Subjects -> PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION (Total: 284 journals)
    - MUNICIPAL GOVERNMENT (9 journals)
    - PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION (248 journals)
    - SECURITY (27 journals)

PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION (248 journals)            First | 1 2     

Showing 201 - 357 of 357 Journals sorted alphabetically
Revue Gouvernance     Open Access  
Risk, Hazards & Crisis in Public Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Rivista trimestrale di scienza dell'amministrazione     Full-text available via subscription  
RP3 : Revista de Pesquisa em Políticas Públicas     Open Access  
RUDN Journal of Public Administration     Open Access  
School of Public Policy Publications     Open Access  
Sinergia : Revista do Instituto de Ciências Econômicas, Administrativas e Contábeis     Open Access  
Singapore Economic Review, The     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Social Policy & Administration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Social Service Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Social Work Education: The International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Sosyoekonomi     Open Access  
South Asian Journal of Macroeconomics and Public Finance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Sri Lanka Journal of Development Administration     Open Access  
Stat & Styring     Full-text available via subscription  
State and Local Government Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Statistics and Public Policy     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Studi Organizzativi     Full-text available via subscription  
Studia z Polityki Publicznej     Open Access  
Surveillance and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Teaching Public Administration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
TEC Empresarial     Open Access  
Tendencias     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Territory, Politics, Governance     Hybrid Journal  
The Philanthropist     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
The Review of International Organizations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Transylvanian Review of Administrative Sciences     Open Access  
Visión de futuro     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
WEDANA : Jurnal Kajian Pemerintahan, Politik dan Birokrasi     Open Access  
Wroclaw Review of Law, Administration & Economics     Open Access  

  First | 1 2     

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
The Review of International Organizations
Journal Prestige (SJR): 3.327
Citation Impact (citeScore): 3
Number of Followers: 16  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1559-744X - ISSN (Online) 1559-7431
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2469 journals]
  • Anjali Kaushlesh Dayal. 2021. Incredible commitments: How UN peacekeeping
           failures shape peace processes (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press)

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      PubDate: 2022-07-01
       
  • Analyzing international organizations: How the concepts we use affect the
           answers we get

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract We explore how “international organizations” have been conceptualized and operationalized in the field of International Relations (IR), identify an important gap between the two, and demonstrate how this shapes our understanding of world politics. Traditionally, we show, IR has embraced a broad conception of international organizations (IOs) that appreciates variation in design. However, the literature has largely coalesced around a measurement standard that reflects the characteristics of major postwar IOs. Prevailing measures, therefore, mainly count formal IOs—bodies founded with legally binding agreements—and omit informal IOs, which are founded with non-binding instruments. We argue that this produces a disconnect between theory and empirical evidence used in the field, since scholars frequently make arguments about IOs in general but draw inferences from formal IOs only. After reviewing how this disconnect has emerged, we use an original dataset on state membership in 260 informal IOs to reanalyze a number of important studies, showing heterogeneous effects for subtypes of IOs that conflict with existing theories to varying degrees. These differences imply that formal and informal IOs have different effects and that existing findings in the field are partly artifacts of the specific way IO variables have been operationalized by scholars. Based on this, we offer recommendations for how to improve research practices moving forward.
      PubDate: 2022-07-01
       
  • Investment with insecure property rights: Capital outflow openness under
           dictatorship

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract Governments have two mechanisms through which to secure the rights of investors: protecting property rights and allowing capital mobility. This article develops a formal theoretic framework that demonstrates how dictators use capital outflow openness as a substitute for poor property rights protection to attract more investment. They do so for two related reasons. First, more capital outflow openness increases the pool of capital dictators can expropriate from. Second, more capital outflow openness increases domestic wages, preventing working class revolts. When the working class is not too strong, the dictator would be able to retain workers’ support by relying on capital outflow openness alone. However, when the working class is strong, the dictator would be forced to improve property rights protection to prevent a working class revolt, constraining the dictator’s ability to expropriate in the future.
      PubDate: 2022-07-01
       
  • Labor clauses in trade agreements: Hidden protectionism'

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract We explore the impact of the introduction and design of labor clauses (LCs) in preferential trade agreements (PTAs) on bilateral trade flows over the period 1990–2014. While it is not a priori clear if the inclusion of LCs in PTAs will decrease or increase bilateral trade, we expect the direction of trade to matter, that is, we expect to observe the (negative or positive) impact of LCs in the South-North trade configuration. We also expect, in that configuration, stronger LCs to yield stronger (negative or positive) effects on bilateral trade flows. Using a novel dataset on the content of labor provisions in PTAs, we find in line with our first expectation that while the introduction of LCs has on average no impact on bilateral trade flows, it increases exports of low and middle-income countries with weaker labor standards in North–South trade agreements. Consistent with our second expectation, this positive impact is mostly driven by LCs with institutionalized cooperation provisions. In contrast, LCs with strong enforcement mechanisms do not have a statistically significant impact on exports of developing countries in North–South PTAs. The results are inconsistent with the ideas that LCs are set for protectionist reasons or have protectionist effects, casting doubt on the logic for the reluctance of many developing countries to include LCs in their trade agreements.
      PubDate: 2022-07-01
       
  • Clubs of autocrats: Regional organizations and authoritarian survival

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract While scholars have argued that membership in Regional Organizations (ROs) can increase the likelihood of democratization, we see many autocratic regimes surviving in power albeit being members of several ROs. This article argues that this is the case because these regimes are often members in “Clubs of Autocrats” that supply material and ideational resources to strengthen domestic survival politics and shield members from external interference during moments of political turmoil. The argument is supported by survival analysis testing the effect of membership in autocratic ROs on regime survival between 1946 to 2010. It finds that membership in ROs composed of more autocratic member states does in fact raise the likelihood of regime survival by protecting incumbents against democratic challenges such as civil unrest or political dissent. However, autocratic RO membership does not help to prevent regime breakdown due to autocratic challenges like military coups, potentially because these types of threats are less likely to diffuse to other member states. The article thereby adds to our understanding of the limits of democratization and potential reverse effects of international cooperation, and contributes to the literature addressing interdependences of international and domestic politics in autocratic regimes.
      PubDate: 2022-07-01
       
  • From grievances to civil war: The impact of geopolitics

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract I revisit claims that the Cold War had no meaningful effect on civil war after 1990 by probing its empirical veracity. I argue and employ a Bartik-style difference-in-differences identification strategy to show that countries with greater political grievances during the Cold War were more likely to experience civil war after the Cold War. I provide evidence suggesting that changes in the credibility of external support to both governments and rebels affected this uptick in conflict onset in aggrieved countries. These findings suggest the confluence of geopolitics and preexisting grievances played a causal role in civil war after the Cold War.
      PubDate: 2022-07-01
       
  • Closing time: Reputational constraints on capital account policy in
           emerging markets

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract Do international reputational concerns constrain governments’ economic policy choices' We assess this question by analyzing emerging market decisions to tighten restrictions on capital outflows. While policymakers should be more likely to tighten restrictions to protect their economies as capital flow volatility (CFV) increases, investors view outflow controls as heterodox policies that violate investment contracts. We argue that the effect of CFV on outflow controls depends on the use of controls in peer markets. When peers are open, governments anticipate that controls will come at a high cost to their market reputations as heterodox measures send a negative signal to investors among a crowd of liberal peers. Conversely, when peers are closed, using controls should do less damage to an economy’s reputation. For 25 emerging markets from 1995–2015, we show that CFV is associated with outflow controls, but only when market peers are already closed, suggesting reputational concerns can limit policy autonomy.
      PubDate: 2022-07-01
       
  • The World Bank COVID-19 response: Politics as usual'

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract Do the normal rules of the game apply in international organizations during a global pandemic' We explore this question by comparing regular and COVID-19 World Bank loans. Analyzing lending from April 2, 2020 (the start of COVID-19 lending) to December 31, 2020, we find different results for the two types of World Bank loans. Looking at regular loans, countries that vote more in line with the U.S. on UN General Assembly resolutions are more likely to receive loans. For COVID-19 loans, geopolitics is not a significant factor. In contrast to ordinary business, the World Bank appears to have kept politics out of its pandemic response, instead more effectively focusing on provision of an important international public good.
      PubDate: 2022-07-01
       
  • Behind the screen: Understanding national support for a foreign investment
           screening mechanism in the European Union

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract What determines national preferences for institutionalizing foreign direct investment (FDI) screening' Over the past decade, advanced economies worldwide have tightened their national investment screening mechanisms (ISMs). In March 2019, the European Union (EU) adopted its first common FDI screening framework. This article explores variations in Member State preferences for the creation and nature of a pan-European screening framework. Based on extensive interviews with high-level EU and country officials involved in the negotiation process, and using a unique measure of national support for the EU-wide ISM created through the first-ever elite survey on this subject matter, we find that countries with higher technological levels were more supportive of FDI screening due to concerns over unreciprocated technological transfer. We also show the effects of Chinese FDI on country-level support for FDI screening sector-dependent. We found no evidence that total Chinese FDI predicts preferences for ISM. Instead, countries with high levels of Chinese FDI in strategic sectors are more likely to support the ISM, while those with high levels of Chinese investment in low-tech sectors tend to oppose screening. Our overall findings suggest that EU investment screening, and national-level screening in general, might become more restrictive in the future, especially in light of the COVID-19 pandemic.
      PubDate: 2022-07-01
       
  • Power, ideas, and World Bank conditionality

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract How and why do the policy areas covered in World Bank loan conditions change over time and across borrowers' We hypothesize that shifts in the Bank’s economic research and policy priorities influence Bank loan conditions, even after controlling for country characteristics and international political aspects. To test this claim we apply keyword-assisted topic models to the analysis of over 13,000 World Bank policy loan conditions and close to 35,000 World Bank research papers published between 1985 and 2014. Contrary to the criticism levelled against the Bank that changes in research and policy priorities are mostly rhetorical and have little substantive effect on Bank lending, we find that internal research and policy priority shifts explain the conditions in a Bank loan at least as well as more traditional donor or borrower-specific measures central to IPE models of Bank lending.
      PubDate: 2022-07-01
       
  • Chinese or western finance' Transparency, official credit flows, and
           the international political economy of development

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract Why do some developing countries obtain more official finance from China vis-a-vis Western sources' This study finds borrower transparency significantly affects which governments borrow more from China. From a supply side perspective, Chinese lending agencies have incentives to lend more to untransparent borrowers. From a demand side perspective, untransparent borrowers have incentives to use Chinese finance to avoid Western pressure to become more transparent. These findings and explanations have three implications. First, they help explain variation in external debt composition across developing countries using official credit. Second, they have implications for the international political economy of developing countries’ financial ties to China. Third, they imply the use of Chinese finance may allow untransparent governments to remain so, an important implication for the political economy of development.
      PubDate: 2022-06-17
       
  • The impact of unilateral BIT terminations on FDI: Quasi-experimental
           evidence from India

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract This study identifies the impact of Bilateral Investment Treaties (BITs) on foreign direct investments (FDI) by taking advantage of the random timing of 44 unilateral BIT terminations in India between 2013 and 2019. Using quarterly bilateral data of 138 foreign investors’ home countries (FIHCs), our difference-in-differences (DD) estimates uncover a significant reduction in FDI inflows to India in response to BIT terminations by more than 30 percent compared to countries without terminations. We identify the sudden break with investor protection for new investments as the major transmission channel. Further investigations suggest that investors do not necessarily abandon India in response to BIT terminations but apparently reroute FDI via FIHCs with BITs. Evidence from firm-level data reveals that investors revoke or reroute mainly deals (e.g. mergers and acquisitions) rather than own new projects. Moreover, similarity of some legal institutions with India offsets the negative effect of BIT terminations.
      PubDate: 2022-06-17
       
  • Julia C. Morse. 2022. The Bankers’ Blacklist: Unofficial Market
           Enforcement and the Global Fight Against Illicit Financing. (Ithaca:
           Cornell University Press) Michele Riccardi. 2022. Money Laundering
           Blacklists. (New York: Routledge) Nkechikwu Valerie Azinge-Egbiri. 2021.
           Regulating and Combating Money Laundering and Terrorist Financing: The Law
           in Emerging Economies. (New York: Routledge)

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      PubDate: 2022-06-15
       
  • Trading favors' UN Security Council membership and subnational
           favoritism in aid recipients

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract We test the hypothesis that aid recipient governments are better able to utilize aid flows for political favoritism during periods in which they are of geo-strategic value to major donors. We examine the effect of a country’s (non-permanent) membership on the United Nations Security Council (UNSC) on the subnational distribution of World Bank aid. Specifically, we analyze whether World Bank projects are targeted to subnational regions in which the head of state was born, or to regions dominated by the same ethnic group as that of the head of state. We find that all regions within a recipient country, on average, receive a greater number of aid projects during UNSC membership years. Moreover, a leader’s co-ethnic regions (but not birth regions) receive significantly more World Bank projects and loan commitments during UNSC membership years compared to other years. This effect is driven chiefly by interest-bearing loans from the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development (IBRD). Most importantly, we find stronger subnational political bias in aid allocation for aid recipients whose UNSC votes are fully aligned with those of the United States, indicating that exchanges of aid for favors occur in multilateral settings.
      PubDate: 2022-06-15
       
  • Trade Wars and Election Interference

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract In response to the Trump trade war, China, the EU, and other countries enacted politically-targeted trade retaliation (PTTR) against swing states and Republican strongholds in the United States. We argue that PTTR increases public concerns about foreign election interference and assess the effects of such retaliation across partisan affiliations. We test our predictions using a national survey experiment in the United States fielded before the 2020 election. In contrast to findings about sanctions and foreign endorsements, we find strong evidence that PTTR increases fears of election interference among both Republicans and Democrats. Partisan double standards in reaction to PTTR were strongest for retaliation targeting swing states and smaller for retaliation targeting the President’s base. Overall, the evidence shows that economic policies which are not primarily intended to influence elections may nevertheless come to be viewed by the public as foreign election interference.
      PubDate: 2022-06-11
       
  • Public responses to foreign protectionism: Evidence from the US-China
           trade war

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract America’s recent turn towards protectionism has raised concerns over the future viability of the liberal international trading system. This study examines how and why public attitudes towards international trade change when one’s country is targeted by protectionist measures from abroad. To address this question, we fielded three original survey experiments in the country most affected by US protectionism: China. First, we find consistent evidence that US protectionism reduces support for trade among Chinese citizens. We replicate this finding in parallel experiments on technology cooperation, and provide further external validation with a survey experiment in Argentina. Second, we show that responses to US protectionism reflect both a “direct reciprocity” logic, whereby citizens want to retaliate against the US specifically, as well as a “generalized reciprocity” logic that reduces support for trade on a broader, systemic, basis.
      PubDate: 2022-06-08
       
  • Publisher Correction to: Managing performance and winning trust: how world
           bank staff shape recipient performance

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      PubDate: 2022-04-28
       
  • China visits: a dataset of Chinese leaders’ foreign visits

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract Leader visits constitute an important signal in international relations. While studies of U.S. diplomacy can all use the same dataset from the Office of the Historian, IR scholars on China must make do with ad hoc datasets and often need to build their own from scratch. We contribute a novel dataset, China V isits, to fill this glaring gap. Our dataset has three major advantages: (1) it covers the period from 1998 onwards so that it is widely applicable to different research agendas; (2) each recorded visit has rich auxiliary information, including its date and duration, and is accompanied by a document from official websites for verification, and the dataset in its entirety is evaluated against existing datasets; (3) it is publicly available and indexed annually with country codes and country names. To facilitate its use, we provide a detailed analysis of the patterns in leader visits.
      PubDate: 2022-04-22
      DOI: 10.1007/s11558-022-09459-z
       
  • When TED talks, does anyone listen' A new dataset on political
           leadership

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract The Technocratic and Education Dataset (TED) provides comprehensive new data on the educational and professional backgrounds of the heads of government of all sovereign states between 1946 and 2015. TED details the educational and employment credentials of 1733 unique heads of government, and provides additional information on their demographic backgrounds and military experience. TED comes in leader-level and country-year versions. These data make three major contributions to the study of leadership. First, TED offers a longer time series than most extant data sets on leadership. Second, TED offers data on a broader cross section of countries, facilitating scholarship on a wider variety of countries, including non-OECD ones, which are excluded from many existing datasets on leaders. Third, by offering detailed data on the educational and employment experiences of leaders, TED helps scholars interested in the mechanisms underlying the effects of these experiences generate more rigorous tests of their theories. TED, therefore, represents a major step forward for those interested in leadership. In this article, we introduce TED and use it to show how the pool of international leaders has changed over time. We end with an empirical application of the data in which we use leadership characteristics to predict countries’ sovereign credit ratings. The article concludes with a discussion of other potential applications of these new data.
      PubDate: 2022-04-02
      DOI: 10.1007/s11558-022-09461-5
       
  • Simone Dietrich. 2021. States, Markets and Foreign Aid. (New York:
           Cambridge University Press)

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      PubDate: 2022-02-09
      DOI: 10.1007/s11558-022-09456-2
       
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


Your IP address: 18.232.59.38
 
Home (Search)
API
About JournalTOCs
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-