RCT of acupuncture in the ED.Trial registration number:NCT04880733 (ClinicalTrials.gov).
      Citation: Acupuncture in Medicine
      PubDate: 2022-03-01T11:14:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09645284221076507
       
  • Low-frequency electroacupuncture improves disordered hepatic energy
           metabolism in insulin-resistant Zucker diabetic fatty rats via the
           AMPK/mTORC1/p70S6K signaling pathway

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      Authors: Xiao-xiao Liu, Li-zhi Zhang, Hai-hua Zhang, Lan-feng Lai, Yi-qiao Wang, Jian Sun, Neng-gui Xu, Zhi-xing Li
      First page: 360
      Abstract: Acupuncture in Medicine, Ahead of Print.
      Background and aim:Disordered hepatic energy metabolism is found in obese rats with insulin resistance (IR). There are insufficient experimental studies of electroacupuncture (EA) for IR and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The aim of this study was to probe the effect of EA on disordered hepatic energy metabolism and the adenosine monophosphate (AMP)-activated protein kinase (AMPK)/mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1)/ribosomal protein S6 kinase, 70-kDa (p70S6K) signaling pathway.Methods:Zucker Diabetic Fatty (ZDF) rats were randomly divided into three groups: EA group receiving EA treatment; Pi group receiving pioglitazone gavage; and ZF group remaining untreated (n = 8 per group). Inbred non-insulin-resistant Zucker lean rats formed an (untreated) healthy control group (ZL, n = 8). Fasting plasma glucose (FPG), fasting insulin (FINS), C-peptide, C-reactive protein (CRP) and homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) indices were measured. Hematoxylin–eosin (H&E) staining was used to investigate the liver morphologically. The mitochondrial structure of hepatocytes was observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Western blotting was adopted to determine protein expression of insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS-1), mTOR, mTORC1, AMPK, tuberous sclerosis 2 (TSC2) and p70S6K, and their phosphorylation. RT-PCR was used to quantify IRS-1, mTOR, mTORC1, AMPK and p70S6K mRNA levels.Results:Compared with the ZF group, FPG, FINS, C-peptide, CRP and HOMA-IR levels were significantly reduced in the EA group (p 
      Citation: Acupuncture in Medicine
      PubDate: 2022-01-17T04:25:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09645284211070301
       
  • Electroacupuncture alleviates anxiety and modulates amygdala CRH/CRHR1
           signaling in single prolonged stress mice

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      Authors: Jing Zhu, Chang Wang, Yu wang, Chunxia Guo, Pingping Lu, Fangfang Mou, Shuijin Shao
      First page: 369
      Abstract: Acupuncture in Medicine, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is an anxiety-related psychiatric disorder, manifesting high comorbidity with anxiety disorders. Its underlying neurobiological mechanisms have been associated with hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal (HPA) axis dysfunction and stress hormones. Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) is a primary stress hormone, expressed in the hypothalamus and amygdala. Electroacupuncture (EA) can improve mood disorders, but its mechanisms have not been fully elucidated. The aim of this study was to observe the effect of EA on PTSD and explore the related mechanisms.Methods:We used single prolonged stress (SPS) mice to establish a PTSD model, and EA was performed after SPS or 7 days later for a week. Then we observed their fear and anxiety-like behavior through cue-induced fear condition tests, open field test and the elevated zero maze. CRH and CRH receptor 1 (CRHR1) protein levels in the amygdala were measured in SPS mice after EA intervention.Results:We found that EA at ST36 and GV20 improved fear and anxiety behavior in SPS mice. The amygdala CRH and CRHR1 protein levels increased in the SPS mice, and this effect was reversed by the EA intervention. CRHR1 inhibition by the CRHR1 antagonist NBI 27914 alleviated anxiety behavior in SPS mice.Conclusion:CRH/CRHR1 signaling in the amygdala may contribute to the anxiolytic effect of EA in SPS mice.
      Citation: Acupuncture in Medicine
      PubDate: 2022-01-19T06:19:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09645284211056352
       
  • Electroacupuncture suppresses spinal nerve ligation-induced neuropathic
           pain via regulation of synaptic plasticity through upregulation of basic
           fibroblast growth factor expression

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      Authors: Kecheng Zhou, Qiaoyun Wu, Jingjing Yue, Xiaolan Yu, Xinwang Ying, Xiaolong Chen, Ye Zhou, Guanhu Yang, Wenzhan Tu, Songhe Jiang
      First page: 379
      Abstract: Acupuncture in Medicine, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Improving synaptic plasticity is a good way to alleviate neuropathic pain. Electroacupuncture (EA) is currently used worldwide to treat this disease, but its specific mechanisms of action need further investigation. Evidence has suggested that basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) plays an important role in promoting nerve regeneration and can promote the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF).Objective:In this study, we examined the effects of EA on synaptic plasticity and its underlying mechanism.Methods:A spinal nerve ligation (SNL) rat model was established. NSC37204 (a specific inhibitor of bFGF) was used to determine the relationship between bFGF and putative EA-mediated improvements in synaptic plasticity. Mechanical withdrawal threshold (MWT) and thermal withdrawal latency (TWL) were assessed to evaluate hyperalgesia in rats with SNL. Tissue morphology was detected by hematoxylin–eosin (HE) and Nissl staining, while neural plasticity and its molecular mechanisms were examined by Western blotting, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), dual-label immunohistochemistry and transmission electron microscopy.Results:We found that EA improved synaptic plasticity, consistent with higher levels of expression of bFGF and VEGF. Contrary to the beneficial effects of EA, NSC37204 promoted synaptic reconstruction. Furthermore, EA-induced improvements in the neurobehavioral state and improved synaptic plasticity were blocked by NSC37204, consistent with lower expression levels of bFGF and VEGF.Conclusion:These findings indicate that EA suppresses SNL-induced neuropathic pain by improving synaptic plasticity via upregulation of bFGF expression.
      Citation: Acupuncture in Medicine
      PubDate: 2022-02-01T09:48:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09645284211066499
       
  • Electroacupuncture attenuates pulmonary vascular remodeling in a rat model
           of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease via the VEGF/PI3K/Akt pathway

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      Authors: Lanxi Zhang, Yange Tian, Peng Zhao, Fanli Jin, Yufang Miao, Yang Liu, Jiansheng Li
      First page: 389
      Abstract: Acupuncture in Medicine, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by airflow limitation that is not fully reversible. Pulmonary vascular remodeling is the main pathological feature of COPD. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), the key regulator of angiogenesis, mediates activation of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (Akt) pathway, which regulates the proliferation and migration of vascular endothelial cells and plays important roles in pulmonary angiogenesis and remodeling in COPD. Here, the efficacy of electroacupuncture (EA) with respect to regulation of microvascular remodeling induced by VEGF/PI3K/Akt was evaluated in a rat model of COPD.Methods:Rats were randomly assigned to blank, COPD model, EA and sham acupuncture (SA) groups. Rats in the EA group received EA at GV14, BL13 and BL23 three times per week, while those in the SA group, as a control, received shallow and minimal electrostimulation at sites 5–10 mm away from the traditional acupuncture point locations. After 2, 4 and 8 weeks of treatment, the optimal treatment duration was determined according to the results of lung function, lung pathology and inflammatory factor levels. Then, microvessel density, protein levels and mRNA expression of selected VEGF/PI3K/Akt pathway intermediates were determined by immunofluorescence, immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis, and mRNA qRT-PCR, respectively.Results:EA improved lung function and lung tissue histopathology, with the best effect after 8 weeks of treatment, as noted by reduced density of lung microvessels and expression of angiogenesis-related factors (VEGF and endothelin (ET)-1). EA-treated COPD rats exhibited reduced VEGF, VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2), ET-1 mRNA and VEGF, VEGFR2, phosphorylated (p)-VEGFR2, PI3K, Akt, p-Akt, mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), and p-mTOR at the protein level in comparison with untreated and SA-treated COPD model rats.Conclusion:EA had beneficial effects on COPD in this animal model including reduced pulmonary vascular remodeling via mechanisms possibly related to the VEGF/PI3K/Akt pathway.
      Citation: Acupuncture in Medicine
      PubDate: 2022-02-26T06:53:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09645284221078873
       
 
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