A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z  

        1 2        [Sort alphabetically]   [Restore default list]

  Subjects -> VETERINARY SCIENCE (Total: 225 journals)
Showing 1 - 63 of 63 Journals sorted by number of followers
Animal Behaviour     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 157)
Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 29)
Veterinary Record     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Veterinary Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Australian Veterinary Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Veterinary Clinics of North America: Small Animal Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Journal of Small Animal Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Animal Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 21)
Journal of Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Equine Veterinary Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Veterinary Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Veterinary Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Veterinary Anaesthesia and Analgesia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
American Journal of Primatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
BMC Veterinary Research     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Canadian Journal of Veterinary Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Equine Veterinary Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
New Zealand Veterinary Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Veterinary and Comparative Oncology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Veterinary Radiology & Ultrasound     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Anthrozoos : A Multidisciplinary Journal of The Interactions of People & Animals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Veterinary Diagnostic Investigation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Veterinary Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Veterinary Immunology and Immunopathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Research in Veterinary Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Veterinary Clinics of North America: Equine Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Animals     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Veterinary Medical Education     Partially Free   (Followers: 11)
Preventive Veterinary Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Trends in Parasitology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Veterinary Research     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Equine Veterinary Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Veterinary Ophthalmology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Veterinary Clinical Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Companion Animal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Veterinary Nurse     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
American Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Veterinary Dermatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Archives of Animal Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Veterinary Microbiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Veterinary Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Animal Reproduction Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Animal Feed Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Domestic Animal Endocrinology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Veterinary Science and Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Feline Medicine & Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Veterinary Parasitology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
African Journal of Wildlife Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Veterinary Pharmacology and Therapeutics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Research in Forestry, Wildlife and Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Veterinary Science & Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Veterinary Nursing Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Veterinary Science & Medical Diagnosis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Veterinary Medicine International     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Research Journal of Veterinary Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Veterinary Clinics of North America: Exotic Animal Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Exotic Pet Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Topics in Companion Animal Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Zoonoses and Public Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Bangladesh Journal of Animal Science     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Open Journal of Animal Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Avian Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Animal Health Research Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Irish Veterinary Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Veterinary Clinics of North America: Food Animal Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Veterinary Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Equine Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Human & Veterinary Medicine - International Journal of the Bioflux Society     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Transboundary and Emerging Diseases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Onderstepoort Journal of Veterinary Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Nutrición Animal Tropical     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Australian Equine Veterinarian     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Ethiopian Veterinary Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Frontiers in Veterinary Science     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Asian Journal of Poultry Science     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Asian Journal of Medical and Biological Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Medical Mycology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Case Reports in Veterinary Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Veterinary Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Bulletin of Animal Health and Production in Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
ILAR Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Veterinary Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Indian Journal of Veterinary Anatomy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Indian Journal of Animal Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Kenya Veterinarian     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Open Journal of Veterinary Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Veterinary Medicine and Science     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
VCOT Open     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery Open Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Advanced Research in Life Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Theriogenology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Reproduction in Domestic Animals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
New Zealand Veterinary Nurse     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Anatomia, Histologia, Embryologia: Journal of Veterinary Medicine Series C     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Small Ruminant Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Research & Reviews : Journal of Veterinary Science and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Bulletin of University of Agricultural Sciences and Veterinary Medicine Cluj-Napoca : Food Science and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Tropical Veterinarian     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Tanzania Veterinary Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Pet Behaviour Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Jurnal Ilmu dan Kesehatan Hewan (Veterinary Science and Medicine Journal)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Global Journal of Animal Scientific Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Buletin Peternakan : Bulletin of Animal Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Iranian Journal of Applied Animal Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Colombiana de Ciencias Pecuarias (Colombian journal of animal science and veterinary medicine)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Abanico Veterinario     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Jurnal Veteriner     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Veterinary and Comparative Orthopaedics and Traumatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Jurnal Agripet     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Buletin Veteriner Udayana     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Veterinary Dentistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Advanced Veterinary Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Brazilian Journal of Veterinary Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Applied Animal Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Acta Veterinaria Hungarica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Austral Journal of Veterinary Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Veterinary Science Development     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Acta Veterinaria Scandinavica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Veterinary Medicine: Research and Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Livestock     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Revista Mexicana de Ciencias Pecuarias     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Archivos de Medicina Veterinaria     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Tropical Animal Health and Production     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Veterinary Quarterly     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
veterinär spiegel     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Polish Journal of Veterinary Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Brasileira de Zootecnia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Brasileira de Higiene e Sanidade Animal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of the South African Veterinary Association     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of the Hellenic Veterinary Medical Society     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Veterinary Research Communications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Chilean Journal of Agricultural & Animal Sciences     Open Access  
CES Medicina Veterinaria y Zootecnia     Open Access  
Veterinaria México OA     Open Access  
Compendio de Ciencias Veterinarias     Open Access  
Iranian Journal of Veterinary Surgery     Open Access  
Ciencia Veterinaria     Open Access  
Nepalese Veterinary Journal     Open Access  
Sri Lanka Veterinary Journal     Open Access  
Salud y Tecnología Veterinaria     Open Access  
Veterinary Parasitology : X     Open Access  
Jurnal Medik Veteriner     Open Access  
Tierärztliche Praxis Ausgabe K: Kleintiere / Heimtiere     Hybrid Journal  
Tierärztliche Praxis Ausgabe G: Großtiere / Nutztiere     Hybrid Journal  
Van Veterinary Journal     Open Access  
Journal of Veterinary and Animal Sciences     Open Access  
Rassegna di Diritto, Legislazione e Medicina Legale Veterinaria     Open Access  
Veterinaria (Montevideo)     Open Access  
SVU-International Journal of Veterinary Sciences     Open Access  
Matrix Science Medica     Open Access  
Veterinary Journal of Mehmet Akif Ersoy University / Mehmet Akif Ersoy Üniversitesi Veteriner Fakültesi Dergisi     Open Access  
Analecta Veterinaria     Open Access  
Veterinarski Glasnik     Open Access  
Medicina Veterinária (UFRPE)     Open Access  
Veterinaria     Open Access  
Jurnal Sain Veteriner     Open Access  
International Journal of Tropical Veterinary and Biomedical Research     Open Access  
Revista de Ciência Veterinária e Saúde Pública     Open Access  
Jurnal Medika Veterinaria     Open Access  
Veterinary Parasitology : Regional Studies and Reports     Full-text available via subscription  
Revue Vétérinaire Clinique     Full-text available via subscription  
Folia Veterinaria     Open Access  
Science and Animal Health     Open Access  
FAVE Sección Ciencias Veterinarias     Open Access  
Revista Ciencias Veterinarias     Open Access  
Wartazoa. Indonesian Bulletin of Animal and Veterinary Sciences     Open Access  
Indonesia Medicus Veterinus     Open Access  
Spei Domus     Open Access  
Revista de Educação Continuada em Medicina Veterinária e Zootecnia     Open Access  
Cogent Food & Agriculture     Open Access  
Revista Veterinaria     Open Access  
Journal of the Selva Andina Research Society     Open Access  
Bangladesh Veterinarian     Open Access  
Journal of Buffalo Science     Hybrid Journal  
Revista de Ciências Agroveterinárias     Open Access  
Intas Polivet     Full-text available via subscription  
Atatürk Üniversitesi Veteriner Bilimleri Dergisi / Atatürk University Journal of Veterinary Sciences     Open Access  
Revue Marocaine des Sciences Agronomiques et Vétérinaires     Open Access  
Acta Veterinaria     Open Access  
Nigerian Veterinary Journal     Open Access  
Revista Brasileira de Ciência Veterinária     Open Access  
Schweizer Archiv für Tierheilkunde     Hybrid Journal  
Bangladesh Journal of Veterinary Medicine     Open Access  
Macedonian Veterinary Review     Open Access  
Annual Review of Animal Biosciences     Full-text available via subscription  
Revista de Investigaciones Veterinarias del Perú     Open Access  
Revista Complutense de Ciencias Veterinarias     Open Access  
Medical Mycology Case Reports     Open Access  
Veterinaria México     Open Access  
Revista de Salud Animal     Open Access  
Revista de Medicina Veterinaria     Open Access  
Revista MVZ Córdoba     Open Access  
Avances en Ciencias Veterinarias     Open Access  
InVet     Open Access  
Zeitschrift für Ganzheitliche Tiermedizin     Hybrid Journal  
team.konkret     Open Access  
pferde spiegel     Hybrid Journal  
kleintier konkret     Hybrid Journal  

        1 2        [Sort alphabetically]   [Restore default list]

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery Open Reports
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.793
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 2  

  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
ISSN (Online) 2055-1169
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1174 journals]
  • Successful treatment of local anaesthetic toxicity using intralipid 20%
           emulsion following intrathoracic bupivacaine overdose in a cat

    • Authors: Sarah Caulfield, Erica Tinson, Rachael Birkbeck
      Abstract: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery Open Reports, Volume 8, Issue 1, January-June 2022.
      Case summaryAn 8.75-year-old male neutered Burmese cat was referred for treatment of pyothorax. The cat was responsive, cardiovascularly stable and tachypnoeic (40 breaths/min) on arrival. Medical management of pyothorax was initiated, bilateral thoracic drains were placed and thoracic lavage using aliquots of saline 0.9% was performed every 4 h. Regional analgesia was provided using 1 mg/kg of intrapleural bupivacaine divided equally between the left and right hemithoraxes every 6 h. On the second day of hospitalisation, the cat developed hypersalivation, mydriasis and tonic–clonic seizure activity 25 mins after accidental intrapleural administration of a 10 mg/kg bupivacaine overdose. Cardiovascular compromise was also noted; the cat became bradycardic (120 beats/min) and blood pressure decreased to 110 mmHg. Clinical signs resolved after administration of intravenous lipid emulsion (ILE) as an intravenous (IV) bolus (1.5 ml/kg over 5 mins), followed by a continuous rate infusion (0.25 ml/kg/min over 25 mins). Local anaesthetic intrapleural anaesthesia was discontinued. There was recrudescence of clinical signs 10 h post-overdose and repeat ILE 20% infusion was required. The cat was discharged with no ongoing complications.Relevance and novel informationTreatment of IV local anaesthetic systemic toxicity with ILE has been reported in cats. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of intrapleural bupivacaine overdose with initial response and resolution of clinical signs followed by recrudescence and subsequent successful treatment using ILE.
      Citation: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery Open Reports
      PubDate: 2022-06-24T06:51:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20551169221104552
      Issue No: Vol. 8, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Acute nephrotic-range glomerular proteinuria following ibuprofen
           intoxication in two cats

    • Authors: Yaiza Herrero, Claudia Iannucci, Nora Schreiber, Bernard D Hansen, Alessio Vigani
      Abstract: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery Open Reports, Volume 8, Issue 1, January-June 2022.
      Case series summaryIn this report we describe the origin of protein loss and development of acute kidney injury after ibuprofen intoxication in two cats. Two 13-month-old neutered male domestic shorthair siblings were presented with acute kidney injury (AKI) and severe glomerular proteinuria following witnessed ibuprofen intoxication 3 days prior. Both cats presented with severe azotaemia (creatinine >900 µmol/l [>10 mg/dl]) and severe proteinuria (urine protein:creatinine [UPC]>20, normal
      Citation: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery Open Reports
      PubDate: 2022-06-21T11:43:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20551169221104551
      Issue No: Vol. 8, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Polysulfone tailor-made implant for the surgical correction of a
           frontoparietal meningoencephalocoele in a cat

    • Authors: Alba Farré Mariné, Martí Pumarola, Alejandro Luján Feliu-Pascual
      Abstract: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery Open Reports, Volume 8, Issue 1, January-June 2022.
      Case summaryA 6-week-old entire female domestic shorthair cat was presented for evaluation of a soft bulge and a palpable skull defect on the forehead, present since adoption a few days earlier. The neurological examination revealed an absent menace response bilaterally and apparent blindness, localising the lesion to the occipital cortex. The main differential diagnoses were meningocoele (MC) and meningoencephalocoele (MEC). Surgical repair was proposed once the cat reached adult size. Meanwhile, the cat developed seizures and was treated with anticonvulsant therapy. At 6 months of age, CT confirmed a frontoparietal MEC with associated porencephaly. Based on a three-dimensional printed skull mould, a polysulfone implant was created. The meninges were dissected from the skin, a durectomy was performed and samples of the protruding brain were obtained. Part of the cerebrospinal fluid was drained until the size of the protruding brain decreased enough to be included below the implant that was anchored on top of the skull with cerclages. Histopathology confirmed the diagnosis of MEC. Three years and 7 months later, the cat had partially recovered vision but continued to seize monthly despite antiepileptic drugs.Relevance and novel informationMC/MEC is a relatively uncommon disease reported in companion animals, and only four cases of surgical management have been described, and did not use a polysulfone tailor-made implant. In human medicine, surgical intervention is the treatment of choice. This case highlights a new implant option for surgical correction of MEC with good long-term result and no complications after 3 years and 7 months.
      Citation: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery Open Reports
      PubDate: 2022-06-07T12:15:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20551169221098940
      Issue No: Vol. 8, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Pancreatic leiomyosarcoma in a domestic shorthair cat

    • Authors: Diego Bobis Villagrá, Mariana Almeida, Alistair Cox, Elisabeth Henderson
      Abstract: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery Open Reports, Volume 8, Issue 1, January-June 2022.
      Case summaryA 7-year-old female neutered domestic shorthair cat was presented with weight loss, abdominal distension, lethargy, pyrexia and hyporexia. Haematology and biochemistry were unremarkable. Abdominal ultrasound revealed a cystic mass within the left cranial abdominal quadrant, adjacent to the pancreas, stomach and spleen. CT revealed a 10.5 cm, rounded, well-encapsulated, hypodense mass arising from the left pancreatic lobe. The remaining organs of the abdominal and thoracic cavity were unremarkable. A partial left lobe pancreatectomy and splenic lymph node removal were performed. Histopathology of the pancreatic mass reported a proliferating population of neoplastic spindle cells most consistent with a preliminary diagnosis of soft tissue sarcoma. Immunohistochemistry characteristics, together with the morphological findings, were consistent with a diagnosis of leiomyosarcoma. The patient recovered without any concerns after receiving routine postoperative care. Clinical examination and abdominal ultrasound 5 months postoperatively revealed no abnormalities.Relevance and novel informationTo our knowledge, this is the first report of pancreatic leiomyosarcoma in a cat. Pancreatic leiomyosarcoma should be considered as one of the possible differential diagnoses for cats presenting with a pancreatic mass.
      Citation: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery Open Reports
      PubDate: 2022-06-07T07:35:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20551169221098328
      Issue No: Vol. 8, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Negative pressure wound therapy over two ipsilateral external skeletal
           fixators for management of high grade open fractures in a cat

    • Authors: Athina Karpozilou, Anna Frykfors von Hekkel, Andrew Phillips
      Abstract: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery Open Reports, Volume 8, Issue 1, January-June 2022.
      Case summaryA 7-month-old female neutered Bengal cat was referred to the Queen Mother Hospital for Animals following unknown trauma. Clinical and radiographic examination revealed a grade IIIB open, comminuted, mid-diaphyseal fracture of the left tibia and fibula, and grade IIIB open mid-diaphyseal fractures of the left metatarsals II–V. The fractures were stabilised with tibial and metatarsal external skeletal fixators. The open wounds were initially debrided surgically using conventional dressings, resulting in a small amount of circumferential granulation tissue formation by 10 days postoperatively. Following this 10-day period of conventional wound management, negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) was applied over the external skeletal fixators and wounds. After 8 days of NPWT complete granulation tissue coverage was achieved in the tibial wound, and only small areas of two metatarsals remained exposed. The tibial wound was left to heal by second intention; a free meshed skin graft was applied to the pedal wound. Twenty weeks postoperatively, all wounds had completely healed and revision surgery with internal fixation was performed to treat a non-union of the tibia. Thirty weeks after the initial surgery, radiographic union of the tibia and metatarsals II–IV was confirmed.Relevance and novel informationThis is the first report of NPWT application over external fixation for the management of wounds associated with open fractures in veterinary medicine. This case was presented to introduce a novel, well-tolerated and simple technique for the management of tissue loss over an open fracture immobilised with external fixation.
      Citation: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery Open Reports
      PubDate: 2022-05-09T09:52:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20551169221092654
      Issue No: Vol. 8, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Surgical treatment of a circumferential oesophagogastric mass associated
           with a peritoneopericardial diaphragmatic hernia in a Maine Coon cat

    • Authors: Maxime G Derré, Laurent Findji, Gerard McLauchlan, Sérgio Guilherme
      Abstract: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery Open Reports, Volume 8, Issue 1, January-June 2022.
      Case summaryA 7-month-old intact female Maine Coon presented with a 2-week history of vomiting. A peritoneopericardial diaphragmatic hernia (PPDH) and a mass arising from the cardia, protruding into the gastric lumen, were diagnosed using a combination of ultrasound and CT. An exploratory gastrotomy revealed a circumferential, irregular, ulcerated mass involving the submucosal layer of the cardia. This mass was excised by partial-thickness resection of the gastro-oesophageal wall. The PPDH was corrected and a gastrostomy feeding tube was placed under the same anaesthetic. Histopathologically, the most characteristic feature of this mass was a submucosal fibroplasia associated with marked ulceration and granulation tissue. No infectious or neoplastic cells were identified. The affected region of the gastric wall appeared narrowly excised. Resolution of clinical signs was achieved until the cat was lost to follow-up 12 months postoperatively.Relevance and novel informationThis is the first report of the surgical management of an oesophagogastric mass in a cat with a concurrent PPDH and no other underlying disease. A benign fibrous mass should be considered as a differential diagnosis of an oesophagogastric mass in feline patients with PPDH. While medical and surgical options are debated for the management of PPDH, symptomatic patients with a concurrent oesophagogastric mass are legitimate candidates for surgical herniorrhaphy to prevent further complications. Based on this case, prognosis can be considered good if surgical resection is complete.
      Citation: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery Open Reports
      PubDate: 2022-05-07T09:20:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20551169221090449
      Issue No: Vol. 8, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Coxofemoral luxation as a complication of localised tetanus in a cat

    • Authors: Cecilia-Gabriella Danciu, Joshua Milgram, Ciprian Andrei Ober, Flaviu Alexandru Tăbăran, Helga Demény, Orit Chai
      Abstract: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery Open Reports, Volume 8, Issue 1, January-June 2022.
      Case summaryA 9-month-old male neutered domestic shorthair cat presented 2 weeks after castration with a 48 h history of acute-onset lateral recumbency and severe hindlimb rigidity. Physical examination findings included hyperthermia, tachypnoea, hindlimb rigidity and a healed orchidectomy site. Neurological examination of the head and forelimbs was normal; however, there was a spastic, non-ambulatory paraparesis of the hindlimbs, which was more severe on the left. Abnormal findings included mildly elevated serum creatine kinase levels and on electromyography there was bilateral pathological spontaneous activity of the biceps femoris muscles. A tentative diagnosis of tetanus was made based on clinical presentation. Treatment was initiated with tetanus antitoxin, diazepam, metronidazole, buprenorphine and physiotherapy of the hindlimbs. There was an improvement over the following 20 days. Twenty-five days later the cat presented with acute, painful, non-weightbearing lameness of the left hindlimb. Physical examination was suggestive of craniodorsal coxofemoral joint luxation, which was confirmed radiographically. This was treated with analgesia and rest. A marked clinical improvement was observed at the 3-month follow-up.Relevance and novel informationTo our knowledge, there have been no previously published reports of spontaneous coxofemoral joint luxation as a complication of hindlimb localised tetanus infection in cats. This report suggests that coxofemoral luxation should be considered as a possible complication in young cats with hindlimb localised tetanus.
      Citation: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery Open Reports
      PubDate: 2022-04-19T11:28:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20551169221090889
      Issue No: Vol. 8, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Cutaneous Mycobacterium goodii infection in an immunocompetent cat in
           Louisiana: clinical presentation, molecular identification, antimicrobial
           susceptibility and management

    • Authors: Chi-Yen Wu, Sandra Diaz, Angela Ellis, Rebekah Jones, Cherie Pucheu-Haston
      Abstract: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery Open Reports, Volume 8, Issue 1, January-June 2022.
      Case summaryA 9-year-old spayed female domestic shorthair cat was presented to a referral hospital for management of recurring non-healing ulcerations and a subcutaneous mass on the ventral abdomen. Prior treatment included antibiotics (cefovecin followed by clindamycin), wound cleaning and surgical debulking, but the ulcerations and mass recurred 1 month after surgical removal. At this point, the cat was started on doxycycline and pradofloxacin and referred for further work-up. The culture of skin biopsy specimens obtained at the time of referral revealed a population of bacterial colonies with two distinctly different phenotypes. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry and 16S rRNA gene sequencing identified both colonies as Mycobacterium goodii. A diagnosis of a cutaneous infection of rapidly growing mycobacteria was made, and treatment with oral pradofloxacin and doxycycline was initiated. The ulcerations resolved within 4 months, and the subcutaneous mass gradually decreased in size until it was no longer palpable, even 4 months after the cessation of antibiotics.Relevance and novel informationThis is the second reported feline cutaneous M goodii infection in North America. The organism was not visualized on histopathology but was successfully cultured from tissue obtained by skin punch biopsy. A phenotypic switching phenomenon affecting the susceptibility results was suspected, possibly explaining the presence of phenotypically different but genetically identical strains. This case highlights the importance of submitting aseptically obtained tissue, fluid or fine-needle aspirates for culture and species identification, as well as histopathology, when infection with higher bacteria, such as rapidly growing mycobacteria, is suspected.
      Citation: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery Open Reports
      PubDate: 2022-04-19T11:26:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20551169221090442
      Issue No: Vol. 8, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Thank you to our reviewers

    • Abstract: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery Open Reports, Volume 8, Issue 1, January-June 2022.

      Citation: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery Open Reports
      PubDate: 2022-04-13T01:37:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20551169221096180
      Issue No: Vol. 8, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Caudal and middle segmental mandibulectomies for the treatment of
           unilateral temporomandibular joint ankylosis in cats

    • Authors: Lenin A Villamizar-Martinez, Daniel G Ferro, Vanessa G Carvalho, Jonathan Ferreira, Alexander M Reiter
      Abstract: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery Open Reports, Volume 8, Issue 1, January-June 2022.
      Case series summaryThree cats affected by unilateral temporomandibular joint ankylosis underwent segmental mandibulectomy, while one cat with bilateral ankylosis underwent right temporomandibular joint gap arthroplasty and left segmental mandibulectomy. Minimal intraoperative complications were linked to the segmental mandibulectomies in the cases reported. All cats recovered their ability to open the mouth, and the vertical range of motion was unaltered during the postoperative period. Mandibular drift and dental malocclusion were the main postoperative complications related to the segmental mandibulectomies.Relevance and novel informationSurgical excision of ankylotic tissue at the temporomandibular joint region may be technically challenging and associated with severe iatrogenic trauma of surrounding tissues. The results of this case series suggest that middle or caudal segmental mandibulectomy is a safe, feasible and effective surgical procedure to treat unilateral temporomandibular ankylosis in cats and could be considered as an alternative surgical technique to surgical excision of ankylotic tissue at the temporomandibular joint.
      Citation: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery Open Reports
      PubDate: 2022-03-31T09:53:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20551169221086438
      Issue No: Vol. 8, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Dilated cardiomyopathy in a cat with congenital hyposomatotropism

    • Authors: Bérénice Lutz, Adeline Betting, Alan Kovacevic, Alexane Durand, Corinne Gurtner, Taina S Kaiponen, Hans Kooistra, Miguel Campos, Yi Cui
      Abstract: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery Open Reports, Volume 8, Issue 1, January-June 2022.
      Case summaryA 7-month-old domestic shorthair cat was presented for evaluation of stunted growth, recurrent hypoglycaemia during the first months of its life and altered mentation. Complete blood count and biochemistry were unremarkable, except for mildly elevated serum creatinine concentration (despite low muscle mass) and concurrent isosthenuria. Hyposomatotropism was diagnosed based on persistent low circulating insulin-like growth factor 1 concentrations and a lack of response of circulating growth hormone (GH) concentration after the administration of GH-releasing hormone. Other endocrinopathies such as hypothyroidism and hypoadrenocorticism were excluded. MRI of the brain revealed a fluid-filled empty sella tursica, consistent with a pituitary cyst and atrophy/hypoplasia of the pituitary. Echocardiography was unremarkable at the time of diagnosis of hyposomatotropism. Three months later, ovariohysterectomy revealed immature ovaries, raising the suspicion of luteinising and follicle-stimulating hormone deficiency. At 1 year of age, the cat developed congestive heart failure secondarily to dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) with severely reduced left ventricular systolic function and died a few days later. Pathology showed atrophy of the adenohypophysis, epithelial delineation of the pituitary cysts, mild cardiomegaly, multifocal fibrosis of the left ventricle and a mild, multifocal, chronic epicarditis.Relevance and novel informationGH deficiency is a very rare endocrinopathy in cats. This is the first case to describe the development of DCM with concurrent hyposomatotropism, which has previously been reported in human medicine. Other notable abnormalities that could be related to GH deficiency are juvenile self-limiting hypoglycaemia, behavioural changes and possible nephropathy.
      Citation: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery Open Reports
      PubDate: 2022-03-30T09:33:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20551169221086437
      Issue No: Vol. 8, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Successful treatment of a lung abscess without surgical intervention in a
           cat

    • Authors: Reo Nishi, Aki Ohmi, Masaya Tsuboi, Kie Yamamoto, Hirotaka Tomiyasu
      Abstract: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery Open Reports, Volume 8, Issue 1, January-June 2022.
      Case summaryAn 8-year-old neutered female domestic shorthair cat was referred with complaints of lethargy, anorexia, fever, tachypnoea and a pulmonary mass on thoracic radiography. Whole-body CT revealed the presence of a nodular lesion in the right caudal lobe of the lung. Fine-needle aspiration of the lung mass yielded purulent fluid and cytology showed a large number of mildly to moderately degenerated neutrophils with numerous cocci and bacilli, leading to the diagnosis of a lung abscess. Empirical administration of doxycycline and orbifloxacin was initiated on the day of referral. Bacterial culture and antibiotic susceptibility tests using the collected fluid sample detected two types of bacteria, which were susceptible to both antibiotics. The clinical signs of the cat improved after the initiation of treatment, and the antibiotics were discontinued 28 days later, after the lung lesions disappeared. No recurrence of lung abscess was observed until 588 days after the discontinuation of treatment.Relevance and novel informationOnly one case of a lung abscess has been previously reported in cats. Furthermore, while surgical resection is the most common treatment for lung abscesses in the field of veterinary medicine, this is the first report of successful treatment with antibiotic administration alone.
      Citation: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery Open Reports
      PubDate: 2022-03-25T12:41:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20551169221086434
      Issue No: Vol. 8, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Myopathy with oval inclusions in a domestic shorthair cat

    • Authors: Eliot Gougeon, Thibaut Larcher, Mireille Ledevin, Yvonne McGrotty, Pierre Méheust
      Abstract: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery Open Reports, Volume 8, Issue 1, January-June 2022.
      Case summaryAn 18-month-old castrated male domestic shorthair cat was presented with a 2-month history of collapse and severe weakness, particularly affecting the pelvic limbs. A biceps femoris muscle biopsy revealed excessive variability in myofibre size, mild necrosis, minimal centronucleation and scattered 10 μm intracytoplasmic oval inclusions. The inclusions appeared amphophilic with haematoxylin and eosin, blue with Gomori trichrome and unstained with nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide dehydrogenase tetrazolium reductase staining. ATPase staining revealed a normal mosaic pattern and atrophy of both type 1 and 2 myofibres. The pathological diagnosis was a myopathy with inclusions. In contrast to previous feline myofibre inclusions previously reported in the literature, inclusions were not identified after immunohistochemistry using anti-desmin, tubulin, spectrin, laminin, LAMP and LC3 antibodies. After supportive care and corticosteroid treatment, clinical improvement was noted and the cat was discharged 10 days after initial presentation. Clinical and neurological re-examinations were performed at 1, 3, 6 and 9 months after discharge. Owner contact at both 10 and 30 months post-discharge confirmed that persistent muscular weakness was present.Relevance and novel informationThis case report describes a novel and slowly progressive feline myopathy associated with oval amphophilic inclusions unreactive to immunostaining, which have not been previously reported in feline myopathies.
      Citation: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery Open Reports
      PubDate: 2022-03-25T11:55:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20551169221081418
      Issue No: Vol. 8, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Nasopharyngeal cryptococcosis in a cat: interlaboratory variation in
           cryptococcal antigen assay test results

    • Authors: Stephanie A McEwan, Jane E Sykes
      Abstract: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery Open Reports, Volume 8, Issue 1, January-June 2022.
      Case summaryAn indoor-only 6-year-old spayed female domestic cat was evaluated for a history of stertorous respiration. Skull radiographs revealed increased soft tissue density within the caudal aspect of the left nasal cavity. CT and rhinoscopy revealed a mass lesion in the choana, plus a smaller lesion, nearly completely occluding flow through the nasal passages. Rhinoscopy was used to collect a biopsy specimen from a fleshy, tan–yellow mass visualized in the caudal nasopharynx. Histopathology was diagnostic for Cryptococcus species infection and systemic antifungal therapy with fluconazole was initiated. Following a series of discordant results, serum samples were submitted to a veterinary diagnostic laboratory that utilized a cryptococcal antigen latex agglutination system with pretreatment of serum with pronase. Twenty-three months after the initial diagnosis, the cat’s serum cryptococcal antigen titer declined to 1:5 and the cat has responded well to continuing treatment.Relevance and novel informationThis case illustrates challenges associated with discordant test results for cryptococcal antigen among laboratories. Discordancies may be due to differences in assay design, or the underlying disease state itself, or whether serum is pre-treated with pronase; with some tests relying on the training and experience of the operator if the cryptococcal antigen detection test requires a subjective interpretation. It also resolves some confusion in the literature related to the assay types available and terminology used to describe them, and emphasizes the importance of considering cryptococcosis as an important differential for cats with upper respiratory signs, without nasal discharge, even if the cat is kept exclusively indoors.
      Citation: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery Open Reports
      PubDate: 2022-03-25T11:52:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20551169221074624
      Issue No: Vol. 8, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Successful treatment of hypodipsic/adipsic hypernatremia in a cat with
           lobar holoprosencephaly using oral desmopressin

    • Authors: Yoriko Akashi, Young Tae Park, Garrett S Oetelaar, Masahiro Murakami
      Abstract: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery Open Reports, Volume 8, Issue 1, January-June 2022.
      Case summaryA 2-year-old female spayed domestic shorthair cat was presented with a history of collapse, possible hypodipsia/adipsia, severe dehydration and hypernatremia. MRI of the brain revealed a failure of separation of the cerebral hemispheres as characterized by an absence of the rostral part of the corpus callosum, fornix and septum pellucidum and the presence of a single fused lateral ventricle. A diagnosis of hypodipsic/adipsic hypernatremia with lobar holoprosencephaly was made. Dietary management of the cat’s condition was attempted by increasing oral water intake, but the cat’s hypernatremia and azotemia persisted. Plasma arginine vasopressin (AVP) analysis revealed a low concentration of circulating AVP (2.3 pg/ml), prompting therapy with oral desmopressin in addition to the dietary management. This combined therapy decreased water consumption of the cat from 200 ml/day (85 ml/kg/day) to 100 ml/day (30 ml/kg/day), normalized plasma sodium concentration and resolved the azotemia.Relevance and novel informationTo our knowledge, this is the second case report of an MRI diagnosis of lobar holoprosencephaly with hypodipsic/adipsic hypernatremia in a cat and the first case report of the successful management of this condition using oral desmopressin. This case report emphasizes that holoprosencephaly should be suspected in cats presented with hypodipsic/adipsic hypernatremia and highlights the utility of MRI in establishing the diagnosis. Measurements of plasma osmolality and AVP concentration corroborate the pathophysiology and support the use of oral desmopressin in addition to dietary management to resolve the hypernatremia.
      Citation: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery Open Reports
      PubDate: 2022-03-23T01:30:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20551169221082542
      Issue No: Vol. 8, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Surgically treated congenital cleft palate in a 4-month-old kitten:
           medium-term clinical and CT assessment

    • Authors: Paul Garnier, Véronique Viateau, Mathieu Manassero, Emeline Maurice
      Abstract: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery Open Reports, Volume 8, Issue 1, January-June 2022.
      Case summaryA 4-month-old female domestic shorthair kitten was presented for a congenital cleft palate causing nasal discharge and sneezing episodes. CT revealed a palatal bone defect involving 20% of the palatal area. Surgical correction of both the hard and soft palate defects was performed using the overlapping and medially positioned flap techniques, respectively. Complete healing of the wound and full resolution of the clinical signs occurred within a 1-month period. At 2 months postoperatively, two punctiform oronasal fistulae were observed rostrally without associated clinical signs. Control CT, performed 6 months postoperatively, revealed a 50% enlargement of the palatal bone defect. At 12 months postoperatively, the cat was still in good general condition without any clinical signs.Relevance and novel informationTo the best of our knowledge, this is the first report to describe the treatment of a congenital cleft palate in a kitten using the overlapping flap technique with a successful medium-term clinical outcome, despite the formation of two oronasal fistulae. This suggests that, as in dogs, full restoration of oronasal compartmentation is not mandatory to achieve functional outcome. The increase of the palatal bone defect over time may play a role in late oronasal fistulae formation and should be considered for surgical planning.
      Citation: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery Open Reports
      PubDate: 2022-03-22T10:55:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20551169221082556
      Issue No: Vol. 8, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Recovery after inadvertent intramedullary microchip implantation at
           C1–C2 in a kitten

    • Authors: Nina Schneider, Andreas Blutke, Birgit Parzefall
      Abstract: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery Open Reports, Volume 8, Issue 1, January-June 2022.
      Case summaryA 15-week-old male British Shorthair cat was presented for peracute paralysis immediately after microchip implantation. Neurological examination revealed a non-ambulatory tetraparesis and left thoracic limb plegia localised to C1–C5 spinal cord segments. CT of the cervical spine showed a diagonally orientated metallic foreign body (microchip transponder, 10 mm in length) within the vertebral canal at the level of C1–C2, resulting in a penetrating spinal cord injury. Based on concerns about further iatrogenic spinal cord injury through surgery, medical management was chosen. Despite the severe clinical signs, the kitten returned to ambulation within 6 days of the injury, with controlled urination and defecation. Continuous neurological improvement was seen for up to 6 weeks after the injury at which point a mild-to-moderate ambulatory tetraparesis and ataxia remained, with an overall good quality of life. Follow-up CT at the age of 13 months revealed a relative cranial displacement and rotation of the microchip towards the foramen magnum, while the cat’s neurological status was unchanged.Relevance and novel informationThis case demonstrated a cervical penetrating spinal cord injury in a growing cat caused by a microchip, which was successfully managed with medical treatment, suggesting that this might be an option for patients at risk of severe surgery-related complications or where owners reject surgery.
      Citation: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery Open Reports
      PubDate: 2022-03-16T01:18:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20551169221081398
      Issue No: Vol. 8, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Laparoscopic portosystemic shunt attenuation in two cats

    • Authors: Francesca Izzo, Edoardo Poggi, Francisco J Pérez Duarte, Filippo Cinti
      Abstract: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery Open Reports, Volume 8, Issue 1, January-June 2022.
      Case series summaryGradual attenuation of an extrahepatic portosystemic shunt using cellophane banding was achieved with a laparoscopic technique in two cats. The portosystemic shunts were treated via a right or left lateral laparoscopic approach. Ultrasonography or CT angiography were used to verify the results of surgery. The success of the procedure was confirmed by normalisation of serum bile acid concentrations and clinical signs at the final re-evaluation.Relevance and novel informationThe aim of this case series was to determine the feasibility and outcome of laparoscopy for portosystemic shunt attenuation in two cats. Laparoscopic portosystemic shunt attenuation appeared to be a feasible, safe and effective procedure in cats.
      Citation: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery Open Reports
      PubDate: 2022-03-11T11:32:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20551169221081416
      Issue No: Vol. 8, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • First report of phaeohyphomycosis caused by Phialophora americana in a
           domestic cat from Argentina

    • Authors: Pablo Borrás, Fernando Messina, Rubén Abrantes, Ricardo Iachini, Leonardo Minatel, Gabriela Santiso
      Abstract: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery Open Reports, Volume 8, Issue 1, January-June 2022.
      Case summaryA 10-year-old male neutered domestic shorthair cat from Quilmes (Province of Buenos Aires, Argentina) presented at the Infectious Diseases and Parasitology Unit with a hyperpigmented nodule of 5 cm diameter on the nasal plane with a small ulceration of more than 1 year’s evolution. A scaly and hyperpigmented alopecic lesion of 3 cm in diameter was found on the lower edge of the tail. The patient was under immunosuppressive therapy with corticosteroids for lymphoplasmacytic duodenitis. Samples of the lesion present on the nasal plane were taken under a surgical procedure. In the wet mount preparations, pigmented irregular hyphae were observed. They developed dark colonies when cultured on Sabouraud medium. On micromorphology, structures compatible with Phialophora species were identified. PCR and sequencing of ITS (ITS1-5.8S-ITS2) confirmed Phialophora americana as the etiologic agent. A therapeutic scheme that included a combination of itraconazole oral solution (1.5 mg/kg PO q12h) with terbinafine (30 mg/kg PO q24h) was indicated for a period of 10 months. The patient died of complications resulting from its underlying disease.Relevance and novel informationAs far as the authors are aware, this is the first study to report P americana as an etiologic agent of phaeohyphomycosis in cats. In this case study, the species was identified using molecular tests.
      Citation: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery Open Reports
      PubDate: 2022-03-08T12:31:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20551169221077611
      Issue No: Vol. 8, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Phenobarbital-induced autoimmune haemolytic anaemia, thrombocytopenia and
           

    • Authors: Michelle Walton-Clark, Victoria Travail, Matthew Best
      Abstract: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery Open Reports, Volume 8, Issue 1, January-June 2022.
      Case summaryA female neutered domestic longhair cat, aged 1 year and 5 months, presented with lymphadenomegaly and anaemia following therapy with phenobarbital for idiopathic epilepsy. Physical examination revealed pale pink mucous membranes and peripheral lymphadenomegaly. Haematology showed a regenerative anaemia (haematocrit 19.3%, reticulocyte count 118.08 ×109/l), and saline agglutination was positive. Infectious disease screening was negative and lymph node cytology was consistent with reactive lymphoid hyperplasia. A diagnosis of phenobarbital-induced reactive lymphoid hyperplasia and immune-mediated anaemia was suspected. Complete resolution of the lymphadenomegaly and anaemia was documented within 4 weeks of phenobarbital discontinuation.Relevance and novel informationThere are limited case reports of phenobarbital-induced haematological changes and lymphadenomegaly; however, the combination has not previously been reported in cats and is similar to the rare but significant syndrome in humans known as ‘anticonvulsant hypersensitivity syndrome’. Anticonvulsant hypersensitivities should be considered as a potentially serious, yet reversible, sequela to phenobarbital treatment that may be mistaken for more severe illness such as neoplasia.
      Citation: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery Open Reports
      PubDate: 2022-03-07T12:04:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20551169221079238
      Issue No: Vol. 8, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Rostral mandibulectomy for the management of trismus in a cat

    • Authors: Kevin Parsons, Sorrel Langley-Hobbs, Christopher Warren-Smith, Peter Southerden, Nicolas Granger, Lee Meakin
      Abstract: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery Open Reports, Volume 8, Issue 1, January-June 2022.
      Case summaryA 5-year-old domestic shorthair cat was evaluated for weight loss and poor coat condition due to an inability to open its mouth (trismus) following head trauma 2 months previously. Contrast CT, electromyography and temporal muscle biopsy identified findings consistent with muscle atrophy, denervation and degeneration. Conservative treatment failed to improve the trismus so a rostral mandibulectomy was performed. Following surgery, the patient resumed normal grooming behaviour and was able to eat soft food unaided. The cat re-presented 5 months postoperatively at which time its body condition had improved; however, episodes of sneezing had been noted. An oronasal fistula was diagnosed and treated successfully with a silicon nasal septum button. Follow-up at 30 months reported an excellent outcome.Relevance and novel informationManagement of trismus with rostral mandibulectomy may be associated with a good return to function, including prehension and ingestion of food, and restoration of normal grooming activity. Rostral mandibulectomy could be considered for animals with trismus for other aetiologies such as masticatory myositis where other management options are not available.
      Citation: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery Open Reports
      PubDate: 2022-02-28T09:33:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20551169221074948
      Issue No: Vol. 8, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Cutaneous xanthoma causing hypercalcaemia in a cat

    • Authors: Doris Ma, Jessica F Romine, Michael Hardcastle
      Abstract: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery Open Reports, Volume 8, Issue 1, January-June 2022.
      Case summaryA 5-year-old male neutered cat weighing 3.56 kg presented owing to the development of two masses over the dorsal cervical and cranial thoracic areas, as well as weight loss, inappetence and vomiting. Diagnostic tests revealed a grossly lipaemic sample with hypercholesterolaemia (440 mg/dl; reference interval [RI] 90.0–205.0), hypercalcaemia (>16.0 mg/dl [RI 8.0–11.8]) and urine specific gravity 1.022 (RI ⩾1.035). When re-presented 9 months later, fasted blood analyses revealed elevated ionised calcium (1.87 mmol/l [RI 1.11–1.38]), persistently elevated total calcium, normal phosphate and persistent minimally concentrated urine with calcium oxalate dihydrate crystals. Ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration of the masses produced blood-tinged purulent fluid with negative culture results. Excisional biopsies of both masses were undertaken, and histopathology was consistent with cutaneous xanthoma. No organisms were identified with special staining, and deep-tissue culture did not grow bacteria or fungi. Postoperatively, repeat fasted biochemical analysis revealed persistent hypercholesterolaemia with normal triglycerides, and normalisation of ionised and total calcium levels. Based on these findings, a diagnosis of cutaneous xanthoma causing hypercalcaemia due to primary dyslipidaemia was made. The cat was reported to be significantly improved in comfort and energy levels postoperatively and a transition to a fat-restricted diet was instituted. Eight months after xanthoma removal no recurrence was reported.Relevance and novel informationTo our knowledge, this is the first report of cutaneous xanthoma and associated granulomatous inflammation causing hypercalcaemia due to dyslipidaemia in a cat. Familial hypercholesterolaemia is an example of a primary condition that could cause dyslipidaemia in cats, and further studies are warranted to better describe the genetic characteristics. Xanthoma formation and the resultant granulomatous inflammation should be considered in cases of hypercalcaemia.
      Citation: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery Open Reports
      PubDate: 2022-02-28T06:15:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20551169221082050
      Issue No: Vol. 8, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Indocyanine-based near-infrared lymphography for real-time detection of
           lymphatics in a cat with multiple mast cell tumours

    • Authors: Raphael Arz, Frauke Seehusen, Valeria S Meier, Mirja C Nolff
      Abstract: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery Open Reports, Volume 8, Issue 1, January-June 2022.
      Case summaryAn 11-year-old female domestic shorthair cat was presented with cutaneous mast cell tumours (MCTs) localised at the right temporal region, the left buccal region and on the third digit of the right thoracic limb. Staging was negative and locoregional lymph nodes appeared normal, based on clinical findings. During surgery, real-time indocyanine green (ICG)-based lymphography was performed to detect the cutaneous draining pattern of all the primary MCTs. ICG was injected intracutaneously in four quadrants around each tumour, and a clear lymphogram was visible shortly after injection. Using near-infrared lymphography (NIR-L) for guidance, all lymphadenectomies were performed in 12 mins or less, with a maximal incision length of 3.5 cm. The smallest resected node was 0.9 cm in diameter. All MCTs were classified as low-grade cutaneous MCT. All four ICG-positive lymph nodes were considered premetastatic or metastatic. The only ICG-negative resected node was also negative for tumour cells. No complications related to NIR-L were recorded.Relevance and novel informationThis is the first description of NIR-L in a cat with MCT. Application was straightforward and ICG enrichment only occurred in the metastatic nodes, suggesting correct identification of lymphatic draining patterns. Of note, as previously described in dogs, we did detect nodal metastasis, despite low-grade primary tumours. The clinical relevance should be evaluated in future studies.
      Citation: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery Open Reports
      PubDate: 2022-02-28T06:13:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20551169221074961
      Issue No: Vol. 8, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Skeletal radiographic manifestations of GM2 gangliosidosis variant 0
           (Sandhoff disease) in two Japanese domestic cats

    • Authors: Yoshihiko Yu, Daisuke Hasegawa, Yuji Hamamoto, Shunta Mizoguchi, Toshiki Fujimori, Yoshiaki Kubo, Md Shafiqul Islam, Osamu Yamato
      Abstract: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery Open Reports, Volume 8, Issue 1, January-June 2022.
      Case series summaryTwo Japanese domestic cats with GM2 gangliosidosis variant 0, diagnosed at different times, are included in this case series. Both cats were diagnosed by genetic analysis and had the HEXB:c.667C>T pathogenic genetic variant, which have been previously reported in Japanese domestic cats with GM2 gangliosidosis variant 0. Clinical signs and the identification of vacuolation in circulating lymphocytes were consistent with those in previous reports of feline GM2 gangliosidosis variant 0. Radiography showed that both cases had similar skeletal radiographic manifestations, which has not been previously reported in Japanese domestic cats with GM2 gangliosidosis variant 0. Radiographic findings included abnormally shaped vertebral bodies, obscure or irregular endplates (both of which were seen especially in the cervical and thoracic vertebrae), generalised osteopenia and new bone proliferation around articular facets.Relevance and novel informationTo the best of our knowledge, this is the first report to present the skeletal radiographic abnormalities of Japanese domestic cats with GM2 gangliosidosis variant 0 caused by the HEXB:c.667C>T pathogenic genetic variant. Furthermore, together with a report published in 2015 on the radiographic findings of feline GM2 gangliosidosis variant 0 caused by another pathogenic genetic variant, this report suggests that these findings may be indicators of feline GM2 gangliosidosis variant 0. The easily obtained radiographic findings described in this report may be useful as a finding suggestive of feline GM2 gangliosidosis variant 0, in addition to the cytological finding of the vacuolated cells. The report emphasises the utility of radiography for diagnosis of cases with suspected progressive neurodegenerative diseases.
      Citation: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery Open Reports
      PubDate: 2022-02-15T05:10:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20551169221074964
      Issue No: Vol. 8, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Primary pulmonary diffuse large B-cell lymphoma associated with feline
           leukaemia virus infection in a young cat

    • Authors: Kento Ishikawa, Tomokazu Nagashima, Yukino Machida, Akiko Yasuda, Karin Yoshida, Michio Fujita, Kazuhiko Ochiai, Daigo Azakami, Masaki Michishita
      Abstract: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery Open Reports, Volume 8, Issue 1, January-June 2022.
      Case summaryA 4-year-old castrated male domestic shorthair cat with a continuous cough was brought to a private veterinary clinic for detailed examination. Radiography of the thoracic cavity revealed a severe radiopaque region in the caudal lobe of the right lung. At 108 days after the initial visit, CT showed a mass of 27 × 23 × 18 mm in the caudal lobe of the right lung. At that time, no abnormalities in other organs except for the lung were detected on CT and peripheral blood and blood biochemistry tests. The mass in the caudal lobe of the right lung was resected by lobectomy; it had a white surface and was firm. Histopathologically, the mass was non-encapsulated, showing an unclear boundary with surrounding tissues. The mass comprised large, round or polygonal neoplastic cells arranged in a diffuse pattern. Immunohistochemically, neoplastic cells were diffusely positive for CD20, feline leukaemia virus (FeLV) p27 and FeLV glycoprotein 70 but negative for CD3, CD204 and E-cadherin. Based on these findings, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma associated with FeLV infection was diagnosed. Although the cat showed no clinical signs of gastrointestinal or respiratory injury, a routine ultrasonography revealed thickening in the jejunum wall 196 days after lobectomy, and subsequent fine-needle aspiration examination confirmed high-grade lymphoma.Relevance and novel informationThis is the first report of primary pulmonary diffuse large B-cell lymphoma associated with FeLV infection in a young cat.
      Citation: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery Open Reports
      PubDate: 2022-02-11T10:22:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20551169221074240
      Issue No: Vol. 8, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Electrochemotherapy as a treatment option for feline nasal melanoma

    • Authors: Annika Little, Michael Macfarlane
      Abstract: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery Open Reports, Volume 8, Issue 1, January-June 2022.
      Case summaryA 4-year-old domestic shorthair cat presented to North Downs Specialist Referrals for treatment of a 7 mm melanoma of the nasal planum. Two treatments of electrochemotherapy using intravenous bleomycin as a chemotherapeutic agent were administered. The tumour was no longer visible after treatment. At the 292-day follow-up there was no recurrence at the site and the patient was clinically well.Relevance and novel informationThere are few data concerning the outcomes of cats with non-ocular feline melanomas and there are currently minimal descriptions in the literature of electrochemotherapy as a treatment option. The available data suggest that nasal melanoma may have a worse prognosis, and that melanomas are locally invasive and have a high propensity for metastasis. The current most effective means for local control is surgery with wide margins. Given the location in this case, this would have required nasal planectomy, while electrochemotherapy provided an effective and possibly more attractive alternative.
      Citation: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery Open Reports
      PubDate: 2022-02-11T10:19:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20551169221074231
      Issue No: Vol. 8, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Outbreak of feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) in shelter-housed cats:
           molecular analysis of the feline coronavirus S1/S2 cleavage site
           consistent with a ‘circulating virulent–avirulent theory’ of FIP
           pathogenesis

    • Authors: Eleni A Healey, Nicole M Andre, Andrew D Miller, Gary R Whitaker, Elizabeth A Berliner
      Abstract: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery Open Reports, Volume 8, Issue 1, January-June 2022.
      Case series summaryThis case series describes three shelter-housed cats concurrently diagnosed with feline infectious peritonitis (FIP). The cats were from a cohort of seven surrendered from the site of a house fire. The three cats presented with mild upper respiratory signs. Within 10 days they clinically declined: progressive signs included pyrexia, icterus, lethargy, anorexia and cavitary effusions. Necropsy followed by histopathology and immunohistochemistry confirmed a diagnosis of FIP in all three. Molecular analysis of the causative feline coronavirus (FCoV) revealed varied amino acid alterations in the spike gene both between cats and between sample types in individual cats. A fourth cat from the cohort remained healthy in the shelter but succumbed to FIP 6 weeks post-adoption.Relevance and novel informationThis case series places FCoV genetic sequences in the context of clinical signs in a small shelter outbreak. Each of the three cats concurrently developed a slightly different clinical presentation. PCR amplification and genetic sequencing revealed that two cats shared an S1/S2 cleavage site mutation (R790S) previously described to be associated with the development of FIP; one of the cats had an additional S1/S2 cleavage site mutation (R793S). The third cat had a single, identical S1/S2 point mutation (R790G) unique from the other two cats; the R790G mutation has not been previously reported. This case series provides interesting data on point mutations associated with the development of FIP and provides support for a ‘circulating virulent–avirulent theory’ of FIP pathogenesis in a small shelter outbreak.
      Citation: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery Open Reports
      PubDate: 2022-02-11T09:17:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20551169221074226
      Issue No: Vol. 8, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Molecular detection of polycystic kidney disease in Persian and
           Persian-related breeds in Iran

    • Authors: Ali Moazezi Ghavihelm, Shahram Jamshidi, Iraj Ashrafi Tamai, Mahsa Zangisheh
      Abstract: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery Open Reports, Volume 8, Issue 1, January-June 2022.
      ObjectivesThis study was aimed at detecting feline autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease in a population of Persian and Persian-related breeds by a molecular method in Iran.MethodsBuccal swab samples were collected from 47 cats and examined with a touchdown PCR method. Additionally, partial sequencing was performed in two cats with bilateral renal cysts.ResultsTwenty-two cats (46.8%) were diagnosed as heterozygous for this mutation. Sequence analysis of two cats showed C to A point mutation in the PKD1 gene, as in previous studies.Conclusions and relevancePrevalence of this disease is high in Iran, highlighting the need for molecular screening tests before including cats in breeding programmes.
      Citation: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery Open Reports
      PubDate: 2022-01-31T06:51:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20551169211070991
      Issue No: Vol. 8, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Effectiveness of a fluralaner spot-on formulation in a case of feline
           demodicosis due to Demodex cati

    • Authors: Pavlina Bouza-Rapti, Anatoli Tachmazidou, Rania Farmaki
      Abstract: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery Open Reports, Volume 8, Issue 1, January-June 2022.
      Case summaryA 7-year-old male domestic shorthair cat was presented with a non-pruritic erythematous crusted nasal hypotrichosis along with bilateral ceruminous otitis externa. The cat was diagnosed with diabetes mellitus and was positive for feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV). Deep skin scraping, trichograms from lesional skin and ear canal parasitological examination were positive for Demodex cati. A 250 mg (55.5 mg/kg) fluralaner spot-on for medium-sized cats (Bravecto; MSD) was applied to the base of the cat’s head. Re-examinations were carried out on the fourth, sixth and eighth weeks after therapy. On the fourth week, the ceruminous otitis had resolved completely and the nasal lesions were markedly improved. One dead adult D cati was found in deep skin scrapings while other tests from the skin and both ear canals were negative. On the second re-examination only a mild hypotrichosis persisted on the nasal region and all parasitological examinations were negative. Eight weeks after the initial examination, the skin lesions had almost clinically resolved. On the 12th week, fluralaner spot-on was repeated. No recurrence was noted at the 6-month follow-up.Relevance and novel informationThe use of isoxazolines has been reported for only a few demodectic cats but was described to be safe and effective. This is the first report to evaluate the efficacy of a single spot-on fluralaner for the treatment of localised dermatitis and otodemodicosis due to D cati, and suggests it as an effective, safe and practical treatment.
      Citation: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery Open Reports
      PubDate: 2022-01-27T12:54:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20551169211069529
      Issue No: Vol. 8, No. 1 (2022)
       
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


Your IP address: 44.192.65.228
 
Home (Search)
API
About JournalTOCs
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-