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  Subjects -> VETERINARY SCIENCE (Total: 220 journals)
Showing 1 - 63 of 63 Journals sorted alphabetically
Abanico Veterinario     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Acta Veterinaria     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Acta Veterinaria Hungarica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Acta Veterinaria Scandinavica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Advanced Research in Life Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Animal Biosciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Advances in Small Animal Care     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
African Journal of Wildlife Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Agrivet : Jurnal Ilmu-Ilmu Pertanian dan Peternakan / Journal of Agricultural Sciences and Veteriner)     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
AL-Qadisiyah Journal of Veterinary Medicine Sciences     Open Access  
American Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
American Journal of Primatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Analecta Veterinaria     Open Access  
Anatomia, Histologia, Embryologia: Journal of Veterinary Medicine Series C     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Animal - Science Proceedings     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Animal Behaviour     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 183)
Animal Feed Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Animal Health Research Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Animal Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 22)
Animal Reproduction Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Animals     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Annual Review of Animal Biosciences     Full-text available via subscription  
Anthrozoos : A Multidisciplinary Journal of The Interactions of People & Animals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Applied Animal Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Archiva Zootehnica     Open Access  
Archives of Animal Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Archivos de Medicina Veterinaria     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Arquivo Brasileiro de Medicina Veterinária e Zootecnia     Open Access  
Asian Journal of Medical and Biological Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Asian Journal of Poultry Science     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Atatürk Üniversitesi Veteriner Bilimleri Dergisi / Atatürk University Journal of Veterinary Sciences     Open Access  
Austral Journal of Veterinary Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Australian Equine Veterinarian     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Veterinary Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Avances en Ciencias Veterinarias     Open Access  
Avian Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Bangladesh Journal of Animal Science     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Bangladesh Journal of Veterinary Medicine     Open Access  
Bangladesh Veterinarian     Open Access  
BMC Veterinary Research     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Brazilian Journal of Veterinary Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Buletin Peternakan : Bulletin of Animal Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Buletin Veteriner Udayana     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Bulletin of Animal Health and Production in Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Bulletin of University of Agricultural Sciences and Veterinary Medicine Cluj-Napoca : Food Science and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Canadian Journal of Veterinary Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Case Reports in Veterinary Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
CES Medicina Veterinaria y Zootecnia     Open Access  
Chilean Journal of Agricultural & Animal Sciences     Open Access  
Ciencia Veterinaria     Open Access  
Cogent Food & Agriculture     Open Access  
Companion Animal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Compendio de Ciencias Veterinarias     Open Access  
Domestic Animal Endocrinology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Equine Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Equine Veterinary Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Equine Veterinary Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Ethiopian Veterinary Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
EUREKA : Health Sciences     Open Access  
FAVE Sección Ciencias Veterinarias     Open Access  
Folia Veterinaria     Open Access  
Frontiers in Veterinary Science     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Global Journal of Animal Scientific Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Human & Veterinary Medicine - International Journal of the Bioflux Society     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
ILAR Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Indian Journal of Animal Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian Journal of Veterinary Anatomy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Indonesia Medicus Veterinus     Open Access  
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intas Polivet     Full-text available via subscription  
International Journal of Equine Science     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Tropical Veterinary and Biomedical Research     Open Access  
International Journal of Veterinary Science and Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Veterinary Science and Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
InVet     Open Access  
Iranian Journal of Applied Animal Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Iranian Journal of Veterinary Surgery     Open Access  
Iraqi Journal of Veterinary Sciences     Open Access  
Irish Veterinary Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Veterinary Science & Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Advanced Veterinary Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Buffalo Science     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Equine Veterinary Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Exotic Pet Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Feline Medicine & Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery Open Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Parasite Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Research in Forestry, Wildlife and Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Small Animal Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Journal of the Hellenic Veterinary Medical Society     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of the Selva Andina Research Society     Open Access  
Journal of the South African Veterinary Association     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Veterinary and Animal Sciences     Open Access  
Journal of Veterinary Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Veterinary Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Veterinary Dentistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Veterinary Diagnostic Investigation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Journal of Veterinary Forensic Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 31)
Journal of Veterinary Medical Education     Partially Free   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Veterinary Medical Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Veterinary Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Veterinary Pharmacology and Therapeutics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Veterinary Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Veterinary Science & Medical Diagnosis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Veterinary Science & Medicine     Open Access  
Jurnal Agripet     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Jurnal Ilmu dan Kesehatan Hewan (Veterinary Science and Medicine Journal)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Jurnal Medik Veteriner     Open Access  
Jurnal Medika Veterinaria     Open Access  
Jurnal Sain Veteriner     Open Access  
Jurnal Veteriner     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Kenya Veterinarian     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
kleintier konkret     Hybrid Journal  
Livestock     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Macedonian Veterinary Review     Open Access  
Matrix Science Medica     Open Access  
Medical Mycology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Medical Mycology Case Reports     Open Access  
Medicina Veterinária (UFRPE)     Open Access  
Nepalese Veterinary Journal     Open Access  
New Zealand Veterinary Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
New Zealand Veterinary Nurse     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Nigerian Veterinary Journal     Open Access  
Nutrición Animal Tropical     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Onderstepoort Journal of Veterinary Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Open Journal of Animal Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Open Journal of Veterinary Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Pet Behaviour Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
pferde spiegel     Hybrid Journal  
Polish Journal of Veterinary Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Preventive Veterinary Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Rassegna di Diritto, Legislazione e Medicina Legale Veterinaria     Open Access  
Reproduction in Domestic Animals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Research & Reviews : Journal of Veterinary Science and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Research in Veterinary Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Research Journal of Veterinary Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Revista Brasileira de Ciência Veterinária     Open Access  
Revista Brasileira de Higiene e Sanidade Animal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Brasileira de Zootecnia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Ciencias Veterinarias     Open Access  
Revista Colombiana de Ciencia Animal     Open Access  
Revista Colombiana de Ciencias Pecuarias (Colombian journal of animal science and veterinary medicine)     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Revista Complutense de Ciencias Veterinarias     Open Access  
Revista de Ciência Veterinária e Saúde Pública     Open Access  
Revista de Ciências Agroveterinárias     Open Access  
Revista de Educação Continuada em Medicina Veterinária e Zootecnia     Open Access  
Revista de Investigaciones Veterinarias del Perú     Open Access  
Revista de Medicina Veterinaria     Open Access  
Revista de Salud Animal     Open Access  
Revista Mexicana de Ciencias Pecuarias     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista MVZ Córdoba     Open Access  
Revista Veterinaria     Open Access  
Revue Marocaine des Sciences Agronomiques et Vétérinaires     Open Access  
Revue Vétérinaire Clinique     Full-text available via subscription  
Salud y Tecnología Veterinaria     Open Access  
Schweizer Archiv für Tierheilkunde     Hybrid Journal  
Science and Animal Health     Open Access  
Small Ruminant Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Spei Domus     Open Access  
Sri Lanka Veterinary Journal     Open Access  
SVU-International Journal of Veterinary Sciences     Open Access  
Tanzania Veterinary Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
team.konkret     Open Access  
Theoretical and Applied Veterinary Medicine     Open Access  
Theriogenology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Tierärztliche Praxis Ausgabe G: Großtiere / Nutztiere     Hybrid Journal  
Tierärztliche Praxis Ausgabe K: Kleintiere / Heimtiere     Hybrid Journal  
Topics in Companion Animal Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Transboundary and Emerging Diseases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Trends in Parasitology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Tropical Animal Health and Production     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Tropical Veterinarian     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Turkish Journal of Veterinary Research     Open Access  
UK Vet Equine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Ukrainian Journal of Veterinary and Agricultural Sciences     Open Access  
Van Veterinary Journal     Open Access  
VCOT Open     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
veterinär spiegel     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Veterinaria     Open Access  
Veterinaria (Montevideo)     Open Access  
Veterinaria México     Open Access  
Veterinaria México OA     Open Access  
Veterinarski Glasnik     Open Access  
Veterinary Anaesthesia and Analgesia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Veterinary and Animal Science     Open Access  
Veterinary and Comparative Oncology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Veterinary and Comparative Orthopaedics and Traumatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Veterinary Clinical Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Veterinary Clinics of North America: Equine Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Veterinary Clinics of North America: Exotic Animal Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Veterinary Clinics of North America: Food Animal Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Veterinary Clinics of North America: Small Animal Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
Veterinary Dermatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Veterinary Immunology and Immunopathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Veterinary Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Veterinary Journal of Mehmet Akif Ersoy University / Mehmet Akif Ersoy Üniversitesi Veteriner Fakültesi Dergisi     Open Access  
Veterinary Medicine and Science     Open Access   (Followers: 2)

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Journal of Veterinary Diagnostic Investigation
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.621
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 13  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1040-6387 - ISSN (Online) 1943-4936
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1176 journals]
  • Comparison of diaphragm meat juice and muscle swab samples to spleen and
           spleen swab samples for the detection of African swine fever viral nucleic
           acid

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      Authors: Rodney Okwasiimire, Aisha Nassali, Dickson Ndoboli, John E. Ekakoro, Bonto Faburay, Edward Wampande, Karyn A. Havas
      Abstract: Journal of Veterinary Diagnostic Investigation, Ahead of Print.
      Use of meat juice and muscle swabs at slaughterhouses may provide an easy-to-collect sample for African swine fever (ASF) surveillance. Meat juice has been experimentally shown to be a reliable sample for the detection of ASF virus (ASFV). We compared the detection of ASFV nucleic acid from diaphragm meat juice, diaphragm muscle swab, spleen, and spleen swabs from pigs with signs of ASFV infection at slaughterhouses around Kampala, Uganda. Pigs with ≥ 2 clinical or pathology signs at the time of slaughter had a spleen sample, spleen swab, diaphragm muscle sample, and diaphragm muscle swab collected. Meat juice was collected from muscle samples through a freeze–thaw cycle. Each sample was tested individually, and 72 spleen, meat juice, and muscle swab sample pools of 4 negative and 1 positive sample were tested, as well. Standard operating procedures from the USDA–Foreign Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory for viral DNA extraction and real-time PCR (rtPCR) were used. Of the 493 pigs evaluated, we classified as positive 357 (72.4%) diaphragm meat juice samples, 218 (44.2%) diaphragm muscle swabs, 247 (50.1%) spleen samples, and 241 (48.9%) spleen swabs. All spleen sample pools were positive (72 of 72; 100%), as were 71 of 72 (98.6%) meat juice pools and 67 of 72 (93.1%) muscle swab pools. Meat juice samples provided a reliable sample type for the detection by rtPCR of ASFV in pigs with natural infections.
      Citation: Journal of Veterinary Diagnostic Investigation
      PubDate: 2023-01-25T06:44:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10406387231151663
       
  • Immunohistochemical analysis of expression of VEGFR2, KIT, PDGFR-β, and
           CDK4 in canine urothelial carcinoma

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      Authors: Laura C. Setyo, Shannon L. Donahoe, Patrick L. Shearer, Penghao Wang, Mark B. Krockenberger
      Abstract: Journal of Veterinary Diagnostic Investigation, Ahead of Print.
      Urothelial carcinomas (UCs), also known as transitional cell carcinomas, are the most common canine urinary tract neoplasms. Tyrosine kinases (TKs) are enzymes that tightly regulate cell growth and differentiation through phosphorylation. Receptor TK (RTK) inhibitors are currently used to treat UCs. Toceranib phosphate (Palladia; Pfizer) is an RTK inhibitor that blocks the activity of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2), platelet-derived growth factor receptor–alpha and –beta (PDGFR-α, -β), FMS-like tyrosine kinase 3, stem cell factor receptor (KIT, kinase inhibitor targeting), and colony stimulating factor receptor. To better understand UCs and validate treatment targets, we performed immunohistochemical staining for RTKs, as well as a novel target, cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4, a central regulator of the mammalian cell cycle), on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues from bladder biopsies from 17 dogs with UCs, 17 dogs with cystitis (diseased controls), and 8 normal dogs (negative controls). Although immunohistochemical scores could not be extrapolated to prognostic value, response to treatment, and outcome of patients with UC, we demonstrated expression of PDGFR-β and VEGFR2 in UCs; all UC samples staining positively for VEGFR2. Minimal positive staining for KIT was noted in the tumor samples. CDK4 staining intensity was significantly weaker in UCs compared with normal and cystitis bladder samples. The intense staining of VEGFR2 in UC cells suggested that VEGFR2 may be of prognostic and/or therapeutic value in dogs with UC. Overexpression of VEGFR2 in UC cells validates this receptor as a treatment target in UC.
      Citation: Journal of Veterinary Diagnostic Investigation
      PubDate: 2023-01-17T12:58:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10406387221146247
       
  • Splenic epidermoid cyst in a dog

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      Authors: Nayoung Lee, Dae-Yong Kim, Yeon-Jung Kim, Dae Young Kim
      Abstract: Journal of Veterinary Diagnostic Investigation, Ahead of Print.
      Splenic epithelial cysts are rare in humans and have not been reported in animals, to our knowledge. During a routine medical examination of a 12-y-old castrated male Maltese dog, a splenic mass was found and subsequently removed via splenectomy. Histologically, a well-defined multilocular cyst in the spleen was lined mostly by simple cuboidal, multifocally by stratified cuboidal, or occasionally by stratified squamous epithelium. Immunohistochemically, the lining cells were positive for cytokeratin and negative for vimentin, CD31, and Wilms tumor protein 1. The case was diagnosed as a primary splenic epidermoid cyst.
      Citation: Journal of Veterinary Diagnostic Investigation
      PubDate: 2023-01-16T11:52:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10406387221150626
       
  • Nutritional secondary hyperparathyroidism in a kitten, supported by
           immunoenzymatic measurement of feline intact parathyroid hormone

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      Authors: Jari Zambarbieri, Eleonora Fusi, Jessica Bassi, Paola Scarpa
      Abstract: Journal of Veterinary Diagnostic Investigation, Ahead of Print.
      A 6-mo-old, intact male, domestic shorthair cat was referred with a history of poor growth, reluctance to move, and deformation of the nasal profile. The kitten had been fed a diet composed almost exclusively of a complementary pet food and tuna, which was similar to an all-meat diet. We detected osteopenia and hypocalcemia associated with severe parathyroid hormone (PTH) and calcitriol increases; we measured PTH concentrations with an immunoenzymatic method that has been validated in cats. Dietary correction, consisting of a complete and balanced wet pet food formulated for growth, resulted in normalization of calcium and PTH concentrations within 2 mo.
      Citation: Journal of Veterinary Diagnostic Investigation
      PubDate: 2023-01-10T11:47:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10406387221143463
       
  • Detection of Tritrichomonas foetus by RT-rtPCR in pooled bovine smegma
           samples

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      Authors: Megan E. Schroeder, Denisse Meza, Rohan Shah, Ivan Leyva-Baca, Rick Conrad, Pamela J. Ferro
      Abstract: Journal of Veterinary Diagnostic Investigation, Ahead of Print.
      Trichomonosis is a venereal disease of cattle caused by the protozoan Tritrichomonas foetus. T. foetus infection in cattle herds can be economically costly for cattle producers; therefore, testing is important for detection of the agent. Given that bulls are considered to be subclinical carriers of T. foetus, it is important to detect T. foetus infection prior to movement and/or breeding season. We have described previously the development of an updated set of PCR primers and probes that offer increased sensitivity of T. foetus detection in smegma samples collected in PBS by utilizing reverse-transcription real-time PCR (RT-rtPCR) that targets the 5.8S ribosomal RNA of the T. foetus organism. Here, we report improvements in the updated RT-rtPCR reagents as well as the evaluation of testing of pooled smegma samples. We found that up to 5 smegma samples can be pooled, similar to routine testing practices (InPouch culture), without reducing the sensitivity of detection of T. foetus.
      Citation: Journal of Veterinary Diagnostic Investigation
      PubDate: 2023-01-10T11:39:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10406387221149407
       
  • The invasive pentastome Raillietiella orientalis in a banded water snake
           from the pet trade

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      Authors: Terence M. Farrell, Heather D. S. Walden, Robert J. Ossiboff
      Abstract: Journal of Veterinary Diagnostic Investigation, Ahead of Print.
      Raillietiella orientalis is established in Florida and rapidly spreading both geographically and in known host species. A banded water snake (Nerodia fasciata), purchased in Michigan at a regional reptile show, expectorated a pentastome whose morphology and DNA sequence indicated that it was R. orientalis. This event indicates that, through the pet trade, R. orientalis has been spread 1,500 km from its previously known distribution limit. Fecal sample analyses indicated that the snake was shedding large numbers of embryonated eggs for at least several months. The diversity of reptile species that are both known hosts of R. orientalis in Florida and are commonly sold in the pet trade indicates that this invasive pentastome may become a widespread health concern for pet owners and veterinarians.
      Citation: Journal of Veterinary Diagnostic Investigation
      PubDate: 2023-01-05T05:47:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10406387221147856
       
  • Invasive spindle-cell rhabdomyosarcoma with osteolysis in a dog: case
           report and literature review

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      Authors: Junchao Shi, Rui Gao, Jing Zhang, Rongyi Xu, Qianhan Jia, Ying Ma, Huijun Lu, Kui Zhao, Feng Gao, Wenqi He
      Abstract: Journal of Veterinary Diagnostic Investigation, Ahead of Print.
      Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS), a malignant mesenchymal neoplasm derived from skeletal muscle, is relatively rare in both human and veterinary medicine. Here we report an unusual case of invasive spindle-cell RMS (SCRMS) with bone infiltration and pathologic fracture in a 3.5-y-old intact female Bulldog. Radiographically, a large, predominantly osteolytic mass in the tibia and fibula of the left hindlimb had features typical of a malignant primary bone tumor. Clinically, osteosarcoma was suspected, and the leg was amputated. Histologically, the mass was composed of loosely interwoven spindle-cell fascicles; tumor cells were fusiform with cigar-shaped nuclei and abundant eosinophilic cytoplasm. The neoplastic cells were strongly immunopositive for vimentin, muscle-specific actin, desmin, myogenin, and myoD1. Invasive SCRMS with osteolysis was diagnosed based on the histologic examination and immunohistochemical (IHC) stains. The dog was alive without any evidence of local recurrence or distant metastasis 18 mo post-surgery. RMS should be included in the differential diagnosis when osteolysis occurs; IHC staining confirmation is of great value for definitive diagnosis and treatment planning.
      Citation: Journal of Veterinary Diagnostic Investigation
      PubDate: 2023-01-05T05:42:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10406387221147319
       
  • Patent hepatic ciliated foregut remnant resulting in an umbilicobiliary
           sinus tract, with gallbladder agenesis, in an 8-wk-old male French Bulldog
           

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      Authors: Hannah E. Wong, John M. Cullen, Marta Vilà-González, Rachel Pittaway, Valeer J. Desmet, Tammy D. Gillian
      Abstract: Journal of Veterinary Diagnostic Investigation, Ahead of Print.
      Hepatic ciliated foregut remnants or cysts are congenital abnormalities resulting from retention of embryonic ciliated foregut within the liver. These structures are rarely reported in the human medical literature and have not been reported in the veterinary literature previously, to our knowledge. We describe here a case of an 8-wk-old male French Bulldog with a congenital patent hepatic ciliated foregut remnant resulting in an umbilicobiliary sinus tract. The dog also had concurrent gallbladder agenesis. The patient had yellow fluid discharging from the umbilicus, mimicking a patent urachus. Surgical exploration, removal, and histology provided a conclusive diagnosis of a hepatic foregut remnant and therapeutic resolution of the clinical signs. The histologic appearance of a hepatic foregut remnant is classical, namely a duct composed of 4 layers: an inner ciliated epithelial lining, loose connective tissue, smooth muscle, and a fibrous capsule.
      Citation: Journal of Veterinary Diagnostic Investigation
      PubDate: 2023-01-05T05:41:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10406387221147317
       
  • Multiplex gel-based PCR assay for the simultaneous detection of 5
           genotypes of porcine astroviruses

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      Authors: Qiuya Zhang, Qin Liu, Tanja Opriessnig, Dan Wen, Keda Gu, Yonghou Jiang
      Abstract: Journal of Veterinary Diagnostic Investigation, Ahead of Print.
      Porcine astrovirus (PAstV) has been associated experimentally with diarrhea in piglets, but much more knowledge is needed about this virus. PAstV has high genetic variability, and 5 genotypes have been identified, namely PAstV1–5. To obtain information on the epidemiology of PAstV, we established a multiplex PAstV PCR assay to detect and differentiate the 5 PAstV genotypes simultaneously. The assay utilized specific primers for each genotype, producing fragments of 307, 353, 205, 253, and 467 bp, representing PAstV1–5, respectively. Our multiplex PCR assay amplified all 5 DNA fragments from single or mixed viral genomes without cross-reactions with other PAstV genotypes or other viruses in pigs. The limit of detection of the multiplex PCR assay was 5 × 102 copies/μL for PAstV1 and PAstV4, and 5 × 103 copies/μL for PAstV2, PAstV3, and PAstV5. We examined 76 pig fecal specimens with our multiplex PCR assay. PAstV was detected in 36 of 76 (47.4%) samples; ≥2 PAstVs were found in 20 of 76 (26.3%) samples. The multiplex PCR assay results were essentially the same as the results using a monoplex PAstV PCR assay, with a coincidence rate of>96%. Our multiplex PCR method provides a simple, sensitive, and specific detection tool for PAstV detection and epidemiologic surveys.
      Citation: Journal of Veterinary Diagnostic Investigation
      PubDate: 2022-12-27T12:45:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10406387221145329
       
  • Doublecortin immunolabeling in canine gliomas with distinct degrees of
           tumor infiltration

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      Authors: Vicente A. A. Reyes, Taryn A. Donovan, Andrew D. Miller, Brian F. Porter, Chad B. Frank, Daniel R. Rissi
      Abstract: Journal of Veterinary Diagnostic Investigation, Ahead of Print.
      Increased doublecortin (DCX) immunolabeling at the tumor margins has been associated with tumor infiltration in human glioma and canine anaplastic meningioma. No association between DCX immunolabeling and glioma infiltration has been reported in dogs, to our knowledge. Here we compare the DCX immunolabeling in 14 diffusely infiltrating gliomas (gliomatosis cerebri) and 14 nodular gliomas with distinct degrees of tumor infiltration. Cytoplasmic DCX immunolabeling was classified according to intensity (weak, moderate, strong), distribution (1 = 70% immunolabeling), and location within the neoplasm (random or at tumor margins). Immunolabeling was detected in 6 of 14 (43%) diffusely infiltrating gliomas and 8 of 14 (57%) nodular gliomas. Diffusely infiltrating gliomas had moderate and random immunolabeling, with distribution scores of 1 (4 cases) or 2 (2 cases). Nodular gliomas had strong (6 cases) or moderate (2 cases) immunolabeling, with distribution scores of 1 (3 cases), 2 (3 cases), and 3 (2 cases), and random (6 cases) and/or marginal (3 cases) immunolabeling. Increased DCX immunolabeling within neoplastic cells palisading around necrosis occurred in 4 nodular gliomas. DCX immunolabeling was not increased at the margins of diffusely infiltrating gliomas, indicating that DCX should not be used as an immunomarker for glioma infiltration in dogs.
      Citation: Journal of Veterinary Diagnostic Investigation
      PubDate: 2022-12-16T05:56:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10406387221145321
       
  • Validation and method comparison for a point-of-care lateral flow assay
           measuring equine whole blood insulin concentrations

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      Authors: Emily H. Berryhill, Naomi S. Urbina, Sam Marton, William Vernau, Flavio H. Alonso
      Abstract: Journal of Veterinary Diagnostic Investigation, Ahead of Print.
      The Wellness Ready Test (WRT) is a lateral flow, stall-side assay that measures equine insulin in whole blood and requires validation before recommending clinical use. We evaluated intra- and inter-assay precision and linearity and compared the WRT with a radioimmunoassay (RIA). Tested concentrations ranged from 695 pmol/L (100 μIU/mL). For 20 replicates at each insulin level, intra-assay CVs of the WRT for insulin were 13.3%, 12.9%, and 15.3% at low (139–278 pmol/L; 20–40 μIU/mL), intermediate (278–417 pmol/L; 40–60 μIU/mL), and high (>417 [math]>60 μIU/mL) concentrations, respectively. For 10 replicates at each level (3 assay lots), inter-assay CVs were 15.9%, 11.0%, and 11.7%, respectively. In the weighted linear regression of 5 measured insulin concentrations against expected concentrations, R2 = 0.98, slope = 1.02, and y-intercept = 14.4 pmol/L (2.08 μIU/mL). The Spearman correlation coefficient (rs) was 0.90 (95% CI: 0.85–0.94) between the WRT and RIA; the WRT = f(RIA) Passing–Bablok regression yielded the fit, y = 1.005x + 24.3 pmol/L (3.50 μIU/mL). The WRT result averaged 10.4% higher than the RIA result, with targeted bias of 25.9, 26.1, and 26.7 pmol/L (3.74, 3.76, and 3.84 μIU/mL) for cutoffs used to diagnose insulin dysregulation of 312, 347, and 451 pmol/L (45, 50, and 65 μIU/mL). Assay clinical sensitivities, specificities, and accuracies determined at the 3 selected clinical cutoffs and using the RIA as gold standard were 87–95%, 92–96%, and 91–95%, respectively (n = 99 samples). Observed total error was 28.4–30.4%. The WRT had acceptable precision, excellent linearity, and good association with the RIA.
      Citation: Journal of Veterinary Diagnostic Investigation
      PubDate: 2022-12-09T05:16:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10406387221142288
       
  • Disseminated Halicephalobus gingivalis infection in a horse

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      Authors: Viju V. Pillai, Lydia J. Mudd, Mario F. Sola
      Abstract: Journal of Veterinary Diagnostic Investigation, Ahead of Print.
      A 19-y-old American Saddlebred gelding was evaluated for epiphora of the right eye and generalized cachexia. Initial examination revealed anterior uveitis without ulceration, for which treatment was initiated. Despite the initial response to treatment, the signs progressively worsened to blindness. Histologic examination of the enucleated eye revealed granulomatous panuveitis and optic neuritis with intralesional nematode larvae identified as Halicephalobus gingivalis. Over time and despite anthelmintic treatment, blindness developed in the left eye along with neurologic signs, and the horse was euthanized. Disseminated halicephalobosis was diagnosed on postmortem examination, involving the heart, spleen, kidneys, oral cavity, tongue, left eye, lungs, CNS, adrenal glands, liver, and lymph nodes. Splenic involvement has not been reported previously, to our knowledge. Halicephalobosis is a sporadic parasitic disease that affects equids mostly and for which prognosis is poor despite aggressive systemic anthelmintic treatment. Parasitic granulomatous disease should be included as a differential diagnosis in equids with ocular or neurologic disease.
      Citation: Journal of Veterinary Diagnostic Investigation
      PubDate: 2022-12-09T05:12:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10406387221141698
       
  • Spurious capillary zone electrophoresis pattern in hypercholesterolemic
           dogs

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      Authors: Giulia Mangiagalli, Sara Meazzi, Alessia Giordano, Silvia Rossi
      Abstract: Journal of Veterinary Diagnostic Investigation, Ahead of Print.
      Capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) is a relatively new serum protein electrophoresis method with higher resolution than other electrophoretic techniques. Hypercholesterolemic dogs exhibit a peculiar CZE pattern. Specifically, they have a shoulder or peak immediately next to the albumin peak. We investigated the prevalence of this spurious peak in hypercholesterolemic dogs and its correlation with the serum cholesterol concentration. Moreover, possible discrepancies between the CZE and spectrophotometric (bromocresol green [BCG] method) albumin concentrations in those animals were evaluated, as well as the accuracy in measuring albumin by a different CZE fractionation system. We retrospectively enrolled 500 hypercholesterolemic and normotriglyceridemic dogs. Each electrophoretic curve was inspected visually to identify a spurious peak (prevalence of 68.8%). We chose 120 dogs to further investigate the albumin concentration; CZE albumin was significantly higher than measured using the BCG method. A weak but significant correlation (r = 0.412; p 
      Citation: Journal of Veterinary Diagnostic Investigation
      PubDate: 2022-12-08T05:59:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10406387221141872
       
  • Pulmonary hamartoma in an elk calf

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      Authors: Paola M. Boggiatto, Steven C. Olsen, Mitchell V. Palmer
      Abstract: Journal of Veterinary Diagnostic Investigation, Ahead of Print.
      Hamartomas are benign tumor-like lesions composed of disorganized growth of mature mesenchymal or epithelial tissues indigenous to the organ involved. Sporadically observed in ruminants, vascular, fibrous, nasal, and pulmonary hamartomas have been reported in calves; pulmonary and cutaneous forms have been reported in sheep. A full-term elk calf found dead had a large intrathoracic mass replacing the left caudal lung lobe and compressing other thoracic organs. Histologically, cross- and tangential sections of bronchi were separated by collagenous mesenchyme and irregularly shaped canaliculi and saccules resembling terminal bronchioles. Rarely present were regions in which saccules, lined by simple cuboidal epithelium, transitioned into attenuated epithelium lining fully developed alveoli. These findings are consistent with a pulmonary hamartoma. To our knowledge, pulmonary hamartoma has not been reported previously in a non-domestic ruminant.
      Citation: Journal of Veterinary Diagnostic Investigation
      PubDate: 2022-12-08T05:46:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10406387221141091
       
  • E. P. Pope Memorial Award to Dr. François Elvinger

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      First page: 5
      Abstract: Journal of Veterinary Diagnostic Investigation, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Veterinary Diagnostic Investigation
      PubDate: 2022-11-22T08:49:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10406387221140652
       
  • 2022 AAVLD awards

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      First page: 7
      Abstract: Journal of Veterinary Diagnostic Investigation, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Veterinary Diagnostic Investigation
      PubDate: 2022-11-22T08:51:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10406387221140642
       
  • Thank you to reviewers

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      First page: 10
      Abstract: Journal of Veterinary Diagnostic Investigation, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Veterinary Diagnostic Investigation
      PubDate: 2022-11-22T08:53:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10406387221140651
       
  • 2022 JVDI readership survey

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      Authors: Grant Maxie
      First page: 12
      Abstract: Journal of Veterinary Diagnostic Investigation, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Veterinary Diagnostic Investigation
      PubDate: 2022-11-22T08:57:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10406387221140921
       
  • Identification, 16S rRNA–based characterization, and antimicrobial
           profile of Gallibacterium isolates from broiler and layer chickens

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      Authors: Muhammad Z. Shabbir, Subhashinie Kariyawasam, Traci A. Pierre, Patricia A. Dunn, Eva A. Wallner-Pendleton, Huaguang Lu
      First page: 13
      Abstract: Journal of Veterinary Diagnostic Investigation, Ahead of Print.
      Gallibacterium spp., particularly G. anatis, have received much attention as poultry pathogens in recent years. We report here the presence and antimicrobial resistance profile of 69 Gallibacterium isolates obtained from 2,204 diagnostic submissions of broiler and layer chickens in 2019–2021. Gallibacterium-positive chickens had lesions primarily in the respiratory tract, reproductive tract, and related serosal surfaces. Gallibacterium spp. were initially identified based on their typical cultural characteristics on blood agar. The isolates were confirmed by a genus-specific PCR spanning 16S-23S rRNA and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequence revealed distinct clades. Of the 69 isolates, 68 clustered with the reference strains of G. anatis and 1 with Gallibacterium genomospecies 1 and 2. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing of 58 of the 69 isolates by a MIC method showed variable responses to antimicrobials. The isolates were all susceptible to enrofloxacin, ceftiofur, florfenicol, and gentamicin. There was a high level of susceptibility to trimethoprim–sulfamethoxazole (98.0%), streptomycin (98.0%), amoxicillin (84.0%), sulfadimethoxine (71.0%), and neomycin (71.0%). All of the isolates were resistant to tylosin. There was resistance to penicillin (98.0%), erythromycin (95.0%), clindamycin (94.0%), novobiocin (90.0%), tetracycline (88.0%), oxytetracycline (76.0%), and sulfathiazole (53.0%). A high rate of intermediate susceptibility was observed for spectinomycin (67.0%) and sulfathiazole (40.0%). Our findings indicate a potential role of G. anatis as an important poultry pathogen and cause of subsequent disease, alone or in combination with other pathogens. Continuous monitoring and an antimicrobial susceptibility assay are recommended for effective treatment and disease control.
      Citation: Journal of Veterinary Diagnostic Investigation
      PubDate: 2022-11-19T06:23:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10406387221133782
       
  • A series of heterogeneous lymphoproliferative diseases with CD3 and MUM1
           co-expressed in cats and dogs

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      Authors: Kelly L. Hughes, Emily D. Rout, Paul R. Avery, Alana A. Pavuk, Anne C. Avery, A Russell Moore
      First page: 22
      Abstract: Journal of Veterinary Diagnostic Investigation, Ahead of Print.
      Lymphoma diagnosis in dogs and cats is continually evolving as new subtypes and human correlates are being recognized. In humans, T-cell lymphomas with MUM1 expressed and plasma cell neoplasia or B-cell lymphomas with CD3 expressed aberrantly are reported only rarely. We report here a case series of tumors in dogs and cats with CD3 and MUM1 co-expressed as determined by immunocytochemistry or immunohistochemistry. Lineage was assigned for these tumors by 3 board-certified pathologists and a veterinary immunologist based on review of clinical and cellular features and the results of ancillary testing including PCR for antigen receptor rearrangements, flow cytometry, and serum protein electrophoresis with immunofixation. In cats, 7 of 7 tumors, and in dogs, 3 of 6 tumors with CD3 and MUM1 co-expressed had clonal rearrangement of the immunoglobulin gene or serum monoclonal immunoglobulin, consistent with a diagnosis of a plasma cell neoplasia or myeloma-related disorder with CD3 expressed aberrantly. Disease was often disseminated; notably, 3 of 7 feline cases had cutaneous and/or subcutaneous involvement in the tarsal area. In dogs, 3 of 6 cases had a clonal T-cell receptor gamma result and no clonal immunoglobulin gene rearrangement and were diagnosed as a T-cell tumor with MUM1 expressed. The use of multiple testing modalities in our series of tumors with plasma-cell and T-cell antigens in dogs and cats aided in the comprehensive identification of the lymphoproliferative disease subtype.
      Citation: Journal of Veterinary Diagnostic Investigation
      PubDate: 2022-11-25T06:55:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10406387221139799
       
  • Sources of variance in the results of a commercial bovine immunoglobulin G
           radial immunodiffusion assay

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      Authors: Alexis C. Thompson, Robert W. Wills, David R. Smith
      First page: 34
      Abstract: Journal of Veterinary Diagnostic Investigation, Ahead of Print.
      Radial immunodiffusion (RID) is used to quantify IgG concentration in neonatal beef or dairy calf serum; variability has been noted that may affect the precision and accuracy of assay results. We determined the source, range, and homogeneity of variance in the results of a commercial bovine IgG RID assay (Triple J Farm). To estimate the variance in the precipitin ring diameter, we used 6 sera, measured 28 times across 8 plates and 4 lots, and 3 standards with known IgG concentrations, measured 75 times across 69 plates and 5 lots. The source of diameter variance was determined using variance partition coefficients for lot, plate, and repetition. We used 11 different methods to generate standard curves to convert RID precipitin ring diameters to IgG concentrations. The Levene test of homogeneity of variance (α = 0.1) was used to evaluate the equality of variance between the standards or serum precipitin ring diameters and calculated IgG concentrations. Lot and plate contributed minimally to the diameter variance. Precipitin ring diameters had equal variance. Calculated IgG concentrations for serum not requiring dilution had equal variance. A linear equation from aggregated standards, performed within the same day, had greater accuracy for the calculated IgG concentrations of the standards compared to other equation methods. Regardless of standard curve methodology or IgG concentration, variability inherent to the assay limits its clinical usefulness.
      Citation: Journal of Veterinary Diagnostic Investigation
      PubDate: 2022-11-23T12:31:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10406387221140047
       
  • Disseminated T-cell lymphoma with non-epitheliotropic cutaneous
           involvement in a cat with erythematous patches and regenerative anemia

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      Authors: Cynthia Robveille, Mark W. Kim, Jason Stayt, Claire R. Sharp, Kathrin F. A. Langner
      First page: 42
      Abstract: Journal of Veterinary Diagnostic Investigation, Ahead of Print.
      A 14-y-old, castrated male, diabetic, domestic longhaired cat was presented for investigation of anemia. General examination revealed widespread cutaneous erythematous macules and patches. Hematology and bone marrow aspiration revealed severe regenerative anemia and marked erythroid hyperplasia, respectively. Low numbers of intermediate-to-large, atypical lymphocytes were observed in the blood smear and bone marrow aspirates. Various imaging modalities demonstrated a diffuse pulmonary bronchial pattern, multifocal mural thickening of the urinary bladder, splenomegaly, and mild tri-cavitary effusion. Skin biopsies and cytologic examination of the pleural effusion demonstrated round-cell neoplasia consistent with lymphoma. Autopsy confirmed disseminated T-cell lymphoma, mostly affecting the urinary bladder, stomach, lymph nodes, and interscapular subcutis and muscles. Angiocentrism and nerve infiltration were present. The cutaneous erythematous patches, characterized by perivascular neoplastic lymphocytic infiltrates and angiodestruction, were a manifestation of the disseminated lymphoma in this cat, similar to the lesions reported in humans affected by angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma.
      Citation: Journal of Veterinary Diagnostic Investigation
      PubDate: 2022-11-01T06:21:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10406387221133543
       
  • Colonic sand impaction with cecal rupture and peritonitis in an adult
           African savanna elephant, and review of noninfectious causes of
           gastrointestinal disease in elephants

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      Authors: Tamires G. W. Teodoro, Francisco A. Uzal, Nicolas Streitenberger, Monika A. Samol, Eileen E. Henderson, Javier Asin
      First page: 47
      Abstract: Journal of Veterinary Diagnostic Investigation, Ahead of Print.
      Gastrointestinal disorders are among the most common disease processes in captive elephants. Colic is a frequent clinical presentation and may have several infectious and noninfectious causes. Ingestion of sand has been reported in elephants living in enclosures with loose sandy soils. Similar to the situation in horses, sand ingestion can cause intestinal impaction and colic in elephants. Here we describe a case of colonic sand impaction with cecal rupture and peritonitis in an African savanna elephant from a zoologic collection that died after several days of colic. On autopsy, abundant, gritty, sandy material was found within a segment of colon immediately aboral to the cecum. There was a full-thickness tear in the cecal wall, free intestinal contents within the abdominal cavity, and peritonitis. To our knowledge, the postmortem examination of an elephant with sand impaction and cecal rupture has not been reported previously; this condition should be included among the differential diagnoses in elephants with colic. We review the reports of noninfectious causes of gastrointestinal disease in elephants, which include cases of small intestinal and colonic torsion and of intestinal obstruction by fecal boluses.
      Citation: Journal of Veterinary Diagnostic Investigation
      PubDate: 2022-11-19T06:27:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10406387221130024
       
  • T-cell lymphoma in a Himalayan black bear in China

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      Authors: Li Zhao, Yonghong Liu, Yu Zhi, Jintian Huang, Wenlong Wang, Wa Gao, Yulin Ding, Shuying Liu, Jinling Wang
      First page: 53
      Abstract: Journal of Veterinary Diagnostic Investigation, Ahead of Print.
      A 12-y-old Himalayan black bear suddenly developed depression, anorexia, cough, and dyspnea and died at the Ordos Zoo, China. At autopsy, the mesenteric and cranial mediastinal lymph nodes (LNs) were enlarged; the largest cranial mediastinal LN was ~13 cm in diameter. Scattered-to-diffuse, rounded-or-oval, gray, firm 1–6-mm nodules were observed on the surfaces of the spleen, liver, lungs, and small intestine. Histologically, the enlarged cranial mediastinal and mesenteric LNs, spleen, small intestine, lungs, and liver contained dense populations of neoplastic lymphoid cells (NLCs). The NLCs were round-or-oval with small amounts of mildly eosinophilic cytoplasm and round-or-oval hyperchromatic nuclei with indistinct nucleoli; the mitotic count was 55 in 2.37 mm2. Immunohistochemically, cell membranes and the cytoplasm of NLCs were CD3+, CD79a−, CD20−, CD15−, CD30−, and CD45RA−; hence, the NLCs were derived from T lymphocytes. To our knowledge, T-cell lymphoma has not been reported previously in a Himalayan black bear.
      Citation: Journal of Veterinary Diagnostic Investigation
      PubDate: 2022-10-29T04:56:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10406387221129828
       
  • Evaluation of barcoded magnetic bead–based immunoassays for the
           simultaneous detection of feline leukemia virus antigen and antibody
           against feline immunodeficiency virus

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      Authors: Kathy Esty, Haylea Elmer, Salam Nassar, Anthony Ruggiero, Seema Singh, Melissa Beall, Jesse Buch
      First page: 57
      Abstract: Journal of Veterinary Diagnostic Investigation, Ahead of Print.
      Testing platforms that leverage automation, require minimal sample volume, and enable various tests to be performed simultaneously on a single sample have the potential to improve workflow and efficiency in veterinary diagnostic laboratories. We evaluated a barcoded magnetic bead (BMB) technology using established immunoassays for detection of feline leukemia virus (FeLV) p27 antigen and antibody against feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV). Analytical sensitivity, limit of blank, and limit of detection were used to establish a functional sensitivity of 1.00 ng/mL of inactivated FeLV antigen and 35.7 ng/mL of anti-FIV monoclonal antibody. Common interferents, such as hemoglobin, lipid, and bilirubin, were not found to interfere with the performance of the assay. Intra- and inter-assay CVs were
      Citation: Journal of Veterinary Diagnostic Investigation
      PubDate: 2022-10-29T04:54:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10406387221129259
       
  • Improved molecular detection of Neorickettsia risticii with a duplex
           real-time PCR assay in the diagnosis of Potomac horse fever

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      Authors: Nagaraja R. Thirumalapura, Julia Livengood, John Beeby, Weihua Wang, Erin L. Goodrich, Laura B. Goodman, Erdal Erol, Deepanker Tewari
      First page: 62
      Abstract: Journal of Veterinary Diagnostic Investigation, Ahead of Print.
      Neorickettsia risticii, an obligate intracellular bacterium, is the causative agent of Potomac horse fever (PHF). Diagnosis of PHF is based on demonstration of serum antibodies, isolation of N. risticii, and/or detection of nucleic acid by a PCR assay. An existing real-time PCR assay targeting the N. risticii 16S rRNA has been validated using blood samples from horses with colitis, and snails; to our knowledge, the performance of the assay for other sample types has not been reported. We describe here a modification of the 16S rRNA gene assay by the addition of a set of primers and probe targeting the N. risticii p51 gene to form a duplex assay. We validated the new assay using diagnostic specimens from 56 horses with suspected PHF. The assay consistently detected down to 5 copies of synthetic targets, and did not show any cross-reaction with common equine enteric pathogens. Although we did not establish the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of the duplex assay, results for both gene targets were in complete agreement, with the exception of 4 fecal samples that tested positive for the 16S rRNA gene only. Further analysis indicated that testing of fecal samples using our 16S rRNA gene assay alone can produce a false-positive result.
      Citation: Journal of Veterinary Diagnostic Investigation
      PubDate: 2022-11-14T05:57:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10406387221135184
       
  • Psittacid alphaherpesvirus 5 infection in Indian ringneck parakeets in
           southern California

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      Authors: Eileen E. Henderson, Nicolas Streitenberger, Javier Asin, Anibal Armien, Beate M. Crossley, April L. Childress, James F. X. Wellehan, Francisco A. Uzal
      First page: 67
      Abstract: Journal of Veterinary Diagnostic Investigation, Ahead of Print.
      Four Indian ringneck parakeets (Psittacula krameri; syn. ringneck parrots or rose-ringed parakeets) were submitted by 2 private owners for autopsy following a history of dyspnea and death. Gross findings were varied and included thickening of the left caudal thoracic air sac, white spots throughout the liver, mild dilation of the proventriculus, coelomic effusion, splenomegaly, and pulmonary congestion and edema. Microscopically, the submitted parakeets had significant lesions in the lower respiratory tract, including necrotizing bronchitis, parabronchitis, and interstitial pneumonia with numerous syncytia containing eosinophilic intranuclear inclusions. Electron microscopy of the lungs was compatible with a herpesviral infection and Psittacid alphaherpesvirus 5 (PsAHV5) was detected via PCR and sequencing. There has been inconsistent terminology used with Psittacid alphaherpesvirus 3 and PsAHV5; we attempt here to clarify the reported history of these viruses.
      Citation: Journal of Veterinary Diagnostic Investigation
      PubDate: 2022-11-11T06:06:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10406387221136568
       
  • Intestinal T-cell lymphoma in an Asian small-clawed otter: case report and
           literature review of lymphoma in the subfamily Lutrinae

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      Authors: Agustín Rebollada-Merino, Rocío Canales, Umberto Romani-Cremaschi, Antonio Rodríguez-Bertos
      First page: 72
      Abstract: Journal of Veterinary Diagnostic Investigation, Ahead of Print.
      The Asian small-clawed otter (Aonyx cinereus) is an endangered species that is common in zoologic collections. A 17-y-old female Asian small-clawed otter under human care, with a clinical history of chronic renal disease, was euthanized because of deteriorating health. Histologically, the jejunal wall was infiltrated by a monomorphic population of small neoplastic lymphocytes that expanded the lamina propria of the villi and crypts, and on rare occasions invaded the submucosa. The tumor was composed of T cells (CD3+) with a proliferation index of 16%. Based on the World Health Organization (WHO) Classification of Hematopoietic Neoplasms in Domestic Animals, this lymphoma was classified as an enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma (EATL) type 2. We also present here a review of the literature on intestinal lymphoma in the subfamily Lutrinae (otters).
      Citation: Journal of Veterinary Diagnostic Investigation
      PubDate: 2022-11-17T04:29:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10406387221138293
       
  • High-grade mucoepidermoid carcinoma of the salivary gland in a bull

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      Authors: Kayla Alexander, Jennifer Beam, Brittany Baughman, Timothy W. Morgan
      First page: 76
      Abstract: Journal of Veterinary Diagnostic Investigation, Ahead of Print.
      Salivary gland neoplasia is uncommon in veterinary species and has rarely been reported in cattle. Adenocarcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and pleomorphic carcinoma have been described in the parotid gland of dairy cows. Here we describe a case of high-grade mucoepidermoid carcinoma in a bull. The bull had a chronic history of caudal mandibular soft tissue swelling. Postmortem examination revealed a 30 × 30-cm mass with a caseonecrotic center, hemorrhage and necrosis of the ipsilateral cervical musculature, osteolysis of the right paracondylar process of the skull and right horn base, pulmonary nodules, and enlarged tracheobronchial lymph nodes. Histology of the mass, lungs, and lymph nodes revealed an invasive neoplasm composed of epithelial cells arranged in nests and ductular structures supported by a spindle cell stroma, with frequent central necrosis. Immunohistochemistry revealed that epithelial cells were diffusely positive for pancytokeratin and p63 with multifocal vimentin positivity; stromal cells were diffusely positive for vimentin and α-SMA. A salivary gland mucoepidermoid carcinoma was diagnosed based on these findings. Although rare, salivary gland neoplasia should be considered a differential diagnosis for mandibular masses in cattle.
      Citation: Journal of Veterinary Diagnostic Investigation
      PubDate: 2022-11-15T05:41:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10406387221137550
       
  • Primary intranasal perivascular wall tumors in 2 cats

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      Authors: Francesco Godizzi, Giancarlo Avallone, Gabriele Ghisleni, Silvia Dell’Aere, Clarissa Zamboni, Paola Valenti, Paola Roccabianca
      First page: 81
      Abstract: Journal of Veterinary Diagnostic Investigation, Ahead of Print.
      Perivascular wall tumors (PWTs) are common well-known canine mesenchymal tumors. The term PWT has not yet been applied to cats; only 2 cases of feline soft tissue hemangiopericytomas (HEPs) are available. In human medicine, sinonasal HEP-like tumor/glomangiopericytoma (SHPCL/GP) and intranasal solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) are well-known mesenchymal tumors with staghorn vasculature and low malignant potential; however, these entities have not been described in small animals. We describe here the pathologic and immunohistochemical features of 2 cases of feline intranasal mesenchymal tumors consistent with PWTs and resembling human SHPCL/GP (case 1), and human intranasal SFT (case 2). Both cats developed intranasal, unilateral, polypoid, expansile neoplasms with a mostly patternless growth of spindle cells, minimal stroma, and prominent staghorn vessels. The stroma was PAS negative, which excludes a glomus tumor. Immunohistochemistry identified diffuse vimentin and PDGFRβ expression. Case 1 was α-SMA positive (as is human SHPCL/GP); case 2 was negative (as is human intranasal SFT). Both tumors were incompletely excised, leading to recurrence in case 1. Case 2 was lost to follow up. To our knowledge, intranasal PWTs have not been reported previously in cats. The frequency of the lesions is not known, but awareness of these entities may assist in their recognition and better characterization in the future.
      Citation: Journal of Veterinary Diagnostic Investigation
      PubDate: 2022-11-23T12:46:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10406387221140074
       
  • Histiocytic sarcoma with central nervous system involvement in 6 cats

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      Authors: Jesse Riker, Lorelei L. Clarke, Elena A. Demeter, Andrew D. Miller, Elizabeth W. Howerth, Doris M. Miller, Daniel R. Rissi
      First page: 87
      Abstract: Journal of Veterinary Diagnostic Investigation, Ahead of Print.
      Here we characterize 6 cases (4 autopsies and 2 biopsies) of histiocytic sarcoma in the CNS of cats. All affected cats had chronic, progressive clinical signs. Three autopsied cats were euthanized because of a poor prognosis, and one died. The clinical outcome for the biopsy cases remains unknown. Tumors occurred in the brain (4 cases), spinal cord (1 case), and brain and spinal cord (1 case). Neoplasms were restricted to the CNS in 3 cases. Reported gross changes in the 4 autopsy cases consisted of neuroparenchymal swelling with or without tissue pallor or gray discoloration (2 cases) and a yellow or dark-gray mass (2 cases). Histologically, pleomorphic, round-to-elongate neoplastic cells with typical histiocytic morphology effaced the neuroparenchyma and leptomeninges. Multinucleate neoplastic cells were observed in all cases. The mitotic count was 1–24 in 2.37 mm2 (10 FN22 40× fields). Neoplastic cells in all cases had positive immunolabeling for Iba1; immunolabeling was negative for E-cadherin, CD3, CD79, and MUM1, confirming their histiocytic origin.
      Citation: Journal of Veterinary Diagnostic Investigation
      PubDate: 2022-11-11T06:09:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10406387221136849
       
 
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