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  Subjects -> VETERINARY SCIENCE (Total: 225 journals)
Showing 1 - 63 of 63 Journals sorted by number of followers
Animal Behaviour     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 156)
Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 29)
Veterinary Record     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Veterinary Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Australian Veterinary Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Veterinary Clinics of North America: Small Animal Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Journal of Small Animal Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Animal Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 21)
Journal of Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Equine Veterinary Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Veterinary Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Veterinary Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Veterinary Anaesthesia and Analgesia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
American Journal of Primatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
BMC Veterinary Research     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Canadian Journal of Veterinary Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Equine Veterinary Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
New Zealand Veterinary Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Veterinary and Comparative Oncology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Veterinary Radiology & Ultrasound     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Anthrozoos : A Multidisciplinary Journal of The Interactions of People & Animals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Veterinary Diagnostic Investigation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Veterinary Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Veterinary Immunology and Immunopathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Research in Veterinary Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Veterinary Clinics of North America: Equine Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Animals     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Veterinary Medical Education     Partially Free   (Followers: 11)
Preventive Veterinary Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Trends in Parasitology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Veterinary Research     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Equine Veterinary Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Veterinary Ophthalmology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Veterinary Clinical Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Companion Animal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Veterinary Nurse     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
American Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Veterinary Dermatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Archives of Animal Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Veterinary Microbiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Veterinary Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Animal Reproduction Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Animal Feed Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Domestic Animal Endocrinology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Veterinary Science and Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Feline Medicine & Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Veterinary Parasitology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
African Journal of Wildlife Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Veterinary Pharmacology and Therapeutics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Research in Forestry, Wildlife and Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Veterinary Science & Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Veterinary Nursing Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Veterinary Science & Medical Diagnosis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Veterinary Medicine International     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Research Journal of Veterinary Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Veterinary Clinics of North America: Exotic Animal Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Exotic Pet Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Topics in Companion Animal Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Zoonoses and Public Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Bangladesh Journal of Animal Science     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Open Journal of Animal Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Avian Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Animal Health Research Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Irish Veterinary Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Veterinary Clinics of North America: Food Animal Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Veterinary Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Equine Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Human & Veterinary Medicine - International Journal of the Bioflux Society     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Transboundary and Emerging Diseases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Onderstepoort Journal of Veterinary Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Nutrición Animal Tropical     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Australian Equine Veterinarian     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Ethiopian Veterinary Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Frontiers in Veterinary Science     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Asian Journal of Poultry Science     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Asian Journal of Medical and Biological Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Medical Mycology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Case Reports in Veterinary Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Veterinary Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Bulletin of Animal Health and Production in Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
ILAR Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Veterinary Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Indian Journal of Veterinary Anatomy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Indian Journal of Animal Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Kenya Veterinarian     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Open Journal of Veterinary Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Veterinary Medicine and Science     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
VCOT Open     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery Open Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Advanced Research in Life Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Theriogenology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Reproduction in Domestic Animals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
New Zealand Veterinary Nurse     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Anatomia, Histologia, Embryologia: Journal of Veterinary Medicine Series C     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Small Ruminant Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Research & Reviews : Journal of Veterinary Science and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Bulletin of University of Agricultural Sciences and Veterinary Medicine Cluj-Napoca : Food Science and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Tropical Veterinarian     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Tanzania Veterinary Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Pet Behaviour Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Jurnal Ilmu dan Kesehatan Hewan (Veterinary Science and Medicine Journal)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Global Journal of Animal Scientific Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Buletin Peternakan : Bulletin of Animal Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Iranian Journal of Applied Animal Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Colombiana de Ciencias Pecuarias (Colombian journal of animal science and veterinary medicine)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Abanico Veterinario     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Jurnal Veteriner     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Veterinary and Comparative Orthopaedics and Traumatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Jurnal Agripet     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Buletin Veteriner Udayana     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Veterinary Dentistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Advanced Veterinary Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Brazilian Journal of Veterinary Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Applied Animal Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Acta Veterinaria Hungarica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Austral Journal of Veterinary Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Veterinary Science Development     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Acta Veterinaria Scandinavica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Veterinary Medicine: Research and Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Livestock     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Revista Mexicana de Ciencias Pecuarias     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Archivos de Medicina Veterinaria     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Tropical Animal Health and Production     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Veterinary Quarterly     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
veterinär spiegel     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Polish Journal of Veterinary Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Brasileira de Zootecnia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Brasileira de Higiene e Sanidade Animal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of the South African Veterinary Association     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of the Hellenic Veterinary Medical Society     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Veterinary Research Communications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Chilean Journal of Agricultural & Animal Sciences     Open Access  
CES Medicina Veterinaria y Zootecnia     Open Access  
Veterinaria México OA     Open Access  
Compendio de Ciencias Veterinarias     Open Access  
Iranian Journal of Veterinary Surgery     Open Access  
Ciencia Veterinaria     Open Access  
Nepalese Veterinary Journal     Open Access  
Sri Lanka Veterinary Journal     Open Access  
Salud y Tecnología Veterinaria     Open Access  
Veterinary Parasitology : X     Open Access  
Jurnal Medik Veteriner     Open Access  
Tierärztliche Praxis Ausgabe K: Kleintiere / Heimtiere     Hybrid Journal  
Tierärztliche Praxis Ausgabe G: Großtiere / Nutztiere     Hybrid Journal  
Van Veterinary Journal     Open Access  
Journal of Veterinary and Animal Sciences     Open Access  
Rassegna di Diritto, Legislazione e Medicina Legale Veterinaria     Open Access  
Veterinaria (Montevideo)     Open Access  
SVU-International Journal of Veterinary Sciences     Open Access  
Matrix Science Medica     Open Access  
Veterinary Journal of Mehmet Akif Ersoy University / Mehmet Akif Ersoy Üniversitesi Veteriner Fakültesi Dergisi     Open Access  
Analecta Veterinaria     Open Access  
Veterinarski Glasnik     Open Access  
Medicina Veterinária (UFRPE)     Open Access  
Veterinaria     Open Access  
Jurnal Sain Veteriner     Open Access  
International Journal of Tropical Veterinary and Biomedical Research     Open Access  
Revista de Ciência Veterinária e Saúde Pública     Open Access  
Jurnal Medika Veterinaria     Open Access  
Veterinary Parasitology : Regional Studies and Reports     Full-text available via subscription  
Revue Vétérinaire Clinique     Full-text available via subscription  
Folia Veterinaria     Open Access  
Science and Animal Health     Open Access  
FAVE Sección Ciencias Veterinarias     Open Access  
Revista Ciencias Veterinarias     Open Access  
Wartazoa. Indonesian Bulletin of Animal and Veterinary Sciences     Open Access  
Indonesia Medicus Veterinus     Open Access  
Spei Domus     Open Access  
Revista de Educação Continuada em Medicina Veterinária e Zootecnia     Open Access  
Cogent Food & Agriculture     Open Access  
Revista Veterinaria     Open Access  
Journal of the Selva Andina Research Society     Open Access  
Bangladesh Veterinarian     Open Access  
Journal of Buffalo Science     Hybrid Journal  
Revista de Ciências Agroveterinárias     Open Access  
Intas Polivet     Full-text available via subscription  
Atatürk Üniversitesi Veteriner Bilimleri Dergisi / Atatürk University Journal of Veterinary Sciences     Open Access  
Revue Marocaine des Sciences Agronomiques et Vétérinaires     Open Access  
Acta Veterinaria     Open Access  
Nigerian Veterinary Journal     Open Access  
Revista Brasileira de Ciência Veterinária     Open Access  
Schweizer Archiv für Tierheilkunde     Hybrid Journal  
Bangladesh Journal of Veterinary Medicine     Open Access  
Macedonian Veterinary Review     Open Access  
Annual Review of Animal Biosciences     Full-text available via subscription  
Revista de Investigaciones Veterinarias del Perú     Open Access  
Revista Complutense de Ciencias Veterinarias     Open Access  
Medical Mycology Case Reports     Open Access  
Veterinaria México     Open Access  
Revista de Salud Animal     Open Access  
Revista de Medicina Veterinaria     Open Access  
Revista MVZ Córdoba     Open Access  
Avances en Ciencias Veterinarias     Open Access  
InVet     Open Access  
Zeitschrift für Ganzheitliche Tiermedizin     Hybrid Journal  
team.konkret     Open Access  
pferde spiegel     Hybrid Journal  
kleintier konkret     Hybrid Journal  

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Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Journal of Feline Medicine & Surgery
Number of Followers: 6  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1098-612X - ISSN (Online) 1532-2750
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1174 journals]
  • JFMS to join the open access movement

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Andy Sparkes, Margie Scherk, Nathalie Dowgray, Heather O’Steen
      Pages: 471 - 472
      Abstract: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery, Volume 24, Issue 6, Page 471-472, June 2022.

      Citation: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery
      PubDate: 2022-06-01T08:18:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1098612X221099806
      Issue No: Vol. 24, No. 6 (2022)
       
  • Behavior and adoptability of hoarded cats admitted to an animal shelter

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      Authors: Linda S Jacobson, Jacklyn J Ellis, Kyrsten J Janke, Jolene A Giacinti, Jyothi V Robertson
      Abstract: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectivesThe aim of this study was to analyze the behavioral characteristics and success of adoption for previously hoarded cats.MethodsShelter records and post-adoption surveys were analyzed for hoarded cats ⩾6 months old at intake. A non-standard scoring system was used. Intake scores were allocated contemporaneously and socialization scores were applied retrospectively for three time points (TPs): 5–10 days post-intake (shelter TP), ⩽1 week post-adoption (home TP1) and >1 week post-adoption (home TP2). Adoption returns were compared between hoarded and non-hoarded cats.ResultsThe study included 195 hoarded cats, of which 174 were adopted. Of 164 cats with intake scores, 86 (52%) were scored as ‘friendly’ at intake. Forty-five cats had socialization scores for all of the TPs, and of these, the percentages of ‘supersocial’ or ‘social’ decreased from 87% at the shelter TP to 47% at home TP1, then increased to 84% at home TP2. Most cats that scored as ‘tense’ at intake had supersocial or social scores at home TP2. Nine of the 88 cats with survey results had out-of-box (OOB) elimination in either the shelter or home but only 1/88 in both. Adopters expressed positive feelings for 42/43 cats for which feelings-based language was used in their survey responses. Notable behaviors, such as neediness, were recorded for 48/88 cats. Relationships with other household pets were typically positive. Eighteen of 174 hoarded (10%) and 188/2662 non-hoarded (7.1%) cats were returned post-adoption. Of these, six hoarded and 87 non-hoarded returns included behavioral reasons. There were no significant differences between hoarded and non-hoarded cats for total or behavioral returns.Conclusions and relevanceHoarded cats had high adoption rates, high adopter satisfaction and the potential for good emotional well-being in adoptive homes. Behavior at intake and OOB elimination in the shelter may not reflect post-adoption behavior. Behavior-based outcome decisions for these vulnerable animals should be deferred to allow time for habituation.
      Citation: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery
      PubDate: 2022-06-20T09:55:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1098612X221102122
       
  • Comparing adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells with prednisolone for the
           treatment of feline inflammatory bowel disease

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      Authors: Tracy L Webb, Craig B Webb
      Abstract: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectivesThe objective of this study was to compare the efficacy of feline mesenchymal stem cells (fMSC) with prednisolone as a treatment for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in cats.MethodsCats with chronic enteropathy that failed a 2-week diet trial and were not found to have significant concurrent disease were eligible for the study. If endoscopic biopsies confirmed a histopathologic diagnosis of IBD, the cat was randomly assigned to either the fMSC or prednisolone groups. Owners were blinded to the grouping. Stem cell treatment consisted of two intravenous injections of 2 × 106 cells/kg of freshly cultured allogeneic stem cells separated by 2 weeks. Prednisolone treatment was 1–2 mg/kg PO q24h, tapered according to clinical response. Owners were asked to make no changes (eg, diet and other medications) for the first 2 months, at which time they either continued to the 6-month recheck with no changes, or ‘failed’ treatment and owners were unblinded and changes made as necessary.ResultsSix prednisolone and six fMSC treatment cats completed the study. All six prednisolone group cats were spayed females with a mean age of 8.3 years (range 2–14), a mean body weight of 3.6 kg (range 2.5–4.8) and a mean pretreatment Feline Chronic Enteropathy Activity Index (FCEAI) score of 3.6 (range 2–6). The six stem cell cats included three spayed females and three castrated males, and had a mean age of 8.0 years (range 4.5–13), a mean body weight of 4.9 kg (range 4.0–5.9) and a mean pretreatment FCEAI score of 3.7 (range 2–5). One cat in each group failed at the 2-month recheck. At the 6-month recheck, the mean FCEAI score for the prednisolone group was 3.7 (range 0.5–9) and 0.75 (range 0–1.5) for the fMSC group.Conclusions and relevanceThese results suggest that this specific fMSC protocol appears to be as effective in the treatment of feline IBD as a standard course of prednisolone therapy.
      Citation: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery
      PubDate: 2022-06-17T02:14:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1098612X221104053
       
  • Therapy for feline secondary hypertriglyceridemia with fenofibrate

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      Authors: Diego D Miceli, Juan M Guevara, Sergio Ferraris, Omar P Pignataro, María F Gallelli
      Abstract: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectivesThe aim of this study was to assess the short-term safety and efficacy of fenofibrate in controlling secondary hypertriglyceridemia in cats.MethodsThis was a prospective cohort study. Seventeen adult cats with hypertriglyceridemia (serum triglycerides [TG]>160 mg/dl) were enrolled. Cats received a median dose of 5 mg/kg (range 3.2–6) fenofibrate (q24h PO) for 1 month. Serum TG, total cholesterol (TC), creatine kinase and liver enzymes (alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase and alkaline phosphatase) were evaluated before (t0) and after 1 month (t1) of fenofibrate treatment.ResultsThe causes of secondary hypertriglyceridemia were diabetes mellitus (DM; 29.4%), obesity (29.4%), hyperadrenocorticism (HAC) and DM (11.7%), HAC without DM (5.9%), hypersomatotropism (HST) and DM (5.9%), hypothyroidism (5.9%), long-term treatment with glucocorticoids (5.9%) and chylothorax (5.9%). Serum TG (t0 median 920 mg/dl [range 237–1780]; t1 median 51 mg/dl [range 21–1001]; P = 0.0002) and TC (t0 median 278 mg/dl [range 103–502]; t1 median 156 mg/dl [range 66–244]; P = 0.0001) concentrations showed a significant decrease after 1 month of fenofibrate treatment. Fifteen cats normalized their TG concentration at t1 (88.2%). Of the eight cats that were hypercholesterolemic at t0, six (75%) normalized their TC concentrations at t1. One of 17 cats (5.9 %) presented with diarrhea; the remaining 16 did not show any adverse effects.Conclusions and relevanceDM and obesity are the most common endocrine causes of secondary hyperlipidemia, although it can also be found in cats with HAC, HST or hypothyroidism. This study suggests that fenofibrate treatment was associated with reduction and normalization of TG and TC concentrations in cats with moderate and severe hypertriglyceridemia, regardless of the cause of secondary hypertriglyceridemia. Further work should focus on controlled studies with a greater number of cases.
      Citation: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery
      PubDate: 2022-06-17T02:14:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1098612X221104066
       
  • Investigated regional apparent diffusion coefficient values of the
           morphologically normal feline brain

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      Authors: Blanca Lindt, Henning Richter, Francesca Del Chicca
      Abstract: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectivesDiffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) MRI is increasingly available in veterinary medicine for investigation of the brain. However, apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values have only been reported in a small number of cats or in research settings. The aim of this study was to investigate the ADC values of different anatomical regions of the morphologically normal brain in a feline patient population. Additionally, we aimed to assess the possible influence on the ADC values of different patient-related factors, such as sex, body weight, age, imaging of the left and right side of the cerebral hemispheres and white vs grey matter regions.MethodsThis retrospective study included cats undergoing an MRI (3T) examination with DWI sequences of the head at the Vetsuisse Faculty of the University Zurich between 2015 and 2021. Only cats with morphologically normal brains were included. On the ADC maps, 10 regions of interest (ROIs) were manually drawn on the following anatomical regions: caudate nucleus; internal capsule (two locations); piriform lobe; thalamus; hippocampus; cortex cerebri (two locations); cerebellar hemisphere; and one ROI in the centre of the cerebellar vermis. Except for the ROI at the cerebellar vermis, each ROI was drawn in the left and right hemisphere. The ADC values were calculated by the software and recorded.ResultsA total of 129 cats were included in this study. The ADC varied in the different ROIs, with the highest mean ADC value in the hippocampus and the lowest in the cerebellar hemisphere. ADC was significantly lower in the white cerebral matter compared with the grey matter. ADC values were not influenced by age, with the exception of the hippocampus and the cingulate gyrus.Conclusion and relevanceADC values of different anatomical regions of the morphologically normal feline brain in a patient population of 129 cats in a clinical setting are reported for the first time.
      Citation: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery
      PubDate: 2022-06-16T08:24:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1098612X221101535
       
  • Investigation of a relationship between serum concentrations of
           microRNA-122 and alanine aminotransferase activity in hospitalised cats

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Susan K Armstrong, Wilna Oosthuyzen, Adam G Gow, Silke Salavati Schmitz, James W Dear, Richard J Mellanby
      Abstract: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectivesCurrent blood tests to diagnose feline liver diseases are suboptimal. Serum concentrations of microRNA (miR)-122 have been shown in humans, dogs and rodents to be a sensitive and specific biomarker for liver injury. To explore the potential diagnostic utility of measuring serum concentrations of miR-122 in cats, miR-122 was measured in a cohort of ill, hospitalised cats with known serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) activity.MethodsIn this retrospective study, cats were grouped into those with an ALT activity within the reference interval (0–83 U/l; n = 38) and those with an abnormal ALT activity (>84 U/l; n = 25). Serum concentrations of miR-122 were measured by real-time quantitative PCR and the relationship between miR-122 and ALT was examined.ResultsmiR-122 was significantly higher in the group with high ALT activity than the ALT group, within normal reference limits (P
      Citation: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery
      PubDate: 2022-06-15T12:51:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1098612X221100071
       
  • Non-injection-site soft tissue sarcoma in cats: outcome following adjuvant
           radiotherapy

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      Authors: Alenka Lavra Zajc, Aaron Harper, Jerome Benoit, Sarah Mason
      Abstract: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectivesBiological behaviour and treatment options of non-injection-site soft tissue sarcomas (nFISS) in cats are less well understood than in dogs. The aim of this retrospective study was to assess the outcomes of cats with nFISS following treatment with adjuvant radiotherapy.MethodsThe medical records of cats with soft tissue sarcomas in locations not associated with, and histology reports not suggestive of, injection-site sarcomas were reviewed. All cats underwent adjuvant radiotherapy, either hypofractionated (32–36 Gy delivered in weekly 8–9 Gy fractions) or conventionally fractionated (48–54 Gy delivered in 16–18 3 Gy fractions) to microscopic disease.ResultsIn total, 18 cats were included in the study, 17 with extremity nFISS and one with facial nFISS. Nine received radiotherapy after a single surgery and nine after multiple surgeries for recurrent nFISS. Eight cats were treated with a hypofractionated protocol and 10 with a conventionally fractionated protocol. The median follow-up time was 540 days (range 51–3317 days). The tumour recurred in eight (44.4%) cats following adjuvant radiotherapy; it recurred in three (37.5%) cats following a hypofractionated protocol and in five (50%) cats following a conventionally fractionated protocol. The overall median progression-free interval (PFI) for 17/18 cats was 2748 days, while the median PFI for the 7/8 cats with recurrence was 164 days. The recurrence for one cat was reported, but the date was unknown and it was therefore censored from these data. When stratifying based on the protocol, the median PFI for hypofractionated and conventionally fractionated protocols was 164 days and 2748 days, respectively. Statistically, there was no significant difference between the two protocols (P = 0.636).Conclusions and relevanceAdjuvant radiotherapy resulted in good long-term tumour control in 12/18 cats with nFISS. Further studies in larger populations are required to assess the significance of radiation dose and fractionation on tumour control and the effect of multiple surgeries prior to initiation of radiotherapy on outcome.
      Citation: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery
      PubDate: 2022-05-31T03:22:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1098612X221098961
       
  • Lack of association between feline AB blood groups and retroviral status:
           a multicenter, multicountry study

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Eva Spada, Hyein Jung, Daniela Proverbio, Roberta Perego, Luciana Baggiani, Silvia Ciuti, Claire R Sharp, Katherine J Nash, Mark Westman, Philippa JP Lait, Elizabeth B Davidow
      Abstract: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectivesThe relationship between blood group antigens and disease has been studied in humans. Blood types have been associated with both decreased and increased rates of various infections. In addition, blood group expression has been shown to vary with some cancers and gastrointestinal diseases. The objective of this study was to explore whether there is a relationship between blood type and retroviral infections in cats.MethodsCase records from a veterinary research laboratory, veterinary teaching hospitals and veterinary blood banks were retrospectively searched for cats where both blood type and retroviral status (feline leukemia [FeLV], feline immunodeficiency virus [FIV] or both) were listed (part 1). In addition, a sample of 33 cats with confirmed FIV infection was genotyped to determine blood groups (part 2).ResultsIn part 1, 709 cats were identified, 119 of which were positive for retroviral infection. Among all cases, 621 were type A (87.6%), 68 were type B (9.6%) and 20 were type AB (2.8%). There was no relationship between overall retroviral status (positive/negative) and blood type (P = 0.43), between FeLV status and blood type (P = 0.86) or between FIV status and blood type (P = 0.94). There was no difference in the distribution of blood types between cats that were healthy and typed as possible blood donors vs sick cats that were typed prior to a possible transfusion (P = 0.13). In part 2, of the 33 FIV-infected cats, all blood group genotypes were identified, although this test did not discriminate type A from type AB.Conclusions and relevanceNo relationship was identified between feline retroviral status and blood type in this study. The relationship between blood type and other disease states requires further study in veterinary patients.
      Citation: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery
      PubDate: 2022-05-30T09:28:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1098612X221100082
       
  • Anti-Müllerian hormone as a diagnostic tool to identify queens with
           ovarian remnant syndrome

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      Authors: Ulrike Flock, Stine Fischer, Jasmin Weeger, Sven Reese, Beate Walter
      Abstract: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectivesOvarian remnant syndrome (ORS) is suspected when heat signs occur in spayed individuals, but further diagnostic procedures are necessary to exclude other possible oestrogen sources, such as the adrenal gland or exogenous supplementation. Anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH), secreted by granulosa cells or Sertoli cells, serves to differentiate sexually intact from gonadectomised animals and has been described in dogs as a tool for diagnosing ORS. The aim of this study was to evaluate if AMH determination can be used to diagnose ORS in cats.MethodsAMH was measured with a chemiluminescence immunoassay in serum samples of 15 sexually intact, 9 spayed and 16 cats with a history of heat signs after spaying. Abdominal ultrasound (n = 13), vaginal smears (n = 7), progesterone measurement (n = 5) and laparotomy (n = 14) were used to determine the presence of ovarian tissue. After surgery, a histological examination of the obtained tissue was performed in the cats with suspected ORS.ResultsIn 15 cats with ORS the AMH serum concentrations were significantly higher than in spayed cats (n = 10; P = 0.025) and significantly lower than in sexually intact cats (n = 15; P = 0.001). Among the cats with ORS, the highest AMH serum concentrations were measured in the queens with cystic ovarian alterations and in one cat from which a whole ovary was obtained. The cat with the lowest AMH serum concentration had a simultaneous high progesterone serum concentration. Cats with ORS did not show any heat signs after surgical removal of the ovarian tissue.Conclusions and relevanceA single determination of AMH in blood serum is a useful diagnostic tool for the diagnosis of ORS in cats, regardless of the hormonal activity of the remnant ovarian tissue.
      Citation: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery
      PubDate: 2022-05-30T09:28:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1098612X221099195
       
  • Quality of life and response to treatment in cats with hypersomatotropism:
           the owners’ point of view

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      Authors: Andrea Corsini, Stijn JM Niessen, Diego D Miceli, Sarah Caney, Florian K Zeugswetter, Nadja S Sieber-Ruckstuhl, Carolina Arenas, Linda M Fleeman, Rodolfo O Leal, Martina Battellino, Federico Fracassi
      Abstract: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectivesThe aim of this study was to collect clinical information from owners of cats with hypersomatotropism (HS) distributed worldwide, assessing the impact of HS and its treatments on cats’ quality of life (QoL) and survival time.MethodsA survey focused on clinical presentation, diagnostic procedures, treatments, cats’ QoL and disease progression was distributed worldwide to owners of cats with HS. The owner’s perception of the cats’ QoL before and after or during treatment was defined using a score ranging from 1 (poor) to 5 (excellent). Improvement following treatment (IFT) was quantified using a score ranging from 1 (absent) to 5 (obvious). Different treatment groups, including at least five cases, were compared.ResultsA total of 127 cats were included from at least 11 different countries. Among these, 120 (95%) were diabetic and 7 (5%) were not. Out of 120 diabetic cats, 55 (46%) were treated with insulin as a single treatment (INS). Other treatments were not mentioned to owners in 35/120 (29%) cases. The median QoL score at diagnosis was 2 (range 1–5) and improved after treatment in all groups. Cabergoline (4; range 1–5), radiotherapy (4; range 2–5) and hypophysectomy (5; range 4–5) showed better median IFT scores compared with INS (3; range 1–5) (P = 0.046, P
      Citation: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery
      PubDate: 2022-05-26T09:08:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1098612X221098718
       
  • Ophthalmic effects of dexmedetomidine, methadone and
           dexmedetomidine–methadone in healthy cats and their reversal with
           atipamezole

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      Authors: Luciana Wolfran, Rafael Rostirolla Debiage, Danielle Mara Lopes, Fabíola Bono Fukushima
      Abstract: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectivesThe aims of this study were to evaluate and compare the effects that dexmedetomidine and methadone, either alone or in combination, have on the ocular variables of healthy adult cats when administered intramuscularly, as well as their reversal with atipamezole.MethodsA randomized crossover blinded study of 10 healthy cats was used to assess the effect of 0.2 mg/kg methadone (MET), 7.5 μg/kg dexmedetomidine (D7), 10 μg/kg dexmedetomidine (D10), 7.5 μg/kg dexmedetomidine and 0.2 mg/kg methadone (DM7) and 10 μg/kg dexmedetomidine and 0.2 mg/kg methadone (DM10) on intraocular pressure (IOP), tear production and pupil diameter (PD). The animals were evaluated for 30 mins. Afterwards, atipamezole was administered and ocular variables were evaluated for 30 mins.ResultsD10, DM7 and DM10 significantly decreased mean IOP but MET or D7 did not. Tear production decreased significantly in all treatments, corresponding to 18%, 59%, 63%, 86% and 98% in MET, D7, D10, DM7 and DM10, respectively. PD increased in all treatments, but MET showed the highest PD. Thirty minutes after atipamezole (RT30), IOP returned to baseline with no difference between groups, and there was a significant increase in tear production, but the means were still different from baseline.Conclusions and relevanceDexmedetomidine decreases IOP and tear production but increases PD in healthy cats. Atipamezole can partly reverse those alterations. Low-dose dexmedetomidine (7.5 µg/kg) promotes sedation without changing the IOP. All protocols significantly decrease tear production, and Schirmer tear test after sedation is not representative of non-sedated values. Methadone induces quick onset mydriasis without changing the IOP.
      Citation: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery
      PubDate: 2022-05-26T09:08:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1098612X221077023
       
  • Assessment of the cutaneous trunci muscle reflex in healthy cats:
           comparison of results acquired by clinicians and cat owners

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      Authors: Chyong-Ying Tsai, Ya-Pei Chang
      Abstract: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectivesThe study aimed to evaluate the cutaneous trunci muscle reflex (CTMR) in healthy cats using methods performed by the clinician and the cat’s owner at home.MethodsA total of 55 healthy cats without neurological abnormalities were included in this study. CTMR evaluation was performed sequentially in each cat using three methods by a clinician: method A, pinch skin with a straight 14 cm Crile haemostat forceps; method B, displace fur with the tip of a pen or haemostat forceps; and method C, poke skin with the tip of a straightened paper clip. The normal response rates for each method were obtained and compared. A ‘CTMR performance score’ was assigned for each cat, reflecting the presence of a normal CTMR response using one or more of the three methods. An ‘owner performance score’ was also obtained, reflecting the response of the CTMR when performed at home by the cat owner. The two scores were compared as paired data for each cat.ResultsThe CTMR was elicited normally in 17 (31%), 27 (49%) and 16 (29%) cats using methods A, B and C, respectively. Method B delivered a significantly higher percentage of normal responses. When comparing the ‘CTMR performance score’ and ‘owner performance score’, the percentage of normal responses was 60% and 100%, respectively, which was significantly different.Conclusions and relevanceThe overall normal response rate of the CTMR in healthy feline subjects was low when performed by a clinician, regardless of the method applied. Conversely, a high percentage of normal responses was obtained by cat owners performing CTMR at home, potentially indicating the impact of stress on the CTMR performance.
      Citation: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery
      PubDate: 2022-05-16T01:14:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1098612X221098716
       
  • Reduced risk of arterial thromboembolism in cats with pleural effusion due
           to congestive heart failure

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      Authors: Francesca Busato, Michele Drigo, Andrea Zoia
      Abstract: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectivesThe aim of the study was to determine whether cardiogenic pleural effusion in cats is associated with a lower risk of arterial thromboembolism (ATE) compared with cats with cardiac disease without evidence of pleural effusion.MethodsA cross-sectional study was conducted on owned cats with natural occurring cardiac diseases. Cats included were classified in three groups: those with cardiac disease but no evidence of congestive heart failure (CHF); those with evidence of cardiogenic pulmonary oedema; and those with evidence of cardiogenic pleural effusion. Prevalence of ATE was calculated and the variables analysed for an association with this outcome were the presence and type of CHF, sex and neuter status, age, breed, type of cardiac diseases and left atrial (LA) dimension. A multivariable logistic regression model was used to fit the association between ATE and these variables.ResultsA total of 366 cats with cardiac disease met the inclusion criteria: 179 were included in the group with cardiac disease but no evidence of CHF, 66 in the group with evidence of cardiogenic pulmonary oedema and 121 in the group with evidence of cardiogenic pleural effusion. Prevalence of ATE (58/366 [15.8%]) was significantly different among groups (with no evidence of CHF, 28/179 [15.6%]; with evidence of cardiogenic pulmonary oedema, 22/66 [33.3%]; with evidence of cardiogenic pleural effusion, 8/121 [6.6%]; P
      Citation: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery
      PubDate: 2022-05-13T10:14:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1098612X221094663
       
  • Tumours involving the retrobulbar space in cats: 37 cases

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      Authors: Bryn A Jones, Nicole Cotterill, Randi Drees, Ursula M Dietrich, Katarzyna Purzycka
      Abstract: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectivesThe aim of this multicentre retrospective study was to describe the clinical presentation, imaging findings, diagnosis and outcomes of cats with retrobulbar neoplasia.MethodsA total of 37 cats that were diagnosed with retrobulbar neoplasia and underwent advanced imaging were recruited from searches of the clinical records of two referral hospitals. All cats had neoplasia confirmed via cytology or histopathology. Data relating to the signalment, presentation, results of investigations, treatment and outcome were recorded. A review of imaging studies was performed where possible.ResultsIn total, 23 cases (62%) were presented with respiratory signs. Exophthalmos was the most common ophthalmological examination finding, present in 18 cases (49%). Thirty-two cases (86%) had secondary extension of neoplasia to the retrobulbar space (most commonly from the nasal cavities), present in 20 cases (54%), of which 12 were lymphoma. In cases where contrast was administered, 28/35 (80%) had contrast-enhancing masses. Orbital extension was detected in 21 cases (57%), exophthalmos in 22 (59%), globe deformation in 12 (32%) and local lymphadenomegaly in 22 (61%). In total, 36 (97%) retrobulbar tumours were malignant. Thoracic imaging, where it was performed, was concerning for metastasis in 8/25 cases (31%), with abdominal imaging suggestive of metastasis in 5/12 (42%). The most common diagnosis was lymphoma with 19 cases (51%), with nasal lymphoma representing 12 of these, followed by carcinoma in 10 (27%). The median survival time, for cases where death was recorded, was 85 days (range 1–263 days).Conclusions and relevanceTo the authors’ knowledge, this is the largest study of neoplasia affecting the feline retrobulbar space. Retrobulbar tumours in cats are overwhelmingly malignant, and commonly due to secondary extension of tumours originating elsewhere. Lymphoma, particularly arising from the nasal cavities, was the most common cause. Cats presenting with signs suggestive of retrobulbar disease should be assessed for disease affecting any of the structures of the head.
      Citation: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery
      PubDate: 2022-05-10T01:11:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1098612X221094947
       
  • Survey of risk factors and frequency of clinical signs observed with
           feline cognitive dysfunction syndrome

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      Authors: Brittany MacQuiddy, Julie Moreno, Jade Frank, Stephanie McGrath
      Abstract: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectivesThe aims of this study were to distribute a survey to cat owners to identify common clinical signs of feline cognitive dysfunction (FCD) and to evaluate for potential risk factors.MethodsA questionnaire was developed and adapted based on previously validated canine cognitive dysfunction questionnaires. This questionnaire was distributed to 4342 cat owners who had presented to Colorado State University Veterinary Teaching Hospital between 2015 and 2020. Cats aged ⩾8 years with signs of cognitive dysfunction and no underlying medical conditions were classified as the FCD-positive group. Cats aged ⩾8 years with no signs of cognitive dysfunction were classified as the FCD-negative control group. Chi-square or Fisher’s exact tests were used to determine associations between categorical variables and a P value
      Citation: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery
      PubDate: 2022-05-10T01:11:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1098612X221095680
       
  • Grapiprant or carprofen following ovariohysterectomy in the cat: analgesic
           efficacy, hematological, biochemical and urinalysis evaluation

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      Authors: Luciana G Teixeira, Charline V Vaccarin, Paula I Schimites, Jean C Gasparotto, Gabriela P Costa, Julia M Griesang, Daniel Vargas, Emanuelle D Bortolotto, Ana BU Soares, Jéssica F Camargo, Cínthia M Andrade, André V Soares, Emerson A Contesini
      Abstract: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectivesThis study aimed to compare the analgesic effect between carprofen and grapiprant every 12 or 24 h on postoperative pain in cats undergoing ovariohysterectomy, in addition to the effects on the hematological, biochemical and urinalysis variables.MethodsA total of 32 female cats were randomly divided into three groups, according to the treatment administered with the first dose given orally 90 mins before surgery, as follows: CAR (cats received 4 mg/kg carprofen, n = 11); GRA1 (cats received 2 mg/kg grapiprant, n = 10); and GRA2 (cats received 2 mg/kg grapiprant q12h, n = 11). Pain was assessed by UNESP-Botucatu Multidimensional Composite Pain Scale (UNESP) and Glasgow Feline Composite Measure Pain Scale (GLASGOW) for cats preoperatively (baseline) and at 1, 3, 6, 8, 12 and 24 h after extubation. Venous blood was collected at baseline, and 12 and 24 h after the administration of carprofen or grapiprant to perform a complete blood count (CBC), the percentage of Heinz bodies and serum biochemistry (alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, gamma-glutamyltransferase, creatinine and urea). Urinalysis was performed at baseline and 24 h after extubation. Glucose levels were evaluated at baseline and 1 h postoperatively.ResultsPain scores were not significantly different among groups in both scales, although pain was higher at 3 h in comparison with 24 h in all groups. In the GRA1 and GRA2 groups, 67% (14/21) of cats needed rescue analgesia compared with 18% (2/11) in the CAR group. Glucose increased from baseline to 1 h in the GRA1 and GRA2 groups. None of the CBC, serum biochemistry and urinalysis variables differed among groups.Conclusions and relevanceGrapiprant did not promote adequate analgesia during the first 3 h postoperatively in cats undergoing ovariohysterectomy compared with carprofen, and no benefits were observed by administering grapiprant every 12 h.
      Citation: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery
      PubDate: 2022-05-09T10:05:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1098612X221097935
       
  • Characterization of post-transfusion anti-FEA 1 alloantibodies in
           transfusion-naive FEA 1-negative cats

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      Authors: Alyssa Cannavino, Dana LeVine, Marie-Claude Blais
      Abstract: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectivesThe aim of this study was to characterize anti-feline erythrocyte antigen (FEA) 1 alloantibodies following sensitization of FEA 1-negative cats, including their rate of appearance, agglutination titer over time and immunoglobulin class. A secondary aim was to obtain polyclonal anti-FEA 1 alloantibodies to increase the availability of FEA 1 blood typing. We also describe a case study documenting an acute hemolytic transfusion reaction in a transfusion-naive FEA 1-negative feline patient that received FEA 1-positive blood.MethodsIn this prospective clinical study, 35 cats with blood group type A underwent extensive blood typing for FEA 1–5. Two cats were identified as FEA 1-negative; these cats were transfused uneventfully with 50 ml of FEA 1-positive, but otherwise compatible, packed red blood cells. Post-transfusion blood samples were collected routinely as long as anti-FEA 1 alloantibodies were detected. Appearance of anti-FEA 1 alloantibodies was detected using a gel column crossmatch method.ResultsAnti-FEA 1 alloantibodies were detected as early as 5 days post-transfusion and remained detectable for over 400 days in one cat. Agglutination titers in both cats were relatively weak (1:1 to 1:8). The main immunoglobulin class was IgM.Conclusions and relevanceTransfusion of FEA 1-negative, transfusion-naive cats with FEA 1-positive blood results in production of post-transfusion anti-FEA 1 alloantibodies as early as 5 days post-transfusion. Our results confirm the potential immunogenicity of FEA 1 and support crossmatching prior to a blood transfusion, even in transfusion-naive cats. Further studies are needed to better document the clinical importance of these post-transfusion antibodies, as well as to facilitate routine blood typing for the FEA 1 antigen in cats.
      Citation: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery
      PubDate: 2022-05-05T02:09:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1098612X221094502
       
  • Feline Comorbidities: Balancing hyperthyroidism and concurrent chronic
           kidney disease

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      Authors: Rebecca Geddes, Joana Aguiar
      Abstract: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery, Ahead of Print.
      Practical relevance:Both hyperthyroidism and chronic kidney disease (CKD) are common long-term conditions in older cats, which might be diagnosed concurrently or develop at different times. Hyperthyroidism may mask the presence of CKD, and vice versa, by various mechanisms that are described in this review. Hyperthyroidism treatment options should be carefully considered when CKD has also been diagnosed.Clinical challenges:Although it can be difficult to diagnose hyperthyroidism and CKD simultaneously, given that one condition may mask the other, it is important to consider the presence of both diseases when examining an older cat presenting with vomiting, weight loss, polyuria/ polydipsia, anorexia or sarcopenia. The concurrent presence of hyperthyroidism and CKD requires careful monitoring of glomerular filtration rate biomarkers, and adequate and prompt support of kidney function when normal thyroid function is re-established. Iatrogenic hypothyroidism is a recognised complication of all of the treatment options for hyperthyroidism, and increases the risk of azotaemia. Therapy with levothyroxine is recommended for cats that are hypothyroid and azotaemic.Evidence base:The information in this review draws on current literature and guidelines related to the pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment recommendations for feline hyperthyroidism and CKD.
      Citation: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery
      PubDate: 2022-04-28T12:31:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1098612X221090390
       
  • Randomised clinical trial evaluating the effect of a single preappointment
           dose of gabapentin on signs of stress in hyperthyroid cats

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      Authors: Matthew Gurney, Lou Gower
      Abstract: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectivesThe aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of gabapentin as an anxiolytic in hyperthyroid cats.MethodsCats (n = 47) with confirmed hyperthyroidism were successfully enrolled. The cat owner allocated a temperament score and a transport stress score at their first visit. For the second visit the cat owner (blinded to treatment) administered either liquid gabapentin 20 mg/kg (n = 22) or an indistinguishable placebo solution (n = 25) 1 h prior to leaving home. A second transport score was allocated by the cat owner at this visit. Upon admission a compliance score was independently assigned by two veterinary nurses blinded to treatment. Excess blood from routine blood draw was analysed for gabapentin plasma concentration from cats in the gabapentin group.ResultsThere were no significant differences in baseline transport score between groups (P = 0.13), but significant differences were noted in the second visit transport score between cats medicated with gabapentin compared with placebo (P = 0.018). Mean compliance scores were significantly different between cats in the treatment group compared with placebo (P = 0.019). Further sedation was required to complete the procedures in 24% of cats in the placebo group compared to 9% in the gabapentin group (P = 0.25). Mean plasma gabapentin concentrations were 10.1 mg/l (range 1.7–22.7) in the gabapentin group within a 1–3 h time frame post-administration.Conclusions and relevanceHyperthyroid cats medicated with 20 mg/kg gabapentin 1 h prior to leaving home were more relaxed during transport and more compliant with veterinary procedures than cats administered a placebo solution.
      Citation: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery
      PubDate: 2022-04-28T10:24:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1098612X221091736
       
  • Dietary 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 effects on vitamin D status, plasma
           metabolites and urine mineral excretion in adult cats

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      Authors: Janelle C Corugedo, Robert C Backus
      Abstract: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectivesThe study aimed to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of vitamin D supplementation with dietary 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 (25[OH]D3) in adult cats.MethodsThree levels of dietary 25(OH)D3 concentrations (4.9, 8.4, 11.8 µg/kg as fed) were received by five adult cats for 9 weeks, each in a randomized complete block design. Effects were determined on plasma or serum concentrations of 25(OH)D3, 24,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3, calcitriol, parathyroid hormone, ionized calcium, urinary excretions of phosphorus, calcium and magnesium, and clinical hematology and chemistry panels.ResultsThe lowest concentration of dietary 25(OH)D3 supported elevation of vitamin D status, with no adverse effects. Supplementation of 8.4 µg/kg 25(OH)D3 had significant effects on the urinary magnesium: creatinine ratio. Increasing supplementation up to 11.8 µg/kg 25(OH)D3 had significant effects on plasma concentrations of calcium and magnesium, and vitamin D metabolites.Conclusions and relevanceDietary supplementation with approximately 5.0 µg/kg of 25(OH)D3 or the ingested equivalence of 0.09 µg of 25(OH)D3 per metabolic body weight (kg0.67) is a safe, potent and effective means for raising vitamin D status in cats. A higher dose with approximately 11.8 µg/kg of 25(OH)D3 resulted in elevation in C-3 epimers of 25(OH)D3 and slight elevation in plasma magnesium and calcium concentrations above their respective reference intervals.
      Citation: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery
      PubDate: 2022-04-28T10:24:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1098612X221090713
       
  • Timolol 0.5% ophthalmic solution influences cardiac function in healthy
           cats

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      Authors: Giovana LR Tuleski, Maria Jose Garcia Ribeiro Pscheidt, Júlio Pereira dos Santos, Marlos Gonçalves Sousa
      Abstract: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectivesThe aim of this study was to ascertain the effect of a drop of timolol 0.5% ophthalmic solution on the systolic function of the left ventricle (LV) and left atrium (LA), and to confirm if timolol helped appraisal of diastolic function by reducing heart rate (HR) and separating the transmitral outflow waves from tissue Doppler imaging (TDI).MethodsA total of 41 client-owned healthy cats underwent two echocardiograms 20 mins apart. The timolol group (33 cats) received a drop of timolol solution after the first examination. Standard and speckle-tracking echocardiography evaluated the LV and LA function of both groups at the two time points evaluated.ResultsTimolol reduced HR (19%), and fractional shortening from LV (20.3%) and LA (16.6%). Septal S' decreased by 51% (from 7.7 to 5.2 cm/s) and lateral S’ dropped by 43.1% (7.3 to 5.1 cm/s). Most longitudinal techniques did not change after timolol, including the mitral annular plane systolic excursion from the interventricular annulus, tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion, LV longitudinal strain and LV tissue motion annular displacement. The isovolumic relaxation time increased by 15.2% (from 54 to 64.6 ms), with most cats presenting this variable above the reference (>60 ms). Timolol did not support diastolic assessment, enabling evaluation in only 2/11 cats when using lateral TDI and 1/9 cats using septal TDI. Regarding side effects, miosis occurred in 18 cats (54.5%).Conclusions and relevanceTimolol reduced systolic function, decreasing standard echocardiographic variables. Regarding diastolic evaluation, although timolol decreased HR, it did not separate the mitral diastolic waves, as expected.
      Citation: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery
      PubDate: 2022-04-26T09:18:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1098612X221083372
       
  • Closure-related complications after median sternotomy in cats: 26 cases
           (2010–2020)

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      Authors: Julie Hennet, Mariette A Pilot, Davina M Anderson, Matteo Rossanese, Angelos Chrysopoulos, Benito de la Puerta, Ronan A Mullins, Guillaume Chanoit
      Abstract: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectivesThe aim of this study was to determine closure-related complications and outcome after median sternotomy (MS) in cats.MethodsThis was a retrospective, multicentric study. The medical records of cats undergoing MS from six referral hospitals were reviewed (2010–2020). Data retrieved included signalment, history, presenting complaints, surgery, patient outcomes and complications. Follow-up was performed via patient records and email/telephone contact with both owners and referring veterinarians. Descriptive statistics were performed.ResultsData on 36 cats were collected; four were excluded due to insufficient follow-up and six died less than 5 days after surgery. Twenty-six cats survived to discharge (survival rate 81%). Three cats had a full sternotomy (FS) performed and 23 cats a partial sternotomy (PS). Of the cats that underwent a PS, six included the manubrium (PSM) and three included the xyphoid process. For 14 cats, the length of sternotomy was unknown. Sternotomy closure was performed with suture in all cats. Two cats (7.7%) developed closure-related complications, both after PSM, during the long-term follow-up, one mild, slightly displaced sternal fracture and one severe, sternal dehiscence (without skin wound dehiscence) requiring revision surgery. No seroma, surgical site infection or wound dehiscence occurred. The most common reason for MS was the presence of a thoracic mass (17/26; 65%), with thymoma being the most common (11/17; 65%).Conclusions and relevanceMS has a low closure-related complication risk in cats when compared with dogs. Complications in cats present differently to what has been previously described in dogs.
      Citation: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery
      PubDate: 2022-04-26T01:07:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1098612X221089701
       
  • Evaluation of potential thiamazole exposure of owners of orally treated
           hyperthyroid cats

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      Authors: Gaëlle Schils, Ellen De Paepe, Bruno Lapauw, Ellen Vanden Broecke, Laurens Van Mulders, Lynn Vanhaecke, Aurélie Lyssens, Lisa Stammeleer, Sylvie Daminet
      Abstract: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectivesThe objective of this study was to evaluate the presence of traces of thiamazole in the urine of owners of hyperthyroid cats treated with antithyroid drugs.MethodsUrine was collected from 24 owners of hyperthyroid cats, five human patients treated with thiamazole and five healthy humans without any contact with antithyroid drugs. All owners of hyperthyroid cats were asked to fill out a questionnaire. Urine of hyperthyroid cats was collected by spontaneous micturition. All urine samples were stored at −20°C until analysis by ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to high-resolution quadrupole Orbitrap mass spectrometry.ResultsThese owners were assessed to have a lot of contact with their cat. Adherence to antithyroid medication handling guidelines was rather poor. High concentrations of thiamazole were detected in all feline samples (median concentration 2818 ng/ml; range 104–15,127) and in the urine of all human patients treated with thiamazole (median concentration 4153 ng/ml; range 1826–5009). No thiamazole was detected in the urine of owners of hyperthyroid cats (limit of detection 3.88 ng/ml; limit of quantification 11.75 ng/ml).Conclusions and relevanceThe results regarding the potential exposure of owners of hyperthyroid cats to antithyroid drugs are reassuring. Nevertheless, prudence is still warranted when administering antithyroid drugs. Whether these results can be extrapolated to the use of transdermal application requires further investigation.
      Citation: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery
      PubDate: 2022-04-26T01:07:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1098612X221091738
       
  • Upper urolithiasis in cats with chronic kidney disease: prevalence and
           investigation of serum and urinary calcium concentrations

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      Authors: Huai-hsun Hsu, Shion Ueno, Hirosumi Miyakawa, Mizuki Ogawa, Yuichi Miyagawa, Naoyuki Takemura
      Abstract: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectivesThis study aimed to define the prevalence of upper urolithiasis in cats with chronic kidney disease (CKD) in a referral population, and to compare urinary calcium:creatinine ratio (UCa:Cr), and total and ionised calcium between cats with CKD with and without upper urolithiasis.MethodsThe medical records of cats diagnosed with CKD were reviewed for signalment, body weight, diet and prevalence of upper urolithiasis. Cats with preserved urine samples were further classified into two groups: urolithiasis group (upper urolithiasis identified by abdominal ultrasonography) and control group (CKD of unknown origin). Serum biochemical analysis, CKD stage, blood gas analysis, urine specific gravity and UCa:Cr were compared between groups using a two-sample t-test or Mann–Whitney U-test for continuous variable and a χ2 test or Fisher’s exact test for categorical variables. Multivariable binary logistic regression analysis was used to identify risk factors.ResultsAmong the 140 cats with CKD, the prevalence of upper urolithiasis was 73%. Fifty cats (5, 29 and 16 cats with CKD stages 1, 2 and 3, respectively) with urine samples met the inclusion criteria and were included in the analysis. Among cats with CKD, being purebred (odds ratio [OR] = 81.56; P = 0.03) and being fed dry food only (OR = 25.06; P = 0.001) were identified as independent upper urolithiasis risk factors; those with upper urolithiasis were more likely to be exclusively fed with urine-acidifying food (P
      Citation: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery
      PubDate: 2022-04-26T01:07:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1098612X221089856
       
  • Haematological and biochemical reference intervals in healthy Ragdoll cats

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      Authors: Riccardo Ferriani, Giulia Mangiagalli, Sara Meazzi, Marianna Pantoli, Federico Barbè, Camilla Pastore, Silvia Rossi
      Abstract: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectivesBreed-specific reference intervals (RIs) may be necessary to avoid misinterpretation of laboratory results. The main aim of this study was to establish haematobiochemical RIs for Ragdoll cats.MethodsForty-two clinically healthy adult (0.8–10 years old) Ragdoll cats (Ragdoll population [RP]) and 60 non-Ragdoll cats as the control population (CP) were prospectively enrolled. Results of haematology, biochemistry and total thyroxine (TT4) were used to determine both Ragdoll-specific and general feline population RIs for each variable using Reference Value Advisor software according to the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute guidelines and the American Society of Veterinary Clinical Pathology guidelines.ResultsFor each analyte, RIs of the RP were calculated and compared with those obtained from the CP. Haematocrit, haemoglobin, mean cell volume, mean cell haemoglobin concentration, reticulocyte absolute count, platelet count and lymphocyte absolute number were statistically different from the CP. Biochemistry RIs revealed a statistical difference in creatinine kinase (CK), total protein, urea, creatinine, glucose, total calcium and iron.Conclusions and relevanceHaematobiochemical RIs of the general feline population must be used with caution in Ragdoll cats when it comes to iron and glucose concentrations, CK activity and absolute lymphocyte number. For these parameters, the use of breed-specific RIs is suggested. The docile and more relaxed nature of this breed may explain these differences and further investigations are necessary to better understand the results. Furthermore, investigations are needed to evaluate the possible benefits of breed-specific urea RIs.
      Citation: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery
      PubDate: 2022-04-26T01:06:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1098612X221089695
       
  • Knowledge, attitudes and influencers of cat owners in North America around
           antimicrobials and antimicrobial stewardship

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      Authors: Madeleine R Stein, J Scott Weese, Jason W Stull, J Trenton McClure, Michelle Evason
      Abstract: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectivesThe primary aims of this study were to determine preferences of North American cat owners when they are prescribed an antimicrobial for their cat with regard to cost, method of administration and the importance of antibiotics for treating infections in people, and to establish baseline knowledge, attitudes and influencers of cat owners on antimicrobial resistance and stewardship.MethodsAn online questionnaire was used for data collection from two cat-owner groups: US cat owners and Canadian cat owners. Participants were queried on antimicrobial resistance and stewardship, and their preferences for their own cat when prescribed an antimicrobial, with respect to cost, method of drug administration and the importance of a drug for treating infections in people. Responses were evaluated through conjoint analysis and Likert-type questions. Data were analyzed using descriptive and analytic statistics.ResultsA total of 630 complete responses were included in the final analysis. Cost (37%) and method of administration (38%) were of similar participant preference when assessed using conjoint analysis. The importance of a drug for treating infections in people was lower priority (21%). The majority of cat owners preferred an antimicrobial that was ‘very important’ in treating human infections. A low proportion (21%) of participants responded that antimicrobial use in pets posed a risk to humans. Participants with a university education were more likely to respond that antimicrobial use in pets was a concern for people (31%; P
      Citation: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery
      PubDate: 2022-04-26T01:05:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1098612X221090456
       
  • Clinical use and complications of percutaneous cystostomy pigtail
           catheters in 25 cats

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      Authors: Genziana Nurra, Charlotte Howes, Guillaume Chanoit, Lee Meakin, Kevin Parsons, Ed Friend
      Abstract: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectivesThe aims of this study were to describe the indications for percutaneous pigtail catheter placement in cats requiring urine diversion, and to report the associated intra- and postoperative complications.MethodsThe medical records of cats that underwent percutaneous pigtail catheter placement for urine diversion between January 2011 and May 2021 were retrospectively reviewed.ResultsTwenty-five cats were included. Indications for pigtail catheter placement were medical management of obstructive urinary tract disease (n = 12), urinary tract damage after traumatic injury (n = 8) and neurological bladder dysfunction (n = 5). Catheters were in place for a median time of 8.28 days (range 3–27), and the duration of the catheter placement was not different between the medical, traumatic and neurological groups. Ten cats (40%) developed pigtail catheter complications including dislodgement, urine leakage, urinary tract infection and bladder rupture. The majority of complications were easily resolved and did not require surgical intervention.Conclusions and relevanceThe results suggest that percutaneous pigtail catheter placement can facilitate urine diversion in both the emergency setting and in the long-term management of urine retention without many complications.
      Citation: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery
      PubDate: 2022-04-01T12:34:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1098612X221080902
       
  • Topics in the routine assessment of newborn kitten vitality: Apgar score,
           reflexes and complementary assessments

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      Authors: Viviane Yukari Hibaru, Keylla Helena Nobre Pacífico Pereira, Kárita da Mata Fuchs, Maria Denise Lopes, Angélica Alfonso, Fabiana Ferreira de Souza, Simone Biagio Chiacchio, Miriam Harumi Tsunemi, Luiz Henrique de Araújo Machado, Maria Lucia Gomes Lourenço
      Abstract: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectivesThe aim of this study was to perform neonatal clinical assessments at birth to identify newborn kittens at risk according to type of delivery, thus allowing immediate intervention and increasing their chances of survival.MethodsThis study compared Apgar scores, reflexes and clinical parameters (temperature, weight, blood glucose and peripheral oxygen saturation [SpO2]) between eutocic neonates and those delivered by emergency cesarean section. The animals were evaluated at birth and after 10 and 60 mins.ResultsThirty-two neonates were evaluated, with 19 animals in the eutocic group (EG) and 13 animals in the cesarean group (CG). When comparing groups, CG neonates had significantly lower Apgar scores (P
      Citation: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery
      PubDate: 2022-03-30T12:50:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1098612X221081404
       
  • Online survey of owners’ experiences of medicating their cats at
           home

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      Authors: Samantha Taylor, Sarah Caney, Claire Bessant, Danièlle Gunn-Moore
      Abstract: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectivesThe aim of this study was to use an online survey to obtain information from cat owners about their experiences of medicating their cats.MethodsAn online survey containing 35 questions on experiences of medicating cats was circulated to cat owners globally.ResultsIn total, 2507 surveys from 57 countries were analysed; 1724 from ‘cat owners’ and 783 from ‘cat owners+’ (respondents with significant cat experience, including veterinary professionals). Around half (50.7%) of cat owners were ‘sometimes’ or ‘never’ provided with information or advice on how to administer medication; however, 91.8% of those given information found it ‘somewhat’ or ‘very’ useful. Around half (53.6%) of owners sought information from the internet about how to administer medication. Total cat owners (cat owners and cat owners+) administered liquids (61.3%), pastes (45.3%) or tablets (39.5%) directly into their cat’s mouth; fewer (22.6–24.1%) hid these medications in food. Total cat owners rated tablets significantly harder to administer than liquids; 53.0% chose liquids as their first-choice formulation while 29.3% chose tablets. Insulin injections and ‘spot-ons’ were significantly easier to administer than any oral medications. Over half (51.6%) of owners reported that medicating their cat(s) had changed their relationship with them; 77.0% reported that their cat(s) had tried to bite or scratch them when medicating. Other challenges included the cat(s) spitting out tablets (78.7%), refusing medication in food (71.7%) and running away (52.7%). Of the owners who failed to complete a course of medication (35.4%), 27.8% stopped near the end of the course, while 19.3% stopped after a few doses, in both cases as medicating was too difficult.Conclusions and relevanceOwners appreciate being provided with information about the administration of medication. Frequent challenges when medicating cats include potential human injury and damage to the owner–cat relationship. Pharmaceutical companies should provide a range of formulations to ease compliance. Veterinary clinics should provide information/demonstrations and internet links when prescribing medications.
      Citation: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery
      PubDate: 2022-03-28T12:53:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1098612X221083752
       
  • Influence of exposure to microbial ligands, immunosuppressive drugs and
           chronic kidney disease on endogenous immunomodulatory gene expression in
           feline adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells

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      Authors: Danielle G Creamer, Chad W Schmiedt, Anna Claire Bullington, Courtney M Caster, Jennifer M Schmiedt, David J Hurley, Roy D Berghaus
      Abstract: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectivesFeline autologous mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) show promise for immunomodulatory activity, but the functional impact of chronic kidney disease (CKD), concurrent immunosuppressive drug administration or infection is unknown. The study objectives compare endogenous cytokine gene expression (interleukin [IL]-6, IL-10, IL-12p40, IL-18 and transforming growth factor beta [TGF-β]) in adipose-derived MSCs (aMSCs) from cats with and without CKD, following in vitro exposure to microbial ligands and treatment with common immunosuppressive drugs.MethodsPreviously obtained aMSCs, phenotype CD44+, CD90+, CD105+ and MHCII–, from cats with (n = 6) and without (n = 6) CKD were compared via real-time PCR (RT-PCR) for immunomodulatory gene expression. aMSCs were exposed in vitro to lipopolysaccharide (LPS), peptidoglycan or polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid (Poly I:C), simulating bacterial or viral exposure, respectively. aMSCs were also exposed to ciclosporin, dexamethasone or methotrexate. Gene expression was measured using RT-PCR, and Cq was utilized after each run to calculate the delta cycle threshold.ResultsaMSCs isolated from healthy and CKD cats showed no significant differences in gene expression in the five measured cytokines. No significant changes in measured gene expression after drug treatment or microbial ligand stimulation were observed between normal or CKD affected cats. Proinflammatory genes (IL-6, IL-12p40 and IL-18) showed altered expression in aMSCs from both groups when compared with the same cells in standard culture after exposure to methotrexate. Poly I:C altered IL-6 and TGF-β gene expression in aMSCs from both healthy and CKD cats when compared with the same cells in standard culture.Conclusions and relevanceThe five genes tested showed no statistical differences between aMSCs from healthy or CKD cats. There was altered cytokine gene expression between the control and treatment groups of both healthy and CKD cats suggesting feline aMSCs have altered function with immunosuppressive treatment or microbial ligand exposure. Although the current clinical relevance of this pilot study comparing brief exposure to select agents in vitro in aMSCs from a small number of cats is unknown, the study highlights a need for continued investigation into the effects of disease and concurrent therapies on use of cell-based therapies in feline patients.
      Citation: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery
      PubDate: 2022-03-18T12:57:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1098612X221083074
       
  • Prospective evaluation of the Animal Trauma Triage Score and Modified
           Glasgow Coma Scale in 25 cats with high-rise syndrome

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      Authors: Ana Miriam Girol-Piner, Matías Moreno-Torres, Vicente J Herrería-Bustillo
      Abstract: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectivesThe purpose of this study was to prospectively evaluate the prognostic utility of the Animal Trauma Triage Score (ATTS) and Modified Glasgow Coma Scale (MGCS) in cats with high-rise syndrome.MethodsATTS and MGCS were obtained upon arrival from 25 client-owned cats presented for high-rise syndrome. Cases were followed during hospitalisation and several variables, including outcome, were recorded.ResultsThe mortality rate in this cohort of cats with high-rise syndrome was 16%. Univariate statistical analysis showed that lactate (P = 0.022), creatinine (P = 0.01), body weight (P = 0.036) and ATTS (P = 0.02) were higher and MGCS (P = 0.011) lower among non-survivors. Multivariable statistical analysis showed that ATTS was the only factor significantly associated with mortality (odds ratio 2.41, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.02–5.71; P = 0.046). A receiver operating characteristics curve showed that ATTS was an excellent predictor of mortality (area under the curve 0.917, 95% CI 0.8–1.0; P = 0.009). An ATTS cut-off of 6.0 had a 75% sensitivity and 90% specificity for non-survival and a cut-off of 10 had a 25% sensitivity and 100% specificity for non-survival.Conclusions and relevanceATTS is predictive of severity and outcome in cats with high-rise syndrome and can help facilitate decision-making by owners and veterinarians.
      Citation: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery
      PubDate: 2022-03-16T03:30:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1098612X221080903
       
  • Dysbiosis index to evaluate the fecal microbiota in healthy cats and cats
           with chronic enteropathies

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      Authors: Chi-Hsuan Sung, Sina Marsilio, Betty Chow, Kailee A Zornow, Jennifer E Slovak, Rachel Pilla, Jonathan A Lidbury, Jörg M Steiner, So Young Park, Min-Pyo Hong, Steve L Hill, Jan S Suchodolski
      Abstract: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectivesPrevious studies have identified various bacterial taxa that are altered in cats with chronic enteropathies (CE) vs healthy cats. Therefore, the aim of this study was to develop a targeted quantitative molecular method to evaluate the fecal microbiota of cats.MethodsFecal samples from 80 client-owned healthy cats and 68 cats with CE were retrospectively evaluated. A panel of quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays was used to measure the fecal abundance of total bacteria and seven bacterial taxa: Bacteroides, Bifidobacterium, Clostridium hiranonis, Escherichia coli, Faecalibacterium, Streptococcus and Turicibacter. The nearest centroid classifier algorithm was used to calculate a dysbiosis index (DI) based on these qPCR abundances.ResultsThe abundances of total bacteria, Bacteroides, Bifidobacterium, C hiranonis, Faecalibacterium and Turicibacter were significantly decreased, while those of E coli and Streptococcus were significantly increased in cats with CE (P
      Citation: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery
      PubDate: 2022-03-10T03:51:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1098612X221077876
       
  • Epidemiology and clinical presentation of feline presumed hereditary or
           breed-related ocular diseases in France: retrospective study of 129 cats

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      Authors: Matthieu MP Bott, Sabine Chahory
      Abstract: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectivesThis study aimed to describe the epidemiology and clinical presentation of presumed hereditary or presumed breed-related ocular diseases in a population of cats in France.MethodsMedical records from between September 2013 and August 2017 were reviewed to identify cats with at least one presumed hereditary or breed-related ocular disease. Cats with concurrent, or a history of, ocular or systemic infectious diseases were excluded. Signalment, history and clinical findings were recorded.ResultsOf the 1161 cats that presented to our institution during the study period, 129 were diagnosed with at least one presumed hereditary or presumed breed-related ocular disease (11.1%, 95% confidence interval [CI] 9.3–12.9). Five ocular abnormalities had a prevalence of>1%: entropion, corneal sequestration, persistent pupillary membrane, cataract and retinal dysplasia. The prevalence of entropion was 2.2% (95% CI 1.3–3.0), with Persians (P = 0.03), Maine Coons (P
      Citation: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery
      PubDate: 2022-03-08T01:27:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1098612X221080598
       
  • Ultrasound appearance of the duodenal papilla in clinically healthy cats

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      Authors: Charlotte Coeuriot, Julie Pontarrasse, Nora Bouhsina, Maureen Lazard, Alexis Bertrand, Marion Fusellier
      Abstract: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectivesThe duodenal papilla (DP) is an anatomical structure located in the duodenal wall, a few centimetres from the pylorus. In cats, the pancreatic and bile ducts merge as they enter the DP, and this explains why cats are more likely than dogs to have concomitant digestive, pancreatic and hepatic infections. Ultrasonography of the DP has been previously established in dogs but not in cats. The purpose of our prospective study was to describe the ultrasound features of the DP in 30 adult clinically healthy cats.MethodsA full abdominal ultrasound was performed. Five measurements were recorded: the width and the height in a transverse section; the length and the height in a longitudinal section; and the thickness of the duodenal wall adoral to the DP in a longitudinal section. The subjective appearance (echogenicity and shape) of the DP was described.ResultsThe dimensions of the DP were a mean ± SD width of 3.13 ± 0.68 mm and height of 2.47 ± 0.63 mm in the transverse section, and length of 3.98 ± 1.27 mm and height of 2.44 ± 0.57 mm in the longitudinal section. The DP was homogeneous, subjectively isoechoic to fat and had a round and oval shape in the transverse and longitudinal sections, respectively. There was no correlation between the DP measurements and the weight, age or sex of the cats. The animals that were fed a mixed diet had a longer DP than those fed dry food.Conclusions and relevanceThis study provides reference values for the dimensions of the DP, as well as information on its ultrasonographic appearance in clinically healthy adult cats. We did not find any correlation between the age of the cats and the size of the papilla, but the age range was small and another study in older cats should be undertaken to address this more thoroughly.
      Citation: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery
      PubDate: 2022-03-07T02:18:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1098612X221078783
       
  • Analysis of feline humeral fracture morphology and a comparison of
           fracture repair stabilisation methods: 101 cases (2009–2020)

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      Authors: Nick Gall, Kevin Parsons, Heidi Radke, Eithne Comerford, Ben Mielke, James Grierson, John Ryan, Elena Addison, Vasileia Logethelou, Agnieszka Blaszyk, Sorrel J Langley-Hobbs
      Abstract: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectivesThe aims of this study were to describe the type, presentation and prognostic factors of feline humeral fractures over a 10-year period and to compare three stabilisation systems for feline humeral diaphyseal fractures.MethodsIn total, 101 cats with humeral fractures presenting to seven UK referral centres between 2009 and 2020 were reviewed. Data collected included signalment, weight at the time of surgery, fracture aetiology, preoperative presentation, fixation method, surgical details, perioperative management and follow-up examinations. Of these cases, 57 cats with humeral diaphyseal fractures stabilised using three different fixation methods were compared, with outcome parameters including the time to radiographic healing, time to function and complication rate.ResultsThe majority of the fractures were diaphyseal (71%), with only 10% condylar. Of the known causes of fracture, road traffic accidents (RTAs) were the most common. Neutered males were over-represented in having a fracture caused by an RTA (P = 0.001) and diaphyseal fractures were significantly more likely to result from an RTA (P = 0.01). Body weight had a positive correlation (r = 0.398) with time to radiographic healing and time to acceptable function (r = 0.315), and was significant (P = 0.014 and P = 0.037, respectively). Of the 57 humeral diaphyseal fractures; 16 (28%) were stabilised using a plate–rod construct, 31 (54%) using external skeletal fixation and 10 (18%) using bone plating and screws only. Open diaphyseal fractures were associated with more minor complications (P = 0.048). There was a significant difference between fixation groups in terms of overall complication rate between groups (P = 0.012). There was no significant difference between fixation groups in time to radiographic union (P = 0.145) or time to acceptable function (P = 0.306).Conclusions and relevanceAll three fixation systems were successful in healing a wide variety of humeral diaphyseal fractures. There was a significantly higher overall complication rate with external skeletal fixators compared with bone plating; however, the clinical impact of these is likely low.
      Citation: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery
      PubDate: 2022-03-07T02:18:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1098612X221080600
       
  • Serum concentrations of gabapentin in cats with chronic kidney disease

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      Authors: Jessica M Quimby, Sarah K Lorbach, Ashlie Saffire, Amanda Kennedy, Luke A Wittenburg, Turi K Aarnes, Karina J Creighton, Sarah E Jones, Rene E Paschall, Emily M King, Clara E Bruner, Jessica N Wallinger, Karen A van Haaften
      Abstract: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectivesThe purpose of this study was to assess serum concentrations of gabapentin in cats with chronic kidney disease (CKD) vs clinically healthy cats.MethodsFive healthy cats were enrolled in a pharmacokinetic study. A single 20 mg/kg dose of gabapentin was administered orally and blood was obtained at 0, 0.25, 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2, 3, 4, 8, 12, 24 and 36 h via a jugular catheter. Serum gabapentin concentrations were measured using liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry. Non-compartmental pharmacokinetic analysis was performed. The same five healthy cats plus 25 cats with stable International Renal Interest Society stage 2 (n = 14) and 3 (n = 11) CKD were enrolled in a limited sampling study. Cats in both groups received a single 10 mg/kg dose of gabapentin, and serum gabapentin concentrations and compliance scores were obtained 3 and 8 h post-administration.ResultsCats with CKD had significantly higher dose-normalized serum gabapentin concentrations than normal cats at 3 h (P = 0.0012 CKD vs normal 10 mg/kg; P = 0.008 CKD vs normal 20 mg/kg) and 8 h (P
      Citation: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery
      PubDate: 2022-02-23T03:11:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1098612X221077017
       
  • Comparison of ultrasonographic echogenicity and outcome in cats with
           suspected pancreatitis

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      Authors: Kristina A Lederer, Katharina M Hittmair, Alexander Tichy, Florian K Zeugswetter
      Abstract: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectivesThe aim of this study was to determine whether ultrasonographic pancreatic echogenicity, especially hypoechogenicity, has an impact on the prognosis of cats with suspected pancreatitis. We hypothesised that cats with a hypoechoic pancreas have a longer duration of hospitalisation, higher treatment costs and a higher mortality rate.MethodsThis was a retrospective study, which included cats with clinical signs of pancreatitis, a SNAP fPL test result above the reference interval and ultrasonographic abnormalities consistent with pancreatitis. Medical records and follow-up information were retrieved from the local electronic database. Cases were assigned to one of three groups based on pancreatic echogenicity: hypoechoic, hyperechoic or mixed echogenicity. Statistical analysis aimed to assess differences in outcome, ultrasonographic abnormalities, historical features, physical examination findings, laboratory results, concurrent diseases or treatment costs.ResultsThirty-six (64%) cats with a hypoechoic, seven (13%) with a hyperechoic and 13 (23%) cats with a mixed echoic pancreas were included. Cats with a hypoechoic pancreas had a significantly lower median body weight (P = 0.010) and lower median body condition score (P = 0.004) compared with the other cats. Furthermore, they were presented as being lethargic significantly more often (P = 0.014), were more likely to have a homogeneously enlarged pancreas (P
      Citation: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery
      PubDate: 2022-02-15T10:44:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1098612X221074921
       
  • Beneficial effects of a prescription home-prepared diet and of zucchini on
           urine calcium oxalate supersaturation and urinary parameters in adult cats
           

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      Authors: Géraldine Blanchard, Concetta Amato, Agnès André, Philippe Bleis, Samuel Ninet, Jürgen Zentek, Patrick Nguyen
      Abstract: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectivesFrom the authors’ experience, the consumption of a balanced prescription home-prepared diet that includes zucchini (courgette) benefits cats with recurrent urolithiasis, but there is no published evidence to support this. The aim was to study the effects on urinary parameters of (1) a balanced prescription home-prepared diet containing zucchini, and (2) the addition of zucchini to a dry food, compared with two commercial therapeutic diets.MethodsEight healthy cats were included in a Latin-square designed protocol. Five diets were evaluated: two commercial diets, designed for cats with urinary disorders, one high-moisture (U-WET) and one high-sodium dry (U-DRY); one home-prepared diet (HOME); one commercial dry food for adult maintenance (DRY); and DRY given together with 10 g of zucchini per kg body weight (DRY-Zuc). After a 7-day adaptation period, urine was collected and daily food and water intakes were assessed for 12 days. Urinary parameters, and relative supersaturation (RSS) for calcium oxalate (CaOx) and struvite, were determined. Data underwent repeated measures ANOVA analysis.ResultsThe digestibility of energy, dry matter, protein and fat was highest with the HOME diet. CaOx RSS was lowest in cats eating the HOME diet, but not significantly different from the U-WET or U-DRY diets. CaOx RSS was lower in cats eating the DRY-Zuc diet than in cats eating the DRY diet. Struvite RSS did not differ significantly among groups.Conclusions and relevanceThis study shows that a balanced prescription home-prepared diet was safe and allowed a very low urinary CaOx RSS. It also showed that adding zucchini to dry food lowered the urine CaOx RSS.
      Citation: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery
      PubDate: 2022-02-10T03:13:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1098612X211067931
       
  • Association between serum fibroblast growth factor-23 concentrations and
           blood calcium levels in chronic kidney disease cats with upper
           urolithiasis

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      Authors: Hirosumi Miyakawa, Huai-Hsun Hsu, Mizuki Ogawa, Ryota Akabane, Yuichi Miyagawa, Naoyuki Takemura
      Abstract: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectivesThis study investigated whether serum fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-23 concentrations are associated with serum total calcium (tCa) and blood ionised calcium (iCa) concentrations in cats with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and upper urolithiasis.MethodsSerum samples and the medical records of cats with CKD with nephroliths, ureteroliths or both were investigated retrospectively. Cats with a serum creatinine concentration >250 μmol/l and/or a serum phosphorus concentration ⩾1.50 mmol/l were excluded. Based on cut-offs for serum tCa (2.70 mmol/l) or blood iCa (1.40 mmol/l), cats were divided into the following groups: total hypercalcaemia (H-tCa) (>2.70 mmol/l) and total normocalcaemia (N-tCa) (⩽2.70 mmol/l) groups, or ionised hypercalcaemia (H-iCa) (>1.40 mmol/l) and ionised normocalcaemia (N-iCa) (⩽1.40 mmol/l) groups, respectively. Serum FGF-23 concentrations were compared between groups and correlation analysis was performed.ResultsThirty-two cats with CKD and upper urolithiasis were included. Serum FGF-23 concentrations in the H-tCa group (median 573 pg/ml [range 125–3888]; n = 12) were significantly higher compared with the N-tCa group (median 245 pg/ml [range 94–627]; n = 20) (P = 0.001). Serum FGF-23 concentrations in the H-iCa group (median 1479 pg/ml [range 509–3888]; n = 6) increased significantly compared with the N-iCa group (median 245 pg/ml [range 94–637]; n = 26) (P
      Citation: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery
      PubDate: 2022-02-08T02:38:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1098612X221075278
       
  • Cabergoline treatment in cats with diabetes mellitus and
           hypersomatotropism

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      Authors: Diego D Miceli, Jorge D García, Gustavo A Pompili, Juan P Rey Amunategui, Sergio Ferraris, Omar P Pignataro, Mirtha Guitelman
      Abstract: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectivesThe aim of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of cabergoline to control hypersomatotropism (HST) and diabetes mellitus (DM) in cats.MethodsThis was a prospective cohort study. Twenty-three cats with HST and concurrent DM were enrolled. Cats received a dose of 10 μg/kg cabergoline q48h PO for 6 months. Serum insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) and fructosamine concentrations, insulin dose and Insulin Resistance Index (IRI) were measured at the time of diagnosis of HST and at the start of cabergoline treatment (t0), and 3 months (t1) and 6 months (t2) during cabergoline treatment.ResultsA decrease and normalization of serum IGF-1 concentration was observed in 35% and 26% of cats, respectively. Median IGF-1 (t0: 1350 ng/ml [range 832–1501]; t1: 1284 ng/ml [range 365–1501]; t2: 1240 ng/ml [range 263–1501]; P = 0.016) decreased significantly. Twelve cats underwent diagnostic imaging of the pituitary area. The median pituitary height at t0 of cats that experienced an IGF-1 reduction (n = 5/12) was significantly lower compared with those that did not experience an IGF-1 reduction (n = 7/12) (3.2 mm [range 3.1–3.7] vs 6 mm [range 3.5–9.5]; P = 0.011). Median fructosamine (t0: 628 µmol/l [range 400–963]; t1: 404 µmol/l [range 249–780]; t2: 400 µmol/l [range 260–815]; P
      Citation: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery
      PubDate: 2022-02-08T02:38:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1098612X221074924
       
  • Fecal shedding of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing
           Enterobacterales in cats admitted to an animal shelter

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      Authors: J Scott Weese, Tyler O’Brien, Shane Bateman
      Abstract: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectivesThe objective of this study was to evaluate shedding of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing bacteria in cats admitted to an animal shelter.MethodsFecal samples were collected from cats admitted to an animal shelter between 12 June and 23 August 2018. Selective enrichment culture for ESBL-producing bacteria was performed and isolates were speciated and tested for selected ESBL genes using PCR.ResultsESBL-producing Enterobacterales were identified in fecal samples from 2/87 (2.3%; 95% confidence interval 0.6–8.0) cats. One isolate was an Escherichia coli that possessed blaCTX-M-1, blaCMY-2 and blaTEM genes. The other was Enterobacter cloacae possessing blaCTX-M-1 and blaCMY-2.Conclusions and relevanceWhile the study sample size and prevalence rate for ESBL-producing bacteria were low, these data document that cats admitted to similar shelters could harbor these agents. The risk posed by ESBL-producing bacterium shedding in cats, both to cats and other species, is currently unclear. However, these findings support the need for more investigation of interspecies transmission of ESBL-producing bacteria and ESBL genes, as well as the importance of antimicrobial stewardship and routine infection control measures.
      Citation: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery
      PubDate: 2022-02-08T02:38:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1098612X221075602
       
  • Use of a cyclical hypofractionated radiotherapy regime (‘QUAD shot’)
           for the treatment of feline sinonasal carcinomas

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      Authors: Petros S Frezoulis, Aaron Harper, Sarah L Mason
      Abstract: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectivesRadiation therapy is the treatment of choice for cats with sinonasal carcinomas. Different protocols have been described in the literature, though a clear consensus regarding the optimal protocol is lacking. The aim of the study was to describe the tolerability, efficacy and outcome of cats treated with a cyclical hypofractionated protocol.MethodsCats with histologically diagnosed sinonasal carcinomas in a single institution were retrospectively included. All patients were treated with a cyclical hypofractionated protocol (‘QUAD shot’ regime). Cats were treated with 4 Gray (Gy) delivered in four fractions within 48 h, with a minimum of 6 h between two treatments, and repeated every 3–4 weeks for a total dose of 48 Gy in three cycles.ResultsSeven cats met the inclusion criteria. Nasal discharge and sneezing were the most common presenting complaints. All cats presented with advanced stage of disease with CT examination (three with modified Adams stage 3 and four with stage 4). Clinical improvement was seen in six cats. Five cats had a follow-up CT; one had a complete response, two had partial responses, one had stable disease and one had progressive disease. Two cats were still alive at the time of writing while four were euthanased owing to tumour-related causes. The median overall survival time was 460 days. The 1-year survival time was 80% and the 2-year survival time was 0%. Severe acute or late toxicity was not reported.Conclusions and relevanceThis is the first report of a cyclical hypofractionated protocol in the veterinary literature that can provide prolonged survival in cats with advanced stage sinonasal carcinoma. Its use should be considered in patients when prolonged hospitalisation can be detrimental to quality of life, while still delivering a therapeutic total dose of radiation therapy.
      Citation: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery
      PubDate: 2022-02-07T09:54:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1098612X211070737
       
  • Online survey to determine client perceptions of feline chronic lower
           airway disease management: response to therapy, side effects and
           challenges encountered

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      Authors: Mathieu V Paulin, Sarah MA Caney, Kevin L Cosford
      Abstract: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectivesThe first aim of this survey was to report client experiences associated with the administration of common medications, particularly glucocorticoids and bronchodilators, in managing cats with feline lower airway disease (FLAD). The second aim was to ascertain client perception of response to treatment and level of satisfaction.MethodsThis was a prospective cross-sectional study. An online survey was distributed worldwide to cat owners caring for cats with a chronic cough. Only cats reported to have FLAD were included.ResultsA total of 153 complete responses describing cats with FLAD were analyzed. Glucocorticoids and bronchodilators were the predominantly prescribed therapeutics for 140/153 (92%) and 80/153 (52%) of FLAD cats, respectively. Oral and inhalant administration routes were reported most commonly: glucocorticoids (64% oral and 75% inhalant) and bronchodilators (21% oral and 88% inhalant). A review of how air quality could be improved was conducted for 54% of cats. Almost half (43%) of owners reported adverse effects secondary to glucocorticoid administration, the most frequent being polyphagia (26%) and polydipsia (21%). Only 10% of owners reported bronchodilator-associated side effects, with restlessness (9%) being the most common. Difficulties giving glucocorticoid or bronchodilator tablets orally were reported for 33% and 71% of owners, respectively. Glucocorticoid or bronchodilator inhalant therapies were difficult to administer for 28% and 31% of owners, respectively. Frequency and severity of coughing were significantly lower after at least 2 months of treatment, with median numerical input on a slider scale (0–100) of 48 and 42 before, and 10 and 7 after treatment, respectively (P
      Citation: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery
      PubDate: 2022-02-07T09:54:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1098612X211070988
       
  • Cross-sectional survey of non-invasive indirect blood pressure measurement
           practices in cats by veterinarians

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      Authors: Iliana Navarro, Stacie Summers, Mark Rishniw, Jessica Quimby
      Abstract: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectivesThis survey of small animal veterinarians endeavored to: (1) determine current methods of indirect blood pressure measurement; (2) detail techniques used to reduce situational hypertension; and (3) better understand the obstacles to performing blood pressure measurement in cats.MethodsAn online survey was produced and circulated to members of the Veterinary Information Network. A total of 733 veterinarians who saw cats in their practice and had access to at least one indirect blood pressure device completed the entirety of the survey.ResultsNinety-six percent (703/733) of veterinarians who completed the survey reported measuring indirect blood pressure in cats in their practice, with veterinary technicians conducting most (600/703; 85.3%) of these measurements. Few veterinarians (30/733; 4.1%) did not measure blood pressure, with these veterinarians citing several obstacles including: difficulty interpreting results with the occurrence of fear, anxiety and stress in cats (20/30; 66.7%); difficulty performing measurements in cats (17/30; 56.7%); and technical staff being uncomfortable performing measurements (12/30; 40.0%). Most veterinarians (300/435; 69.0%) in this survey preferred an ultrasonic Doppler flow detector with sphygmomanometry, with many (272/300; 90.7%) perceiving that the results obtained with this device were more trustworthy compared with results obtained with oscillometry. Ninety percent (633/703) of veterinarians employed techniques to reduce situational hypertension in cats. Techniques perceived to be most helpful among veterinarians included: using a quiet location (454/633; 71.7%); minimizing restraint (316/633; 49.9%); performing blood pressure prior to other procedures (eg, phlebotomy, cystocentesis) (302/633; 47.7%); avoiding other animals (219/633; 34.6%); and allowing time for acclimation (167/633; 26.4%).Conclusions and relevanceThis survey study of veterinarians helps clarify obstacles to routine blood pressure measurement in conscious cats. Veterinarians reported several strategies that they felt reduced situational hypertension in cats. The data inform modifications of techniques to increase the frequency and perceived reliability of blood pressure measurement in at-risk cats.
      Citation: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery
      PubDate: 2022-02-03T09:36:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1098612X211067015
       
  • CT characterisation and classification of feline temporomandibular joint
           trauma: a case series of 79 cats

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      Authors: Lisa A Mestrinho, Sónia SF Sebastião, Maciej A Zwierucho, Aaron Lutchman, Lorrie Gaschen, Stephanie Goldschmidt, Graham Thatcher, Yu Izumisawa, Richard L Meeson
      Abstract: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectivesThe aim of this study was to characterise and describe patterns of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) injuries occurring in cats using CT.MethodsA cross-sectional study was carried out in adherence with the STROBE guidelines. Among the medical and CT records of 79 cats, 158 TMJs were reviewed in a collaborative study between six institutions.ResultsTMJ injuries were most commonly unilateral, representing 70.9% of cases. The mandibular condyle was fractured in 88 cases (55.7%) of the 158 TMJs observed. Of those, 84.0% were intra-articular condyle fractures, with the medial half of the mandibular condyle over-represented. Luxations occurred in 32.9% of cases, which was 19.0% of all evaluated TMJs. Rostrodorsal luxations were most common representing 87.0% of all luxations. Temporal bone fractures were observed in 30.4% of all cases, which was 18.4% of TMJs. The majority of fractures were of an unknown cause. When the cause was determined, road traffic accident (RTA) was the most frequent, followed by animal interaction, other external forces (sharp or blunt force) and high-rise trauma. Bilateral injuries were 13.1 times more likely to occur in high-rise trauma (P = 0.01) and temporal bone fracture was significantly associated with RTAs (P = 0.016). No other significant associations were observed between cause of injury and the resulting TMJ injury pattern.Conclusions and relevanceVarious TMJ injury patterns can occur in cats as a result of trauma. Intra-articular fractures of the medial half of the mandibular condyle occur most commonly. Although unilateral injuries are more frequent, high-rise trauma tends to present with bilateral lesions. Further studies with a larger sample size should be performed to better understand TMJ patterns of injury and how they relate to possible causes.
      Citation: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery
      PubDate: 2022-01-31T10:56:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1098612X211066654
       
 
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