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  Subjects -> VETERINARY SCIENCE (Total: 225 journals)
Showing 1 - 63 of 63 Journals sorted by number of followers
Animal Behaviour     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 166)
Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 29)
Veterinary Record     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Veterinary Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Australian Veterinary Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Veterinary Clinics of North America: Small Animal Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Journal of Small Animal Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Animal Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 21)
Journal of Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Equine Veterinary Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Veterinary Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Veterinary Anaesthesia and Analgesia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Veterinary Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
BMC Veterinary Research     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
American Journal of Primatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Equine Veterinary Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Canadian Journal of Veterinary Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Veterinary and Comparative Oncology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Veterinary Radiology & Ultrasound     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
New Zealand Veterinary Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Veterinary Diagnostic Investigation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Anthrozoos : A Multidisciplinary Journal of The Interactions of People & Animals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Veterinary Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Research in Veterinary Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Veterinary Immunology and Immunopathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Veterinary Medical Education     Partially Free   (Followers: 11)
Animals     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Veterinary Clinics of North America: Equine Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Preventive Veterinary Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Veterinary Research     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Equine Veterinary Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Trends in Parasitology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Veterinary Clinical Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Veterinary Ophthalmology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Veterinary Microbiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
American Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Veterinary Dermatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Companion Animal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Veterinary Nurse     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Veterinary Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Archives of Animal Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Animal Reproduction Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Animal Feed Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Research in Forestry, Wildlife and Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Veterinary Parasitology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
African Journal of Wildlife Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Veterinary Pharmacology and Therapeutics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Veterinary Science and Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Feline Medicine & Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Domestic Animal Endocrinology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Veterinary Science & Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Veterinary Clinics of North America: Exotic Animal Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Research Journal of Veterinary Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Veterinary Nursing Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Veterinary Science & Medical Diagnosis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Veterinary Medicine International     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Exotic Pet Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Veterinary Clinics of North America: Food Animal Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Equine Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Veterinary Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Irish Veterinary Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Avian Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Open Journal of Animal Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Animal Health Research Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Bangladesh Journal of Animal Science     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Human & Veterinary Medicine - International Journal of the Bioflux Society     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Topics in Companion Animal Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Transboundary and Emerging Diseases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Zoonoses and Public Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Onderstepoort Journal of Veterinary Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Australian Equine Veterinarian     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Frontiers in Veterinary Science     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Asian Journal of Medical and Biological Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Case Reports in Veterinary Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
ILAR Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Nutrición Animal Tropical     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Veterinary Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Medical Mycology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Ethiopian Veterinary Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Asian Journal of Poultry Science     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Bulletin of Animal Health and Production in Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Theriogenology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Indian Journal of Veterinary Anatomy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Indian Journal of Animal Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Veterinary and Comparative Orthopaedics and Traumatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Open Journal of Veterinary Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Veterinary Medicine and Science     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Anatomia, Histologia, Embryologia: Journal of Veterinary Medicine Series C     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Small Ruminant Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery Open Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Advanced Research in Life Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
New Zealand Veterinary Nurse     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Reproduction in Domestic Animals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
VCOT Open     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Veterinary Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Kenya Veterinarian     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Tropical Veterinarian     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Bulletin of University of Agricultural Sciences and Veterinary Medicine Cluj-Napoca : Food Science and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Research & Reviews : Journal of Veterinary Science and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Acta Veterinaria     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Acta Veterinaria Hungarica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Global Journal of Animal Scientific Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Buletin Peternakan : Bulletin of Animal Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Iranian Journal of Applied Animal Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Colombiana de Ciencias Pecuarias (Colombian journal of animal science and veterinary medicine)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Jurnal Ilmu dan Kesehatan Hewan (Veterinary Science and Medicine Journal)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Jurnal Veteriner     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Jurnal Agripet     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Buletin Veteriner Udayana     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Veterinary Dentistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Advanced Veterinary Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Brazilian Journal of Veterinary Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Applied Animal Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Tanzania Veterinary Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Pet Behaviour Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Abanico Veterinario     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Austral Journal of Veterinary Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Polish Journal of Veterinary Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of the South African Veterinary Association     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Livestock     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Veterinary Quarterly     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of the Hellenic Veterinary Medical Society     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Veterinary Medicine: Research and Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Mexicana de Ciencias Pecuarias     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Veterinary Science Development     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Acta Veterinaria Scandinavica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Veterinary Research Communications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Revista Brasileira de Zootecnia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Archivos de Medicina Veterinaria     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Tropical Animal Health and Production     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Brasileira de Higiene e Sanidade Animal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
veterinär spiegel     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Chilean Journal of Agricultural & Animal Sciences     Open Access  
CES Medicina Veterinaria y Zootecnia     Open Access  
Veterinaria México OA     Open Access  
Compendio de Ciencias Veterinarias     Open Access  
Iranian Journal of Veterinary Surgery     Open Access  
Ciencia Veterinaria     Open Access  
Nepalese Veterinary Journal     Open Access  
Sri Lanka Veterinary Journal     Open Access  
Salud y Tecnología Veterinaria     Open Access  
Veterinary Parasitology : X     Open Access  
Jurnal Medik Veteriner     Open Access  
Tierärztliche Praxis Ausgabe K: Kleintiere / Heimtiere     Hybrid Journal  
Tierärztliche Praxis Ausgabe G: Großtiere / Nutztiere     Hybrid Journal  
Van Veterinary Journal     Open Access  
Journal of Veterinary and Animal Sciences     Open Access  
Rassegna di Diritto, Legislazione e Medicina Legale Veterinaria     Open Access  
Veterinaria (Montevideo)     Open Access  
SVU-International Journal of Veterinary Sciences     Open Access  
Matrix Science Medica     Open Access  
Veterinary Journal of Mehmet Akif Ersoy University / Mehmet Akif Ersoy Üniversitesi Veteriner Fakültesi Dergisi     Open Access  
Analecta Veterinaria     Open Access  
Veterinarski Glasnik     Open Access  
Medicina Veterinária (UFRPE)     Open Access  
Veterinaria     Open Access  
Jurnal Sain Veteriner     Open Access  
International Journal of Tropical Veterinary and Biomedical Research     Open Access  
Revista de Ciência Veterinária e Saúde Pública     Open Access  
Jurnal Medika Veterinaria     Open Access  
Veterinary Parasitology : Regional Studies and Reports     Full-text available via subscription  
Revue Vétérinaire Clinique     Full-text available via subscription  
Folia Veterinaria     Open Access  
Science and Animal Health     Open Access  
FAVE Sección Ciencias Veterinarias     Open Access  
Revista Ciencias Veterinarias     Open Access  
Wartazoa. Indonesian Bulletin of Animal and Veterinary Sciences     Open Access  
Indonesia Medicus Veterinus     Open Access  
Spei Domus     Open Access  
Revista de Educação Continuada em Medicina Veterinária e Zootecnia     Open Access  
Cogent Food & Agriculture     Open Access  
Revista Veterinaria     Open Access  
Journal of the Selva Andina Research Society     Open Access  
Bangladesh Veterinarian     Open Access  
Journal of Buffalo Science     Hybrid Journal  
Revista de Ciências Agroveterinárias     Open Access  
Intas Polivet     Full-text available via subscription  
Atatürk Üniversitesi Veteriner Bilimleri Dergisi / Atatürk University Journal of Veterinary Sciences     Open Access  
Revue Marocaine des Sciences Agronomiques et Vétérinaires     Open Access  
Nigerian Veterinary Journal     Open Access  
Revista Brasileira de Ciência Veterinária     Open Access  
Schweizer Archiv für Tierheilkunde     Hybrid Journal  
Bangladesh Journal of Veterinary Medicine     Open Access  
Macedonian Veterinary Review     Open Access  
Annual Review of Animal Biosciences     Full-text available via subscription  
Revista de Investigaciones Veterinarias del Perú     Open Access  
Revista Complutense de Ciencias Veterinarias     Open Access  
Medical Mycology Case Reports     Open Access  
Veterinaria México     Open Access  
Revista de Salud Animal     Open Access  
Revista de Medicina Veterinaria     Open Access  
Revista MVZ Córdoba     Open Access  
Avances en Ciencias Veterinarias     Open Access  
InVet     Open Access  
Zeitschrift für Ganzheitliche Tiermedizin     Hybrid Journal  
team.konkret     Open Access  
pferde spiegel     Hybrid Journal  
kleintier konkret     Hybrid Journal  

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Veterinary Research Communications
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.589
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 1  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0165-7380 - ISSN (Online) 1573-7446
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2469 journals]
  • Clinical features and epidemiology of severe fever with thrombocytopenia
           syndrome in dogs in the Republic of Korea: an observational study
           (2019–2020)

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      Abstract: Abstract Severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome (SFTS) is a zoonotic disease with a high mortality rate for humans and cats. The clinical course and prognosis of SFTS in dogs remains unclear. In the present study, we investigated the clinical and epidemiological characteristics of SFTS virus (SFTSV) infection in dogs. All evaluated dogs exhibited an acute course and symptoms including fever (57.1%), anorexia (57.1%), depression (42.9%), and vomiting (35.7%). Thrombocytopenia was present in 45.5% of dogs, while jaundice was not observed. C-reactive protein, alanine transaminase, and alkaline phosphatase were elevated in some cases. Viral clearance occurred within 6 to 26 days. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the SFTSV sequences were consistent with viruses circulating in the Republic of Korea. As dogs often live in close contact with humans, awareness of the clinical and epidemiological features of SFTS in dogs is crucial. Further large-scale studies are necessary to investigate SFTSV infection in dogs.
      PubDate: 2022-08-06
       
  • Immune responses and protective immunity in Pangasius pangasius (Hamilton,
           1822) as induced by outer membrane proteins of Edwardsiella tarda and
           aluminium hydroxide adjuvant complex

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      Abstract: Abstract Edwardsiella tarda is considered one of the important bacterial fish pathogens. The outer membrane proteins (OMPs) of E. tarda are structurally and functionally conserved, and immunogenic. This study assessed the effects of the OMPs of E. tarda CGH9 as a vaccine without aluminium hydroxide [AH] (T1) and with AH adjuvant (T2) on the respiratory burst (ROB) activity, lymphocyte proliferation of head kidney (HK) leukocytes, and serum antibody production in pangas catfish Pangasius pangasius. The ROB activity and lymphocyte proliferation of HK leukocytes increased in both vaccinated groups compared to the control. Nonetheless, the T2 group showed a gradual increase in ROB activity and lymphocyte proliferation of HK leukocytes up to 3-weeks post-vaccination (wpv). The serum antibody production in the T1 group decreased initially for up to 2-wpv and increased from 3-wpv; whereas, in the T2 group, the serum-specific antibody levels were significantly high from 1-wpv compared to control. Simultaneously, the protective efficacy in terms of relative percentage survival in the T2 group after injecting with a lethal dose of E. tarda CGH9 was high (89.00±15.56) compared to the T1 group (78.00±0.00). Furthermore, the catfish administered with a booster dose of E. tarda OMPs with or without AH adjuvant showed no additional increase in immune response or protective immunity. These results suggested that E. tarda OMPs and AH adjuvant complex has a higher potential to induce protective immunity, which may be a good choice as a vaccine to combat E. tarda infection in catfish.
      PubDate: 2022-08-05
       
  • Trace mineral mixture supplemented to in vitro maturation medium improves
           subsequent embryo development and embryo quality in cattle

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      Abstract: Abstract Trace minerals participate in reproductive processes and are crucial for oocyte maturation. The objective of the present study was to investigate the effect of combined supplementation with copper (Cu), manganese (Mn), selenium (Se) and zinc (Zn) during bovine in vitro maturation (IVM) on subsequent embryo development and quality. The IVM medium was supplemented as follows: a) Control (no mineral supplementation); b) MScz (6 ng/mL Mn + 100 ng/mL Se + 200 ng/mL Cu + 400 ng/mL Zn); c) MScZ (6 ng/mL Mn + 100 ng/mL Se + 200 ng/mL Cu + 1200 ng/mL Zn); d) MSCz (6 ng/mL Mn + 100 ng/mL Se + 600 ng/mL Cu + 400 ng/mL Zn). Supplementation with MScz and MSCz produced more blastocysts compared with the control. Total blastocyst cell number was higher when minerals were added at any combination. Day-8 blastocysts derived from oocytes treated with minerals had lower intracellular reactive oxygen species concentration and lipid content than the control. In conclusion, combined supplementation with Cu, Mn, Se and Zn during bovine oocyte IVM increased in vitro production performance, improving embryo developmental ability and quality.
      PubDate: 2022-08-04
       
  • Food preference of nine-banded armadillo (Dasypus novemcinctus, Linnaeus,
           1758) under human care

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      Abstract: Abstract This study aims to evaluate the food preference of nine banded armadillos kept in captivity, exposed to four different diets: Diet 1 (D1) - dry dog food and ground beef; Diet 2 (D2) - dry dog food, ground beef, and chicken eggs; Diet 3 (D3) - dog food, ground beef, bananas, and papaya; Diet 4 (D4) - dog food, ground beef, chicken eggs, banana, and papaya. To this end, an experiment was carried out for five weeks, the first four of which were for preliminary management and the fifth week for data collection. Frequency of consumption, total intake for each diet, and intake ratio were evaluated. The dietary preference was higher for the diets with a higher protein percentage (D1 and D2), mainly D2, which presented increased demand and intake starting on the fourth day of observation. In second day of observation, D1 presented the higher intake ratio, but D2 gradually replaced it. The diet containing the lowest protein rate (D3) was the least favored on all observation days and evaluations. In conclusion, the food preference of ex-situ armadillos seems to be related to the inclusion of greater amounts of protein, particularly that of animal origin, with eggs being the most appreciated ingredient in this study.
      PubDate: 2022-08-03
       
  • Molecular characterization of Infectious Bursal Disease Virus isolated in
           Chile reveals several mutations in VP2 coding region and a reassortment in
           its genome

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      Abstract: Abstract Infectious Bursal Disease (IBD) is a well-described disease in young chickens. It is caused by the Infectious Bursal Disease Virus (IBDV), which has a bi-segmented, double-strand RNA genome. The absence of a lipidic envelope makes IBDV highly resistant to environmental conditions. Consequently, it is widely reported around the world. Fourteen samples retrieved from chickens exhibiting apparent alterations of the bursa of Fabricius between 2017 and 2021 were included in the study. These samples were passaged into embryonated eggs and the presence of IBD was confirmed through RT-PCR. The PCR products were sequenced and analyzed to characterize the Chilean IBDV isolates for comparison with GenBank sequences, including vaccines sequences currently used in Chile. Phylogenetic analysis classified the Chilean sequences as A1B1, except the sample 15002_CL_2021 which was classified as A2B1. On the other hand, all Chilean viruses were grouped as B1, based on viral segment B. Estimated evolutionary divergence between different genogroups supports these clustering. Moreover, samples 13936_CL_2017, 14038_CL_2017, 14083_CL_2017, 14145_CL_2018, 14431_CL_2019, and 14459_CL_2019 showed high similitude with the D78 and ViBursa CE vaccines (both currently used in Chile). Viruses 14010_CL_2018, 14040_CL_2017, 14514_CL_2019 and 14019_CL_2017 exhibited patterns that do not exactly fit either vaccine. Finally, viruses 15,041 N-_CL_2021, 15,041 N+_CL_2021, and 15004_CL_2021 showed even more differences regarding both vaccines. This is the first study in Chile to analyze the genetic sequences of IBDV isolates. The different assessments conducted as part of the study suggest a close relationship with vaccines currently in use. Interestingly, one of the viruses exhibited a reassortment in its genome segments, which could confer new characteristics to the virus. However, new approaches would be required to establish the origin of the isolated viruses, as well as how the recombination is changing its virulence or morbidity.
      PubDate: 2022-08-03
       
  • Investigation of Carnivore protoparvovirus 1 and Amdoparvovirus infections
           in red fox populations of the Italian Dolomites

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      Abstract: Abstract Members of the family Parvoviridae are well recognized infectious agents of companion, livestock and wild animals as well, whose relevance on production, health, welfare and conservation is often high. Nevertheless, the knowledge of their epidemiology in wild populations is scarce or fragmentary. In this study, the presence and features of two parvoviruses, Carnivore protoparvovirus 1 and Amdoparvovirus, were evaluated in the red fox population resident in the Dolomites area, Northern Italy, and compared with the scenario of other countries and Italian regions. Six out of 117 spleen samples (5.13%: 95CI: 1.91–10.83%) tested positive to Carnivore protoparvovirus 1 and were molecularly characterized as Canine parvovirus (CPV). Infection frequency was comparable with that observed in wild carnivore populations present in Southern Italian regions, although in that case, Feline parvovirus (FPV) was predominant. No evidence of infection-related clinical signs was reported and viral loads were invariably low, suggesting the subclinical nature of the infection, the persistent carrier status or the detection of traces of viral DNA. No samples tested positive to Amdoparvovirus genus-specific PCR. The present study provides the first evidence of CPV circulation in the Northern Italy fox population. Unfortunately, the inevitable convenience nature of the sampling prevents definitive conclusions. Therefore, a more coordinated and standardized approach should be applied, at least in neighbouring geographic areas, to study these viral infections and their relevance in wildlife.
      PubDate: 2022-08-02
       
  • Generalized and fatal felid alphaherpesvirus-1 natural infection with
           liver involvement in a feline leukaemia virus-positive adult cat: a case
           report

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      Abstract: Abstract Generalized and fatal felid alphaherpesvirus-1 (FeHV-1) natural infection with liver involvement is rarely reported in cats, and the occurrence of herpesvirus viraemia with internal organ histologic lesions in adult cats is unknown. A 1.5-year-old cat, female, mixed breed, positive for feline leukaemia virus (FeLV) presented in a veterinary teaching hospital with sneezing, nasal discharge, anorexia, and diarrhoea after two weeks, evolving to inspiratory dyspnoea. Complete blood count and serum biochemistry analysis showed marked leukopenia and thrombocytopenia. After clinical worsening and lack of treatment response, the cat was euthanized. Pathological findings included hepatic necrosis, fibrinonecrotic tracheitis, and bronchointerstitial pneumonia. Marked amounts of coccobacillary bacteria were observed covering the necrotic tracheal and bronchial mucosa, at the cytoplasm of alveolar macrophages, and free in alveoli lumen, mimicking a primary bacterial tracheitis and pneumonia. Both lung and tracheal bacteria exhibited marked immunolabeling in anti-Escherichia coli immunohistochemistry. In addition, rare epithelial cells of bronchi contained round, eosinophilic, intranuclear viral inclusion bodies (4–7 µm) that marginate the chromatin, characteristic of FeHV-1 infection. Strong multifocal anti-FeHV-1 immunolabeling was observed in necrotic epithelial cells of the liver, trachea, and lungs. Generalized herpesvirus infection with the occurrence of acute hepatic necrosis and severe respiratory illness is a potential differential diagnosis in FeLV-positive cats with respiratory signs. The immunodepression in these cats probably favours a FeHV-1 viraemia in addition to the development of opportunistic bacterial infections, such as Escherichia coli, and it is associated with a poor outcome.
      PubDate: 2022-07-20
       
  • HIF-1α upregulation exerts the antagonistic effect against angiogenesis
           inhibition in manganese deficiency-induced tibial dyschondroplasia of
           broiler chicks

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      Abstract: Abstract Manganese (Mn) is an essential microelement for broiler breeding and its deficiency causes tibial dyschondroplasia (TD). Tibial growth plate (TGP) development and metaphyseal vascularization are crucial for tibia growth in fast-growing broiler chickens, but their roles in Mn deficiency-induced TD in chicks remain unclear. This study was designed to clarify this issue. A total of 36 one-day-old broilers were divided into the control group and Mn-deficiency (Mn-D) group, which were fed with a standard diet (60 mg Mn/kg) and Mn deficiency diet (22 mg Mn/kg) for 42 days, respectively. TGP and proximal tibial metaphysis were collected to perform the related assays. This study found that Mn deficiency decreased the tibia length and TGP thickness in the TD model. Also, Mn deficiency increased the irregular and white tibial dyschondroplasia lesions (TDL) region under the TGP, and reduced the expression levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF). Combined with histological assessment, it was suggested that Manganese deficiency inhibited angiogenesis in the proximal tibial metaphysis. Meanwhile, Mn deficiency enhanced the expression levels of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 α (HIF-1α), autophagy-related protein 5 (ATG5), and microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 β (LC3-II) in TGP, but decreased the expression level of SQSTM1 (P62), which suggested that autophagy was activated during this process. Collectively, these data indicate that HIF-1α up-regulation and concurrent autophagy activation exert a protective effect against Mn deficiency-induced angiogenesis inhibition, which may provide useful guidance to prevent TD in broilers.
      PubDate: 2022-07-15
       
  • Lipid droplets and perilipins in canine osteosarcoma. Investigations on
           tumor tissue, 2D and 3D cell culture models

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      Abstract: Abstract Lipid droplets were identified as important players in biological processes of various tumor types. With emphasis on lipid droplet-coating proteins (perilipins, PLINs), this study intended to shed light on the presence and formation of lipid droplets in canine osteosarcoma. For this purpose, canine osteosarcoma tissue samples (n = 11) were analyzed via immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy for lipid droplets and lipid droplet-coating proteins (PLINs). Additionally, we used the canine osteosarcoma cell lines D-17 and COS4288 in 2D monolayer and 3D spheroid (cultivated for 7, 14, and 21 days) in vitro models, and further analyzed the samples by means of histochemistry, immunofluorescence, molecular biological techniques (RT-qPCR, Western Blot) and electron microscopical imaging. Lipid droplets, PLIN2, and PLIN3 were detected in osteosarcoma tissue samples as well as in 2D and 3D cultivated D-17 and COS4288 cells. In spheroids, specific distribution patterns of lipid droplets and perilipins were identified, taking into consideration cell line specific zonal apportionment. Upon external lipid supplementation (oleic acid), a rise of lipid droplet amount accompanied with an increase of PLIN2 expression was observed. Detailed electron microscopical analyzes revealed that lipid droplet sizes in tumor tissue were comparable to that of 3D spheroid models. Moreover, the biggest lipid droplets were found in the central zone of the spheroids at all sampling time-points, reaching their maximum size at 21 days. Thus, the 3D spheroids can be considered as a relevant in vitro model for further studies focusing on lipid droplets biology and function in osteosarcoma.
      PubDate: 2022-07-14
       
  • Prevalence of bacteriuria in cats with neurogenic bladder

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      Abstract: Abstract Urinary tract infections are defined as the adherence, multiplication, and persistence of an infectious agent within the urogenital system, causing an associated inflammatory response and clinical signs; instead, the presence of bacteria in urine as determined by positive bacterial culture (PUC) from a properly collected urine specimen, in the absence of clinical signs, is defined subclinical bacteriuria. Limited information on the prevalence of PUC in spinal cord injury cats affected by neurogenic bladder (NB) is available. On contrary, in NB dogs and humans the prevalence of bacteriuria is well documented. Moreover, while in humans information about bacteriemia associated with NB is already available, this aspect has never been studied in NB cats. The aim of this prospective study was to determine the prevalence of PUC in cats with NB, compared to animals affected by chronic kidney disease (CKD) and healthy cats. Furthermore, the prevalence of bacteriemia in cats with NB was evaluated. Fifty-one cats met the inclusion criteria: 12 cats were affected by NB, 22 had CKD and 17 were healthy. The prevalence of PUC was 58.33% and 18% in NB and CKD cat populations, respectively. All blood cultures were negative. The incomplete bladder emptying and the decreased resistance in the bladder wall could be considered predisposing elements to PUC in the NB feline population. The results of this study highlight, for the first time, an high prevalence of PUC in cats affected by NB, which was not found to be associated with bacteriemia.
      PubDate: 2022-07-14
       
  • Comparison of effects of a single dose of MHYOSPHERE® PCV ID with three
           commercial porcine vaccine associations against Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae
           (Mhyo) and porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) on piglet growth during the
           nursery period under field conditions

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      Abstract: Abstract Pigs routinely undergo stressful vaccination procedures, which are often unavoidable given the unavailability of safer alternatives, challenging animal welfare. The available vaccines for Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae (Mhyo) or Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) are mostly administered intramuscularly in association to prevent Porcine respiratory disease complex (PRDC). MHYOSPHERE® PCV ID is the first vaccine protecting from both agents by intradermal route. This randomized, blind-field trial aimed to compare the effects of MHYOSPHERE® PCV ID with those of three different intramuscular associations of commercially available vaccines. A total of 7072 21-day-old piglets from 12 consecutive batches in one farm were randomly vaccinated with MHYOSPHERE® PCV ID (G1) or Ingelvac CircoFLEX® + Hyogen® (G2), Porcilis® PCV + M + PAC® (G3), and Porcilis® PCV + Hyogen® (G4). Growth performance during the nursery period and adverse reactions (ARs) after vaccine administration were monitored. Average Daily Weight Gain (ADWG) during the first 7 days post-weaning in G1 was 10.92, 3.03, and 20.08 g/day higher than in G2, G3, and G4, respectively, and 0.65, 4.06, and 9.58 g/day higher than in G2, G3, and G4 during the entire nursery period, respectively. G1 ADWG was significantly higher than G4 during both periods and significantly higher than G2 during the first 7 days post-weaning. Incidence of systemic ARs in G2 and G4 was 0.03% and 0.32%, respectively; none were recorded in G1 and G3. Replacing the usual intramuscular vaccination with MHYOSPHERE® PCV ID results in higher growth performance during the first weeks after weaning with no systemic ARs.
      PubDate: 2022-07-13
       
  • The first Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae recovered from a sheep with respiratory
           disease in Brazil – draft genome and genomic analysis

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      Abstract: Abstract Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae is an important etiological agent of sheep respiratory disease worldwide. Here, we describe the first isolation and draft genome sequence of M. ovipneumoniae strain USP-BR2017 retrieved from tracheobronchial lavage of a sheep showing clinical signs of respiratory disease in the Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil. The culture of tracheobronchial lavage resulted in glucose-fermenting fried egg colonies, which were identified as M. ovipneumoniae by polymerase chain reaction. The genome was sequenced using the Illumina NextSeq 2000 and de novo assembled using SPAdes. The genome of the sequenced organism presented an approximate size of 1,122,253 bp. The annotation revealed 773 coding DNA sequences (CDSs), 806 genes, three rRNAs, and 30 tRNAs. Data analysis revealed M. ovipneumoniae strain USP-BR2017 contains a few virulence genes, including the hemolysing C gene (hlyC). In addition, strain USP-BR2017 showed high identity over the 16S rRNA gene with other sheep isolates from China and United States. This first description of M. ovipneumoniae in diseased Brazilian sheep demonstrates the importance of continuous surveillance and diagnostics of pathogens causing respiratory disease in sheep in Brazil.
      PubDate: 2022-07-08
       
  • A review of the neural control of micturition in dogs and cats:
           neuroanatomy, neurophysiology and neuroplasticity

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      Abstract: Abstract This article discusses the current knowledge on the role of the neurological structures, especially the cerebellum and the hypothalamus, and compares the information with human medicine. Micturition is a complex voluntary and involuntarily mechanism. Its physiological completion strictly depends on the hierarchical organisation of the central nervous system pathways in the peripheral nervous system. Although the role of the peripheral nervous system and subcortical areas, such as brainstem centres, are well established in veterinary medicine, the role of the cerebellum and hypothalamus have been poorly investigated and understood. Lower urinary tract dysfunction is often associated with neurological diseases that cause neurogenic bladder (NB). The neuroplasticity of the nervous system in the developmental changes of the mechanism of micturition during the prenatal and postnatal periods is also analysed.
      PubDate: 2022-07-08
       
  • Gastrointestinal parasites in red-legged partridges (Alectoris rufa)
           hunted in Spain: a warning to game managers

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      Abstract: Abstract Red-legged partridge (Alectoris rufa) populations are currently declining in the Iberian Peninsula, mainly due to habitat degradation and hunting pressure. In addition, the release of farm-reared partridges may introduce pathogens, including parasites, to wild populations. The presence of digestive parasites in red-legged partridges hunted in fifteen Spanish provinces was studied. Fecal samples and gastrointestinal tracts were collected, analyzed, and the morphometric identification of parasites was carried out. Eimeria spp. oocysts, nematode, cestode and trematode eggs were observed in fecal samples. Adult nematodes (Ascaridia galli, Ascaridia compar, Heterakis gallinarum, Heterakis tenuicauda, Trichostrongylus tenuis, Subulura spp., Cyrnea spp. and Aonchotheca caudinflata), tapeworms (Raillietina tetragona, R. echinobothrida, R. micracantha, Rhabdometra nigropunctata, and Choanotaenia infundibulum), and trematodes (Brachylaima spp., Brachylecithum spp., Dicrocoelium spp.) were identified in the gastrointestinal tracts. Significant statistical differences were found among climatic regions in the prevalence and intensity of Eimeria spp. infection, median intensity and the prevalence of indirect life cycle helminths, with Southern areas always showing higher infection values. The study provides information of the health status of red-legged partridges in Spain, highlighting the risk associated with the release of farm-reared partridges for restocking purposes. This should be taken into account to improve management strategies for the long-term conservation of the species.
      PubDate: 2022-07-07
       
  • In vivo therapeutic efficacy of Curcuma longa extract loaded ethosomes on
           wound healing

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      Abstract: Since ancient times, medicinal plants are widely accepted to promote the health and wellness of animals and mankind. The medicinal plant-based therapies have limitations of delayed onset of action, inconsistent absorption, low bioavailability, oxidation, and poor solubility. The encapsulation studies suggested improved efficacy. Therefore, the present study attempts to evaluate the efficacy of Curcuma longa extracts encapsulated in Ethosome on wound healing model compared to crude extract. The Curcuma longa extract swere prepared by cold percolation method and total curcuminoid content was determined by Reverse phase-HPLC. Three Ethosomal suspensions (ETS1, ETS2, and ETS3) were prepared and characterized for particle distribution, morphology, and absorption spectrum by Zetasizer, Scanning Electron Microscopy, and FTIR respectively. The Ethosomal suspension with the highest entrapment efficiency was applied topically at a varying concentrations (0.25, 0.5, and 1 g/cm2) on the surgically created wounds in rats. The efficacy of wound healing was evaluated by clinical observation, macroscopic evaluation of granulation tissue, colour digital image processing, and histology. The methanolic extract of Curcuma longa showed better antibacterial potential than ethanolic and aqueous. The total Curcuminoid content in the Curcuma longa rhizome was 4.03%. The size, PDI, zeta potential, and viscosity of Ethosomal suspension ranged from 34.8 to 371 nm, 0.236–1.178, 15.6-36.8mV, and 0.8460–0.8510, respectively. The ETS3 was found the most optimum combination with the highest entrapment efficiency and the topical application at a dose rate of 0.5 g/cm2 and 1.0 g/cm2 resulted in comparable wound contracture, pain score, histopathological score as compared to control groups.It was concluded that the Curcuma longa encapsulation in Ethosome resulted in improved wound appearance, granulation tissue score, and appearance with a shortened period of wound resolution at the cellular level as compared to crude extract. Graphical abstract
      PubDate: 2022-07-07
       
  • A preliminary analysis of the variation in circulating
           25-hydroxycholecalciferol concentrations in peri-partum spring-calving
           dairy cows

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      Abstract: Abstract Vitamin D has a well-established role in regulating the intestinal absorption of minerals but its association with immunity has not been extensively explored in livestock. Although an optimal circulating concentration of 30 ng/ml 25-hydroxycholecalciferol (25(OH)D) is proposed for immune function, it is unknown if this vitamin D concentration is sufficient, particularly for cows under a pasture-based, spring-calving dairy production system. The objectives of this retrospective analysis were to assess circulating vitamin D concentrations in a total of 843 bio-banked serum samples from Holstein-Friesian dairy cows enrolled from 12 spring-calving, pasture-based dairy farms in Ireland. Mean 25(OH)D concentrations were 36.3 ng/ml at calving, 30.7 ng/ml at 7 days post-partum (DPP), and 38.3 ng/ml at 21 DPP. However, mean concentrations masked significant inter-farm and inter-individual variation (P < 0.05). In fact, the proportion of cows with vitamin D insufficiency of < 30 ng/ml was found to be 33.8%, 55.5% and 19.5% at each time point, respectively. In addition, 25(OH)D concentrations correlated positively with immune cell populations (monocytes and lymphocytes) and negatively with blood urea and non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA) at 7 DPP. This is the first report of 25(OH)D concentrations in pasture-based peripartum dairy cows and we show a high degree of variation across farms and between individual animals. Sub-optimal concentrations of vitamin D in some post-partum cows may predispose cattle to multiple metabolic or infectious diseases, and therefore further work is now warranted.
      PubDate: 2022-07-05
       
  • Genome centric engineering using ZFNs, TALENs and CRISPR-Cas9 systems for
           trait improvement and disease control in Animals

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      Abstract: Abstract Livestock is an essential life commodity in modern agriculture involving breeding and maintenance. The farming practices have evolved mainly over the last century for commercial outputs, animal welfare, environment friendliness, and public health. Modifying genetic makeup of livestock has been proposed as an effective tool to create farmed animals with characteristics meeting modern farming system goals. The first technique used to produce transgenic farmed animals resulted in random transgene insertion and a low gene transfection rate. Therefore, genome manipulation technologies have been developed to enable efficient gene targeting with a higher accuracy and gene stability. Genome editing (GE) with engineered nucleases-Zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) and transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) regulates the targeted genetic alterations to facilitate multiple genomic modifications through protein-DNA binding. The application of genome editors indicates usefulness in reproduction, animal models, transgenic animals, and cell lines. Recently, CRISPR/Cas system, an RNA-dependent genome editing tool (GET), is considered one of the most advanced and precise GE techniques for on-target modifications in the mammalian genome by mediating knock-in (KI) and knock-out (KO) of several genes. Lately, CRISPR/Cas9 tool has become the method of choice for genome alterations in livestock species due to its efficiency and specificity. The aim of this review is to discuss the evolution of engineered nucleases and GETs as a powerful tool for genome manipulation with special emphasis on its applications in improving economic traits and conferring resistance to infectious diseases of animals used for food production, by highlighting the recent trends for maintaining sustainable livestock production.
      PubDate: 2022-07-04
       
  • Feline obesity causes hematological and biochemical changes and oxidative
           stress – a pilot study

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      Abstract: Abstract Obesity, an extremely important factor in feline clinical practice, is estimated to affect up to one third of the feline population. Moreover, it can trigger chronic inflammation, which could predispose to oxidative stress by increasing reactive oxygen species, thereby generating potentially irreversible cellular damage. This study analyzed hematological, biochemical and oxidative stress profiles at various degrees of feline obesity. Forty-five cats were selected and divided into three groups: control (n = 17), overweight (n = 13) and obese (n = 15), after clinical and laboratory evaluation and body condition score. Biochemical and oxidative stress analyses were performed using a photocolorimeter and hematological analyses were performed in a veterinary cell counter. Obese cats showed increased mean corpuscular volume (MCV), red cell distribution width (RDW), HDL cholesterol and triglycerides and decreased activity of gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT) than control cats, although within the reference ranges for the species. As for oxidative stress, obese cats showed higher total antioxidant capacity (TAC), by the inhibition of 2,2’-Azino-Bis-3-Ethylbenzthiazoline-6-Sulfonic Acid (ABTS), inhibition of ABTS associated with horseradish peroxidase (ABTS + HRP), cupric ion reducing antioxidant capacity (CUPRAC) and ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) methods, while overweight cats had a higher TAC-ABTS + HRP and TAC-FRAP than control cats. We conclude that the conditions of natural obesity and overweight in the feline species alter its hematological, biochemical and oxidative stress parameters.
      PubDate: 2022-07-02
       
  • Glyphosate-induced liver and kidney dysfunction, oxidative stress,
           immunosuppression in Nile tilapia, but ginger showed a protection role

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      Abstract: Abstract The water-borne herbicides are involved in the toxicity of aquatic animals resulting in impaired health status and low productivity. Dietary medicinal herbs present a practical solution to relieve the impacts of herbicides toxicity on the performances of aquatic animals. Herein, we investigated the toxicity of commercial glyphosate-induced oxidative stress, immunosuppression, liver and kidney dysfunction, and the protective role of ginger or ginger nanoparticles in Nile tilapia. Fish were allocated into four groups: the first group presented the control without glyphosate toxicity and ginger feeding, the second group intoxicated with glyphosate at 0.6 mg/L and fed ginger free diet, the third group intoxicated with glyphosate and fed ginger at 2.5 g/kg, and the fourth group intoxicated with glyphosate and fed ginger nanoparticles at 2.5 g/kg. Fish were kept under the experimental conditions for four weeks, and the samples of blood and tissues were collected after 2 and 4 weeks. Markedly, fish exposed to glyphosate showed the highest ALT and AST activities, glucose and cortisol levels, and malondialdehyde levels (MDA) in gills and tissues. While fish in the control and fish intoxicated with glyphosate and fed ginger nanoparticles had the lowest ALT and AST activities, glucose and cortisol levels, and MDA levels after 2 and 4 weeks (P < 0.05). Fish fed dietary ginger had lower ALT and AST activities, glucose and cortisol levels, and MDA levels than the glyphosate intoxicated group after 2 and 4 weeks (P < 0.05). Interestingly, fish-fed ginger nanoparticles showed lower urea and creatinine levels and higher total protein, albumin, and globulin than the glyphosate intoxicated group (P < 0.05) and similar to the control (P > 0.05). Further, fish intoxicated with glyphosate and fed ginger nanoparticles had the highest GSH, lysozyme activity, and immunoglobulin levels after 2 and 4 weeks (P < 0.05). In conclusion, ginger nanoparticles are superior to the standard ginger form in enhancing the antioxidative and immune responses of Nile tilapia exposed to glyphosate.
      PubDate: 2022-06-30
       
  • Dried Blood Spots technology for veterinary applications and biological
           investigations: technical aspects, retrospective analysis, ongoing status
           and future perspectives

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      Abstract: Abstract Dried Blood Spots (DBS) technology has become a valuable tool in medical studies, however, in veterinary and biological research DBS technology applications are still limited. Up-to-date no review has comprehensively integrated all the evidence existing across the fields, technologies and animal species. In this paper we summarize the current applications of DBS technology in the mentioned areas, and provide a scope of different types of dried sample carriers (cellulose and non-cellulose), sampling devices, applicable methods for analyte extraction and detection. Mammals, birds, insects and other species are represented as the study objects. Besides the blood, the review considers a variety of specimens, such as milk, saliva, tissue samples and others. The main applications of dried samples highlighted in the review include epidemiological surveys and monitoring for infections agents or specific antibodies for disease/vaccination control in households and wildlife. Besides the genetic investigations, the paper describes detection of environmental contaminants, pregnancy diagnosis and many other useful applications of animal dried samples. The paper also analyses dried sample stability and storage conditions for antibodies, viruses and other substances. Finally, recent developments and future research for DBS technology in veterinary medicine and biological sciences are discussed.
      PubDate: 2022-06-30
       
 
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