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  Subjects -> VETERINARY SCIENCE (Total: 225 journals)
Showing 1 - 63 of 63 Journals sorted alphabetically
Abanico Veterinario     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Acta Veterinaria     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Acta Veterinaria Hungarica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Acta Veterinaria Scandinavica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Advanced Research in Life Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Small Animal Care     Full-text available via subscription  
African Journal of Wildlife Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Agrivet : Jurnal Ilmu-Ilmu Pertanian dan Peternakan / Journal of Agricultural Sciences and Veteriner)     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
AL-Qadisiyah Journal of Veterinary Medicine Sciences     Open Access  
American Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
American Journal of Primatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Analecta Veterinaria     Open Access  
Anatomia, Histologia, Embryologia: Journal of Veterinary Medicine Series C     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Animal - Science Proceedings     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Animal Behaviour     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 178)
Animal Feed Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Animal Health Research Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Animal Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 21)
Animal Reproduction Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Animals     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Annual Review of Animal Biosciences     Full-text available via subscription  
Anthrozoos : A Multidisciplinary Journal of The Interactions of People & Animals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Applied Animal Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Archiva Zootehnica     Open Access  
Archives of Animal Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Archivos de Medicina Veterinaria     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Arquivo Brasileiro de Medicina Veterinária e Zootecnia     Open Access  
Asian Journal of Medical and Biological Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Asian Journal of Poultry Science     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Atatürk Üniversitesi Veteriner Bilimleri Dergisi / Atatürk University Journal of Veterinary Sciences     Open Access  
Austral Journal of Veterinary Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Australian Equine Veterinarian     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Veterinary Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Avances en Ciencias Veterinarias     Open Access  
Avian Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Bangladesh Journal of Animal Science     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Bangladesh Journal of Veterinary Medicine     Open Access  
Bangladesh Veterinarian     Open Access  
BMC Veterinary Research     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Brazilian Journal of Veterinary Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Buletin Peternakan : Bulletin of Animal Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Buletin Veteriner Udayana     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Bulletin of Animal Health and Production in Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Bulletin of University of Agricultural Sciences and Veterinary Medicine Cluj-Napoca : Food Science and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Canadian Journal of Veterinary Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Case Reports in Veterinary Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
CES Medicina Veterinaria y Zootecnia     Open Access  
Chilean Journal of Agricultural & Animal Sciences     Open Access  
Ciencia Veterinaria     Open Access  
Cogent Food & Agriculture     Open Access  
Companion Animal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Compendio de Ciencias Veterinarias     Open Access  
Domestic Animal Endocrinology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Equine Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Equine Veterinary Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Equine Veterinary Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Ethiopian Veterinary Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
EUREKA : Health Sciences     Open Access  
FAVE Sección Ciencias Veterinarias     Open Access  
Folia Veterinaria     Open Access  
Frontiers in Veterinary Science     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Global Journal of Animal Scientific Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Human & Veterinary Medicine - International Journal of the Bioflux Society     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
ILAR Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Indian Journal of Animal Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian Journal of Veterinary Anatomy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Indonesia Medicus Veterinus     Open Access  
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intas Polivet     Full-text available via subscription  
International Journal of Tropical Veterinary and Biomedical Research     Open Access  
International Journal of Veterinary Science and Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Veterinary Science and Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
InVet     Open Access  
Iranian Journal of Applied Animal Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Iranian Journal of Veterinary Surgery     Open Access  
Iraqi Journal of Veterinary Sciences     Open Access  
Irish Veterinary Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Veterinary Science & Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Advanced Veterinary Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Buffalo Science     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Equine Veterinary Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Exotic Pet Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Feline Medicine & Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery Open Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Parasite Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Research in Forestry, Wildlife and Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Small Animal Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Journal of the Hellenic Veterinary Medical Society     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of the Selva Andina Research Society     Open Access  
Journal of the South African Veterinary Association     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Veterinary and Animal Sciences     Open Access  
Journal of Veterinary Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Veterinary Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Veterinary Dentistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Veterinary Diagnostic Investigation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Journal of Veterinary Forensic Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 29)
Journal of Veterinary Medical Education     Partially Free   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Veterinary Medical Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Veterinary Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Veterinary Pharmacology and Therapeutics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Veterinary Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Veterinary Science & Medical Diagnosis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Veterinary Science & Medicine     Open Access  
Jurnal Agripet     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Jurnal Ilmu dan Kesehatan Hewan (Veterinary Science and Medicine Journal)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Jurnal Medik Veteriner     Open Access  
Jurnal Medika Veterinaria     Open Access  
Jurnal Sain Veteriner     Open Access  
Jurnal Veteriner     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Kenya Veterinarian     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
kleintier konkret     Hybrid Journal  
Livestock     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Macedonian Veterinary Review     Open Access  
Matrix Science Medica     Open Access  
Medical Mycology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Medical Mycology Case Reports     Open Access  
Medicina Veterinária (UFRPE)     Open Access  
Nepalese Veterinary Journal     Open Access  
New Zealand Veterinary Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
New Zealand Veterinary Nurse     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Nigerian Veterinary Journal     Open Access  
Nutrición Animal Tropical     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Onderstepoort Journal of Veterinary Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Open Journal of Animal Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Open Journal of Veterinary Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Pet Behaviour Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
pferde spiegel     Hybrid Journal  
Polish Journal of Veterinary Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Preventive Veterinary Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Rassegna di Diritto, Legislazione e Medicina Legale Veterinaria     Open Access  
Reproduction in Domestic Animals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Research & Reviews : Journal of Veterinary Science and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Research in Veterinary Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Research Journal of Veterinary Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Revista Brasileira de Ciência Veterinária     Open Access  
Revista Brasileira de Higiene e Sanidade Animal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Brasileira de Zootecnia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Ciencias Veterinarias     Open Access  
Revista Colombiana de Ciencia Animal     Open Access  
Revista Colombiana de Ciencias Pecuarias (Colombian journal of animal science and veterinary medicine)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Complutense de Ciencias Veterinarias     Open Access  
Revista de Ciência Veterinária e Saúde Pública     Open Access  
Revista de Ciências Agroveterinárias     Open Access  
Revista de Educação Continuada em Medicina Veterinária e Zootecnia     Open Access  
Revista de Investigaciones Veterinarias del Perú     Open Access  
Revista de Medicina Veterinaria     Open Access  
Revista de Salud Animal     Open Access  
Revista Mexicana de Ciencias Pecuarias     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista MVZ Córdoba     Open Access  
Revista Veterinaria     Open Access  
Revue Marocaine des Sciences Agronomiques et Vétérinaires     Open Access  
Revue Vétérinaire Clinique     Full-text available via subscription  
Salud y Tecnología Veterinaria     Open Access  
Schweizer Archiv für Tierheilkunde     Hybrid Journal  
Science and Animal Health     Open Access  
Small Ruminant Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Spei Domus     Open Access  
Sri Lanka Veterinary Journal     Open Access  
SVU-International Journal of Veterinary Sciences     Open Access  
Tanzania Veterinary Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
team.konkret     Open Access  
Theoretical and Applied Veterinary Medicine     Open Access  
Theriogenology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Tierärztliche Praxis Ausgabe G: Großtiere / Nutztiere     Hybrid Journal  
Tierärztliche Praxis Ausgabe K: Kleintiere / Heimtiere     Hybrid Journal  
Topics in Companion Animal Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Transboundary and Emerging Diseases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Trends in Parasitology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Tropical Animal Health and Production     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Tropical Veterinarian     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Turkish Journal of Veterinary Research     Open Access  
UK Vet Equine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Ukrainian Journal of Veterinary and Agricultural Sciences     Open Access  
Van Veterinary Journal     Open Access  
VCOT Open     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
veterinär spiegel     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Veterinaria     Open Access  
Veterinaria (Montevideo)     Open Access  
Veterinaria México     Open Access  
Veterinaria México OA     Open Access  
Veterinarski Glasnik     Open Access  
Veterinary Anaesthesia and Analgesia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Veterinary and Animal Science     Open Access  
Veterinary and Comparative Oncology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Veterinary and Comparative Orthopaedics and Traumatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Veterinary Clinical Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Veterinary Clinics of North America: Equine Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Veterinary Clinics of North America: Exotic Animal Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Veterinary Clinics of North America: Food Animal Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Veterinary Clinics of North America: Small Animal Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Veterinary Dermatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Veterinary Immunology and Immunopathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Veterinary Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Veterinary Journal of Mehmet Akif Ersoy University / Mehmet Akif Ersoy Üniversitesi Veteriner Fakültesi Dergisi     Open Access  
Veterinary Medicine and Science     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Veterinary Medicine International     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Veterinary Medicine: Research and Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 1)

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Journal Cover
Journal of Feline Medicine & Surgery
Number of Followers: 6  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1098-612X - ISSN (Online) 1532-2750
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1174 journals]
  • Prevalence, clinical presentation and MRI of intervertebral disc
           herniations in cats

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Leonardo Bibbiani, Stefania Gelendi, Marco Bernardini, Federica Balducci, Barbara Contiero, Sara Canal
      Abstract: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectivesThe aims of this study were to evaluate the prevalence and to describe the clinical and diagnostic imaging features of the different types of feline intervertebral disc herniation (IVDH).MethodsMedical records and imaging studies were retrospectively reviewed for cats diagnosed with IVDH between January 2008 and October 2020. Information obtained from the clinical records included signalment, clinical presentation, the presence of spinal hyperaesthesia and neurolocalisation. Diagnostic imaging findings, including type (ie, intervertebral disc extrusion [IVDE], intervertebral disc protrusion [IVDP] or acute non-compressive nucleus pulposus extrusion (ANNPE), site and number of IVDHs, were recorded. The association between breed, age, sex, duration and severity of neurological signs, the presence of spinal pain and MRI features was evaluated.ResultsForty-three cats were included. A total of 50 IVDHs were identified: 39 cats were diagnosed with a single IVDH and four with multiple IVDHs. The most common type of IVDH was ANNPE (n = 22), followed by IVDP (n = 19) and IVDE (n = 9). Neuroanatomical localisation included L4–S3 (n = 19/43), T3–L3 (n = 18/43) and C1–C5 (n = 6/43). Cats with a single IVDH were statistically significantly associated with a diagnosis of ANNPE (P = 0.023) compared with cats with multiple IVDHs affected by IVDP (P = 0.004). Males were more commonly affected by IVDE (P = 0.020) and females by ANNPE (P = 0.020). Cats with IVDP had a longer duration of clinical signs (P
      Citation: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery
      PubDate: 2022-09-29T09:28:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1098612X221121893
       
  • Validation of a biomechanical testing protocol of craniodorsal hip
           luxation in feline cadavers and comparison of two ultra-high molecular
           weight polyethylene materials used for extra-articular hip stabilisation

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      Authors: Julien Letesson, Bastien Goin, Eric Viguier, Thibaut Cachon
      Abstract: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectivesThe aim of our study was to describe a biomechanical testing protocol to reproduce ex vivo craniodorsal hip luxation specific to the feline model, and evaluate the biomechanical properties of an intact hip joint compared with the fixation strength of two different techniques of extra-articular hip stabilisation.MethodsEighteen hip joints (femur and hemipelvis) were harvested from nine mature feline cadavers. CT was performed for each hip joint so that a biomechanical base specific to each joint morphotype could be created using computer-aided design. The biomechanical bases were then produced using a three-dimensional printer to secure the hip joints during testing. A total of 34 biomechanical compression tests were performed. Eighteen compression tests were performed in the control group, of which two fractured. The remaining 16 hip joints were then randomly assigned either to group A (hip joints stabilised with an extra-articular ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) implant secured by an interference screw [n = 8]) or to group B (hip joints stabilised with a UHMWPE iliofemoral suture [n = 8]).ResultsMean ± SD yield, failure load and linear stiffness in the control group were 616 ± 168 N, 666 ± 158 N and 231 ± 50 N/mm, respectively. The relative fixation strength (% of intact joint) before hip luxation in groups A and B was 43.8% and 34.7%, respectively. No statistical difference was found between groups A and B for yield and failure load. However, the reoccurrence of craniodorsal hip luxation was higher in group B than in group A, in 5/8 and 0/8 tests, respectively. Moreover, in group A, the extra-articular UHMWPE implant induced caudodorsal hip luxation, reported as failure mode in 7/8 cases.Conclusions and relevanceThis modified biomechanical protocol for testing craniodorsal hip luxation in a feline model was validated as repeatable and with acceptable variance. The extra-articular UHMWPE implant stabilisation technique proved to be more efficient in avoiding reoccurrence of craniodorsal hip luxation than UHMWPE iliofemoral suture.
      Citation: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery
      PubDate: 2022-09-08T06:16:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1098612X221114851
       
  • Cardiac troponin I in healthy Norwegian Forest Cat, Birman and domestic
           shorthair cats, and in cats with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

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      Authors: Sofia Hanås, Anders Larsson, Jesper Rydén, Inger Lilliehöök, Jens Häggström, Anna Tidholm, Katja Höglund, Ingrid Ljungvall, Bodil S Holst
      Abstract: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectivesThe aims of this study were to assess the potential associations between the serum cardiac troponin I (cTnI) concentration in healthy cats and feline characteristics, systolic blood pressure, heart rate (HR), echocardiographic measurements and storage time; and to compare cTnI concentrations in healthy cats with concentrations in cats with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), with or without left atrial enlargement (LAE) and in cats with HCM, to assess potential associations between cTnI concentration and echocardiographic variables.MethodsCardiac TnI was analysed using an Abbott ARCHITECT ci16200 analyser in serum from prospectively included healthy Norwegian Forest Cat (NF; n = 33), Birman (n = 33) and domestic shorthair (DSH; n = 30) cats, and from 39 cats with HCM, with or without LAE.ResultsIn healthy cats, higher cTnI concentrations were found in Birman cats than in NF cats (P = 0.014) and in neutered male cats than in intact females (P = 0.032). Cardiac TnI was positively associated with HR (P
      Citation: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery
      PubDate: 2022-09-08T01:33:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1098612X221117115
       
  • Clinical presentation and outcome in cats with aural squamous cell
           carcinoma: a review of 25 cases (2010–2021)

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      Authors: Alysha M McGrath, Carolyn L Chen, Brittany Abrams, Leah Hixon, Janet A Grimes, Emily Viani, Mary A McLoughlin, Giovanni Tremolada, Janis Lapsley, Laura E Selmic
      Abstract: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery, Ahead of Print.
      Case series summaryEar canal neoplasia is uncommon in cats. Ceruminous gland adenocarcinoma is the most frequently reported malignant neoplasm of the feline ear canal, and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is the most common malignant neoplasm diagnosed in the feline middle ear. However, limited information exists on the outcome of cats diagnosed with SCC of the ear canal, middle or inner ear. Therefore, the objective of this study was to describe the outcome of cats diagnosed with SCC affecting these locations. Medical records were reviewed at multiple institutions to identify cats with a definitive diagnosis of SCC. Twenty-five cats were identified. Eleven cats were treated with surgery, eight with medical management, two with coarse fractionated radiation therapy, two with a combination of coarse fractionated radiation therapy and chemotherapy, one with a combination of surgery and coarse fractionated radiation therapy, one cat with systemic chemotherapy and one cat received no treatment following diagnosis. The median survival time of cats treated with surgery was 168 days vs 85 days (P = 0.28) for those treated palliatively with either medical management, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or a combination of radiation therapy and chemotherapy.Relevance and novel informationThis case series documented that SCC of the ear canal, middle and/or internal ear is a locally aggressive tumor that carries an overall poor prognosis. The median survival time for cats treated with surgery was longer than that with any other modality, but this difference was not statistically significant.
      Citation: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery
      PubDate: 2022-09-06T02:15:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1098612X221119144
       
  • Erratum to ‘2022 AAFP/EveryCat Feline Infectious Peritonitis
           Diagnosis Guidelines’

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery
      PubDate: 2022-09-06T01:48:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1098612X221126448
       
  • Erratum to ‘Rising to the challenge of FIP diagnosis’

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery
      PubDate: 2022-09-06T01:35:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1098612X221126447
       
  • Comparison of ultrasonographic renal measurements in kittens up to 3
           months of age and young cats

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      Authors: Maria CR Castiglioni, Sheila C Rahal, Jeana P Silva, Maria J Mamprim
      Abstract: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectivesThis study aimed to evaluate renal measurements by B-mode ultrasound in kittens during their first 3 months and compare them with those of young adult cats.MethodsForty-eight healthy mixed-breed cats (24 males and 24 females) were enrolled in this study. The cats were divided into six age groups: groups 1–5 (kittens) and group 6 (young adult cats). Each kidney was examined using B-mode imaging and the following measurements taken: renal length (RL), renal height (RH), renal width (RW), cortical thickness (CoT), medullary thickness (MdT) and corticomedullary ratio (CMr). The ratio and correlation of RL to aortic diameter (AoD) and the length of the fifth/sixth lumbar vertebrae (LLV) were also determined.ResultsAmong groups, there was a statistically significant difference between RW, renal volume (RV), CoT, MdT and CMr. The smallest renal dimensions were obtained in the youngest kittens (up to 10 days of age), including RL (1.84 ± 0.40 cm), RH (1.14 ± 0.17 cm), RW (1.25 ± 0.20 cm) and RV (1.47 ± 0.68 ml). A strong correlation was observed between RL:AoD and RL:LLV, allowing for linear regression equations and reference intervals for RL:AoD and RL:LLV to be created for each age group.Conclusions and relevanceB-mode ultrasound showed that renal measurements in kittens differed from those in young adult cats, and that the renal dimensions, renal CoT and CMr increased with the growth of the cat. The RL-LLV ratio is a reliable method for measuring RL according to age group.
      Citation: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery
      PubDate: 2022-09-05T10:15:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1098612X221119392
       
  • Stability of coagulation factors in feline fresh frozen plasma intended
           for transfusion after 1 year of storage

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      Authors: Carles Blasi-Brugué, Rui RF Ferreira, Ignacio M Sanchez, Augusto JF de Matos, Rafael Ruiz de Gopegui
      Abstract: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectivesThe most common use of plasma transfusion is for haemostatic purposes, but coagulation factor activities in stored feline plasma are unknown. The concentration and stability of coagulation factors I (fibrinogen), II, V, VII, VIII, IX, X, XI and XII in feline fresh frozen plasma (fFFP) stored for 1 year were studied.MethodsFifty-five units of fFFP were produced from 55 fresh whole-blood donations obtained from indoor healthy blood donor cats. Twenty-one units were stored for
      Citation: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery
      PubDate: 2022-09-01T02:06:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1098612X221114630
       
  • Association between feline hyperthyroidism and thoracic radiographic
           evaluation of cardiomegaly and pulmonary hyperinflation

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      Authors: Victoria Young, Sangeeta Rao, Sarah B Shropshire, Angela J Marolf
      Abstract: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectivesHyperthyroidism frequently affects middle-to-older-aged cats that can present with cardiorespiratory signs. The effects of hyperthyroidism on cardiac size and function have been previously documented. Anecdotally, pulmonary hyperinflation identified on thoracic radiographs may also be associated with hyperthyroidism; however, there is no literature to support this claim. The goal of this study was to determine any association between hyperthyroidism, pulmonary hyperinflation and cardiomegaly with the following hypotheses: (1) hyperthyroid cats would not have evidence of radiographic pulmonary hyperinflation compared with control cats; and (2) hyperthyroid cats were more likely to have evidence of radiographic cardiomegaly than control cats.MethodsIn this retrospective case-control study, the thoracic radiographs of 52 hyperthyroid cats and 46 non-hyperthyroid cats were evaluated for subjective and objective measurements of pulmonary hyperinflation and cardiomegaly.ResultsThere were no statistically significant differences between hyperthyroid and non-hyperthyroid cats for any variable indicative of pulmonary hyperinflation. The mean ± SD vertebral heart score on lateral views for hyperthyroid cats was 7.75 ± 0.53 and for control cats was 7.55 ± 0.54, which was significantly different (P = 0.05). Among all cats, a more severe total elevation in thyroxine (T4) was correlated with a larger vertebral heart score on lateral views (Spearman’s correlation coefficient = 0.23, P = 0.02).Conclusions and relevanceWhile the results of this study suggest that hyperthyroid cats are more likely to have a larger vertebral heart score on lateral views than control cats, the clinical relevance of this finding is unclear given the large degree of overlap between hyperthyroid and non-hyperthyroid cats. In addition, among all cats, a greater total T4 elevation was weakly correlated with a larger vertebral heart score. Hyperthyroidism is not associated with radiographic pulmonary hyperinflation and is an unlikely differential for this radiographic finding.
      Citation: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery
      PubDate: 2022-08-31T10:14:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1098612X221118190
       
  • Recording of body weight and body condition score of cats in electronic
           health records from UK veterinary practices

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      Authors: Samantha Taylor, Georgina Roberts, Marcus Evans, Alexander J German
      Abstract: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectivesThe aim of this study was to determine how frequently body weight, body condition score (BCS) and terms pertaining to weight status are recorded in the electronic health records (EHRs) of veterinary practices in the UK, as well as to examine the variables affecting recording and associated with body weight, where recorded.MethodsData recorded in EHRs were searched in two 3-month periods in 2019 and 2020. For each visit, variables including type and time of consultation, signalment, recording of body weight, recording of BCS, weight (kg), BCS value and whether an overweight or weight-loss term was used in free text were recorded. Linear mixed-effects models were created to examine associations between body weight and variables, while mixed-effects logistic regression was used to determine associations between the same variables and weight or BCS recording.ResultsThe statistical data set comprised 129,076 visits from 129,076 cats at 361 practices. Weight was recorded at most (95.2%) visits, BCS was recorded at only 22.5% of visits, and terms associated with weight loss and overweight status were recorded in 10.0% and 7.2% of free-text records, respectively. Where BCS was recorded, approximately one-third of cats had an overweight score (8.0% of total visits). Using either an overweight term (P
      Citation: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery
      PubDate: 2022-08-31T03:19:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1098612X221117348
       
  • Clinical parameters at time of admission as prognostic indicators in cats
           presented for trauma to an emergency centre in New Zealand: a
           retrospective analysis

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      Authors: William R Fitzgerald, Nick J Cave, Ivayla D Yozova
      Abstract: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectivesThe aims of this study were to describe the clinical features of cats presented for trauma in a first-opinion and referral teaching hospital in New Zealand, and to determine the relationship between those features and outcome.MethodsThe electronic medical records of cats presented for trauma to the Massey University Pet Emergency Centre between September 2013 and January 2019 were examined, from which the signalment, clinical parameters and patient outcomes were extracted. Cases were assigned an Animal Trauma Triage (ATT) score and Modified Glasgow Coma Scale (MGCS) score. Variables were selected for inclusion in a logistic regression model to predict survival, and backward elimination was used to find the minimal significant model.ResultsIn total, 530 cats met the inclusion criteria. The cause of injury was not known in the majority of cases (38.0%). The most common location of injury was the hindlimbs/pelvis/tail (n = 247; 41%), and skin lacerations/abrasions were the most common specific injury. Multivariate analysis revealed altered mentation (odds ratio [OR] 0.31, P = 0.029), hypothermia (rectal temperature
      Citation: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery
      PubDate: 2022-08-26T03:10:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1098612X221115674
       
  • Prevalence of polycystic kidney disease in Persian and Persian-related
           cats in western Mexico

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      Authors: Néstor G Michel-Regalado, Miguel A Ayala-Valdovinos, Jorge Galindo-García, Theodor Duifhuis-Rivera, Abraham Virgen-Méndez
      Abstract: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectivesAutosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), the most frequently diagnosed hereditary disease affecting Persian cats, is caused by a cytosine-to-adenine transversion (10063C>A) in PKD1, the gene that codes for polycystin-1. The objective of this study was to provide a preliminary estimate of the frequency of the pathogenic 10063C>A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) of PKD1 in Persian and Persian-related cat breeds in western Mexico.MethodsBlood samples were collected from 104 cats (89 Persian, seven Persian crossbreed, five Siamese and three Himalayan cats). Genotyping was performed with our proposed PCR restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) assay, as well as a previously established PCR-RFLP method for validation. The genotypes of control cats were corroborated by a commercial veterinary genetics laboratory.ResultsOur proposed PCR-RFLP assay and the validated PCR-RFLP methodology indicated that 24/104 (23.1%) cats in this study were heterozygous carriers of the 10063C>A SNP, including 23/89 Persian cats (25.8%) and 1/7 Persian crossbreed cats (14.3%). No Siamese or Himalayan cats were carriers. There were no discrepancies between the results obtained with our proposed assay and those obtained with the validation method or with commercial laboratory results.Conclusions and relevanceThe carrier frequency of the PKD1 10063C>A SNP in Persian and Persian-related cat breeds in western Mexico was found to be 23.1%. ADPKD frequencies among cat populations in Mexico have not been published previously. Genotyping assays can be used to facilitate the selection of breeding stocks by local breeders and veterinarians to avoid propagation of ADPKD.
      Citation: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery
      PubDate: 2022-08-11T04:59:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1098612X221114043
       
  • Gastroduodenal ulceration detected endoscopically in cats: retrospective
           study of 61 patients

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      Authors: Enrico Bottero, Alessio Pierini, Pietro Ruggiero, Deborah Cattaneo, Andrea Campanile, Elena Benvenuti
      Abstract: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectivesThe aim of this study was to describe the endoscopic appearance of gastroduodenal ulcers (GDUs), and to assess the clinical, ultrasonographic and histological data, as well as long-term follow-up, in cats.MethodsThe medical record databases of five veterinary endoscopists were evaluated between January 2016 and 2020, in a retrospective study. Cats with at least one gastric or duodenal ulcer detected by endoscopic examination were included. All the medical records of the selected cats were reviewed and information was collected regarding breed, age, sex, neuter status, medical history, clinical signs, and ultrasonographic, endoscopic and histological findings. The cats were evaluated at 6, 12 and 18 months.ResultsSixty-one cats with a median age of 9.0 years (range 2.0–16.0) were included in the study. The most common complaints were vomiting (n = 55; 90%) and hyporexia (n = 40; 66%); haematemesis was reported in 12 (20%) cats. Endoscopy showed GDUs in the following locations: gastric body in 28 cats (46%), antropyloric area in 34 cats (56%), fundus in 13 cats (21%) and duodenum in eight cats (13%). A single GDU was found in 42 cats (69%) and multiple GDUs were seen in 19 cats (31%). Histopathological evaluation revealed benign lesions in 33 (54%) cats and malignant lesions in 28 (46%; 24 high-grade lymphoma, one low-grade lymphoma and three carcinoma). High-grade lymphoma was detected only in the stomach. Cats diagnosed with malignant GDUs (median 10.5, range 4–16) were significantly older than cats with benign lesions (P = 0.002).Conclusions and relevanceGDUs are common and were detected in 5.1% of cats undergoing an upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. The risk of a malignant ulcer increases proportionally with each year of increasing age. GDU location, number and morphological appearance do not provide any indication of the nature of the ulcer; however, duodenal ulcers are frequently benign. Endoscopic examination facilitates the early and minimally invasive detection of GDUs in cats.
      Citation: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery
      PubDate: 2022-07-18T11:06:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1098612X221109802
       
  • Use of feeding tubes in 112 cats in an internal medicine referral service
           (2015–2020)

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      Authors: Audrey Brunet, Tarek Bouzouraa, Jean-Luc Cadore, Marine Hugonnard
      Abstract: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectivesThe aims of this study were to describe diseases, complications and outcomes associated with the use of feeding tubes in a population of sick cats with appetite disturbance managed at an internal medicine referral service.MethodsClinicopathological data from cats receiving nasoenteral (NE) or oesophagostomy (O) tubes were studied. Cats were categorised according to their underlying disease and divided into subgroups (NE or O tube). The following factors associated with survival were analysed: disease category, type of tube and return to appetite.ResultsIncluded in the study were 112 cats, representing 118 cases. Of the 118 cases, 98 (83%) and 20 (17%) received NE or O tubes, respectively. The most common underlying conditions were digestive (13.5%), hepatobiliary (11%) and upper urinary tract (11%) disorders. Hepatobiliary (50%) and upper respiratory tract (30%) conditions were predominant in the O tube group. Digestive (15%) and upper urinary tract (12%) diseases were more common in the NE tube group. Complications following tube placement occurred in 22/118 cases (18.6%). The global survival rate was 73% and did not differ between NE (71.4%) and O tube (80%) groups (P = 1.00) or disease categories (P = 0.61). Return of appetite before feeding tube removal occurred in 56 cases (47%), within a median of 3 days (range 1–30) and was not associated with mirtazapine administration (P = 1.00). Appetite returned earlier for cats with NE tubes (3 days, range 1–17) than for those with O tubes (33 days, range 5–60; P
      Citation: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery
      PubDate: 2022-07-14T10:16:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1098612X221108835
       
  • Surgical treatment and outcome of intrahepatic shunts in 12 cats

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      Authors: Lavinia Economu, Rhiannon Strickland, Vicky J Lipscomb
      Abstract: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery, Ahead of Print.
      Case series summary The objective of this case series was to describe the presentation, surgical treatment and outcome of a congenital intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (IHPSS) in 12 cats. A retrospective case series of cats undergoing surgical treatment for an IHPSS was undertaken. Signalment, clinical signs, imaging, surgical treatment, complications and short-term outcome (1 year after first surgery) was obtained, where possible, using a health-related quality of life owner questionnaire. Seven cats were diagnosed with a left divisional shunt, three with a central divisional shunt and two with a right divisional shunt using intraoperative mesenteric portovenography. Three cats tolerated complete acute suture attenuation, eight cats underwent partial suture attenuation, four of which received complete suture ligation at a second surgery, and one cat underwent partial attenuation with a thin film band. Six cats (50%) developed post-attenuation neurological signs (PANS) after first surgery and two cats (17%) died or were euthanased due to severe PANS. Long-term outcome was available for eight cats (67%), with a median follow-up time of 1743 days (range 364–2228), and was described as excellent in five cats (63%), fair in two cats (25%) and poor in one cat (12%).Relevance and novel information Few papers exist that describe the presentation, intraoperative imaging, treatment and outcome of IHPSSs in cats. This is the first to describe surgical attenuation with a thin film band in a cat with an IHPSS. This case series reports excellent long-term outcomes in a majority of surgically treated cats with IHPSS.
      Citation: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery
      PubDate: 2022-07-14T10:16:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1098612X221109325
       
  • Use of tetrasodium EDTA acid for the treatment of intraluminal obstruction
           of subcutaneous ureteral bypass devices

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      Authors: Valerie Duval, Marilyn Dunn, Catherine Vachon
      Abstract: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectivesThe aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of a 4% tetrasodium EDTA (tEDTA) infusion protocol in the subcutaneous ureteral bypass (SUB) devices of cats with intraluminal obstruction at a veterinary teaching hospital between July 2017 and April 2020.MethodsThis was a retrospective controlled study. Cats with an obstructed SUB device underwent a 4% tEDTA infusion protocol. Obstruction of the device was diagnosed based on renal pelvic dilation, dilatation of the ureter, mineralized material within the device (cystostomy or nephrostomy catheters) seen on ultrasound, the absence of visible bubbles within the renal pelvis and/or urinary bladder following ultrasound-guided flushing of the device with saline.ResultsA total of 16 tEDTA infusion protocols were performed in 14 cats. The infusion protocol was considered successful in 11/16 SUB devices (68.8%). Six devices (n = 6/11; 54.5%) had recurrence of obstruction with a median time of 87 days. One or more episodes of self-limiting pollakiuria and/or hematuria following infusion was seen in eight patients (n = 8/14; 57.1%).Conclusions and relevanceInfusions of 4% tEDTA successfully relieved intraluminal obstruction in patients with occluded SUB devices; however, the recurrence of obstruction was common. Additional studies evaluating case selection and optimal protocols are warranted.
      Citation: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery
      PubDate: 2022-06-28T08:15:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1098612X221107795
       
  • Ear-tipping practices for identification of cats sterilized in
           trap–neuter–return programs in the USA

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      Authors: Aimee M Dalrymple, Lauren J MacDonald, Rachael E Kreisler
      Abstract: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectivesEar-tipping practices and the meaning of the ear tip in trap–neuter–return (TNR) programs have not been well documented. The purpose of this study was to report the frequency of common ear-tipping practices in the USA, to identify the most effective methods and to establish a foundation for ear-tipping practice standards.MethodsAn anonymous 24-question survey was advertised from 4 to 20 October 2021 to individuals who participate in TNR programs that routinely perform ear tipping.ResultsThere were 526 survey responses from individuals who participate in TNR programs, of whom 410 completed the survey. For ear-tip meaning, nearly 100% of respondents indicated that an ear tip meant that a cat had been sterilized. Several respondents answered that it also indicated rabies vaccination or socialization status, with 92 (22%) selecting both, 79 (19%) selecting rabies only and 50 (12%) selecting unsocial only. The majority of respondents tipped the left ear (81%), used a visual estimate to determine the cut (92%) and described the ideal silhouette as straight across (92%). The median percentage of cats where ear tips bled after initial hemostasis was 5% (interquartile range [IQR] 2–10), and the median percentage of negative feedback regarding the ear tip was 1% (IQR 0–5). In terms of weighted rank order, the most common feedback was that too much ear tip was removed (5.5), followed by a cat being ear tipped in error (4.7), persistent bleeding (4.2) and not enough ear tip being removed (4.2). Responses revealed heterogeneity regarding technique for both excision and hemostasis, as well as personnel performing the procedure. There were no significant associations between techniques and bleeding or negative feedback.Conclusions and relevanceThere is variation in the methods for performing an ear tip, as well as what an ear tip signifies. Standards for this procedure would be helpful.
      Citation: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery
      PubDate: 2022-06-28T08:15:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1098612X221105843
       
  • Feline non-erosive immune-mediated polyarthritis: a multicentre,
           retrospective study of 20 cases (2009–2020)

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      Authors: Florence Wootton, Barbara Glanemann, Sorrel Langley-Hobbs, Craig Breheny, Samuel Fowlie, Fiona Whitworth, Paolo Silvestrini, Anna Threlfall, Stephanie Sorrell, Vicki Black
      Abstract: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery, Ahead of Print.
      Case series summaryCats with non-erosive immune-mediated polyarthritis (IMPA) were identified from seven referral hospitals between 2009 and 2020 for a multicentre retrospective case series. Data were obtained from hospital records and referring veterinarians were contacted for follow-up. Twenty cases were identified: 12 castrated males (60%), one entire male (5%) and seven spayed females (35%). Common clinical signs included lameness (n = 20/20) and pyrexia (n = 10/18). Three cats presented with and two cats developed ligament laxity during treatment. Thirteen cats (65%) were diagnosed with non-associative IMPA and seven (35%) with associative IMPA. Comorbidities identified included chronic enteropathy (n = x/7), feline immunodeficiency virus (n = x/7) feline herpesvirus (n = x/7), bronchopneumonia (n = x/7) and discospondylitis (n = x/7). Sampling of the tarsal joints most frequently identified an increased proportion of neutrophils, consistent with IMPA. Eighteen cats (90%) received immunosuppressants. Eleven cats were started on prednisolone; eight had a poor response resulting in the addition of a second agent, euthanasia or acceptance of the persisting signs. One cat received ciclosporin and required an alternative second agent owing to adverse effects. Five cats were started on prednisolone and ciclosporin; three had a poor response and required an alternative second agent. One cat received prednisolone and chlorambucil and had a good response. Two cats (10%) received meloxicam and had a good response, although the clinical signs recurred when medication was tapered. A good outcome was achieved in 14/20 cats (70%) with IMPA. In the cats with a poor outcome 4/6 were euthanased and 2/6 had chronic lameness.Relevance and novel informationPrognosis for feline IMPA can be good. Multimodal immunosuppression was often required. IMPA should be considered in lame cats, with or without pyrexia, when there is no evidence of trauma or infection. The tarsal joints should be included in the multiple joints chosen for sampling. Ligament laxity can occur in non-erosive feline IMPA.
      Citation: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery
      PubDate: 2022-06-28T08:15:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1098612X221107783
       
  • ‘The Mercury Challenge’: feline systolic blood pressure in primary
           care practice – a European survey

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      Authors: Andrew Sparkes, Catherine Garelli-Paar, Thomas Blondel, Emilie Guillot
      Abstract: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectivesThe aim of this study was to collect data from a substantial number of older cats having their systolic blood pressure (SBP) measured in a variety of clinical practices, to describe the findings and assess variables that affected the duration of assessment and the values obtained.MethodsAn international (European-based) multicentre convenience sample survey of cats ⩾7 years of age attending veterinary clinics and having SBP measured as part of their clinical assessment. Information gathered included details of the cat, concomitant disease(s) or therapies, SBP results, device used, time taken to assess SBP and the demeanor of the cat.ResultsUseable data were available from 8884 cats aged 7–26 years, from 811 clinics across 16 countries. The device used to measure SBP was Doppler in 47.4% and oscillometry in 48.5%. The demeanor of the cat was reported to be calm in 45.7%, anxious in 41.9% and nervous in 8.9%; and the duration of assessment was reported to be 10 mins in 7.9%. Concomitant chronic kidney disease (CKD) was reported in 21.8%, hyperthyroidism in 12.0% or both in 3.1%. The median SBP was 150 mmHg (range 80–310), with 18.6% classified as hypertensive (SBP 160–179 mmHg) and 21.1% as severely hypertensive (SBP ⩾180 mmHg). The measured SBP was significantly affected by the cat’s demeanor, duration of SBP assessment, presence of CKD and/or hyperthyroidism, the cat’s sex and age, and the presence of concomitant therapy. The duration of SBP assessment was significantly affected by the cat’s demeanor.Conclusions and relevanceIn veterinary clinics, SBP can be measured in most cats within a short period of time using either Doppler or oscillometric equipment. The presence of CKD or hyperthyroidism was associated with significantly higher SBP values, and anxious or nervous cats had higher SBP values and took longer to obtain SBP assessments.
      Citation: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery
      PubDate: 2022-06-27T08:10:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1098612X221105844
       
  • Alpha-chloralose poisoning in cats: clinical findings in 25 confirmed and
           78 suspected cases

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      Authors: Cecilia Tegner, Sandra Lundgren, Kristoffer Dreimanis, Annica Tevell Åberg, Ulrika Windahl
      Abstract: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectivesThe aim of this study was to describe the clinical picture in cats with alpha-chloralose (AC) intoxication and to confirm AC in serum from suspected cases of AC poisoning.MethodsSuspected cases of AC poisoning were identified in patient records from a small animal university hospital from January 2014 to February 2020. Clinical signs of intoxication described in respective records were compiled, the cats were graded into four intoxication severity scores and hospitalisation time and mortality were recorded. Surplus serum from select cases in late 2019 and early 2020 was analysed to detect AC with a quantitative ultra-high performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry analysis, and the AC concentration was compared with the respective cat’s intoxication severity score.ResultsSerum from 25 cats was available for analysis and AC poisoning was confirmed in all. Additionally, 78 cats with a clinical suspicion of AC intoxication were identified in the patient records, most of which presented from September to April. The most common signs of intoxication were ataxia, tremors, cranial nerve deficits and hyperaesthesia. The prevalence of clinical signs and intoxication severity differed from what has previously been reported, with our population presenting with less severe signs and no deaths due to intoxication. The majority had a hospitalisation time
      Citation: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery
      PubDate: 2022-06-27T08:10:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1098612X221107787
       
  • Urine bacterial culture growth and association with urine sedimentation
           and clinical findings in cats with acute kidney injury

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      Authors: Kenneth Siu, Amanda Diaz, Abigail Chadwick, Deborah Keys, Sarah Shropshire, Stacie C Summers
      Abstract: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectivesA urine culture is often pursued in cats with acute kidney injury (AKI) to screen for bacterial growth in the urine, but it can be cost prohibitive. The aim of the study was to determine the ability of a urinalysis and lower urinary tract signs (LUTS) to predict urine culture results in cats with AKI.MethodsNinety-seven cats with AKI were included in this study. This was a retrospective, observational study. Medical records from 2008 to 2018 were reviewed to identify cats with AKI that had a paired urinalysis and urine bacterial culture. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive values of microscopic bacteriuria, pyuria, hematuria and the presence of LUTS for predicting urine culture results was calculated.ResultsThirty-two percent of cats (n = 31) had a positive urine culture. Of these, 28 (90%) had bacteriuria, 21 (68%) had pyuria, 13 (42%) had hematuria and 10 (32%) had LUTS. Of the 42 cats without hematuria or pyuria, seven had a positive urine culture (17%). Bacteriuria had a high sensitivity (90%) and specificity (92%) for predicting urine culture bacterial growth. The absence of bacteriuria had a high negative predictive value for no bacterial growth (95%). The odds of a positive urine culture were increased with bacteriuria (odds ratio [OR] 114, 95% confidence interval [CI] 29–621; P
      Citation: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery
      PubDate: 2022-06-24T02:11:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1098612X221105309
       
  • Ophthalmic effects of dexmedetomidine, methadone and
           dexmedetomidine–methadone in healthy cats and their reversal with
           atipamezole

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      Authors: Luciana Wolfran, Rafael Rostirolla Debiage, Danielle Mara Lopes, Fabíola Bono Fukushima
      Abstract: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectivesThe aims of this study were to evaluate and compare the effects that dexmedetomidine and methadone, either alone or in combination, have on the ocular variables of healthy adult cats when administered intramuscularly, as well as their reversal with atipamezole.MethodsA randomized crossover blinded study of 10 healthy cats was used to assess the effect of 0.2 mg/kg methadone (MET), 7.5 μg/kg dexmedetomidine (D7), 10 μg/kg dexmedetomidine (D10), 7.5 μg/kg dexmedetomidine and 0.2 mg/kg methadone (DM7) and 10 μg/kg dexmedetomidine and 0.2 mg/kg methadone (DM10) on intraocular pressure (IOP), tear production and pupil diameter (PD). The animals were evaluated for 30 mins. Afterwards, atipamezole was administered and ocular variables were evaluated for 30 mins.ResultsD10, DM7 and DM10 significantly decreased mean IOP but MET or D7 did not. Tear production decreased significantly in all treatments, corresponding to 18%, 59%, 63%, 86% and 98% in MET, D7, D10, DM7 and DM10, respectively. PD increased in all treatments, but MET showed the highest PD. Thirty minutes after atipamezole (RT30), IOP returned to baseline with no difference between groups, and there was a significant increase in tear production, but the means were still different from baseline.Conclusions and relevanceDexmedetomidine decreases IOP and tear production but increases PD in healthy cats. Atipamezole can partly reverse those alterations. Low-dose dexmedetomidine (7.5 µg/kg) promotes sedation without changing the IOP. All protocols significantly decrease tear production, and Schirmer tear test after sedation is not representative of non-sedated values. Methadone induces quick onset mydriasis without changing the IOP.
      Citation: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery
      PubDate: 2022-05-26T09:08:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1098612X221077023
       
  • Online survey of owners’ experiences of medicating their cats at
           home

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      Authors: Samantha Taylor, Sarah Caney, Claire Bessant, Danièlle Gunn-Moore
      Abstract: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectivesThe aim of this study was to use an online survey to obtain information from cat owners about their experiences of medicating their cats.MethodsAn online survey containing 35 questions on experiences of medicating cats was circulated to cat owners globally.ResultsIn total, 2507 surveys from 57 countries were analysed; 1724 from ‘cat owners’ and 783 from ‘cat owners+’ (respondents with significant cat experience, including veterinary professionals). Around half (50.7%) of cat owners were ‘sometimes’ or ‘never’ provided with information or advice on how to administer medication; however, 91.8% of those given information found it ‘somewhat’ or ‘very’ useful. Around half (53.6%) of owners sought information from the internet about how to administer medication. Total cat owners (cat owners and cat owners+) administered liquids (61.3%), pastes (45.3%) or tablets (39.5%) directly into their cat’s mouth; fewer (22.6–24.1%) hid these medications in food. Total cat owners rated tablets significantly harder to administer than liquids; 53.0% chose liquids as their first-choice formulation while 29.3% chose tablets. Insulin injections and ‘spot-ons’ were significantly easier to administer than any oral medications. Over half (51.6%) of owners reported that medicating their cat(s) had changed their relationship with them; 77.0% reported that their cat(s) had tried to bite or scratch them when medicating. Other challenges included the cat(s) spitting out tablets (78.7%), refusing medication in food (71.7%) and running away (52.7%). Of the owners who failed to complete a course of medication (35.4%), 27.8% stopped near the end of the course, while 19.3% stopped after a few doses, in both cases as medicating was too difficult.Conclusions and relevanceOwners appreciate being provided with information about the administration of medication. Frequent challenges when medicating cats include potential human injury and damage to the owner–cat relationship. Pharmaceutical companies should provide a range of formulations to ease compliance. Veterinary clinics should provide information/demonstrations and internet links when prescribing medications.
      Citation: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery
      PubDate: 2022-03-28T12:53:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1098612X221083752
       
  • Epidemiology and clinical presentation of feline presumed hereditary or
           breed-related ocular diseases in France: retrospective study of 129 cats

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      Authors: Matthieu MP Bott, Sabine Chahory
      Abstract: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectivesThis study aimed to describe the epidemiology and clinical presentation of presumed hereditary or presumed breed-related ocular diseases in a population of cats in France.MethodsMedical records from between September 2013 and August 2017 were reviewed to identify cats with at least one presumed hereditary or breed-related ocular disease. Cats with concurrent, or a history of, ocular or systemic infectious diseases were excluded. Signalment, history and clinical findings were recorded.ResultsOf the 1161 cats that presented to our institution during the study period, 129 were diagnosed with at least one presumed hereditary or presumed breed-related ocular disease (11.1%, 95% confidence interval [CI] 9.3–12.9). Five ocular abnormalities had a prevalence of>1%: entropion, corneal sequestration, persistent pupillary membrane, cataract and retinal dysplasia. The prevalence of entropion was 2.2% (95% CI 1.3–3.0), with Persians (P = 0.03), Maine Coons (P
      Citation: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery
      PubDate: 2022-03-08T01:27:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1098612X221080598
       
  • Ultrasound appearance of the duodenal papilla in clinically healthy cats

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      Authors: Charlotte Coeuriot, Julie Pontarrasse, Nora Bouhsina, Maureen Lazard, Alexis Bertrand, Marion Fusellier
      Abstract: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectivesThe duodenal papilla (DP) is an anatomical structure located in the duodenal wall, a few centimetres from the pylorus. In cats, the pancreatic and bile ducts merge as they enter the DP, and this explains why cats are more likely than dogs to have concomitant digestive, pancreatic and hepatic infections. Ultrasonography of the DP has been previously established in dogs but not in cats. The purpose of our prospective study was to describe the ultrasound features of the DP in 30 adult clinically healthy cats.MethodsA full abdominal ultrasound was performed. Five measurements were recorded: the width and the height in a transverse section; the length and the height in a longitudinal section; and the thickness of the duodenal wall adoral to the DP in a longitudinal section. The subjective appearance (echogenicity and shape) of the DP was described.ResultsThe dimensions of the DP were a mean ± SD width of 3.13 ± 0.68 mm and height of 2.47 ± 0.63 mm in the transverse section, and length of 3.98 ± 1.27 mm and height of 2.44 ± 0.57 mm in the longitudinal section. The DP was homogeneous, subjectively isoechoic to fat and had a round and oval shape in the transverse and longitudinal sections, respectively. There was no correlation between the DP measurements and the weight, age or sex of the cats. The animals that were fed a mixed diet had a longer DP than those fed dry food.Conclusions and relevanceThis study provides reference values for the dimensions of the DP, as well as information on its ultrasonographic appearance in clinically healthy adult cats. We did not find any correlation between the age of the cats and the size of the papilla, but the age range was small and another study in older cats should be undertaken to address this more thoroughly.
      Citation: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery
      PubDate: 2022-03-07T02:18:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1098612X221078783
       
  • Serum concentrations of gabapentin in cats with chronic kidney disease

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      Authors: Jessica M Quimby, Sarah K Lorbach, Ashlie Saffire, Amanda Kennedy, Luke A Wittenburg, Turi K Aarnes, Karina J Creighton, Sarah E Jones, Rene E Paschall, Emily M King, Clara E Bruner, Jessica N Wallinger, Karen A van Haaften
      Abstract: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectivesThe purpose of this study was to assess serum concentrations of gabapentin in cats with chronic kidney disease (CKD) vs clinically healthy cats.MethodsFive healthy cats were enrolled in a pharmacokinetic study. A single 20 mg/kg dose of gabapentin was administered orally and blood was obtained at 0, 0.25, 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2, 3, 4, 8, 12, 24 and 36 h via a jugular catheter. Serum gabapentin concentrations were measured using liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry. Non-compartmental pharmacokinetic analysis was performed. The same five healthy cats plus 25 cats with stable International Renal Interest Society stage 2 (n = 14) and 3 (n = 11) CKD were enrolled in a limited sampling study. Cats in both groups received a single 10 mg/kg dose of gabapentin, and serum gabapentin concentrations and compliance scores were obtained 3 and 8 h post-administration.ResultsCats with CKD had significantly higher dose-normalized serum gabapentin concentrations than normal cats at 3 h (P = 0.0012 CKD vs normal 10 mg/kg; P = 0.008 CKD vs normal 20 mg/kg) and 8 h (P
      Citation: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery
      PubDate: 2022-02-23T03:11:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1098612X221077017
       
  • Comparison of ultrasonographic echogenicity and outcome in cats with
           suspected pancreatitis

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      Authors: Kristina A Lederer, Katharina M Hittmair, Alexander Tichy, Florian K Zeugswetter
      Abstract: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectivesThe aim of this study was to determine whether ultrasonographic pancreatic echogenicity, especially hypoechogenicity, has an impact on the prognosis of cats with suspected pancreatitis. We hypothesised that cats with a hypoechoic pancreas have a longer duration of hospitalisation, higher treatment costs and a higher mortality rate.MethodsThis was a retrospective study, which included cats with clinical signs of pancreatitis, a SNAP fPL test result above the reference interval and ultrasonographic abnormalities consistent with pancreatitis. Medical records and follow-up information were retrieved from the local electronic database. Cases were assigned to one of three groups based on pancreatic echogenicity: hypoechoic, hyperechoic or mixed echogenicity. Statistical analysis aimed to assess differences in outcome, ultrasonographic abnormalities, historical features, physical examination findings, laboratory results, concurrent diseases or treatment costs.ResultsThirty-six (64%) cats with a hypoechoic, seven (13%) with a hyperechoic and 13 (23%) cats with a mixed echoic pancreas were included. Cats with a hypoechoic pancreas had a significantly lower median body weight (P = 0.010) and lower median body condition score (P = 0.004) compared with the other cats. Furthermore, they were presented as being lethargic significantly more often (P = 0.014), were more likely to have a homogeneously enlarged pancreas (P
      Citation: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery
      PubDate: 2022-02-15T10:44:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1098612X221074921
       
  • Beneficial effects of a prescription home-prepared diet and of zucchini on
           urine calcium oxalate supersaturation and urinary parameters in adult cats
           

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      Authors: Géraldine Blanchard, Concetta Amato, Agnès André, Philippe Bleis, Samuel Ninet, Jürgen Zentek, Patrick Nguyen
      Abstract: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectivesFrom the authors’ experience, the consumption of a balanced prescription home-prepared diet that includes zucchini (courgette) benefits cats with recurrent urolithiasis, but there is no published evidence to support this. The aim was to study the effects on urinary parameters of (1) a balanced prescription home-prepared diet containing zucchini, and (2) the addition of zucchini to a dry food, compared with two commercial therapeutic diets.MethodsEight healthy cats were included in a Latin-square designed protocol. Five diets were evaluated: two commercial diets, designed for cats with urinary disorders, one high-moisture (U-WET) and one high-sodium dry (U-DRY); one home-prepared diet (HOME); one commercial dry food for adult maintenance (DRY); and DRY given together with 10 g of zucchini per kg body weight (DRY-Zuc). After a 7-day adaptation period, urine was collected and daily food and water intakes were assessed for 12 days. Urinary parameters, and relative supersaturation (RSS) for calcium oxalate (CaOx) and struvite, were determined. Data underwent repeated measures ANOVA analysis.ResultsThe digestibility of energy, dry matter, protein and fat was highest with the HOME diet. CaOx RSS was lowest in cats eating the HOME diet, but not significantly different from the U-WET or U-DRY diets. CaOx RSS was lower in cats eating the DRY-Zuc diet than in cats eating the DRY diet. Struvite RSS did not differ significantly among groups.Conclusions and relevanceThis study shows that a balanced prescription home-prepared diet was safe and allowed a very low urinary CaOx RSS. It also showed that adding zucchini to dry food lowered the urine CaOx RSS.
      Citation: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery
      PubDate: 2022-02-10T03:13:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1098612X211067931
       
  • Association between serum fibroblast growth factor-23 concentrations and
           blood calcium levels in chronic kidney disease cats with upper
           urolithiasis

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      Authors: Hirosumi Miyakawa, Huai-Hsun Hsu, Mizuki Ogawa, Ryota Akabane, Yuichi Miyagawa, Naoyuki Takemura
      Abstract: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectivesThis study investigated whether serum fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-23 concentrations are associated with serum total calcium (tCa) and blood ionised calcium (iCa) concentrations in cats with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and upper urolithiasis.MethodsSerum samples and the medical records of cats with CKD with nephroliths, ureteroliths or both were investigated retrospectively. Cats with a serum creatinine concentration >250 μmol/l and/or a serum phosphorus concentration ⩾1.50 mmol/l were excluded. Based on cut-offs for serum tCa (2.70 mmol/l) or blood iCa (1.40 mmol/l), cats were divided into the following groups: total hypercalcaemia (H-tCa) (>2.70 mmol/l) and total normocalcaemia (N-tCa) (⩽2.70 mmol/l) groups, or ionised hypercalcaemia (H-iCa) (>1.40 mmol/l) and ionised normocalcaemia (N-iCa) (⩽1.40 mmol/l) groups, respectively. Serum FGF-23 concentrations were compared between groups and correlation analysis was performed.ResultsThirty-two cats with CKD and upper urolithiasis were included. Serum FGF-23 concentrations in the H-tCa group (median 573 pg/ml [range 125–3888]; n = 12) were significantly higher compared with the N-tCa group (median 245 pg/ml [range 94–627]; n = 20) (P = 0.001). Serum FGF-23 concentrations in the H-iCa group (median 1479 pg/ml [range 509–3888]; n = 6) increased significantly compared with the N-iCa group (median 245 pg/ml [range 94–637]; n = 26) (P
      Citation: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery
      PubDate: 2022-02-08T02:38:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1098612X221075278
       
  • Cabergoline treatment in cats with diabetes mellitus and
           hypersomatotropism

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      Authors: Diego D Miceli, Jorge D García, Gustavo A Pompili, Juan P Rey Amunategui, Sergio Ferraris, Omar P Pignataro, Mirtha Guitelman
      Abstract: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectivesThe aim of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of cabergoline to control hypersomatotropism (HST) and diabetes mellitus (DM) in cats.MethodsThis was a prospective cohort study. Twenty-three cats with HST and concurrent DM were enrolled. Cats received a dose of 10 μg/kg cabergoline q48h PO for 6 months. Serum insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) and fructosamine concentrations, insulin dose and Insulin Resistance Index (IRI) were measured at the time of diagnosis of HST and at the start of cabergoline treatment (t0), and 3 months (t1) and 6 months (t2) during cabergoline treatment.ResultsA decrease and normalization of serum IGF-1 concentration was observed in 35% and 26% of cats, respectively. Median IGF-1 (t0: 1350 ng/ml [range 832–1501]; t1: 1284 ng/ml [range 365–1501]; t2: 1240 ng/ml [range 263–1501]; P = 0.016) decreased significantly. Twelve cats underwent diagnostic imaging of the pituitary area. The median pituitary height at t0 of cats that experienced an IGF-1 reduction (n = 5/12) was significantly lower compared with those that did not experience an IGF-1 reduction (n = 7/12) (3.2 mm [range 3.1–3.7] vs 6 mm [range 3.5–9.5]; P = 0.011). Median fructosamine (t0: 628 µmol/l [range 400–963]; t1: 404 µmol/l [range 249–780]; t2: 400 µmol/l [range 260–815]; P
      Citation: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery
      PubDate: 2022-02-08T02:38:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1098612X221074924
       
  • Fecal shedding of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing
           Enterobacterales in cats admitted to an animal shelter

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      Authors: J Scott Weese, Tyler O’Brien, Shane Bateman
      Abstract: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectivesThe objective of this study was to evaluate shedding of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing bacteria in cats admitted to an animal shelter.MethodsFecal samples were collected from cats admitted to an animal shelter between 12 June and 23 August 2018. Selective enrichment culture for ESBL-producing bacteria was performed and isolates were speciated and tested for selected ESBL genes using PCR.ResultsESBL-producing Enterobacterales were identified in fecal samples from 2/87 (2.3%; 95% confidence interval 0.6–8.0) cats. One isolate was an Escherichia coli that possessed blaCTX-M-1, blaCMY-2 and blaTEM genes. The other was Enterobacter cloacae possessing blaCTX-M-1 and blaCMY-2.Conclusions and relevanceWhile the study sample size and prevalence rate for ESBL-producing bacteria were low, these data document that cats admitted to similar shelters could harbor these agents. The risk posed by ESBL-producing bacterium shedding in cats, both to cats and other species, is currently unclear. However, these findings support the need for more investigation of interspecies transmission of ESBL-producing bacteria and ESBL genes, as well as the importance of antimicrobial stewardship and routine infection control measures.
      Citation: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery
      PubDate: 2022-02-08T02:38:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1098612X221075602
       
  • Use of a cyclical hypofractionated radiotherapy regime (‘QUAD shot’)
           for the treatment of feline sinonasal carcinomas

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      Authors: Petros S Frezoulis, Aaron Harper, Sarah L Mason
      Abstract: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectivesRadiation therapy is the treatment of choice for cats with sinonasal carcinomas. Different protocols have been described in the literature, though a clear consensus regarding the optimal protocol is lacking. The aim of the study was to describe the tolerability, efficacy and outcome of cats treated with a cyclical hypofractionated protocol.MethodsCats with histologically diagnosed sinonasal carcinomas in a single institution were retrospectively included. All patients were treated with a cyclical hypofractionated protocol (‘QUAD shot’ regime). Cats were treated with 4 Gray (Gy) delivered in four fractions within 48 h, with a minimum of 6 h between two treatments, and repeated every 3–4 weeks for a total dose of 48 Gy in three cycles.ResultsSeven cats met the inclusion criteria. Nasal discharge and sneezing were the most common presenting complaints. All cats presented with advanced stage of disease with CT examination (three with modified Adams stage 3 and four with stage 4). Clinical improvement was seen in six cats. Five cats had a follow-up CT; one had a complete response, two had partial responses, one had stable disease and one had progressive disease. Two cats were still alive at the time of writing while four were euthanased owing to tumour-related causes. The median overall survival time was 460 days. The 1-year survival time was 80% and the 2-year survival time was 0%. Severe acute or late toxicity was not reported.Conclusions and relevanceThis is the first report of a cyclical hypofractionated protocol in the veterinary literature that can provide prolonged survival in cats with advanced stage sinonasal carcinoma. Its use should be considered in patients when prolonged hospitalisation can be detrimental to quality of life, while still delivering a therapeutic total dose of radiation therapy.
      Citation: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery
      PubDate: 2022-02-07T09:54:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1098612X211070737
       
  • Online survey to determine client perceptions of feline chronic lower
           airway disease management: response to therapy, side effects and
           challenges encountered

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      Authors: Mathieu V Paulin, Sarah MA Caney, Kevin L Cosford
      Abstract: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectivesThe first aim of this survey was to report client experiences associated with the administration of common medications, particularly glucocorticoids and bronchodilators, in managing cats with feline lower airway disease (FLAD). The second aim was to ascertain client perception of response to treatment and level of satisfaction.MethodsThis was a prospective cross-sectional study. An online survey was distributed worldwide to cat owners caring for cats with a chronic cough. Only cats reported to have FLAD were included.ResultsA total of 153 complete responses describing cats with FLAD were analyzed. Glucocorticoids and bronchodilators were the predominantly prescribed therapeutics for 140/153 (92%) and 80/153 (52%) of FLAD cats, respectively. Oral and inhalant administration routes were reported most commonly: glucocorticoids (64% oral and 75% inhalant) and bronchodilators (21% oral and 88% inhalant). A review of how air quality could be improved was conducted for 54% of cats. Almost half (43%) of owners reported adverse effects secondary to glucocorticoid administration, the most frequent being polyphagia (26%) and polydipsia (21%). Only 10% of owners reported bronchodilator-associated side effects, with restlessness (9%) being the most common. Difficulties giving glucocorticoid or bronchodilator tablets orally were reported for 33% and 71% of owners, respectively. Glucocorticoid or bronchodilator inhalant therapies were difficult to administer for 28% and 31% of owners, respectively. Frequency and severity of coughing were significantly lower after at least 2 months of treatment, with median numerical input on a slider scale (0–100) of 48 and 42 before, and 10 and 7 after treatment, respectively (P
      Citation: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery
      PubDate: 2022-02-07T09:54:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1098612X211070988
       
  • Cross-sectional survey of non-invasive indirect blood pressure measurement
           practices in cats by veterinarians

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      Authors: Iliana Navarro, Stacie Summers, Mark Rishniw, Jessica Quimby
      Abstract: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectivesThis survey of small animal veterinarians endeavored to: (1) determine current methods of indirect blood pressure measurement; (2) detail techniques used to reduce situational hypertension; and (3) better understand the obstacles to performing blood pressure measurement in cats.MethodsAn online survey was produced and circulated to members of the Veterinary Information Network. A total of 733 veterinarians who saw cats in their practice and had access to at least one indirect blood pressure device completed the entirety of the survey.ResultsNinety-six percent (703/733) of veterinarians who completed the survey reported measuring indirect blood pressure in cats in their practice, with veterinary technicians conducting most (600/703; 85.3%) of these measurements. Few veterinarians (30/733; 4.1%) did not measure blood pressure, with these veterinarians citing several obstacles including: difficulty interpreting results with the occurrence of fear, anxiety and stress in cats (20/30; 66.7%); difficulty performing measurements in cats (17/30; 56.7%); and technical staff being uncomfortable performing measurements (12/30; 40.0%). Most veterinarians (300/435; 69.0%) in this survey preferred an ultrasonic Doppler flow detector with sphygmomanometry, with many (272/300; 90.7%) perceiving that the results obtained with this device were more trustworthy compared with results obtained with oscillometry. Ninety percent (633/703) of veterinarians employed techniques to reduce situational hypertension in cats. Techniques perceived to be most helpful among veterinarians included: using a quiet location (454/633; 71.7%); minimizing restraint (316/633; 49.9%); performing blood pressure prior to other procedures (eg, phlebotomy, cystocentesis) (302/633; 47.7%); avoiding other animals (219/633; 34.6%); and allowing time for acclimation (167/633; 26.4%).Conclusions and relevanceThis survey study of veterinarians helps clarify obstacles to routine blood pressure measurement in conscious cats. Veterinarians reported several strategies that they felt reduced situational hypertension in cats. The data inform modifications of techniques to increase the frequency and perceived reliability of blood pressure measurement in at-risk cats.
      Citation: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery
      PubDate: 2022-02-03T09:36:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1098612X211067015
       
  • CT characterisation and classification of feline temporomandibular joint
           trauma: a case series of 79 cats

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      Authors: Lisa A Mestrinho, Sónia SF Sebastião, Maciej A Zwierucho, Aaron Lutchman, Lorrie Gaschen, Stephanie Goldschmidt, Graham Thatcher, Yu Izumisawa, Richard L Meeson
      Abstract: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectivesThe aim of this study was to characterise and describe patterns of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) injuries occurring in cats using CT.MethodsA cross-sectional study was carried out in adherence with the STROBE guidelines. Among the medical and CT records of 79 cats, 158 TMJs were reviewed in a collaborative study between six institutions.ResultsTMJ injuries were most commonly unilateral, representing 70.9% of cases. The mandibular condyle was fractured in 88 cases (55.7%) of the 158 TMJs observed. Of those, 84.0% were intra-articular condyle fractures, with the medial half of the mandibular condyle over-represented. Luxations occurred in 32.9% of cases, which was 19.0% of all evaluated TMJs. Rostrodorsal luxations were most common representing 87.0% of all luxations. Temporal bone fractures were observed in 30.4% of all cases, which was 18.4% of TMJs. The majority of fractures were of an unknown cause. When the cause was determined, road traffic accident (RTA) was the most frequent, followed by animal interaction, other external forces (sharp or blunt force) and high-rise trauma. Bilateral injuries were 13.1 times more likely to occur in high-rise trauma (P = 0.01) and temporal bone fracture was significantly associated with RTAs (P = 0.016). No other significant associations were observed between cause of injury and the resulting TMJ injury pattern.Conclusions and relevanceVarious TMJ injury patterns can occur in cats as a result of trauma. Intra-articular fractures of the medial half of the mandibular condyle occur most commonly. Although unilateral injuries are more frequent, high-rise trauma tends to present with bilateral lesions. Further studies with a larger sample size should be performed to better understand TMJ patterns of injury and how they relate to possible causes.
      Citation: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery
      PubDate: 2022-01-31T10:56:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1098612X211066654
       
 
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