Subjects -> PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION (Total: 284 journals)
    - MUNICIPAL GOVERNMENT (9 journals)
    - PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION (248 journals)
    - SECURITY (27 journals)

PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION (248 journals)            First | 1 2     

Showing 201 - 357 of 357 Journals sorted alphabetically
Revue Gouvernance     Open Access  
Risk, Hazards & Crisis in Public Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Rivista trimestrale di scienza dell'amministrazione     Full-text available via subscription  
RP3 : Revista de Pesquisa em Políticas Públicas     Open Access  
RUDN Journal of Public Administration     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
School of Public Policy Publications     Open Access  
Sinergia : Revista do Instituto de Ciências Econômicas, Administrativas e Contábeis     Open Access  
Singapore Economic Review, The     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Social Policy & Administration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Social Service Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Social Work Education: The International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Sosyoekonomi     Open Access  
South Asian Journal of Macroeconomics and Public Finance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Sri Lanka Journal of Development Administration     Open Access  
Stat & Styring     Full-text available via subscription  
State and Local Government Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Statistics and Public Policy     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Studi Organizzativi     Full-text available via subscription  
Studia z Polityki Publicznej     Open Access  
Surveillance and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Teaching Public Administration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
TEC Empresarial     Open Access  
Tendencias     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Territory, Politics, Governance     Hybrid Journal  
The Philanthropist     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
The Review of International Organizations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Transylvanian Review of Administrative Sciences     Open Access  
Visión de futuro     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
WEDANA : Jurnal Kajian Pemerintahan, Politik dan Birokrasi     Open Access  
Wroclaw Review of Law, Administration & Economics     Open Access  

  First | 1 2     

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The Review of International Organizations
Journal Prestige (SJR): 3.327
Citation Impact (citeScore): 3
Number of Followers: 16  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1559-744X - ISSN (Online) 1559-7431
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2469 journals]
  • Publisher Correction to: Managing performance and winning trust: how world
           bank staff shape recipient performance

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      PubDate: 2022-10-01
       
  • Correction to: Courtney Hillebrecht. 2021. Saving the international
           justice regime. Beyond backlash against international courts (Cambridge:
           Cambridge University Press)

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      PubDate: 2022-10-01
       
  • Courtney Hillebrecht. 2021. Saving the international justice regime.
           Beyond backlash against international courts (Cambridge: Cambridge
           University Press)

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      PubDate: 2022-10-01
       
  • Do Voters Reward Politicians for Trade Liberalization' Evidence from
           South Korea

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      Abstract: Abstract Do voters reward politicians for trade liberalization' We examine this question by analyzing voter responses in South Korea to the US-Korea Trade Agreement. Exploiting a change in party positions on the FTA over time, we examine the effects of different party positions on outcomes in the legislative and presidential elections. We find that voters who expect direct gains (losses) specifically from the treaty increase (decrease) support for the pro-trade party. However, voters in export-oriented industries do not reward politicians for a free trade agreement that does not directly affect their well-being. Our analysis of seven waves of individual-level panel survey data also demonstrates that a short-term change in a candidate’s position on the FTA influences voter decisions in the upcoming presidential election. The findings suggest that voter preferences with regard to trade can materialize into voting behavior when voters have a clear ex ante expectation of specific gains or losses from the trade policy.
      PubDate: 2022-10-01
       
  • Expropriation and human rights: does the seizure of FDI signal wider
           repression'

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      Abstract: Abstract Is expropriation - the seizure of assets from foreign investors - a sign of wider repression in host countries' If so, under which circumstances' The relationship between expropriation and human rights has been under-explored in the international relations and international political economy literatures. We argue that domestic repression and expropriation are interrelated: both can be part of a state’s repertoire of coercive activities, the use of these tools reflecting a leader’s insecurity about their power position. Expropriation, however, often attracts widespread media attention, and thus may signal wider repressive acts against citizens, which are typically harder to detect. We present an exploratory analysis using a cross-country sample of seventy-eight non-OECD countries (1960-2006). Results show that expropriation is connected to higher repression, and that the effect is stronger in countries with higher historical human rights protection, which are in the middle of the democracy-autocracy spectrum. Our theoretical and empirical contributions illuminate a relationship between property rights and human rights, and give important insights to understanding state incentives to repress.
      PubDate: 2022-10-01
       
  • Decision-making in international organizations: institutional design and
           performance

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      Abstract: Abstract International organizations (IOs) experience significant variation in their decision-making performance, or the extent to which they produce policy output. While some IOs are efficient decision-making machineries, others are plagued by deadlock. How can such variation be explained' Examining this question, the article makes three central contributions. First, we approach performance by looking at IO decision-making in terms of policy output and introduce an original measure of decision-making performance that captures annual growth rates in IO output. Second, we offer a novel theoretical explanation for decision-making performance. This account highlights the role of institutional design, pointing to how majoritarian decision rules, delegation of authority to supranational institutions, and access for transnational actors (TNAs) interact to affect decision-making. Third, we offer the first comparative assessment of the decision-making performance of IOs. While previous literature addresses single IOs, we explore decision-making across a broad spectrum of 30 IOs from 1980 to 2011. Our analysis indicates that IO decision-making performance varies across and within IOs. We find broad support for our theoretical account, showing the combined effect of institutional design features in shaping decision-making performance. Notably, TNA access has a positive effect on decision-making performance when pooling is greater, and delegation has a positive effect when TNA access is higher. We also find that pooling has an independent, positive effect on decision-making performance. All-in-all, these findings suggest that the institutional design of IOs matters for their decision-making performance, primarily in more complex ways than expected in earlier research.
      PubDate: 2022-10-01
       
  • Crisis affectedness, elite cues and IO public legitimacy

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      Abstract: Abstract What effects do international crises have on the public legitimacy of International Organizations (IOs)' Deviating from previous research, we argue that such crises make those international organizations more salient that are mandated to solve the respective crisis. This results in two main effects. First, the public legitimacy of those IOs becomes more dependent on citizens’ crisis-induced worries, leading to a more positive view of those IOs. Second, as the higher salience also leads to higher levels of elite communication regarding IOs, elite blaming of the IOs during crises results in direct negative effects on public legitimacy beliefs on IOs. Finally, both the valence and content of the elite discourse additionally moderate the positive effects of crisis-induced worries. Implementing survey experiments on public legitimacy beliefs on the WHO during the COVID-19 crisis with about 4400 respondents in Austria, Germany and Turkey, we find preliminary evidence for the expectations derived from our salience argument. In the conclusion, we discuss the implications of these findings for future research on IO legitimacy and IO legitimation.
      PubDate: 2022-10-01
       
  • Undermining conditionality' The effect of Chinese development
           assistance on compliance with World Bank project agreements

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      Abstract: Abstract Does Chinese development assistance undermine recipient country compliance with DAC aid conditionality' I theorize that Chinese aid provides an outside option that weakens recipient countries’ incentives to comply with conditionality by decreasing their dependence on DAC donors and undermining the ability of DAC donors to credibly commit to the enforcement of aid agreements. I test the theoretical predictions using project-level data on government compliance with World Bank project agreements for a sample of 42 Sub-Saharan African countries from 2000-2014. The empirical analysis finds strong support for the hypothesis that Chinese development assistance decreases the likelihood of recipient country compliance with the conditions specified in World Bank project agreements. The results are robust to alternative measures of Chinese development assistance, potential sources of omitted variable bias, and an instrumental variable estimation strategy.
      PubDate: 2022-10-01
       
  • China and the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank (AIIB): Chinese
           Influence Over Membership Shares'

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      Abstract: Abstract Does China exert influence over the AIIB, including its share allocation, to pursue its interests as many skeptical eyes suggest' What explains the subscription shares a member state has at the AIIB' Building upon existing literature on American influence in international financial institutions, we propose a unique theoretical argument on these questions. While most of the extant literature focuses on the US dispensing patronage to politically-economically proximate states, we suggest that China may not be so inclined. Instead, we theorize that states that are a priori distant from China might obtain higher shares relative to their GDP at the AIIB. We reason that this outcome is due to the benefits China faces in attracting more distant states (the supply side) as well as the political costs more distant states face in joining the AIIB (the demand side). More distant states are likely to demand more shares given their higher costs of membership, and China is inclined to accommodate these demands both for institutional legitimacy and the potential benefit of attracting distant countries closer to itself. Our evidence—from multiple interviews with top policy-makers and statistical analysis—provides robust support for our theoretical arguments.
      PubDate: 2022-10-01
       
  • Global banking and the spillovers from political shocks at the core of the
           world economy

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      Abstract: Abstract When do political shocks in core countries reverberate across the global financial system' We identify cross-border banking as a distinct transmission mechanism for political shocks. Democratic processes that advance (undermine) the interests of the global banking industry in core economies benefit (hurt) countries with closer banking ties to these economies. Empirically, we leverage the unanticipated outcomes of the 2016 US presidential election and the Brexit referendum to identify the role of cross-border banking in transmitting these shocks. We show that US global banks benefited disproportionately from the US election surprise. Accordingly, countries with closer ties to US banks fared relatively better; exposure to US bank flows cushioned the negative effect of the election. Evidence from Brexit reinforces the banking-channel hypothesis. The findings further our understanding of the role of global banks in the international financial order and underscore the need for more research on the political economy of global banking.
      PubDate: 2022-10-01
       
  • Foreign aid and judicial autonomy

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      Abstract: Abstract Foreign aid donors increasingly embrace judicial autonomy as an important component of advancing democracy and promoting investment abroad. Recipient governments also recognize the importance of judicial reform for improving the investment climate at home. However, developing countries often lack the necessary state capacity that would enable them to implement these reforms. We argue that recipient countries that lack the state capacity to undertake reforms on their own turn to donors, who readily assist in judicial reforms via targeted democracy and governance interventions. At the same time, we suggest that the external assistance matters less for recipients that are able to implement judicial reforms by themselves. We employ an instrumental variable model to test this argument in a global sample of aid-eligible countries.
      PubDate: 2022-10-01
       
  • Measuring precision precisely: A dictionary-based measure of imprecision

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      Abstract: Abstract How can we measure and explain the precision of international organizations’ (IOs) founding treaties' We define precision by its negative – imprecision – as indeterminate language that intentionally leaves a wide margin of interpretation for actors after agreements enter into force. Compiling a “dictionary of imprecision” from almost 500 scholarly contributions and leveraging insight from linguists that a single vague word renders the whole sentence vague, we introduce a dictionary-based measure of imprecision (DIMI) that is replicable, applicable to all written documents, and yields a continuous measure bound between zero and one. To demonstrate that DIMI usefully complements existing approaches and advances the study of (im-)precision, we apply it to a sample of 76 IOs. Our descriptive results show high face validity and closely track previous characterizations of these IOs. Finally, we explore patterns in the data, expecting that imprecision in IO treaties increases with the number of states, power asymmetries, and the delegation of authority, while it decreases with the pooling of authority. In a sample of major IOs, we find robust empirical support for the power asymmetries and delegation propositions. Overall, DIMI provides exciting new avenues to study precision in International Relations and beyond.
      PubDate: 2022-09-22
       
  • The state does not live by warfare alone: War and revenue in the long
           nineteenth century

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      Abstract: Abstract Previous research shows that wars contributed to the expansion of state revenues in the Early Modern period and in the twentieth century. There are, however, few cross-national studies on the long nineteenth century. Using new unbalanced panel data on wars and public revenues from 1816 to 1913 for 27 American and European countries, this article provides new evidence that military conflicts very rarely triggered lasting increases in public revenues during those years. We argue that the uneven diffusion of military innovations reduced the probability that international wars would be sufficiently intense to push state actors to seek additional resources. Moreover, the distinction between international and civil wars was blurred by the opportunities for non-state actors to mobilize military forces comparable to those of the state. Therefore, only very intense international and civil wars had a lasting impact on state revenues, but such conflicts were extremely rare, both in Europe and the Americas.
      PubDate: 2022-09-21
       
  • Susan Park. 2022. The Good Hegemon: US Power, Accountability as Justice,
           

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      PubDate: 2022-08-22
       
  • Axel Dreher, Andreas Fuchs, Bradley Parks, Austin Strange and Michael J.
           Tierney. 2022. Banking on Beijing: The Aims and Impacts of China’s
           Overseas Development Program. (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press)

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      PubDate: 2022-08-16
       
  • Constraints and incentives in the investment regime: How bargaining power
           shapes BIT reform

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      Abstract: Abstract States have increasingly started to terminate and renegotiate their bilateral investment treaties (BITs). Dominant explanations have however overlooked the underlying bargaining dynamic of investment treaty negotiations. This paper argues that while states initially in a weaker negotiating position have the strongest incentives to change their existing BITs, their ability to do so is constrained by their bargaining power. Such states become more likely to demand renegotiation or exit dissatisfying BITs if they have experienced sufficient changes in their bargaining power in relation to the treaty partner. This paper identifies observable implications of the weaker states’ incentives and bargaining power constraints for adjusting their bilateral investment treaty commitments. Leveraging a panel dataset on 2,623 BITs ranging from 1962 to 2019, interaction effects between bargaining power and incentives stemming from rationalist and bounded rationality assumptions about states’ decision-making are analyzed in relation to the occurrence of renegotiations and terminations. The paper finds that change in bargaining power in relation to the treaty partner is an important factor underlying the weaker states’ ability to terminate or renegotiate BITs, contributing to the study of investment regime reform and exit from international institutions.
      PubDate: 2022-08-03
       
  • Institutional roots of international alliances: Party groupings and
           position similarity at global climate negotiations

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      Abstract: Abstract A large literature in international relations explores the domestic origin of national positions at international organizations (IOs). Less researched is the institutional assembling within IOs, and how alliances formed around negotiation groups affect countries’ positions. We explore this question in the context of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), focusing on the role that institutional coalitions have on members’ statement similarity. Our baseline expectation is that similar economic development is the main determinant of coalition-building, so more common preferences emerge among members of economically similar negotiation groups. At the same time, and in line with other institutionalist views, we hold that some coalitions reflect alternative cross-cutting dimensions of interdependence and that this may increase the position similarity of their members. In the case of climate cooperation, we suggest that a high level of shared environmental vulnerability in a group may also cluster countries’ positions. We interrogate our expectations with new text-as-data measures that estimate associations of countries’ statements at the UNFCCC between 2010 and 2016. We find that states in more economically homogenous negotiation blocs share more similar national statements. Additionally, similar themes emerge among more vulnerable countries, although these are only amplified in small and uniform negotiation groups. Our evidence has implications for global cooperation based on a North–South dialogue and for the effectiveness of institutionalized coalitions at international organizations.
      PubDate: 2022-08-01
       
  • Anjali Kaushlesh Dayal. 2021. Incredible commitments: How UN peacekeeping
           failures shape peace processes (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press)

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      PubDate: 2022-07-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s11558-022-09453-5
       
  • Julia C. Morse. 2022. The Bankers’ Blacklist: Unofficial Market
           Enforcement and the Global Fight Against Illicit Financing. (Ithaca:
           Cornell University Press) Michele Riccardi. 2022. Money Laundering
           Blacklists. (New York: Routledge) Nkechikwu Valerie Azinge-Egbiri. 2021.
           Regulating and Combating Money Laundering and Terrorist Financing: The Law
           in Emerging Economies. (New York: Routledge)

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      PubDate: 2022-06-15
      DOI: 10.1007/s11558-022-09466-0
       
  • Simone Dietrich. 2021. States, Markets and Foreign Aid. (New York:
           Cambridge University Press)

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      PubDate: 2022-02-09
      DOI: 10.1007/s11558-022-09456-2
       
 
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