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  Subjects -> VETERINARY SCIENCE (Total: 225 journals)
Showing 1 - 63 of 63 Journals sorted by number of followers
Animal Behaviour     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 178)
Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 29)
Veterinary Record     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Veterinary Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Australian Veterinary Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Veterinary Clinics of North America: Small Animal Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Animal Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 21)
Journal of Small Animal Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Journal of Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Equine Veterinary Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Veterinary Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Veterinary Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Veterinary Anaesthesia and Analgesia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
BMC Veterinary Research     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
American Journal of Primatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Equine Veterinary Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Canadian Journal of Veterinary Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
New Zealand Veterinary Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Veterinary and Comparative Oncology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Veterinary Radiology & Ultrasound     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Veterinary Diagnostic Investigation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Anthrozoos : A Multidisciplinary Journal of The Interactions of People & Animals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Veterinary Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Veterinary Immunology and Immunopathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Veterinary Clinics of North America: Equine Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Research in Veterinary Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Animals     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Equine Veterinary Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Veterinary Medical Education     Partially Free   (Followers: 11)
Veterinary Research     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Trends in Parasitology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Preventive Veterinary Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Veterinary Ophthalmology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Veterinary Clinical Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Veterinary Microbiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Veterinary Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Companion Animal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Veterinary Nurse     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
American Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Archives of Animal Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Veterinary Dermatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Research in Forestry, Wildlife and Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
African Journal of Wildlife Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Animal Reproduction Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Animal Feed Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Veterinary Pharmacology and Therapeutics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Veterinary Parasitology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Feline Medicine & Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Domestic Animal Endocrinology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Veterinary Science and Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Veterinary Science & Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Veterinary Nursing Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Veterinary Science & Medical Diagnosis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Veterinary Medicine International     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Research Journal of Veterinary Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Exotic Pet Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Veterinary Clinics of North America: Exotic Animal Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Avian Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Zoonoses and Public Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Equine Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Open Journal of Animal Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Topics in Companion Animal Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Irish Veterinary Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Animal Health Research Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Veterinary Clinics of North America: Food Animal Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Human & Veterinary Medicine - International Journal of the Bioflux Society     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Veterinary Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Transboundary and Emerging Diseases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Bangladesh Journal of Animal Science     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Onderstepoort Journal of Veterinary Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Ethiopian Veterinary Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Veterinary Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Asian Journal of Medical and Biological Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Asian Journal of Poultry Science     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Case Reports in Veterinary Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Frontiers in Veterinary Science     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Nutrición Animal Tropical     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
ILAR Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Medical Mycology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Bulletin of Animal Health and Production in Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Advanced Research in Life Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Australian Equine Veterinarian     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Indian Journal of Animal Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
New Zealand Veterinary Nurse     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Veterinary Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Open Journal of Veterinary Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Veterinary Medicine and Science     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian Journal of Veterinary Anatomy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Reproduction in Domestic Animals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Veterinary and Comparative Orthopaedics and Traumatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Small Ruminant Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
VCOT Open     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery Open Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Anatomia, Histologia, Embryologia: Journal of Veterinary Medicine Series C     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Kenya Veterinarian     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Theriogenology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Acta Veterinaria     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Abanico Veterinario     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Tropical Veterinarian     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Tanzania Veterinary Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Research & Reviews : Journal of Veterinary Science and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Bulletin of University of Agricultural Sciences and Veterinary Medicine Cluj-Napoca : Food Science and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Global Journal of Animal Scientific Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Buletin Peternakan : Bulletin of Animal Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Iranian Journal of Applied Animal Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Colombiana de Ciencias Pecuarias (Colombian journal of animal science and veterinary medicine)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Jurnal Veteriner     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Wartazoa. Indonesian Bulletin of Animal and Veterinary Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Jurnal Agripet     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Buletin Veteriner Udayana     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Pet Behaviour Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Veterinary Dentistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Advanced Veterinary Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Brazilian Journal of Veterinary Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Applied Animal Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Jurnal Ilmu dan Kesehatan Hewan (Veterinary Science and Medicine Journal)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Acta Veterinaria Hungarica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Veterinary Science Development     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of the Hellenic Veterinary Medical Society     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Polish Journal of Veterinary Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Veterinary Medicine: Research and Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Brasileira de Zootecnia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Mexicana de Ciencias Pecuarias     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Archivos de Medicina Veterinaria     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
veterinär spiegel     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Livestock     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Tropical Animal Health and Production     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Veterinary Quarterly     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Acta Veterinaria Scandinavica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of the South African Veterinary Association     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Brasileira de Higiene e Sanidade Animal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Veterinary Research Communications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Chilean Journal of Agricultural & Animal Sciences     Open Access  
CES Medicina Veterinaria y Zootecnia     Open Access  
Veterinaria México OA     Open Access  
Compendio de Ciencias Veterinarias     Open Access  
Iranian Journal of Veterinary Surgery     Open Access  
Ciencia Veterinaria     Open Access  
Nepalese Veterinary Journal     Open Access  
Sri Lanka Veterinary Journal     Open Access  
Salud y Tecnología Veterinaria     Open Access  
Veterinary Parasitology : X     Open Access  
Jurnal Medik Veteriner     Open Access  
Tierärztliche Praxis Ausgabe K: Kleintiere / Heimtiere     Hybrid Journal  
Tierärztliche Praxis Ausgabe G: Großtiere / Nutztiere     Hybrid Journal  
Van Veterinary Journal     Open Access  
Journal of Veterinary and Animal Sciences     Open Access  
Rassegna di Diritto, Legislazione e Medicina Legale Veterinaria     Open Access  
Veterinaria (Montevideo)     Open Access  
SVU-International Journal of Veterinary Sciences     Open Access  
Matrix Science Medica     Open Access  
Veterinary Journal of Mehmet Akif Ersoy University / Mehmet Akif Ersoy Üniversitesi Veteriner Fakültesi Dergisi     Open Access  
Analecta Veterinaria     Open Access  
Veterinarski Glasnik     Open Access  
Medicina Veterinária (UFRPE)     Open Access  
Veterinaria     Open Access  
Jurnal Sain Veteriner     Open Access  
International Journal of Tropical Veterinary and Biomedical Research     Open Access  
Revista de Ciência Veterinária e Saúde Pública     Open Access  
Jurnal Medika Veterinaria     Open Access  
Veterinary Parasitology : Regional Studies and Reports     Full-text available via subscription  
Revue Vétérinaire Clinique     Full-text available via subscription  
Folia Veterinaria     Open Access  
Science and Animal Health     Open Access  
FAVE Sección Ciencias Veterinarias     Open Access  
Revista Ciencias Veterinarias     Open Access  
Indonesia Medicus Veterinus     Open Access  
Spei Domus     Open Access  
Revista de Educação Continuada em Medicina Veterinária e Zootecnia     Open Access  
Cogent Food & Agriculture     Open Access  
Revista Veterinaria     Open Access  
Journal of the Selva Andina Research Society     Open Access  
Bangladesh Veterinarian     Open Access  
Journal of Buffalo Science     Hybrid Journal  
Revista de Ciências Agroveterinárias     Open Access  
Intas Polivet     Full-text available via subscription  
Atatürk Üniversitesi Veteriner Bilimleri Dergisi / Atatürk University Journal of Veterinary Sciences     Open Access  
Revue Marocaine des Sciences Agronomiques et Vétérinaires     Open Access  
Nigerian Veterinary Journal     Open Access  
Revista Brasileira de Ciência Veterinária     Open Access  
Schweizer Archiv für Tierheilkunde     Hybrid Journal  
Bangladesh Journal of Veterinary Medicine     Open Access  
Macedonian Veterinary Review     Open Access  
Annual Review of Animal Biosciences     Full-text available via subscription  
Revista de Investigaciones Veterinarias del Perú     Open Access  
Revista Complutense de Ciencias Veterinarias     Open Access  
Medical Mycology Case Reports     Open Access  
Veterinaria México     Open Access  
Revista de Salud Animal     Open Access  
Revista de Medicina Veterinaria     Open Access  
Revista MVZ Córdoba     Open Access  
Avances en Ciencias Veterinarias     Open Access  
InVet     Open Access  
Zeitschrift für Ganzheitliche Tiermedizin     Hybrid Journal  
team.konkret     Open Access  
pferde spiegel     Hybrid Journal  
kleintier konkret     Hybrid Journal  
Arquivo Brasileiro de Medicina Veterinária e Zootecnia     Open Access  

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Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Journal of Veterinary Dentistry
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.21
Number of Followers: 1  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0898-7564 - ISSN (Online) 2470-4083
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1174 journals]
  • Approach and Interfragmentary Stabilization of Caudal Mandibular Fracture
           in the Cat

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Katherine Kling, Sandra Manfra Marretta
      Abstract: Journal of Veterinary Dentistry, Ahead of Print.
      An approach to caudal mandibular fracture stabilization is described along with three cases wherein the approach was applied in relatively young cats with traumatic mandibular fractures caudal to or involving the mandibular first molar. This approach was well-tolerated and facilitated a quick return to function as supported by minimal or no reliance on esophageal feeding tubes.
      Citation: Journal of Veterinary Dentistry
      PubDate: 2022-09-30T06:44:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08987564221128663
       
  • A Standard Method for Intraoral Dental Radiography With Dental
           Photo-Stimulative Phosphor (PSP) Plates in Big Cats

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Eva Kopp, Peter Stelzer, Christine Lendl, Andrea Meyer-Lindenberg, Peter Fahrenkrug
      Abstract: Journal of Veterinary Dentistry, Ahead of Print.
      In recent years, dentistry has steadily gained more prominence in veterinary medicine, including exotic and wild animal medicine. It is known that dental diseases are among the most common diseases in captured big cats. However, so far, there is no standardized method for dental radiography in these animals. Therefore, this study aimed to develop a standardized procedure for the systematic radiographic examination of the teeth in big cats. In total, 34 big cats, including 21 lions and 13 tigers, of different ages were examined. Animals that needed treatment for known dental diseases and those that had to be anesthetized for other medically necessary procedures and dental health status examinations were included. Intraoral dental radiographs were captured with digital imaging plates designed for intraoral dental radiography in horses. Based on the intraoral dental radiography procedures used in domestic cats, both the bisecting angle technique and parallel technique were used. A hemisphere model originally developed for horses was used to describe the path and position of the x-ray beam as accurately as possible. The results demonstrated that it was possible to completely image all the teeth of big cat dentition on seven radiographs using the described method. This method can be used to acquire high-quality intraoral dental radiographs in big cats, aiding in the quick and reliable diagnosis of dental diseases.
      Citation: Journal of Veterinary Dentistry
      PubDate: 2022-09-26T05:39:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08987564221126373
       
  • Submucosal Injection of Activated Platelet-Rich Plasma for Treatment of
           Periodontal Disease in Dogs

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Cheng-Shu Chung, Yi-Fang Wei, Lee-Shuan Lin
      Abstract: Journal of Veterinary Dentistry, Ahead of Print.
      Periodontal disease is the most common oral disease seen in dogs, and its routine treatment usually involves dental scaling. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) therapy may enhance the effectiveness of treatment of periodontal disease, delay the progression of the disease and decrease the time under anesthesia. However, its application in dogs is rarely discussed. The objective of this study was to evaluate the benefits of activated PRP for treatment of periodontal disease in dogs. 43 mL of whole blood was collected from six adult dogs and PRP extracted using the double centrifugation tube method. Subsequently, the PRP was activated using calcium chloride (A-PRP). Significantly elevated concentrations of PDGF-BB (7000.28 pg/mL), TGF-β (378.98 pg/mL), and VEGF (7.14 pg/mL) were detected in the A-PRP. Additionally, three of the dogs with stage 2–3 periodontal disease were enrolled in the clinical trial. Periodontal pocket depth, stage of periodontal disease, gingival index, horizontal bone loss, and alveolar bone density involving the maxillary third and fourth premolar and first molar teeth (107, 108, 109, 207, 208, and 209) were evaluated. Teeth were treated by dental scaling alone (control group) or by dental scaling followed by submucosal injection of 0.1 mL A-PRP per site. After 56 days, significant improvement in periodontal pocket depth, stage of periodontal disease, gingival index, and horizontal bone loss was observed in dogs injected with A-PRP. The high concentrations of growth factors in A-PRP likely contributed to this effect. The use of submucosal injections of A-PRP to treat canine stage 2–3 periodontal disease appears safe and effective for clinical practice.
      Citation: Journal of Veterinary Dentistry
      PubDate: 2022-09-22T05:40:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08987564221124165
       
  • Abstracts from the 2022 Veterinary Dental Forum, September 28th –
           October 1st, Reno-Tahoe, Nevada, USA

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Journal of Veterinary Dentistry, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Veterinary Dentistry
      PubDate: 2022-09-20T06:29:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08987564221127613
       
  • Dental Disorders in Wild and Domestic Pigs (Sus Scrofa): A Review

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Michael Efeturi Okandeji, Ayodeji David Lijoka, Foluso Ayobami Atiba, Olufemi Adebukola Adebiyi, James Olukayode Olopade
      Abstract: Journal of Veterinary Dentistry, Ahead of Print.
      Teeth in the mouth of vertebrates represent the modified descendants of bony dermal plates of ancestral fishes. Dental disorders, which are deviations of dental tissues origins, are derived from any or all of the dental tissues; enamel, dentin or cementum, and include dental abnormalities and diseases. These disorders can be influenced by genetic or environmental factors, or an interplay of both factors. This article reviews disorders that have been reported in both wild and domestic pigs and the frequency of occurrence of these conditions.
      Citation: Journal of Veterinary Dentistry
      PubDate: 2022-09-20T06:28:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08987564221125398
       
  • Paying Forward

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Jan Bellows
      Abstract: Journal of Veterinary Dentistry, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Veterinary Dentistry
      PubDate: 2022-09-19T07:39:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08987564221126931
       
  • A Review of Dentinogenesis Imperfecta and Primary Dentin Disorders in Dogs

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      Authors: Jessica Mack Wilson, Cynthia Bell, Katherine Queck, Kristin Scott
      Abstract: Journal of Veterinary Dentistry, Ahead of Print.
      This review describes the clinical, radiographic and histologic characteristics of dentinogenesis imperfecta diagnosed in two unrelated young dogs without evidence of concurrent osteogenesis imperfecta. The dentition was noted to have generalized coronal discoloration ranging from grey-blue to golden brown. Clinical pulp exposure, coronal wear and fractures were observed as was radiographic evidence of endodontic disease, thin dentin walls or dystrophic obliteration of the pulp canal. The enamel was severely affected by attrition and abrasion despite histologically normal areas; loss was most likely due to poor adherence or support by the underlying abnormal dentin. Histologically, permanent and deciduous teeth examined showed thin, amorphous dentin without organized dentin tubules and odontoblasts had dysplastic cell morphology. Primary dentin disorders, including dentinogenesis imperfecta and dentin dysplasia, have been extensively studied and genetically characterized in humans but infrequently reported in dogs. Treatment in human patients is aimed at early recognition and multi-disciplinary intervention to restore and maintain normal occlusion, aesthetics, mastication and speech. Treatment in both humans and canine patients is discussed as is the documented genetic heritability of primary dentin disorders in humans.
      Citation: Journal of Veterinary Dentistry
      PubDate: 2022-09-15T06:14:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08987564221123419
       
  • Clinical, Diagnostic and Histological Findings Involving Cheek Teeth
           Hypercementosis in Nine Horses

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: James A. Brown, Brian G. Murphy, Kemba S. Clapp, Elise E. B. LaDouceur
      Abstract: Journal of Veterinary Dentistry, Ahead of Print.
      Hypercementosis is infrequently reported to affect the cheek teeth of horses and presents as mineral deposits either attached (peripheral) or solitary ovoid (nodular) structures in the tooth bearing region. There is overlap between radiological and histological appearance of hypercementosis, cementoma, and equine odontoclastic tooth resorption and hypercementosis (EOTRH). The clinical presentation, imaging features, surgical management, and histological findings of nine horses that presented for dental lesions and associated hypercementosis of cheek teeth are reported. Horses were 4-15 years old and presented for either nasal discharge or facial swelling. Peripheral and nodular mineral structures were identified using radiographs or computed tomography in six and three horses, respectively. Eight of nine cases involved maxillary cheek teeth. Of six cases with peripheral hypercementosis, three had enlargement of the apical cross-sectional area that was greater than the coronal cross-sectional area thus preventing extraction along the normal eruption pathway and necessitating sectioning (two cases) and repulsion. Nodular hypercementosis lesions were extracted in three of the four cases. Post-extraction complications occurred in five cases; four cases required additional procedures. All horses returned to their intended use, ie riding or pasture. Histology of extracted dental and proliferative mineral material revealed hypercementosis characterized by large sheets of eosinophilic matrix with lacunae (usually empty; presumed artifact) and frequent, irregular, basophilic cement lines. All cases had evidence of chronic inflammation, such as caries, chronic fractures and/or pulpitis. The findings of this case series share many features with previous published descriptions of cementoma and with histological findings of hypercementosis lesions of EOTRH. Further investigation into differentiation of these entities is warranted.
      Citation: Journal of Veterinary Dentistry
      PubDate: 2022-08-23T05:10:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08987564221121735
       
  • Clinical, Radiographic and Histologic Evaluation of 40 Cystic Oral Lesions
           in 37 Cats

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      Authors: Daniel J. Clayton, Cindy Bell, Kristina Feigin, Bonnie Shope
      Abstract: Journal of Veterinary Dentistry, Ahead of Print.
      Feline cystic oral lesions are uncommon and include odontogenic cysts and cystic odontogenic tumors. Accurate diagnosis requires close collaboration between the clinician's clinical and radiographic findings and the pathologist's histologic interpretations. The odontogenic cysts identified in this series include a periapical cyst, dentigerous cysts and a type of unclassified collateral cyst that appears to be a previously undefined, distinct entity in cats (UCC). Many of the cysts (52%) were unable to be classified due to insufficient diagnostic information, which often related to the associated tooth being unavailable for evaluation. Cystic odontogenic tumors included ameloblastomas, amyloid producing ameloblastomas (APA), and feline inductive odontogenic tumors (FIOT). The purpose of this case series was to assess correlations between clinical and radiographic findings, histopathologic interpretation and signalment to identify common characteristics and provide recommendations for clinicians and pathologists to optimize diagnostic efficiency and accuracy for cystic oral lesions in cats.
      Citation: Journal of Veterinary Dentistry
      PubDate: 2022-08-10T06:38:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08987564221119956
       
  • Thermographic Examination of the Gingiva of 16 Dogs

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Kürs¸ad Yiğitarslan, Candemir Özcan, Bekir Cetintav
      Abstract: Journal of Veterinary Dentistry, Ahead of Print.
      Gingivitis is a common periodontal disease in dogs and refers to inflammation of the gingiva. Gingival Index (GI), Papillary Bleeding Index (PBI) and Plaque Index (PI) are oral indices that describe the health status of the gingiva and which are based on human observation. Thermal changes due to inflammation are expected in gingivitis. Thermographic imaging, a wide-spread diagnostic tool in veterinary science, can be used for identification when there is abnormal body surface temperature in an area of the animal body. In this study, oral examination results and thermographic images obtained from 458 teeth from 16 dogs were used. Firstly, a thermal imaging procedure for diagnosis of gingival diseases of dogs was defined. Secondly, reference surface temperatures of tissues for each oral indices were determined. And thirdly, statistically significant thermal differences between the levels of each index was compared. The statistical analysis showed that there are significant thermal differences in some index levels and that presence or absence of plaque is an important etiologic factor in thermal examination of gingivitis. The study showed that thermographic images can be used to determine thermal changes in oral tissues of dogs with gingivitis.
      Citation: Journal of Veterinary Dentistry
      PubDate: 2022-08-02T07:16:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08987564221117738
       
  • Genomic Medicine in Periodontal Disease: Old Issue, New Insights

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      Authors: Nuno Gonçalves-Anjo, João Requicha, Andreia Teixeira, Isabel Dias, Carlos Viegas, Estela Bastos
      Abstract: Journal of Veterinary Dentistry, Ahead of Print.
      Genetic variability is the main cause of phenotypic variation. Some variants may be associated with several diseases and can be used as risk biomarkers, identifying animals with higher susceptibility to develop the pathology. Genomic medicine uses this genetic information for risk calculation, clinical diagnosis and prognosis, allowing the implementation of more effective preventive strategies and/or personalized therapies. Periodontal disease (PD) is the inflammation of the periodontium induced mainly by bacterial plaque and is the leading cause of tooth loss. Microbial factors are responsible for the PD initiation; however, several studies support the genetic influence on the PD progression. The main purpose of the present publication is to highlight the main steps involved in the genomic medicine applied to veterinary patients, describing the flowchart from the characterization of the genetic variants to the identification of potential associations with specific clinical data. After investigating which genes might potentially be implicated in canine PD, the RANK gene, involved in the regulation of osteoclastogenesis, was selected to illustrate this approach. A case-control study was performed using DNA samples from a population of 90 dogs – 50 being healthy and 40 with PD. This analysis allowed for the discovery of four new intronic variations that were banked in GenBank (g.85A>G, g.151G>T, g.268A>G and g.492T>C). The results of this study are not intended to be applied exclusively to PD. On the contrary, this genetic information is intended to be used by other researchers as a foundation for the development of multiple applications in the veterinary clinical field.
      Citation: Journal of Veterinary Dentistry
      PubDate: 2022-06-29T05:18:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08987564221109102
       
  • Correlation Between Radiographic and Histopathologic Findings Associated
           with Unerupted Teeth in Dogs

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      Authors: Jason P. Hutt, Mary Krakowski Volker, Melissa D. Sánchez
      Abstract: Journal of Veterinary Dentistry, Ahead of Print.
      An association between unerupted teeth and dentigerous cysts is well known,– however little is known about the presence of disease and histopathologic changes in unerupted teeth without radiographic evidence of cyst formation. Forty-two dogs representing 25 breeds, ranging in age from 5 months to 12 years were selected based on radiographic evidence of an unerupted tooth or teeth, either as a primary complaint or incidental finding. Dogs meeting the study criteria were presented to a private dental referral practice within a period of eighteen months from December 2016 through May 2018. Patients were treated with conservative en bloc resection of the unerupted tooth and overlying bone as well as debridement of any cystic structure and biopsy of the samples collected. Radiographs were evaluated using criteria previously established to assess for evidence of a cyst., – A total of 68 unerupted teeth were identified; 63 (92.7%) were mandibular first premolar teeth. Of the 63 unerupted mandibular first premolar teeth, 28 (44.4%) had radiographic evidence of a cystic structure. Histopathology revealed that 21 of 28 (75.0%) had evidence of non-keratinizing stratified squamous epithelium consistent with a cyst lining. Of the remaining 35 of 63 (55.6%) mandibular first premolar teeth with no radiographic evidence of a cyst, 27 (77.1%) had no histologic evidence of epithelium associated with the impacted tooth. Notably however, the remaining 8 of 35 (22.9%) unerupted teeth without radiographic evidence of a cyst did have histologic evidence of non-keratinizing stratified squamous epithelium associated with the impacted tooth.
      Citation: Journal of Veterinary Dentistry
      PubDate: 2022-06-17T06:10:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08987564221108520
       
  • Dental Pain in Cats: A Prospective 6-Month Study

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      Authors: Isabel Palmeira, Maria João Fonseca, Céline Lafont-Lecuelle, Patrick Pageat, Alessandro Cozzi, Pietro Asproni, João Filipe Requicha, Joana de Oliveira
      Abstract: Journal of Veterinary Dentistry, Ahead of Print.
      Dental pathology is among the most ubiquitous diseases in cats of all ages. Dental pain is yet to be fully understood in cats and therefore its presence is often missed. To better understand feline dental disease as a pain trigger during routine examination and whether disease severity correlates to the degree of pain, a 6-month prospective study in a cats’ only veterinary hospital in Portugal was conducted. Sixty-four cats that randomly presented for different clinical procedures were evaluated. Dental and periodontal abnormalities (primary dental parameters, PDP), as well as clinical signs related to dental pain (secondary dental parameters, SDP), were assessed. All cats underwent an oral cavity examination, upon which, the Feline Acute Pain Scale from Colorado State University Veterinary Teaching Hospital (CPS), was used in order to assess pain. Six PDP (periodontal disease, gingival index, calculus index, tooth resorption, tooth fracture and missing teeth) and five SDP (mouth discomfort, halitosis, hypersalivation, difficulty in holding food and several attempts at prehension of food), were compared with CPS pain scores. All SDP were significantly associated to higher CPS pain scores (p 
      Citation: Journal of Veterinary Dentistry
      PubDate: 2022-05-23T06:14:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08987564221103142
       
  • Oral Pathology in Portuguese Dogs: An Eight-Year Biopsy-Based
           Retrospective Study

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      Authors: Leonor Delgado, Paula Brilhante-Simões, Justina Prada, Luis Monteiro
      Abstract: Journal of Veterinary Dentistry, Ahead of Print.
      The oral cavity of the dog can be the site of several types of pathology including both benign and malignant lesions. The aim of this study was to analyze the frequency and clinical-pathological characteristics of oral lesions present in a cohort of Portuguese dogs. A retrospective observational cross-sectional study on 704 canine oral lesions submitted for histopathological diagnosis to a Veterinary Pathology Center in the north of Portugal from 2010 to 2017 was performed. Gender, age, location of the lesion and the histopathological diagnosis was analysed. From the 704 cases included, 307 (43.6%) were females and 397 (56.4%) males. The mean age was 9.53 ± 3.6 years-old (range 3 to 240 months). The site most frequently affected was the gingiva (n = 283; 40.2%). 342 (48.6%) cases were malignant neoplasms, most represented by oral melanoma (n = 129; 37.7%). 256 (36.4%) cases were benign neoplasms, most represented by fibromatous epulis of periodontal ligament origin/peripheral odontogenic fibroma (FEPLO/POF) (n = 208;81.3%). 106 (15%) were non-neoplastic lesions, most represented by gingival hyperplasia (n = 25, 23.6%). This study provides useful information about frequency and distribution of oral lesions in dogs over a period of eight years allowing valuable comparison with other countries and other species. The most common benign tumours were FEPLO/POF while oral melanoma was the most common malignant tumour.
      Citation: Journal of Veterinary Dentistry
      PubDate: 2022-05-11T07:34:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08987564221098107
       
  • The Effect of Two Different Doses of Astaxanthin on Alveolar Bone Loss in
           an Experimental Model of Periodontitis in Diabetic Rats

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      Authors: Aysan Lektemur Alpan, Metin Çalışır
      First page: 224
      Abstract: Journal of Veterinary Dentistry, Ahead of Print.
      This study evaluated the effects of astaxanthin (ASX) on alveolar bone loss, receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL), and osteoprotegerin (OPG) activity in ligature-induced periodontitis in diabetic rats. Diabetes mellitus (DM) was induced with 50 mg/kg intraperitoneal streptozotocin in 40 male Wistar rats. The Wistar rats were divided into six experimental groups: non-ligated (NL; n = 6); ligature only (L; n = 6); DM only (D; n = 6); DM + ligature (DP; n = 6); DM + ligature + 1 mg/kg/day ASX (ASX 1 group; n = 8); and DM + ligature + astaxanthin 5 mg/kg/day ASX (ASX 5 group; n = 8). Silk ligatures were placed along the gingival margin of the left mandibular first molar tooth. The study duration was 11 days, after which the animals were euthanised. Changes in alveolar bone levels were clinically measured, and RANKL and OPG activities were immunohistochemically examined. Alveolar bone loss was the most significant in the DP group (p 
      Citation: Journal of Veterinary Dentistry
      PubDate: 2022-04-15T05:53:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08987564221093736
       
  • Assessment of Extractions of Deciduous Mandibular Canine Teeth to Correct
           Linguoversion Malocclusion in 17 Dogs

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      Authors: Kirk Herrmann, Kendall Taney
      First page: 234
      Abstract: Journal of Veterinary Dentistry, Ahead of Print.
      A search of medical records at the Center for Veterinary Dentistry and Oral Surgery, Gaithersburg, MD was conducted to identify patients who received extractions of deciduous mandibular canine teeth to treat linguoversion. Patients were included if they were less than 5.5 months of age and had a diagnosis of deciduous class 2 or bilateral class 1 malocclusions. Treatment was considered a success if normocclusion of the permanent dentition was achieved at follow up evaluation. Seventeen patients represented 13 different breeds. No significant correlation was seen between age of treatment (mean age 3.34 months) or sex (11 males, 6 females). Six patients had class 1 malocclusions (35.29%) and eleven patients had class 2 malocclusion (64.71%). Of the six dogs treated for class 1 malocclusions, two had traumatic palatal contact and four had only minor soft tissue contact. Eleven cases of class 2 malocclusion were treated and of these there was one mild, six moderate, and four severe cases of mandibular distocclusion. All cases treated for class 1 malocclusions had a successful outcome resulting in permanent normocclusion (100%), while class 2 malocclusions had success in three of eleven cases (27.27%). The outcomes based on occlusion type were determined to be significant (p = 0.009). All participants had immediate relief of soft tissue trauma and no significant side effects of treatment were recorded. The results show that extractions of deciduous linguoverted mandibular canine teeth (LMC) can immediately improve traumatic impingement and may be a factor in providing a comfortable and functional adult occlusion. Further investigation with a larger sample size would be warranted.
      Citation: Journal of Veterinary Dentistry
      PubDate: 2022-05-27T05:38:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08987564221099133
       
  • A Mass Spectrometric Approach to the Proteomic Profiling of the Canis
           lupus familiaris Acquired Enamel Pellicle on Hydroxyapatite Discs

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      Authors: Melissa M. Grant, Sabah Pasha, Taichi Inui, Iain Chapple, Steve Harris, Lucy Holcombe
      First page: 241
      Abstract: Journal of Veterinary Dentistry, Ahead of Print.
      The acquired enamel pellicle (AEP) is a multi-protein film attached to the surface of teeth, which functions to lubricate the dental surface, form an anti-erosive barrier and exhibits antimicrobial properties. The initiation of AEP formation occurs within seconds of exposure to saliva, a biofluid rich in protein species. While there have been many publications on the formation of human AEP there is little research on the composition of canine AEP during its acquisition. The aim of these studies was to explore the composition of canine AEP formation, utilising hydroxyapatite (HA) discs as a tooth substitute matrix, over time. Qualitative and quantitative proteomics techniques using tandem mass tag labelled peptides and LC-MS/MS were used to follow the formation of canine AEP on hydroxyapatite discs over the course of an hour. Proteins adsorbed to the HA surface included highly abundant proteins in canine saliva, antimicrobial proteins, protease inhibitors and the buffering agent carbonic anhydrase. Greater understanding of the canine AEP deepens fundamental knowledge of the early processes driving bacterial colonisation of the tooth surface and subsequent plaque accumulation.
      Citation: Journal of Veterinary Dentistry
      PubDate: 2022-05-13T06:58:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08987564221097188
       
  • Radiographic Outcome of the Endodontic Treatment of 55 Fractured Canine
           Teeth in 43 Dogs (2013-2018)

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      Authors: Alexander I. Adrian, Michael Balke, Rebecca Lynch, Lisa Fink
      First page: 250
      Abstract: Journal of Veterinary Dentistry, Ahead of Print.
      Medical records from 4 private practice veterinary dentistry specialty clinics were reviewed for a 5-year period (2013-2018) to identify dogs that had a fractured canine tooth treated by root canal therapy and returned for subsequent follow-up evaluation. Evaluation criteria included the presence of complete medical records with diagnostic quality intraoral radiographs for each procedure visit with a minimum of 6 months between visits. Forty-three dogs with a total of 55 endodontically treated canine teeth were identified and evaluated. Root canal treatment outcome was defined as successful, no evidence of failure (NEF), or failure based on radiographic findings. Patient age, time from initial treatment to follow-up, obturation material used, radiographic quality of obturation (including voids, overfill, and retention of fractured endodontic files), radiographic evidence of periapical disease and/or presence of external inflammatory root resorption (EIRR), and the presence or absence of a full coverage metal crown were evaluated. Treatment was classified as successful in 51 (92.73%) teeth, NEF in 3 (5.45%) teeth, and failure in 1 (1.82%) tooth. The results suggest that endodontic treatment of fractured canine teeth in dogs is a successful treatment option that allows for retention of this functionally important tooth.
      Citation: Journal of Veterinary Dentistry
      PubDate: 2022-05-12T12:54:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08987564221101091
       
  • Past, Present, and Future Trends of Nickel Titanium Rotary Instrumentation

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      Authors: Melissa Guillory, Patrick Vall
      First page: 257
      Abstract: Journal of Veterinary Dentistry, Ahead of Print.
      This article reviews the historical development, properties, and trends of nickel titanium rotary instrumentation use for the veterinary endodontist.
      Citation: Journal of Veterinary Dentistry
      PubDate: 2022-05-19T04:32:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08987564221098566
       
  • Mandibular Blastomycosis in a 5-Year-Old Dog

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      Authors: Caroline Washington, April Paulman, Barbara L. Stapleton
      First page: 269
      Abstract: Journal of Veterinary Dentistry, Ahead of Print.
      A case of localized oral mandibular blastomycosis is described in a five-year-old dog. Complete resolution of clinical signs and oral radiographic changes were seen following itraconazole therapy at 5 mg/kg/day for four and a half months. The patient remained free of Blastomyces at the one year follow up based on the Mira Vista Blastomyces urine antigen test by EIA (Enzyme Immunoassay)a. A literature review of localized blastomycosis cases in humans and dogs was performed, available diagnostic tests evaluated, and treatment comparisons made.
      Citation: Journal of Veterinary Dentistry
      PubDate: 2022-05-03T11:42:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08987564221098166
       
  • Unilateral, Rostral Maxillary Sinusitis Resulting from Displacement and
           Retention of an Alveolar Plug in a 4-Year-Old Horse

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      Authors: Gideon P. Stemmet, Mickaël P. Robert, Yolandi Smit
      First page: 278
      Abstract: Journal of Veterinary Dentistry, Ahead of Print.
      Sinusitis is a common occurrence in horses and often develops secondary to dental disease. Extraction of cheek teeth in horses is associated with variable degrees of complications and although postoperative displacement and retention of alveolar plugs has been identified as one such potential complication, few cases of resulting sinusitis have been reported. This manuscript describes a four-year-old Thoroughbred mare that was presented for chronic unilateral left-sided mucopurulent nasal discharge after extraction of the left maxillary second molar tooth two months earlier. Radiographic and computed tomographic (CT) examinations revealed a well circumscribed, soft tissue opacity in the left rostral sinus compartment. Intraoral examination revealed feed impacted in the alveolus of the extracted tooth and an oral sinus fistula. Upper airway endoscopy showed thick, purulent material at the nasomaxillary aperture. Sinoscopy showed unexpectedly clean frontal, dorsal conchal and caudal maxillary sinuses. The alveolar dental plug associated with previous exodontia became apparent within the sinus and was removed through the sinoscopy portal. Repeat endoscopies confirmed progressive clearance of the sinusitis during hospitalization. Unilateral nasal discharge returned three months later. An abscess within the sinus had formed. Complete resolution of the sinusitis was achieved after lancing the abscess and further sinus lavage. Sinoscopy through a frontal sinus trephination portal proved useful in diagnosis and treatment. Detailed evaluation of structures allowed for rapid establishment of adequate drainage and communication between all sinus compartments without osteoplastic surgery.
      Citation: Journal of Veterinary Dentistry
      PubDate: 2022-05-30T06:35:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08987564221104206
       
  • Combined Gap and Interpositional Arthroplasty Utilizing Three-Dimensional
           Printed Model in a Dog with Temporomandibular Joint Ankylosis and
           Pseudoankylosis

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      Authors: Emily Renner, Graham Thatcher
      First page: 284
      Abstract: Journal of Veterinary Dentistry, Ahead of Print.
      Objective: To report the surgical treatment of a canine with both ankylosis and pseudoankylosis of temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Methods: The patient presented for inability to open his mouth. Facial asymmetry with normal dental occlusion was appreciated and computed tomography (CT) was performed. CT was used to diagnose ankylsosis and pseudoankylosis of left TMJ secondary to chronic maxillofacial trauma. A gap arthroplasty followed by interpositional arthroplasty using temporalis muscle fascia was performed to remove the site of fusion and prevent re-ankylosis between remaining cut boney surfaces. A three-dimensional (3D) printed skull for surgical planning and intraoperative spatial localization was employed. Results: Following preoperative and intraoperative evaluation of the 3D printed skull, the surgery was performed successfully without major complications. The patient's TMJ range of motion was markedly improved and remains improved as noted by inter-incisal distance measurements, ability to pant, and ease of chewing. Conclusion: A combined Gap and interpositional arthroplasty was assisted with the use of a 3D printed skull and immediately resulted in improved TMJ range of motion and patient quality of life. Three-month postoperative CT revealed stable ostectomies with no complications, with the exception of left-sided disuse masticatory muscle atrophy. Long-term follow-up is warranted. Clinical Significance: Three-dimensional printed skull models may be utilized preoperatively and intraoperatively to determine individual variants and landmarks, especially in cases where anatomical structures are difficult to recognize. Gap arthroplasty with interpositional myofascial transposition is an option for a patient with both anklyosis and pseudoankylosis of the TMJ.
      Citation: Journal of Veterinary Dentistry
      PubDate: 2022-06-01T05:43:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08987564221100670
       
  • Abstracts for 2022 Veterinary Dental Forum, September 28th – October
           1st, Reno-Tahoe, Nevada, USA

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      First page: 290
      Abstract: Journal of Veterinary Dentistry, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Veterinary Dentistry
      PubDate: 2022-07-19T06:27:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08987564221113404
       
  • Instructions for Authors - JOVD

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      First page: 297
      Abstract: Journal of Veterinary Dentistry, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Veterinary Dentistry
      PubDate: 2022-07-14T08:12:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08987564221112315
       
 
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