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  Subjects -> VETERINARY SCIENCE (Total: 220 journals)
Showing 1 - 63 of 63 Journals sorted by number of followers
Animal Behaviour     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 194)
Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 32)
Veterinary Record     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Veterinary Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Australian Veterinary Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Animal Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 26)
Journal of Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Veterinary Clinics of North America: Small Animal Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24)
Zoonotic Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 24)
Journal of Small Animal Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Veterinary Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Equine Veterinary Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Veterinary Anaesthesia and Analgesia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
American Journal of Primatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Veterinary Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Canadian Journal of Veterinary Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
BMC Veterinary Research     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Veterinary and Comparative Oncology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Veterinary Forensic Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Equine Veterinary Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Veterinary Radiology & Ultrasound     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
New Zealand Veterinary Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Animals     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Research in Veterinary Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Veterinary Diagnostic Investigation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Veterinary Medical Education     Partially Free   (Followers: 13)
Anthrozoos : A Multidisciplinary Journal of The Interactions of People & Animals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Equine Veterinary Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Trends in Parasitology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Veterinary Clinics of North America: Equine Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Veterinary Immunology and Immunopathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Feline Medicine & Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Veterinary Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Preventive Veterinary Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Veterinary Research     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
American Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Advances in Animal Biosciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Animal Feed Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Veterinary Microbiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Veterinary Ophthalmology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Veterinary Clinical Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Animal Reproduction Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Archives of Animal Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Veterinary Dermatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Veterinary Nurse     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Research in Forestry, Wildlife and Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Veterinary Pharmacology and Therapeutics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Veterinary Science and Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Animal - Science Proceedings     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Topics in Companion Animal Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
UK Vet Equine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Animal Health Research Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Exotic Pet Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Veterinary Clinics of North America: Exotic Animal Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Veterinary Parasitology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Research Journal of Veterinary Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Veterinary Science & Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Veterinary Nursing Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Case Reports in Veterinary Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery Open Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Avian Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Domestic Animal Endocrinology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Veterinary Clinics of North America: Food Animal Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Zoonoses and Public Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Transboundary and Emerging Diseases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Human & Veterinary Medicine - International Journal of the Bioflux Society     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Irish Veterinary Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Open Journal of Animal Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Veterinary Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Advanced Research in Life Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Acta Veterinaria Scandinavica     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Medical Mycology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Asian Journal of Poultry Science     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Open Journal of Veterinary Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Bulletin of Animal Health and Production in Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Ethiopian Veterinary Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Veterinary Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Asian Journal of Medical and Biological Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Nutrición Animal Tropical     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Advanced Veterinary Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
VCOT Open     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Small Animal Care     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Agrivet : Jurnal Ilmu-Ilmu Pertanian dan Peternakan / Journal of Agricultural Sciences and Veteriner)     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Anatomia, Histologia, Embryologia: Journal of Veterinary Medicine Series C     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Veterinary Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Reproduction in Domestic Animals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Small Ruminant Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Theriogenology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Kenya Veterinarian     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Veterinary Medicine and Science     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Revista Colombiana de Ciencias Pecuarias (Colombian journal of animal science and veterinary medicine)     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Parasite Science     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Acta Veterinaria Hungarica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Tropical Animal Health and Production     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Veterinary Research Communications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of the South African Veterinary Association     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Archivos de Medicina Veterinaria     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Veterinary Science Development     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Polish Journal of Veterinary Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Veterinary Medicine: Research and Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Veterinary Quarterly     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
ILAR Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Tanzania Veterinary Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Tropical Veterinarian     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Acta Veterinaria     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revue Marocaine des Sciences Agronomiques et Vétérinaires     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Global Journal of Animal Scientific Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intas Polivet     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Buletin Peternakan : Bulletin of Animal Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cogent Food & Agriculture     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Veterinary Dentistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Applied Animal Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Austral Journal of Veterinary Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Veterinary Science & Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Theoretical and Applied Veterinary Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Veterinary and Animal Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Archiva Zootehnica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Turkish Journal of Veterinary Research     Open Access  
EUREKA : Health Sciences     Open Access  
Revista Colombiana de Ciencia Animal     Open Access  
Iraqi Journal of Veterinary Sciences     Open Access  
Ukrainian Journal of Veterinary and Agricultural Sciences     Open Access  
Chilean Journal of Agricultural & Animal Sciences     Open Access  
CES Medicina Veterinaria y Zootecnia     Open Access  
Compendio de Ciencias Veterinarias     Open Access  
Ciencia Veterinaria     Open Access  
Nepalese Veterinary Journal     Open Access  
Salud y Tecnología Veterinaria     Open Access  
Veterinary Parasitology : X     Open Access  
Jurnal Medik Veteriner     Open Access  
Rassegna di Diritto, Legislazione e Medicina Legale Veterinaria     Open Access  
Veterinaria (Montevideo)     Open Access  
Analecta Veterinaria     Open Access  
Veterinarski Glasnik     Open Access  
Jurnal Sain Veteriner     Open Access  
Revista de Ciência Veterinária e Saúde Pública     Open Access  
Veterinary Parasitology : Regional Studies and Reports     Full-text available via subscription  
Revue Vétérinaire Clinique     Full-text available via subscription  
Folia Veterinaria     Open Access  
FAVE Sección Ciencias Veterinarias     Open Access  
Revista Ciencias Veterinarias     Open Access  
Spei Domus     Open Access  
Revista de Educação Continuada em Medicina Veterinária e Zootecnia     Open Access  
Revista Veterinaria     Open Access  
Journal of the Selva Andina Research Society     Open Access  
Revista de Ciências Agroveterinárias     Open Access  
Nigerian Veterinary Journal     Open Access  
Schweizer Archiv für Tierheilkunde     Hybrid Journal  
Macedonian Veterinary Review     Open Access  
Revista Complutense de Ciencias Veterinarias     Open Access  
Revista de Salud Animal     Open Access  
Revista de Medicina Veterinaria     Open Access  
Revista MVZ Córdoba     Open Access  
Avances en Ciencias Veterinarias     Open Access  
InVet     Open Access  

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Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Veterinary Pathology
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.078
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 17  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0300-9858 - ISSN (Online) 1544-2217
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1176 journals]
  • Image challenge in Veterinary Pathology

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Pages: 505 - 507
      Abstract: Veterinary Pathology, Volume 61, Issue 4, Page 505-507, July 2024.

      Citation: Veterinary Pathology
      PubDate: 2024-07-01T07:00:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03009858241240433
      Issue No: Vol. 61, No. 4 (2024)
       
  • Image Challenge in Veterinary Pathology, Answers: Reproductive Tract
           Diseases

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      Pages: 679 - 681
      Abstract: Veterinary Pathology, Volume 61, Issue 4, Page 679-681, July 2024.

      Citation: Veterinary Pathology
      PubDate: 2024-07-01T07:00:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03009858241244852
      Issue No: Vol. 61, No. 4 (2024)
       
  • Helicosporidium sp. infection in a California kingsnake (Lampropeltis
           californiae): Spillover of a pathogen of invertebrates to a vertebrate
           host

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      Authors: Javier Asin, April L. Childress, Eva Dervas, Michael M. Garner, Francisco A. Uzal, James F. X. Wellehan, Eileen E. Henderson, Anibal G. Armien
      Abstract: Veterinary Pathology, Ahead of Print.
      Helicosporidium is a genus of nonphotosynthetic, green algae in the family Chlorellaceae, closely related to Prototheca. It is a known pathogen of invertebrates, and its occurrence in vertebrates has not been documented. A captive, 10-month-old, male, albino California kingsnake (Lampropeltis californiae) was submitted for necropsy. Gross examination revealed hemorrhagic laryngitis and a red mottled liver. Histologically, intravascular, intramonocytic/macrophagic and extracellular, eukaryotic organisms were observed in all tissues. These organisms stained positive with Grocott-Gomori methenamine silver and periodic acid-Schiff and were variably acid-fast and gram-positive. Ultrastructural analysis revealed approximately 4 µm vegetative multiplication forms and cysts with 3 parallel ovoid cells and a helically coiled filamentous cell. A polymerase chain reaction with primers targeting Prototheca, amplicon sequencing, and Bayesian phylogenetic analysis confirmed it clustered within Helicosporidium sp. with 100% posterior probability. The genus Helicosporidium was found to nest within the genus Prototheca, forming a clade with Prototheca wickerhamii with 80% posterior probability.
      Citation: Veterinary Pathology
      PubDate: 2024-06-17T05:00:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03009858241259179
       
  • Massive branchial henneguyosis of catfish: A distinct, myxozoan-induced
           gill disease caused by severe interlamellar Henneguya exilis infection in
           catfish aquaculture

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      Authors: Justin M. Stilwell, Matt J. Griffin, John H. Leary, Lester H. Khoo, Alvin C. Camus
      Abstract: Veterinary Pathology, Ahead of Print.
      Proliferative gill disease (PGD), caused by the myxozoan Henneguya ictaluri, has been the most notorious parasitic gill disease in the US catfish aquaculture industry. In 2019, an unusual gill disease caused by massive burdens of another myxozoan, Henneguya exilis, was described in channel (Ictalurus punctatus) × blue (Ictalurus furcatus) hybrid catfish. Targeted metagenomic sequencing and in situ hybridization (ISH) were used to differentiate these conditions by comparing myxozoan communities involved in lesion development and disease pathogenesis between massive H. exilis infections and PGD cases. Thirty ethanol-fixed gill holobranchs from 7 cases of massive H. exilis infection in hybrid catfish were subjected to targeted amplicon sequencing of the 18S rRNA gene and compared to a targeted metagenomic data set previously generated from clinical PGD case submissions. Furthermore, serial sections of 14 formalin-fixed gill holobranchs (2 per case) were analyzed by RNAscope duplex chromogenic ISH assays targeting 8 different myxozoan species. Targeted metagenomic and ISH data were concordant, indicating myxozoan community compositions significantly differ between PGD and massive branchial henneguyosis. Although PGD cases often consist of mixed species infections, massive branchial henneguyosis consisted of nearly pure H. exilis infections. Still, H. ictaluri was identified by ISH in association with infrequent PGD lesions, suggesting coinfections occur, and some cases of massive branchial henneguyosis may contain concurrent PGD lesions contributing to morbidity. These findings establish a case definition for a putative emerging, myxozoan-induced gill disease of farm-raised catfish with a proposed condition name of massive branchial henneguyosis of catfish (MBHC).
      Citation: Veterinary Pathology
      PubDate: 2024-06-12T09:33:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03009858241259181
       
  • Renal alterations in cats (Felis catus) housed in shelters and affected by
           systemic AA-amyloidosis: Clinicopathological data, histopathology, and
           ultrastructural features

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      Authors: Filippo Ferri, Silvia Ferro, Silvia Lucia Benali, Luca Aresu, Lorenza Muscardin, Federico Porporato, Francesco Rossi, Chiara Guglielmetti, Enrico Gallo, Carlo Palizzotto, Carolina Callegari, Stefano Ricagno, Maria Mazza, Luigi Michele Coppola, Gabriele Gerardi, Francesca Lavatelli, Serena Caminito, Giulia Mazzini, Giovanni Palladini, Giampaolo Merlini, Eric Zini
      Abstract: Veterinary Pathology, Ahead of Print.
      AA-amyloidosis is frequent in shelter cats, and chronic kidney disease is the foremost cause of death. The aims were to describe kidney laboratory and microscopic findings in shelter cats with AA-amyloidosis. Cats were included if kidney specimens were collected post-mortem and laboratory data were available within 6 months before death. Renal lesions were evaluated with optical and electron microscopy. Mass spectrometry was used to characterize amyloid. Nine domestic short-hair cats were included; 4 females and 5 males with a median age of 8 years (range = 2–13). All cats had blood analyses and urinalyses available. Serum creatinine concentrations were increased in 6 cats and symmetric dimethylarginine was increased in all of the cats. All of the cats had proteinuria. Eight of 9 cats had amyloid in the medulla, and 9 had amyloid in the cortex (glomeruli). All cats had amyloid in the interstitium. Six cats had concurrent interstitial nephritis and 1 had membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis. All cats had extrarenal amyloid deposits. Amyloid was AA in each case. In conclusion, renal deposition of amyloid occurs in both cortex and medulla in shelter cats and is associated with azotemia and proteinuria. Renal involvement of systemic AA-amyloidosis should be considered in shelter cats with chronic kidney disease. The cat represents a natural model of renal AA-amyloidosis.
      Citation: Veterinary Pathology
      PubDate: 2024-06-12T09:30:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03009858241257903
       
  • Presumed hemocytic neoplasms in scorpions

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      Authors: Shawn Thomas, Christopher Gaudette, Simon Spiro, Daniel S. Dombrowski, Elise E. B. LaDouceur
      Abstract: Veterinary Pathology, Ahead of Print.
      Although neoplasia has been documented in invertebrates, it has not been reported in scorpions. This report describes presumed hemocytic neoplasia in 2 scorpions: a>3-year-old, female emperor scorpion (Pandinus imperator) and a>4-year-old, male, Asian forest scorpion (Heterometrus sp.). The emperor scorpion had a 1-month history of body wall swelling separating the exoskeleton of the caudal opisthosoma. At necropsy, this corresponded to a white mass in the caudal coelom. The forest scorpion was found dead and processed whole for histology, at which point multiple masses were identified in the coelom and invading skeletal muscle. Histologically, both masses were composed of sheets of hemocytes with round to oval nuclei; eosinophilic, periodic acid Schiff-positive, cytoplasmic granules; mild cellular atypia; and low mitotic rates. Features of inflammation (e.g., melanization and nodulation) were not observed. These masses were diagnosed as a hemocytoma (emperor scorpion) and a hemocytic sarcoma (forest scorpion), possibly of plasmatocyte origin.
      Citation: Veterinary Pathology
      PubDate: 2024-06-11T07:54:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03009858241257898
       
  • Pathological findings and differential diagnoses of lymph node diseases in
           slaughtered cattle in Brazil: A study of 2000 samples

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      Authors: Carlos E. B. Lopes, Fabiana G. Xavier, Rafael R. Nicolino, Luana F. M. Cordeiro, Leandro C. Rezende, Marcelo C. Lopes, Dayse H. L. Silva, Antônio A. Fonseca Júnior, Luciana R. Ferreira, Marcelo F. Camargos, Paulo M. Soares Filho, Ivy C. C. Souza, Roselene Ecco
      Abstract: Veterinary Pathology, Ahead of Print.
      Slaughterhouse inspections play a crucial role in the sanitary control of zoonoses and foodborne diseases. This study aimed to identify and analyze the frequencies of lymph node diseases in cattle slaughtered for human consumption, using the samples sent to the anatomic pathology service of the Federal Laboratory for Agricultural Defense (Laboratório Federal de Defesa Agropecuária), Minas Gerais, Brazil, from January 2015 to September 2022. In total, 2000 lymph node samples were analyzed, and additional information was individually retrieved. Lesions were most frequently identified in thoracic lymph nodes. Bacterial isolation and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) were performed using samples suspected of tuberculosis. Tuberculosis cases accounted for 89.3% of the samples. Histopathology was more sensitive than other ancillary tests for diagnosing tuberculosis. Paraffin-embedded tissues from lymphoma cases were subjected to immunophenotyping using anti-CD3 and anti-CD79a immunohistochemistry. Frozen and/or paraffin-embedded tissues from lymphoma cases were used to identify the enzootic bovine leukosis (EBL) retrovirus through qPCR. Other diagnoses included primary (T- and B-cell lymphoma) and metastatic neoplasms (squamous cell carcinoma, pulmonary adenocarcinoma, undifferentiated carcinoma, undifferentiated adenocarcinoma, undifferentiated sarcoma, undifferentiated round cell tumor, mesothelioma, hepatic carcinoid, meningioma, and seminoma), actinogranulomas (pyogranulomatous lymphadenitis [actinobacillosis and actinomycosis]), idiopathic lymphadenitis (neutrophilic and/or histiocytic, granulomatous, and suppurative), and miscellaneous nonspecific lymphadenopathies (depletion/lymphoid atrophy, lymphangiectasia, erythrocyte drainage, parasitic eosinophilic lymphadenitis, follicular hyperplasia, and toxic granulomatous lymphadenitis). The combination of histopathology with complementary techniques is important for successful diagnosis, especially in complex cases of high epidemiological, economic, and zoosanitary importance, such as tuberculosis and EBL.
      Citation: Veterinary Pathology
      PubDate: 2024-06-11T07:51:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03009858241257908
       
  • Effects of fixation and demineralization on histomorphology and DNA
           amplification of canine bone marrow

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      Authors: Gabriella M. L. Diamantino, Janet Beeler-Marfisi, Robert A. Foster, William Sears, Alice Defarges, William Vernau, Dorothee Bienzle
      Abstract: Veterinary Pathology, Ahead of Print.
      Fixation and demineralization protocols for bone marrow (BM) across diagnostic laboratories are not standardized. How different protocols affect histomorphology and DNA amplification is incompletely understood. In this study, 2 fixatives and 3 demineralization methods were tested on canine BM samples. Twenty replicate sternal samples obtained within 24 hours of death were fixed overnight in either acetic acid-zinc-formalin (AZF) or 10% neutral-buffered formalin (NBF) and demineralized with formic acid for 12 hours. Another 53 samples were fixed in AZF and demineralized with hydrochloric acid for 1-hour, formic acid for 12 hours, or ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA) for 24 hours. Histologic sections were scored by 4 raters as of insufficient, marginal, good, or excellent quality. In addition, DNA samples extracted from sections treated with the different fixation and demineralization methods were amplified with 3 sets of primers to conserved regions of T cell receptor gamma and immunoglobulin heavy chain genes. Amplification efficiency was graded based on review of capillary electrophoretograms. There was no significant difference in the histomorphology scores of sections fixed in AZF or NBF. However, EDTA-based demineralization yielded higher histomorphology scores than demineralization with hydrochloric or formic acid, whereas formic acid resulted in higher scores than hydrochloric acid. Demineralization with EDTA yielded DNA amplification in 29 of 36 (81%) samples, whereas demineralization with either acid yielded amplification in only 2 of 72 (3%) samples. Although slightly more time-consuming and labor-intensive, tissue demineralization with EDTA results in superior morphology and is critical for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification with the DNA extraction method described in this article.
      Citation: Veterinary Pathology
      PubDate: 2024-06-06T10:43:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03009858241257920
       
  • Granulocytic neoplasm suggestive of primary myeloid sarcoma in 3 dogs

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      Authors: Alessandra Ubiali, Valeria Martini, Stefano Comazzi, Selina Iussich, Barbara Miniscalco, Alessia Poggi, Emanuela Morello, Paola Roccabianca, Barbara Rütgen, Clarissa Zamboni, Fulvio Riondato
      Abstract: Veterinary Pathology, Ahead of Print.
      Myeloid sarcoma (MS) is a solid tumor of granulocytic origin with extramedullary localization. This tumor is rare in humans and animals. The diagnostic approach is heterogeneous, and the definitive diagnosis may be difficult to achieve. Primary MS has never been described as a spontaneous neoplasm in companion dogs. Two purebred and 1 mixed-breed dogs, 6- to 11-year-old, developed round cell tumors in the mediastinum, lymph nodes (LNs) and tonsils, and LNs, respectively. Granulocytic origin and exclusion of lymphoid lineage were confirmed by flow cytometry, supported by immunohistochemistry or immunocytochemistry. Pivotal to the diagnosis were positive labeling for myeloid (CD11b, CD14) and hematopoietic precursors (CD34) markers, along with negative labeling for lymphoid markers. Blood and bone marrow infiltration were not detected at initial diagnosis, excluding acute myeloid leukemia. The behavior of these tumors was aggressive, resulting in poor clinical outcomes, even when chemotherapy was attempted.
      Citation: Veterinary Pathology
      PubDate: 2024-06-06T10:38:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03009858241257897
       
  • A putatively novel papillomavirus associated with cutaneous plaques and
           squamous cell carcinoma in captive North American snow leopards (Panthera
           uncia)

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      Authors: Mandy Womble, Shaina Weingart, Susan May, Michael Garner, Jennifer Luff
      Abstract: Veterinary Pathology, Ahead of Print.
      Cutaneous plaques and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) are common in captive North American snow leopards (SLs) (Panthera uncia). Our objective was to determine whether these lesions are potentially associated with papillomavirus(es). Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was performed on 3 cutaneous plaques using degenerate primers for papillomaviruses. A putatively novel papillomavirus was identified that shared 76% sequence identity to Felis catus papillomavirus 2. Specific PCR for this virus was performed on 5 cutaneous SCC samples and 7 normal skin samples, which were all positive. In situ hybridization for this putatively novel virus was performed, which revealed strong hybridization signals within hyperplastic cells in cutaneous plaques (n = 3) and within neoplastic cells in cutaneous SCC samples (n = 5). No hybridization signals were identified within normal skin. Ultimately, identification of a causal viral agent in the development of plaques and SCC in SLs will help guide therapeutic intervention and lay the foundation for development of prophylactic vaccines.
      Citation: Veterinary Pathology
      PubDate: 2024-05-21T11:23:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03009858241254340
       
  • Neurobrucellosis (Brucella ceti) in striped dolphins (Stenella
           coeruleoalba): Immunohistochemical studies on immune response and
           neuroinflammation

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      Authors: Agustín Rebollada-Merino, Federica Giorda, Martí Pumarola, Laura Martino, Alberto Gomez-Buendia, Umberto Romani-Cremaschi, Cristina Casalone, Virginia Mattioda, Fabio Di Nocera, Giuseppe Lucifora, Antonio Petrella, Lucas Domínguez, Mariano Domingo, Carla Grattarola, Antonio Rodríguez-Bertos
      Abstract: Veterinary Pathology, Ahead of Print.
      Neurobrucellosis is a shared condition of cetaceans and humans. However, the pathogenesis and immune response in cetacean neurobrucellosis has not been extensively studied. In this multicentric investigation, 21 striped dolphin (Stenella coeruleoalba) neurobrucellosis (Brucella ceti) cases diagnosed over a 10-year period (2012-2022) were retrospectively evaluated. For each case, morphological changes were assessed by evaluating 21 histological parameters. Furthermore, the immunohistochemical expression of Brucella antigen, glial fibrillary acid protein (GFAP), and a selection of inflammatory cell (IBA-1, CD3, and CD20) and cytokine (tumor necrosis factor-alpha [TNF-α], interferon-gamma [IFN-γ], interleukin [IL]-1β, IL-2, and IL-6) markers were investigated. Inflammation of the leptomeninges, ependyma, and/or choroid plexus was lymphohistiocytic, containing macrophages/microglia (IBA-1+), T-cells (CD3+), and B-cells (CD20+) in equal proportion. B-cells occasionally formed tertiary follicles. GFAP expression showed astrocytosis in most cases. Expression of TNF-α, IFN-γ, and IL-2 indicated an intense proinflammatory response, stimulating both macrophages and T-cells. Our results showed that the inflammation and neuroinflammation in neurobrucellosis of striped dolphins mimic human neurobrucellosis and in vitro and in vivo studies in laboratory animals. Cetacean disease surveillance can be exploited to expand the knowledge of the pathogenesis and immunology of infectious diseases, particularly brucellosis, under a One Health approach.
      Citation: Veterinary Pathology
      PubDate: 2024-05-18T06:54:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03009858241250336
       
  • Pneumocystis murina lesions in lungs of experimentally infected
           Cd40l–/– mice

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      Authors: Andrea Cappelleri, Simone Canesi, Luca Bertola, Valentina Capo, Alessandra Zecchillo, Luisa Albano, Anna Villa, Eugenio Scanziani, Camilla Recordati
      Abstract: Veterinary Pathology, Ahead of Print.
      The Cd40l–/– mouse is a well-established model of X-linked hyper-immunoglobulin M (IgM) syndrome, an immunodeficiency disorder of human beings characterized by the lack of expression of the CD40 ligand (CD40L) on activated T-cells, predisposing to infections with opportunistic pathogens like Pneumocystis jirovecii. The aim of our study was to describe the pulmonary lesions in Cd40l–/– mice experimentally infected with Pneumocystis murina, in comparison with naturally infected severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice. Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded lungs from 26 Cd40l–/–, 11 SCID, and 5 uninfected Cd40l–/– mice were examined by histology and immunohistochemistry for the presence of the pathogen and for leukocyte populations (CD3, CD4, CD45R/B220, CD8a, Iba-1, Ly-6G, CD206, MHC II, and NKp46/NCR1). Infection was confirmed by immunohistochemistry in 18/26 (69%) Cd40l–/– mice and in 11/11 (100%) SCID mice. Fourteen out of 26 (54%) Cd40l–/– mice had interstitial pneumonia. Twenty-three out of 26 (88%) Cd40l–/– mice had peribronchiolar/perivascular lymphoplasmacytic infiltrates, rich in B-cells and Mott cells. Acidophilic macrophage pneumonia was additionally found in 20/26 (77%) Cd40l–/– mice. Only 4/11 (36%) SCID mice had interstitial pneumonia, but no peribronchiolar/perivascular infiltrates or acidophilic macrophage pneumonia were observed in this strain. This study represents the first description of pulmonary histopathological lesions in Cd40l–/– mice infected with P. murina. We speculate that the singular characteristics of the inflammatory infiltrates observed in Cd40l–/– mice could be explained by the specific immune phenotype of the model.
      Citation: Veterinary Pathology
      PubDate: 2024-05-17T10:41:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03009858241252409
       
  • “Errata” does anyone read them' Revisiting mitotic counts
           in mast cell tumors

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      Authors: Donald J. Meuten, Frances M. Moore, Phil H. Kass, Cheryl A. London, Christopher M. Reilly, Erin M. Romansik, Felipe A. R. Sueiro
      Abstract: Veterinary Pathology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Veterinary Pathology
      PubDate: 2024-05-14T10:56:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03009858241246987
       
  • Survivin, β-catenin, and ki-67 immunohistochemical expression in canine
           perivascular wall tumors: Preliminary assessment of prognostic
           significance

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      Authors: Francesco Godizzi, Federico Armando, Patrizia Boracchi, Giancarlo Avallone, Damiano Stefanello, Roberta Ferrari, Lavinia E. Chiti, Andrea Cappelleri, Clarissa Zamboni, Silvia Dell’Aere, Attilio Corradi, Paola Roccabianca
      Abstract: Veterinary Pathology, Ahead of Print.
      High survivin expression has been correlated with poor outcomes in several canine tumors but not in soft tissue tumors (STTs). Survivin is a target gene of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway, which is involved in human STT oncogenesis. Immunohistochemistry for survivin, β-catenin, and Ki-67 was performed on 41 canine perivascular wall tumors (cPWTs), and statistical associations of protein expression and histopathologic and clinical variables with clinical outcomes were investigated. Immunohistochemically, there was nuclear positivity (0.9%–12.2% of tumor cells) for survivin in 41/41 (100%), cytoplasmic positivity (0 to> 75% of tumor cells) for survivin in 31/41 (76%), nuclear positivity (2.9%–67.2% of tumor cells) for β-catenin in 24/41 (59%), and cytoplasmic positivity (0% to> 75% of tumor cells) for β-catenin in 23/41 (56%) of cPWTs. All tumors expressed nuclear Ki-67 (2.2%–23.5%). In univariate analysis and multivariate analysis (UA and MA, respectively), every 1% increase of nuclear survivin was associated with an increase of the instantaneous death risk by a factor of 1.15 [hazard ratio (HR) = 1.15; P = .007]. Higher nuclear survivin was associated with grade II/III neoplasms (P = .043). Expression of cytoplasmic survivin, nuclear and cytoplasmic β-catenin, and nuclear Ki-67 were not significantly associated with prognosis in UA nor MA. Tumor size was a significant prognostic factor for local recurrence in UA [subdistribution HR (SDHR) = 1.19; P = .02] and for reduced overall survival time in MA. According to UA and MA, a unitary increase of mitotic count was associated with an increase of the instantaneous death risk by a factor of 1.05 (HR = 1.05; P = .014). Nuclear survivin, mitotic count, and tumor size seem to be potential prognostic factors for cPWTs. In addition, survivin and β-catenin may represent promising therapeutic targets for cPWTs.
      Citation: Veterinary Pathology
      PubDate: 2024-05-10T12:33:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03009858241246981
       
  • Eponyms in science: A proposal to minimize their use

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      Authors: F. Yvonne Schulman, Daniel R. Rissi
      Abstract: Veterinary Pathology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Veterinary Pathology
      PubDate: 2024-05-10T06:47:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03009858241252408
       
  • Short beak and dwarfism syndrome among Pekin ducks: First detection, full
           genome sequencing, and immunohistochemical signals of novel goose
           parvovirus in tongue tissue

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      Authors: Amal A. M. Eid, Mohamed A. Lebdah, Sarah S. Helal, Mohamed G. Seadawy, Abdelgalil El-Gohary, Mohamed R. Mousa, Ayman H. El-Deeb, Fakry F. Mohamed, Reham M. ElBakrey
      Abstract: Veterinary Pathology, Ahead of Print.
      Novel goose parvovirus (NGPV) is continuously threatening the global duck industry, as it causes short beak and dwarfism syndrome among different duck breeds. In this study, we investigated the viral pathogenesis in the tongue of affected ducks, as a new approach for deeper understanding of the syndrome. Seventy-three, 14- to 60-day-old commercial Pekin ducks were clinically examined. Thirty tissue pools of intestine and tongue (15 per tissue) were submitted for molecular identification. Clinical signs in the examined ducks were suggestive of parvovirus infection. All examined ducks had short beaks. Necrotic, swollen, and congested protruding tongues were recorded in adult ducks (37/73, 51%). Tongue protrusion without any marked congestion or swelling was observed in 20-day-old ducklings (13/73, 18%), and no tongue protrusion was observed in 15-day-old ducklings (23/73, 32%). Microscopically, the protruding tongues of adult ducks showed necrosis of the superficial epithelial layer with vacuolar degeneration. Glossitis was present in the nonprotruding tongues of young ducks, which was characterized by multifocal lymphoplasmacytic aggregates and edema in the propria submucosa. Immunohistochemical examination displayed parvovirus immunolabeling, mainly in the tongue propria submucosa. Based on polymerase chain reaction, goose parvovirus was detected in 9 out of 15 tongue sample pools (60%). Next-generation sequencing confirmed the presence of a variant goose parvovirus that is globally named NGPV and closely related to Chinese NGPV isolates. Novel insights are being gained from the study of NGPV pathogenesis in the tongue based on molecular and immunohistochemical identification.
      Citation: Veterinary Pathology
      PubDate: 2024-05-07T12:13:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03009858241249108
       
  • Corrigendum to mitotic index is predictive for survival for canine
           cutaneous mast cell tumors

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      Abstract: Veterinary Pathology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Veterinary Pathology
      PubDate: 2024-05-02T12:46:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03009858241252668
       
  • Postmortem pathologic findings in dogs that underwent total body
           irradiation and hematopoietic cell transplant: A case series of five dogs
           with B-cell multicentric lymphoma

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      Authors: William Benedict, Steven Suter, Danielle Meritet
      Abstract: Veterinary Pathology, Ahead of Print.
      Alternative therapies that can help achieve complete remission in dogs with lymphoma include total body irradiation and hematopoietic cell transplant, though there are few reports describing successes and pathologic sequelae of these procedures. During a 10-year period, 94 dogs with multicentric lymphoma received a hematopoietic cell transplant following total body irradiation at North Carolina State University College of Veterinary Medicine. Seven of these 94 dogs (7%) died prior to discharge, five (5%) of which presented for postmortem examination. Of these dogs, four received an autologous hematopoietic cell transplant, while one received a haploidentical allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant. All five dogs had bone marrow depletion with all hematopoietic lines affected. Three had systemic candidiasis, while two had bacterial infections. To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first report to document pathologic findings and development of systemic mycoses in dogs post total-body irradiation therapy and hematopoietic cell transplant.
      Citation: Veterinary Pathology
      PubDate: 2024-05-02T12:12:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03009858241249114
       
  • Intramural coronary artery and myocardial pathology in captive tigers
           (Panthera tigris) and African lions (Panthera leo)

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      Authors: Rebecca L. Makii, Juan Muñoz Gutiérrez
      Abstract: Veterinary Pathology, Ahead of Print.
      There is limited published data regarding cardiovascular disease in nondomestic felid populations. To address this knowledge gap, necropsy cases of tigers and lions with representative myocardial samples submitted to a diagnostic laboratory were histologically assessed with hematoxylin and eosin and Sirius red stains. A total of 32 submissions (15 tigers, 17 lions) were identified in a 4-year period. All tigers and lions had some degree of coronary artery lesions in the left ventricle and/or interventricular septum. Major findings included moderate to marked arteriosclerosis in 8 tigers (53%) and 4 lions (24%) and moderate to marked perivascular fibrosis in 10 tigers (67%) and 9 lions (53%). Moreover, 10 tigers (67%) and 8 lions (47%) had coronary artery lesions with variable degrees of perivascular cardiomyocyte degeneration and/or loss. To our knowledge, this is the first report describing coronary artery pathology in captive tigers and lions.
      Citation: Veterinary Pathology
      PubDate: 2024-04-25T08:22:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03009858241246984
       
  • Tumor-associated macrophages and tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes in canine
           cutaneous and subcutaneous mast cell tumors

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      Authors: Luca Bertola, Benedetta Pellizzoni, Chiara Giudice, Valeria Grieco, Roberta Ferrari, Lavinia E. Chiti, Damiano Stefanello, Martina Manfredi, Donatella De Zani, Camilla Recordati
      Abstract: Veterinary Pathology, Ahead of Print.
      Cutaneous and subcutaneous mast cell tumors (MCTs) are common canine neoplasms characterized by variable biological behavior. Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) and tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) can be effective prognostic markers in numerous human neoplasms and are increasingly investigated in dogs. The aim of this study was to characterize immune cells in canine MCTs and their relationship with histological location (cutaneous, subcutaneous) and histologic nodal metastatic status (HN0-3). Thirty-eight MCTs (26 cutaneous, 12 subcutaneous) from 33 dogs with known sentinel lymph node (SLN) metastatic status were immunolabeled for Iba1 (macrophages), CD20 (B cells), CD3 (T cells), and Foxp3 (regulatory T cells). Semiquantitative scoring of interstitial and perivascular CD3+, CD20+, and Foxp3+ cells and morphological evaluation of Iba1+ cells were performed. For each marker, the percent immunopositive area was evaluated by image analysis. All MCTs were diffusely infiltrated by Iba1+ cells and variably infiltrated by CD20+, CD3+, and rare Foxp3+ cells. Stellate/spindle Iba1+ cells were associated with HN2 and HN3 SLNs. Perivascular Foxp3+ cells, CD3+ cells, and percent CD3+ areas were increased in subcutaneous MCTs. Interstitial CD3+ cells were increased in cutaneous MCTs with HN0 SLNs. No differences in CD20+ cells were identified between cutaneous and subcutaneous MCTs and among SLN classes. MCTs were markedly infiltrated by TAMs and variably infiltrated by TILs. Stellate/spindle morphology of TAMs associated with HN2 and HN3 SLNs is suggestive of a pro-tumoral (M2) phenotype. Cutaneous and subcutaneous MCTs have different tumor-immune microenvironments, and T-cell infiltration might contribute to prevention of nodal metastatic spread of cutaneous MCTs.
      Citation: Veterinary Pathology
      PubDate: 2024-04-22T11:59:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03009858241244851
       
  • Melan-A immunolabeling in canine extramedullary plasmacytomas

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      Authors: Lukas Schuwerk, Anastasiia Ulianytska, Wolfgang Baumgärtner, Wencke Reineking
      Abstract: Veterinary Pathology, Ahead of Print.
      Histologic diagnosis of less well-differentiated cases of canine extramedullary plasmacytomas (CEMPs) may require immunohistochemical confirmation to discriminate these tumors from other round cells tumors including lymphoma, cutaneous histiocytoma, and amelanotic melanomas. CEMPs are characterized by widespread immunoreactivity for multiple myeloma 1 (MUM1) antigen and λ light chains, while the melanocytic marker melan-A has been reported to yield negative results. Here, 33 randomly selected CEMPs, 20 melanocytomas, and 20 malignant melanomas were immunohistochemically tested for MUM1, melan-A, and PNL2. In addition, CEMPs were examined for PAX5, E-cadherin, CD3, CD18, CD20, S100, as well as λ and κ light chain immunoreactivity. All CEMPs were characterized by labeling for MUM1 and λ light chain, as well as variable immunopositivity for the remaining antibodies. Notably, 13 cases of CEMPs (39.4%) exhibited immunolabeling for melan-A. Melanocytic tumors immunolabeled for melan-A (40/40; 100%) and PNL2 (34/40; 85%). An unexpected cytoplasmic immunoreactivity for MUM1 was observed in 2 melanocytic tumors. Summarized, MUM1 or melan-A immunomarkers alone are not sufficient to differentiate between CEMPs and amelanotic melanomas and should be part of a larger immunopanel including λ light chain, CD20, and PNL2.
      Citation: Veterinary Pathology
      PubDate: 2024-04-20T12:43:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03009858241246979
       
  • Tissue and cellular tropism of Eptesicus fuscus gammaherpesvirus in big
           brown bats, potential role of pulmonary intravascular macrophages

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      Authors: Ursula G. Perdrizet, Janet E. Hill, LaRhonda Sobchishin, Baljit Singh, Champika Fernando, Trent K. Bollinger, Vikram Misra
      Abstract: Veterinary Pathology, Ahead of Print.
      Gammaherpesviruses (γHVs) are recognized as important pathogens in humans but their relationship with other animal hosts, especially wildlife species, is less well characterized. Our objectives were to examine natural Eptesicus fuscus gammaherpesvirus (EfHV) infections in their host, the big brown bat (Eptesicus fuscus), and determine whether infection is associated with disease. In tissue samples from 132 individual big brown bats, EfHV DNA was detected by polymerase chain reaction in 41 bats. Tissues from 59 of these cases, including 17 from bats with detectable EfHV genomes, were analyzed. An EfHV isolate was obtained from one of the cases, and electron micrographs and whole genome sequencing were used to confirm that this was a unique isolate of EfHV. Although several bats exhibited various lesions, we did not establish EfHV infection as a cause. Latent infection, defined as RNAScope probe binding to viral latency-associated nuclear antigen in the absence of viral envelope glycoprotein probe binding, was found within cells of the lymphoid tissues. These cells also had colocalization of the B-cell probe targeting CD20 mRNA. Probe binding for both latency-associated nuclear antigen and a viral glycoprotein was observed in individual cells dispersed throughout the alveolar capillaries of the lung, which had characteristics of pulmonary intravascular macrophages. Cells with a similar distribution in bat lungs expressed major histocompatibility class II, a marker for antigen presenting cells, and the existence of pulmonary intravascular macrophages in bats was confirmed with transmission electron microscopy. The importance of this cell type in γHVs infections warrants further investigation.
      Citation: Veterinary Pathology
      PubDate: 2024-04-15T11:33:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03009858241244849
       
  • Hypoxia-associated markers in the prognosis of oral canine melanoma

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      Authors: Cecilia Gola, Lorella Maniscalco, Selina Iussich, Emanuela Morello, Matteo Olimpo, Eugenio Martignani, Paolo Accornero, Davide Giacobino, Eugenio Mazzone, Paola Modesto, Katia Varello, Luca Aresu, Raffaella De Maria
      Abstract: Veterinary Pathology, Ahead of Print.
      Canine oral malignant melanoma (COMM) is the most common neoplasm in the oral cavity characterized by local invasiveness and high metastatic potential. Hypoxia represents a crucial feature of the solid tumor microenvironment promoting cancer progression and drug resistance. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) and its downstream effectors, vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A), glucose transporter isoform 1 (GLUT1), C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4), and carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX), are the main regulators of the adaptive response to low oxygen availability. The prognostic value of these markers was evaluated in 36 COMMs using immunohistochemistry. In addition, the effects of cobalt chloride–mediated hypoxia were evaluated in 1 primary COMM cell line. HIF-1α expression was observed in the nucleus, and this localization correlated with the presence or enhanced expression of HIF-1α-regulated genes at the protein level. Multivariate analysis revealed that in dogs given chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan-4 (CSPG4) DNA vaccine, COMMs expressing HIF-1α, VEGF-A, and CXCR4 were associated with shorter disease-free intervals (DFI) compared with tumors that were negative for these markers (P = .03), suggesting hypoxia can influence immunotherapy response. Western blotting showed that, under chemically induced hypoxia, COMM cells accumulate HIF-1α and smaller amounts of CAIX. HIF-1α induction and stabilization triggered by hypoxia was corroborated by immunofluorescence, showing its nuclear translocation. These findings reinforce the role of an hypoxic microenvironment in tumor progression and patient outcome in COMM, as previously established in several human and canine cancers. In addition, hypoxic markers may represent promising prognostic markers, highlighting opportunities for their use in therapeutic strategies for COMMs.
      Citation: Veterinary Pathology
      PubDate: 2024-04-13T10:23:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03009858241244853
       
  • SOX-10 and TRP-1 expression in feline ocular and nonocular melanomas

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      Authors: Margherita Orlandi, Ilaria Porcellato, Monica Sforna, Adriana Lo Giudice, Giuseppe Giglia, Luca Mechelli, Chiara Brachelente
      Abstract: Veterinary Pathology, Ahead of Print.
      In felines, ocular and nonocular melanomas are uncommon tumors that represent a diagnostic challenge for pathologists, especially when amelanotic. To date, the immunohistochemical diagnostic panel in cats is based on specific melanocytic markers (Melan-A and PNL2) and a nonspecific but sensitive marker (S100). In human medicine, SOX-10 is reported to be a sensitive antibody for the detection of melanoma micrometastasis in the lymph node. TRP-1, an enzyme involved in melanogenesis, has recently been used in humans and dogs as a specific melanocyte marker. The aim of this study was to evaluate the cross-reactivity and the expression of SOX-10 and TRP-1 antibodies in feline normal tissue and melanocytic tumors. Thirty-one cases of ocular, cutaneous, and oral melanomas were retrospectively evaluated and confirmed by histopathological examination and by immunolabeling with Melan-A and/or PNL2. SOX-10 nuclear expression in normal tissues was localized in epidermal, subepidermal, hair bulb, and iridal stromal melanocytes and dermal nerves. In melanomas, nuclear expression of SOX-10 was detected in ocular (11/12; 92%), oral (6/7; 86%), and cutaneous sites (12/12; 100%). TRP-1 cytoplasmic immunolabeling in normal tissue was observed in epidermal and bulbar melanocytes and in the lining pigmented epithelium of the iris and in its stroma. Its expression was positively correlated to the degree of pigmentation in the tumor and was observed in 75% of ocular (9/12), 43% of oral (3/7), and 33% of cutaneous melanomas (4/12). This study demonstrated the cross-reactivity of SOX-10 and TRP-1 antibodies in feline non-neoplastic melanocytes and their expression in ocular and nonocular melanomas.
      Citation: Veterinary Pathology
      PubDate: 2024-04-13T10:18:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03009858241244850
       
  • ORF virus causes tumor-promoting inflammation in sheep and goats

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      Authors: Davide Pintus, Maria G. Cancedda, Giantonella Puggioni, Rosario Scivoli, Angela M. Rocchigiani, Caterina Maestrale, Elisabetta Coradduzza, Roberto Bechere, Luciana Silva-Flannery, Hannah A. Bullock, Simona Macciocu, Maria A. Montesu, Vincenzo Marras, Simone Dore, Jana M. Ritter, Ciriaco Ligios
      Abstract: Veterinary Pathology, Ahead of Print.
      ORF virus (ORFV) causes contagious ecthyma (“ORF”), a disease of sheep and goats characterized by lesions ranging from vesicles and pustules to atypical papilloma-like and angiomatous lesions in the skin and mucosae. The authors investigated the molecular factors leading to the ORF-associated atypical tumor-like changes. Fifteen lambs, 15 kids, and an adult ram clinically affected by natural ORFV infection were enrolled in the study and examined by several methods. ORFV was detected by viral culture or real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in the lesioned tissues and in the blood of the clinically affected sheep and goats. Surprisingly, ORFV was also detected in the blood of healthy goats from an affected herd. Microscopically, they found a pseudo-papillomatous proliferation of the epithelium, while the dermis and lamina propria were expanded by a proliferating neovascular component that highly expressed the viral vascular endothelial growth factor (vVEGF) and its host receptor vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2). Immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence, and in situ hybridization for mRNA showed that epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) was expressed in the fibrovascular component, in the infiltrating CD163+ macrophages, and in the basal stratum of the epidermis. Confocal immunofluorescence microscopy demonstrated that CD163+ macrophages were associated with VEGF and VEGFR2. Finally, they found by quantitative RT-PCR the overexpression of the interleukin-6 and VEGFR2 genes in the lesioned tissues. These findings suggest that ORFV activates an inflammatory reaction characterized by CD163+ macrophages expressing EGFR and VEGFR2, which might play an oncogenic role through synergistic action with vVEGF signaling.
      Citation: Veterinary Pathology
      PubDate: 2024-04-13T10:16:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03009858241241794
       
  • The relationships of platelet-derived growth factor, microvascular
           proliferation, and tumor cell proliferation in canine high-grade
           oligodendrogliomas: Immunohistochemistry of 45 tumors and an AFOB-01
           xenograft mouse model

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      Authors: Kio Yoshida, James K. Chambers, Kazuyuki Uchida
      Abstract: Veterinary Pathology, Ahead of Print.
      High-grade oligodendroglioma (HGOG) is the most common type of glioma in dogs and expresses platelet-derived growth factor receptor-α (PDGFR-α). Microvascular proliferation is often observed in HGOG. Therefore, the present study investigated the functional relationships between PDGFR-α, microvascular proliferation, and tumor cell proliferation in canine HGOG. The expression of PDGFR-α and PDGF-subunit A (PDGF-A) in tumor cells, as well as endothelial cells and pericytes of tumor-associated microvascular proliferations, in 45 canine HGOGs were examined immunohistochemically. Microvascular proliferation was observed in 24/45 cases (53%). PDGFR-α expression in tumor cells and microvascular proliferations was observed in 45/45 (100%) and 2/24 cases (8%), respectively. Furthermore, PDGF-A expression in tumor cells and microvascular proliferations was detected in 13/45 (29%) and 24/24 cases (100%), respectively. In vitro, stimulation of the canine HGOG cell line AOFB-01 with PDGF-A showed that the doubling time of AOFB-01 cells was significantly shorter with PDGF-A than without PDGF-A. Crenolanib (a PDGFR inhibitor) inhibited AOFB-01 cell proliferation. In vivo, the AOFB-01 xenograft mouse model was treated with crenolanib. Tumor xenografts were smaller in crenolanib-treated mice than in untreated control mice. PDGFR-α expression in tumor cells and PDGF-A expression in microvascular proliferations and tumor cells suggest autocrine and paracrine effects of PDGF-A in canine HGOG. The results of in vitro assays indicate that canine HGOG expresses functional PDGFR-α, which responds to PDGF-A. Therefore, PDGF-A produced by microvascular proliferations and tumor cells may promote the proliferation of PDGFR-α-expressing tumor cells in canine HGOG. PDGFR-α signaling has potential as a therapeutic target.
      Citation: Veterinary Pathology
      PubDate: 2024-04-05T09:29:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03009858241241793
       
  • The 2-tier grading system identifies canine cutaneous and/or subcutaneous
           mast cell tumors with aggressive biological behavior regardless of growth
           model

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      Authors: Silvia Sabattini, Alessia Brocanelli, Riccardo Zaccone, Eugenio Faroni, Andrea Renzi, Luca Ciammaichella, Giuliano Bettini, Laura Marconato
      Abstract: Veterinary Pathology, Ahead of Print.
      Histologic grading of canine cutaneous mast cell tumors (cMCTs) has prognostic and therapeutic implications, yet validation for subcutaneous MCTs (scMCTs) is lacking. For scMCTs with or without dermal invasion, determining their biological behavior remains poorly standardized and sometimes sparks controversy. This prospective study aimed to assess the prognostic utility of the 2-tier histologic grading system in MCTs with different growth models (GMs) and explore the prognostic impact of the GM itself. We assessed 6 histologic GM categories: solely cMCT (C-SC0), cMCT with superficial (C-SC1) or deep subcutaneous (C-SC2) involvement, solely scMCT (SC-C0), and scMCT with deep (SC-C1) or superficial (SC-C2) infiltration of the dermis. Ninety-one MCTs from 76 dogs undergoing excision and regional/sentinel lymphadenectomy were examined. GM classification identified 11 (12%) C-SC0 tumors, 12 (13%) C-SC1, 15 (16%) C-SC2, 21 (23%) SC-C0, 15 (16%) SC-C1, and 17 (19%) SC-C2. Mitotic count, 2-tier grade, nodal involvement, surgical margins, and outcome were stratified according to GM. scMCTs lacking dermal invasion, historically associated with a benign clinical course, had a poor prognosis in 10% of cases. cMCTs exhibiting deep subcutaneous involvement included the largest percentage of high-grade tumors (33%), had the highest occurrence of overt nodal metastases (33%), and had the lowest 1-year survival rate (86%). Histologic grade was confirmed as a relevant prognostic factor, surpassing nodal involvement and histologic margin status. The 2-tier histologic grading enabled the identification of all MCTs with aggressive biological behavior, regardless of their cutaneous or subcutaneous location.
      Citation: Veterinary Pathology
      PubDate: 2024-04-05T09:23:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03009858241240443
       
  • Pathology of “double scale” skin defect in farmed American alligators
           (Alligator mississippiensis) and the possible association with hepatic
           fibrosis

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      Authors: Ilaria M. Piras, Annemarie Bezuidenhout, Josué Díaz-Delgado, Deirdre Slawski, Pamela A. Kelly
      Abstract: Veterinary Pathology, Ahead of Print.
      “Double scale” is a poorly characterized skin defect of crocodilians that drastically reduces the economic value of crocodilian skin. This study investigated the morphology and pathogenesis of double scale in a ranching farm of American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis). We compared the histopathology of skin and selected organs (liver, lung, kidney, heart, spleen, intestine, and brain) of alligators with double scale against healthy control animals, together with serum and liver vitamin and mineral levels. Skin affected with double scale had statistically significant hyperkeratosis, epidermal atrophy, and increased basal cell degeneration compared with control alligators (P < .0001). Interestingly, all alligators with double scale had varying degrees of hepatic fibrosis. Feed analysis showed that alligators that had double scale and hepatic fibrosis had prolonged dietary exposure to high levels of vitamin A, iron, and copper. Serum analysis indicated that levels of zinc (p < .0001), copper (P < .05), and vitamin E (P < .002) were significantly lower in alligators with hepatic fibrosis and double scale compared with controls. Finally, immunohistochemical analysis of skin with double scale showed a marked reduction in immunolabeling with the zinc-binding protein metallothionein. These results suggest that zinc deficiency, in combination with other micronutrient anomalies, may play a role in the pathogenesis of double scale in alligators with liver fibrosis.
      Citation: Veterinary Pathology
      PubDate: 2024-03-29T07:07:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03009858241238685
       
  • Mitotic activity: A systematic literature review of the assessment
           methodology and prognostic value in feline tumors

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      Authors: Christof A. Bertram, Taryn A. Donovan, Alexander Bartel
      Abstract: Veterinary Pathology, Ahead of Print.
      Increased proliferation is a driver of tumorigenesis, and quantification of mitotic activity is a standard task for prognostication. This systematic review is an analysis of all available references on mitotic activity in feline tumors to provide an overview of the assessment methods and prognostic value. A systematic literature search in PubMed and Scopus and a nonsystematic search in Google Scholar were conducted. All articles on feline tumors that correlated mitotic activity with patient outcome were identified. Data analysis revealed that of the 42 eligible articles, mitotic count (MC, mitotic figures/tumor area) was evaluated in 39 studies, and mitotic index (MI, mitotic figures/tumor cells) in 3 studies. The risk of bias was considered high for most studies (26/42, 62%) based on small study populations, insufficient details of the MC/MI methods, and lack of statistical measures for diagnostic accuracy or effect on outcome. The MC/MI methods varied between studies. A significant association of MC with survival was determined in 20 of 28 (71%) studies (10 studies evaluated other outcome metrics or provided individual patient data), while 1 study found an inverse effect. Three tumor types had at least 4 studies, and a prognostic association with survival was found in 5 of 6 studies on mast cell tumors, 5 of 5 on mammary tumors, and 3 of 4 on soft-tissue sarcomas. MI was shown to correlate with survival for mammary tumors by 2 research groups; however, comparisons to MC were not conducted. Further studies with standardized mitotic activity methods and appropriate statistical analysis for discriminant ability of patient outcome are needed to infer the prognostic value of MC and MI.
      Citation: Veterinary Pathology
      PubDate: 2024-03-27T10:28:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03009858241239566
       
  • Mitotic activity: A systematic literature review of the assessment
           methodology and prognostic value in canine tumors

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      Authors: Christof A. Bertram, Taryn A. Donovan, Alexander Bartel
      Abstract: Veterinary Pathology, Ahead of Print.
      One of the most relevant prognostic indices for tumors is cellular proliferation, which is most commonly measured by the mitotic activity in routine tumor sections. The goal of this systematic review was to analyze the methods and prognostic relevance of histologically measuring mitotic activity that have been reported for canine tumors in the literature. A total of 137 articles that correlated the mitotic activity in canine tumors with patient outcome were identified through a systematic (PubMed and Scopus) and nonsystematic (Google Scholar) literature search and eligibility screening process. Mitotic activity methods encompassed the mitotic count (MC, number of mitotic figures per tumor area) in 126 studies, presumably the MC (method not specified) in 6 studies, and the mitotic index (MI, number of mitotic figures per number of tumor cells) in 5 studies. A particularly high risk of bias was identified based on the available details of the MC methods and statistical analyses, which often did not quantify the prognostic discriminative ability of the MC and only reported P values. A significant association of the MC with survival was found in 72 of 109 (66%) studies. However, survival was evaluated by at least 3 studies in only 7 tumor types/groups, of which a prognostic relevance is apparent for mast cell tumors of the skin, cutaneous melanoma, and soft tissue tumor of the skin and subcutis. None of the studies using the MI found a prognostic relevance. This review highlights the need for more studies with standardized methods and appropriate analysis of the discriminative ability to prove the prognostic value of the MC and MI in various tumor types. Future studies are needed to evaluate the influence of the performance of individual pathologists on the appropriateness of prognostic thresholds and investigate methods to improve interobserver reproducibility.
      Citation: Veterinary Pathology
      PubDate: 2024-03-27T10:24:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03009858241239565
       
  • Diagnostic challenge in veterinary pathology: Bony elbow mass in a
           domestic ferret

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      Authors: Judith A. Kovach-Zukin, Joyce S. Knoll, Andrew Cartoceti, Robert A. Foster, Marina Liles, Julianne Richard, Elizabeth Marie Rush, Elise E. B. LaDouceur
      Abstract: Veterinary Pathology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Veterinary Pathology
      PubDate: 2024-03-15T12:48:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03009858241238678
       
  • Mannheimia haemolytica–associated fibrinonecrotizing abomasitis in
           lambs

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      Authors: Estela Pérez, Francisco A. Uzal, Ricardo de Miguel, Ana Rodríguez-Largo, Raúl Reséndiz, Nicolás Streitenberger, Melissa Macías-Rioseco, Álex Gómez, Natalia Calvo-Sánchez, Marta Pérez, Lluís Luján, Javier Asín
      Abstract: Veterinary Pathology, Ahead of Print.
      Mannheimia haemolytica–associated abomasitis has been clinically described as a cause of sudden death in lambs, but it is poorly characterized. We describe the pathological features of a severe fibrinonecrotizing abomasitis in 3 lambs that died suddenly. All 3 abomasums had a thickened submucosa due to edema and necrotic areas delimited by bands of degenerate neutrophils with slender nuclei (oat cells) and angiocentric distributions. The overlying mucosa was congested. Myriads of gram-negative coccobacilli were observed within the oat cell bands. M. haemolytica was isolated from the abomasum in all 3 animals and was serotyped as A2 in one of them. Pericarditis and pleuritis were observed in 2 of the lambs. Clostridium spp. were isolated in 1 lamb and detected by immunohistochemistry in the 3 animals, suggesting clostridial co-infection. M. haemolytica should be considered among the differential diagnoses of necrotizing abomasitis in lambs.
      Citation: Veterinary Pathology
      PubDate: 2024-03-05T10:26:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03009858241235393
       
  • Embolic necrosuppurative pneumonia in domestic cats induced by a novel
           Neisseria species

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      Authors: Christopher R. Bolt, Vikash K. Singh, Arno Wünschmann, Hallie C. Richards, Kelly L. Gehlhaus, Sunil K. Mor
      Abstract: Veterinary Pathology, Ahead of Print.
      Three cats, aged 2 to 11 years, presented to the University of Minnesota Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory over a 3-year period following euthanasia or death due to respiratory distress. Thoracic radiographs revealed nodular, soft tissue opacities throughout the lung fields in all cases. On postmortem examination, approximately 60% to 80% of the lung parenchyma were expanded by multifocal to coalescing, well-demarcated, beige, semi-firm nodules. Histologically, large numbers of neutrophils, fewer macrophages, fibrin, and cellular and karyorrhectic debris effaced the pulmonary parenchyma. The inflammatory foci contained aggregates of gram-negative cocci. 16s rRNA Sanger sequencing and whole-genome sequencing identified the bacteria isolated from the lung of all cats under aerobic conditions as a novel Neisseria spp. Based on whole-genome sequence analysis, all 3 sequences shared 92.71% and 92.67% average nucleotide identity with closely related Neisseria animaloris NZ LR134440T and Neisseria animaloris GCA 002108605T, respectively. The in silico DNA-DNA hybridization identity compared to our isolates was 46.6% and 33.8% with strain DSM Neisseria zoodegmatis 21642 and strain DSM 21643, respectively. All 3 sequences have less than 95% average nucleotide identity and less than 70% DNA-DNA hybridization identity, suggesting that the 3 isolates are a novel species of the genus Neisseria. Infection with Neisseria spp. induces an embolic pneumonia in cats that radiographically and pathologically resembles a metastatic neoplastic process and should be considered among the etiologic differential diagnoses in cases of infectious pulmonary disease with a disseminated, nodular lung pattern.
      Citation: Veterinary Pathology
      PubDate: 2024-03-05T10:21:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03009858241235392
       
  • Experimental oral administration of pollen beetle (Astylus atromaculatus)
           to cattle results in an acute lethal gastrointestinal disease

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      Authors: Federico Giannitti, Mizael Machado, Caroline da Silva Silveira, Ximena Cibils-Stewart, Nicolás Baráibar, Cintia R. R. Queiroz-Machado, Robert H. Poppenga, Alejo Menchaca, Francisco A. Uzal, Juan A. García, Carolina Matto, Fernando Dutra, Gretel Ruprechter, Darío Caffarena, Anderson Saravia
      Abstract: Veterinary Pathology, Ahead of Print.
      In the summer of 2023, ingestion of Astylus atromaculatus (pollen beetle) was linked to spontaneous fatal disease in grazing cattle and sheep in Argentina and Uruguay. While the disease was experimentally reproduced in sheep and guinea pigs in the 1970’s, no experimental reproductions have been attempted in cattle, and controversy exists as to whether this insect is indeed noxious to cattle and at which dose. Here, we demonstrate that A. atromaculatus causes acute fatal disease in Hereford calves at single oral dosages of 2.5, 4.5, 10.0, and 15.0 g of insect/kg body weight. Death or severe disease necessitating euthanasia occurred at 38 to 48 hours postinoculation regardless of the dose, suggesting that the single fatal dosage is likely
      Citation: Veterinary Pathology
      PubDate: 2024-03-04T08:19:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03009858241231557
       
  • Macrophage polarization in lymph node granulomas from cattle and pigs
           naturally infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex

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      Authors: Fernanda Larenas-Muñoz, Mohamed G. Hamed, Inés Ruedas-Torres, José María Sánchez-Carvajal, Javier Domínguez, Francisco José Pallarés, Librado Carrasco, Irene M. Rodríguez-Gómez, Jaime Gómez-Laguna
      Abstract: Veterinary Pathology, Ahead of Print.
      Tuberculosis in animals is caused by members of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC), with the tuberculous granuloma being the main characteristic lesion. The macrophage is the main cell type involved in the development of the granuloma and presents a wide plasticity ranging from polarization to classically activated or pro-inflammatory macrophages (M1) or to alternatively activated or anti-inflammatory macrophages (M2). Thus, this study aimed to analyze macrophage polarization in granulomas from cattle and pig lymph nodes naturally infected with MTC. Tuberculous granulomas were microscopically categorized into four stages and a panel of myeloid cells (CD172a/calprotectin), M1 macrophage polarization (iNOS/CD68/CD107a), and M2 macrophage polarization (Arg1/CD163) markers were analyzed by immunohistochemistry. CD172a and calprotectin followed the same kinetics, having greater expression in late-stage granulomas in pigs. iNOS and CD68 had higher expression in cattle compared with pigs, and the expression was higher in early-stage granulomas. CD107a immunolabeling was only observed in porcine granulomas, with a higher expression in stage I granulomas. Arg1+ cells were significantly higher in pigs than in cattle, particularly in late-stage granulomas. Quantitative analysis of CD163+ cells showed similar kinetics in both species with a consistent frequency of immunolabeled cells throughout the different stages of the granuloma. Our results indicate that M1 macrophage polarization prevails in cattle during early-stage granulomas (stages I and II), whereas M2 phenotype is observed in later stages. Contrary, and mainly due to the expression of Arg1, M2 macrophage polarization is predominant in pigs in all granuloma stages.
      Citation: Veterinary Pathology
      PubDate: 2024-03-01T08:18:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03009858241231606
       
  • Experimental infection of domestic turkeys with lymphoproliferative
           disease virus of North American origin

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      Authors: Chloe C. Goodwin, Kayla G. Adcock, Andrew B. Allison, Mark G. Ruder, Rebecca L. Poulson, Nicole M. Nemeth
      Abstract: Veterinary Pathology, Ahead of Print.
      Lymphoproliferative disease virus (LPDV) was first documented in wild turkeys in North America in 2009. LPDV infection is often subclinical but can manifest as lymphoid proliferation or round cell neoplasia. Despite high prevalence across many sampled areas corresponding to declining populations of wild turkeys, knowledge regarding LPDV pathogenesis, risk factors for disease development, and associated impacts on population dynamics are unknown. To understand transmission, viral shedding, and tissue tropism, we inoculated 21 domestic turkeys via the oral cavity, crop, nasal cavity, subcutis, or coelomic cavity. For 12 weeks, oropharyngeal swabs, cloacal swabs, and whole blood were collected weekly. At 1 week postinoculation, 3 turkeys (3/21; 14%) had detectable LPDV proviral DNA in blood by polymerase chain reaction, and 10 developed DNAemia (50%; 10/20) by 12 weeks. LPDV proviral DNA was intermittently detected in oropharyngeal and cloacal swabs. Splenomegaly was the most consistent gross finding in DNAemic birds (8/11; 73%). Lymphoid hyperplasia in the spleen was the most significant microscopic finding (9/11; 82%). Three turkeys (3/11; 27%) developed round cell neoplasia characterized by sheets of pleomorphic, round to polygonal cells in the adrenal gland, bone marrow, skin, small intestine, and/or spleen. LPDV was detected in the spleen and bone marrow from all turkeys with DNAemia and all neoplasms. Our study establishes that infection and disease with North American LPDV from wild turkeys can be experimentally reproduced in domestic turkeys, laying the groundwork for future investigations into LPDV pathogenesis, development of diagnostic techniques, and understanding the impacts of LPDV on wild turkey populations.
      Citation: Veterinary Pathology
      PubDate: 2024-02-28T10:38:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03009858241231558
       
  • Assessment of SOX10 expression in 437 canine neoplasms of different
           embryologic origins

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      Authors: Sophie Nelissen, Andrew D. Miller
      Abstract: Veterinary Pathology, Ahead of Print.
      Several members of the SRY-related HMG-box (SOX) protein family are implicated in tumorigenesis, metastasis, and regulation of the tumor microenvironment. SOX10, which is involved in neural crest cell migration and differentiation, has long been recognized a sensitive and specific immunohistochemical (IHC) marker in the diagnosis of melanoma in humans. However, expression of SOX10 in other tumor types has infrequently been evaluated in humans until recently and has not been thoroughly investigated in the dog. Our aim was to characterize the expression of SOX10 in canine neoplasms to objectively assess its value as a diagnostic IHC marker. Immunohistochemistry for SOX10 was performed on 437 archived, formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues from representative canine neoplasms of ectodermal (15 tumor types), mesodermal (13 tumor types), endodermal (8 tumor types), and mixed/unknown (7 tumor types) embryologic origin. Oral and cutaneous tumors of melanocytic origin were used as positive controls. Intense SOX10 immunolabeling was observed in most tumors of ectodermal origin, including consistent expression in mammary carcinomas, and gliomas. Embryonal and hair follicle neoplasms inconsistently exhibited strong nuclear immunolabeling. Oral fibrosarcomas and undifferentiated oral sarcomas both inconsistently exhibited moderate to strong nuclear immunolabeling. Neoplasms of mesodermal and endodermal origin lacked immunolabeling. Salivary carcinomas, representing an unknown/mixed embryologic origin, were strongly labeled. SOX10 expression is not limited to melanomas, but is expressed by canine tumors of diverse tissues and embryologic derivation. Importantly, expression of SOX10 by a subset of oral sarcomas impairs its value as a marker for spindle cell oral melanomas.
      Citation: Veterinary Pathology
      PubDate: 2024-02-17T09:02:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03009858241231562
       
  • Eptesipox virus-associated lesions in naturally infected big brown bats

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      Authors: Ursula G. Perdrizet, Janet E. Hill, Champika Fernando, LaRhonda Sobchishin, Vikram Misra, Trent K. Bollinger
      Abstract: Veterinary Pathology, Ahead of Print.
      Bats have many unique qualities amongst mammals; one of particular importance is their reported tolerance to viruses without developing disease. Here, the authors present evidence to the contrary by describing and demonstrating viral nucleic acids within lesions from eptesipox virus (EfPV) infection in big brown bats. One hundred and thirty bats submitted for necropsy from Saskatchewan, Canada, between 2017 and 2021 were screened for EfPV by polymerase chain reaction (PCR); 2 had amplifiable poxvirus DNA. The lesions associated with infection were oral and pharyngeal ulcerations and joint swelling in 2/2 and 1/2 cases, respectively. These changes were nonspecific for poxvirus infection, although intracytoplasmic viral inclusion bodies within the epithelium, as observed in 2/2 bats, are diagnostic when present. Viral nucleic acids, detected by in situ hybridization (ISH), were observed in the epithelium adjacent to ulcerative lesions from both cases and within the joint proliferation of 1 case. A new isolate of EfPV was obtained from 1 case and its identity was confirmed with electron microscopy and whole genome sequencing. Juxtanuclear replication factories were observed in most cells; however, rare intranuclear virus particles were also observed. The significance of the presence of virus particles within the nucleus is uncertain. Whole genome assembly indicated that the nucleotide sequence of the genome of this EfPV isolate was 99.7% identical to a previous isolate from big brown bats in Washington, USA between 2009 and 2011. This work demonstrates that bats are not resistant to the development of disease with viral infections and raises questions about the dogma of poxvirus intracytoplasmic replication.
      Citation: Veterinary Pathology
      PubDate: 2024-02-17T08:57:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03009858241231556
       
  • Diagnostic challenge in veterinary pathology: Mandibular mass in a cow

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      Authors: Gabrita De Zan, Claudia Zanardello, Andrea Cittaro, Marilena Boscarato, Alessia Rizzardi, Nadia Genero, Monia Cocchi
      Abstract: Veterinary Pathology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Veterinary Pathology
      PubDate: 2024-02-12T12:13:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03009858241230102
       
  • High-mortality epizootic Mycobacterium ulcerans ecovar Liflandii in a
           colony of Zaire Dwarf Clawed Frogs (Hymenochirus boettgeri)

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      Authors: Matthew Boulanger, Marcus J. Crim, Jill Keller, Mark J. Hoenerhoff
      Abstract: Veterinary Pathology, Ahead of Print.
      Mycobacterium ulcerans ecovar Liflandii (MuLiflandii) was identified as the causative agent of mycobacteriosis in a research colony of Zaire dwarf clawed frogs (Hymenochirus boettgeri) at the University of Michigan. Clinical presentation included lethargy, generalized septicemia, cutaneous granulomas, coelomic effusion, and acute mortality. Identification of the mycobacterial species was based on molecular, microbiological, and histopathologic characteristics. These findings indicate that MuLiflandii is a primary cause of morbidity and mortality in Zaire dwarf clawed frogs and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of sepsis and coelomic effusion in amphibians. Mycobacterial speciation is important given the variability in pathogenesis within the family Mycobacteriaceae and the implications for both animal and human health as potential zoonoses. The Zaire dwarf clawed frog is a species common in the pet trade, and these findings provide consideration for this pathogen as a potentially important public health concern. This is the first report of MuLiflandii infection in the genus Hymenochirus and illustrates the diagnostic challenges of differentiating among both mycolactone-producing mycobacteria and Mycobacterium marinum. Furthermore, we demonstrate the utility of environmental sampling for this pathogen within the tank system, suggesting this mode of sampling could replace the need for direct frog surveillance.
      Citation: Veterinary Pathology
      PubDate: 2024-02-12T12:11:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03009858241230103
       
  • Apolipoprotein C-III amyloidosis in white lions (Panthera leo)

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      Authors: Natsumi Kobayashi, Susumu Iwaide, Hiroto Fukui, Yumi Une, Yoshiyuki Itoh, Miki Hisada, Tomoaki Murakami
      Abstract: Veterinary Pathology, Ahead of Print.
      Apolipoprotein C-III (ApoC-III) amyloidosis in humans is a hereditary amyloidosis caused by a D25V mutation in the APOC3 gene. This condition has only been reported in a French family and not in animals. We analyzed a 19-year-old white lion (Panthera leo) that died in a Japanese safari park and found renal amyloidosis characterized by severe deposition confined to the renal corticomedullary border zone. Mass spectrometry-based proteomic analysis identified ApoC-III as a major component of renal amyloid deposits. Amyloid deposits were also positive for ApoC-III by immunohistochemistry. Based on these results, this case was diagnosed as ApoC-III amyloidosis for the first time in nonhuman animals. Five additional white lions were also tested for amyloid deposition retrospectively. ApoC-III amyloid deposition was detected in 3 white lions aged 19 to 21 years but not in 2 cases aged 0.5 and 10 years. Genetic analysis of white and regular-colored lions revealed that the APOC3 sequences of the lions were identical, regardless of amyloid deposition. These results suggest that ApoC-III amyloidosis in lions, unlike in humans, may not be a hereditary condition but an age-related condition. Interestingly, lion ApoC-III has a Val30 substitution compared with other species of Panthera that have Met30. Structural predictions suggest that the conformation of ApoC-III with Met30 and ApoC-III with Val30 are almost identical, but this substitution may alter the ability to bind to lipids. As with the D25V mutation in human ApoC-III, the Val30 substitution in lions may increase the proportion of free ApoC-III, leading to amyloid formation.
      Citation: Veterinary Pathology
      PubDate: 2024-02-12T12:09:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03009858241230100
       
  • Mortality associated with SARS-CoV-2 in nondomestic felids

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      Authors: Mary Drozd, Jana M. Ritter, Jonathan Peter Samuelson, Maryanna Parker, Leyi Wang, Samantha J. Sander, Jill Yoshicedo, Louden Wright, Jenee Odani, Trent Shrader, Elizabeth Lee, Shawn R. Lockhart, Ria R. Ghai, Karen A. Terio
      Abstract: Veterinary Pathology, Ahead of Print.
      Between September and November 2021, 5 snow leopards (Panthera uncia) and 1 lion (Panthera leo) were naturally infected with severe acute respiratory coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) and developed progressive respiratory disease that resulted in death. Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 sequencing identified the delta variant in all cases sequenced, which was the predominant human variant at that time. The time between initial clinical signs and death ranged from 3 to 45 days. Gross lesions in all 6 cats included nasal turbinate hyperemia with purulent discharge and marked pulmonary edema. Ulcerative tracheitis and bronchitis were noted in 4 cases. Histologically, there was necrotizing and ulcerative rhinotracheitis and bronchitis with fibrinocellular exudates and fibrinosuppurative to pyogranulomatous bronchopneumonia. The 4 cats that survived longer than 8 days had fungal abscesses. Concurrent bacteria were noted in 4 cases, including those with more acute disease courses. Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 was detected by in situ hybridization using probes against SARS-CoV-2 spike and nucleocapsid genes and by immunohistochemistry. Viral nucleic acid and protein were variably localized to mucosal and glandular epithelial cells, pneumocytes, macrophages, and fibrinocellular debris. Based on established criteria, SARS-CoV-2 was considered a contributing cause of death in all 6 cats. While mild clinical infections are more common, these findings suggest that some SARS-CoV-2 variants may cause more severe disease and that snow leopards may be more severely affected than other felids.
      Citation: Veterinary Pathology
      PubDate: 2024-02-07T09:32:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03009858231225500
       
  • Diagnostic Challenge in Veterinary Pathology: Metastatic Mammary Tumor in
           a Female Tiger (Panthera Tigris)

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      Authors: Charisha Fraser, Mun Keong Kok, Intan Shameha Abdul Razak, Yulianna Puspitasari, Annas Salleh
      Abstract: Veterinary Pathology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Veterinary Pathology
      PubDate: 2024-01-22T05:53:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03009858241226650
       
  • Diagnostic challenge in veterinary pathology: Tri-cavitary effusion in a
           cat with systemic pyogranulomatous inflammation

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      Authors: Sai Fingerhood, Pradeep Neupane, Edward B. Breitschwerdt, Eunju April Choi
      Abstract: Veterinary Pathology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Veterinary Pathology
      PubDate: 2024-01-22T05:49:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03009858241226648
       
  • Immunohistochemical characterization of the immune cell response during
           chlamydial infection in the male and female koala (Phascolarctos cinereus)
           reproductive tract

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      Authors: Sara Pagliarani, Stephen D. Johnston, Kenneth W. Beagley, Chiara Palmieri
      Abstract: Veterinary Pathology, Ahead of Print.
      Chlamydiosis is one of the main causes of the progressive decline of koala populations in eastern Australia. While histologic, immunologic, and molecular studies have provided insights into the basic function of the koala immune system, the in situ immune cell signatures during chlamydial infection of the reproductive tract in koalas have not been investigated. Thirty-two female koalas and 47 males presented to wildlife hospitals with clinical signs suggestive of Chlamydia infection were euthanized with the entire reproductive tract collected for histology; immunohistochemistry (IHC) for T-cell (CD3ε, CD4, and CD8α), B-cell (CD79b), and human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DR markers; and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (rtPCR) for Chlamydia pecorum. T-cells, B-cells, and HLA-DR-positive cells were observed in both the lower and upper reproductive tracts of male and female koalas with a statistically significant associations between the degree of the inflammatory reaction; the number of CD3, CD4, CD79b, and HLA-DR positive cells; and the PCR load. CD4-positive cells were negatively associated with the severity of the gross lesions. The distribution of immune cells was also variable according to the location within the genital tract in both male and female koalas. These preliminary results represent a step forward towards further exploring mechanisms behind chlamydial infection immunopathogenesis, thus providing valuable information about the immune response and infectious diseases in free-ranging koalas.
      Citation: Veterinary Pathology
      PubDate: 2024-01-19T01:08:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03009858231225499
       
  • Prognostic impact of Ki-67 in canine splenic hemangiosarcoma: A
           preliminary study

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      Authors: Elena Brigandì, Paola Valenti, Barbara Bacci, Barbara Brunetti, Giancarlo Avallone
      Abstract: Veterinary Pathology, Ahead of Print.
      Canine splenic hemangiosarcoma has a high metastatic rate and short survival time. Currently, the main prognostic parameters are tumor stage and therapy, while data on histologic parameters, such as grade and Ki-67 expression, are scarce. The aims of this study were to compare two methods of assessment of Ki-67, verify their prognostic impact, and define a threshold value based on survival. Thirty-one cases of histologically diagnosed canine splenic hemangiosarcoma, which were treated with splenectomy and had full staging and follow-up information, were collected. Three were stage I, 17 stage II, and 11 stage III. The mean mitotic count (MC) was 23.9 (standard deviation [SD]: 22.1) and the median was 15 (range, 1–93). Immunohistochemistry for Ki-67 was performed, the Ki-67 labeling index (Ki-67LI) was assessed as a percentage of positive neoplastic nuclei per ≥500 cell, and the Ki-67 count (KI-67C) was defined as the average number of positive nuclei using a 1 cm2 optical grid performed in 5, 40× fields. The mean Ki-67LI and Ki-67C were 56.4% (SD: 38.7) and 27.2 (SD: 12.9) and medians were 51% (range, 8.2–55.2) and 26 (range, 5.5–148), respectively. Using a cut-off of 56% and 9, respectively, Kaplan-Meier survival curves showed an association of overall survival with Ki-67LI and MC. In addition to clinical stage, Ki-67LI maintained its prognostic value on multivariate analysis, supporting the role of Ki-67LI as an independent prognostic parameter. Based on these results, we propose a diagnostically applicable cut-off value of 56% for Ki-67LI as a prognostic parameter for canine splenic hemangiosarcoma.
      Citation: Veterinary Pathology
      PubDate: 2024-01-12T12:45:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03009858231225507
       
  • Swine models in translational research and medicine

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      Authors: David K. Meyerholz, Eric R. Burrough, Nicole Kirchhof, Douglas J. Anderson, Kristi L. Helke
      Abstract: Veterinary Pathology, Ahead of Print.
      Swine are increasingly studied as animal models of human disease. The anatomy, size, longevity, physiology, immune system, and metabolism of swine are more like humans than traditional rodent models. In addition, the size of swine is preferred for surgical placement and testing of medical devices destined for humans. These features make swine useful for biomedical, pharmacological, and toxicological research. With recent advances in gene-editing technologies, genetic modifications can readily and efficiently be made in swine to study genetic disorders. In addition, gene-edited swine tissues are necessary for studies testing and validating xenotransplantation into humans to meet the critical shortfall of viable organs versus need. Underlying all of these biomedical applications, the knowledge of husbandry, background diseases and lesions, and biosecurity needs are important for productive, efficient, and reproducible research when using swine as a human disease model for basic research, preclinical testing, and translational studies.
      Citation: Veterinary Pathology
      PubDate: 2024-01-10T12:11:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03009858231222235
       
  • Humanization with CD34-positive hematopoietic stem cells in NOG-EXL mice
           results in improved long-term survival and less severe myeloid cell
           hyperactivation phenotype relative to NSG-SGM3 mice

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      Authors: Elinor Willis, Jillian Verrelle, Esha Banerjee, Charles-Antoine Assenmacher, James C. Tarrant, Nicholas Skuli, Moriah L. Jacobson, Donald M. O’Rouke, Zev A. Binder, Enrico Radaelli
      Abstract: Veterinary Pathology, Ahead of Print.
      NSG-SGM3 and NOG-EXL mice combine severe immunodeficiency with transgenic expression of human myeloid stimulatory cytokines, resulting in marked expansion of myeloid populations upon humanization with CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). Humanized NSG-SGM3 mice typically develop a lethal macrophage activation syndrome and mast cell hyperplasia that limit their use in long-term studies (e.g., humanization followed by tumor xenotransplantation). It is currently unclear to what extent humanized NOG-EXL mice suffer from the same condition observed in humanized NSG-SGM3 mice. We compared the effects of human CD34+ HSC engraftment in these two strains in an orthotopic patient-derived glioblastoma model. NSG-SGM3 mice humanized in-house were compared to NOG-EXL mice humanized in-house and commercially available humanized NOG-EXL mice. Mice were euthanized at humane or study endpoints, and complete pathological assessments were performed. A semiquantitative multiparametric clinicopathological scoring system was developed to characterize chimeric myeloid cell hyperactivation (MCH) syndrome. NSG-SGM3 mice were euthanized at 16 weeks after humanization because of severe deterioration of clinical conditions. Humanized NOG-EXL mice survived to the study endpoint at 22 weeks after humanization and showed less-severe MCH phenotypes than NSG-SGM3 mice. Major differences included the lack of mast cell expansion and limited tissue/organ involvement in NOG-EXL mice compared to NSG-SGM3 mice. Engraftment of human lymphocytes, assessed by immunohistochemistry, was similar in the two strains. The longer survival and decreased MCH phenotype severity in NOG-EXL mice enabled their use in a tumor xenotransplantation study. The NOG-EXL model is better suited than the NSG-SGM3 model for immuno-oncology studies requiring long-term survival after humanization.
      Citation: Veterinary Pathology
      PubDate: 2024-01-10T12:06:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03009858231222216
       
  • Pyrethroid-associated nephrotoxicity in channel catfish, Ictalurus
           punctatus, and blue catfish, I. furcatus, at a public aquarium

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      Authors: Justin M. Stilwell, Sean M. Perry, Lora Petrie-Hanson, Rachel Sheffler, John P. Buchweitz, Alexa J. Delaune
      Abstract: Veterinary Pathology, Ahead of Print.
      Over the course of an approximately 11-month period, an outdoor, freshwater, mixed species, recirculating, display system at a public aquarium experienced intermittent mortalities of channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) and blue catfish (I. furcatus). Catfish acutely presented for abnormal buoyancy, coelomic distention, and protein-rich coelomic effusion. Gross lesions typically involved massive coelomic distension with protein-rich effusion, generalized edema, and gastric hemorrhage and edema. Microscopically, primary lesions included renal tubular necrosis, gastric edema with mucosal hemorrhages, and generalized edema. Aerobic culture and virus isolation could not recover a consistent infectious agent. Intracoelomic injection of coelomic effusion and aspirated retrobulbar fluid from a catfish into naïve zebrafish (bioassay) produced peracute mortality in 3 of 4 fish and nervous signs in the fourth compared with 2 saline-injected control zebrafish that had - no mortality or clinical signs. Kidney tissue and coelomic effusion were submitted for gas chromatography tandem mass spectrometry by multiple reaction monitoring against laboratory standards, which detected the presence of multiple pyrethroid toxins, including bioallethrin, bifenthrin, trans-permethrin, phenothrin, and deltamethrin. Detection of multiple pyrethroids presumably reflects multiple exposures with several products. As such, the contributions of each pyrethroid toward clinical presentation, lesion development, and disease pathogenesis cannot be determined, but they are suspected to have collectively resulted in disrupted osmoregulation and fluid overload due to renal injury. Pesticide-induced toxicoses involving aquarium fish are rarely reported with this being the first description of pyrethroid-induced lesions and mortality in public aquarium-held fish.
      Citation: Veterinary Pathology
      PubDate: 2024-01-09T12:16:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03009858231222226
       
 
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  Subjects -> VETERINARY SCIENCE (Total: 220 journals)
Showing 1 - 63 of 63 Journals sorted by number of followers
Animal Behaviour     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 194)
Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 32)
Veterinary Record     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Veterinary Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Australian Veterinary Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Animal Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 26)
Journal of Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Veterinary Clinics of North America: Small Animal Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24)
Zoonotic Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 24)
Journal of Small Animal Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Veterinary Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Equine Veterinary Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Veterinary Anaesthesia and Analgesia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
American Journal of Primatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Veterinary Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Canadian Journal of Veterinary Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
BMC Veterinary Research     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Veterinary and Comparative Oncology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Veterinary Forensic Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Equine Veterinary Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Veterinary Radiology & Ultrasound     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
New Zealand Veterinary Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Animals     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Research in Veterinary Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Veterinary Diagnostic Investigation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Veterinary Medical Education     Partially Free   (Followers: 13)
Anthrozoos : A Multidisciplinary Journal of The Interactions of People & Animals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Equine Veterinary Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Trends in Parasitology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Veterinary Clinics of North America: Equine Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Veterinary Immunology and Immunopathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Feline Medicine & Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Veterinary Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Preventive Veterinary Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Veterinary Research     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
American Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Advances in Animal Biosciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Animal Feed Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Veterinary Microbiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Veterinary Ophthalmology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Veterinary Clinical Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Animal Reproduction Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Archives of Animal Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Veterinary Dermatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Veterinary Nurse     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Research in Forestry, Wildlife and Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Veterinary Pharmacology and Therapeutics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Veterinary Science and Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Animal - Science Proceedings     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Topics in Companion Animal Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
UK Vet Equine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Animal Health Research Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Exotic Pet Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Veterinary Clinics of North America: Exotic Animal Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Veterinary Parasitology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Research Journal of Veterinary Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Veterinary Science & Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Veterinary Nursing Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Case Reports in Veterinary Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery Open Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Avian Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Domestic Animal Endocrinology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Veterinary Clinics of North America: Food Animal Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Zoonoses and Public Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Transboundary and Emerging Diseases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Human & Veterinary Medicine - International Journal of the Bioflux Society     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Irish Veterinary Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Open Journal of Animal Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Veterinary Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Advanced Research in Life Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Acta Veterinaria Scandinavica     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Medical Mycology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Asian Journal of Poultry Science     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Open Journal of Veterinary Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Bulletin of Animal Health and Production in Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Ethiopian Veterinary Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Veterinary Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Asian Journal of Medical and Biological Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Nutrición Animal Tropical     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Advanced Veterinary Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
VCOT Open     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Small Animal Care     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Agrivet : Jurnal Ilmu-Ilmu Pertanian dan Peternakan / Journal of Agricultural Sciences and Veteriner)     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Anatomia, Histologia, Embryologia: Journal of Veterinary Medicine Series C     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Veterinary Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Reproduction in Domestic Animals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Small Ruminant Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Theriogenology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Kenya Veterinarian     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Veterinary Medicine and Science     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Revista Colombiana de Ciencias Pecuarias (Colombian journal of animal science and veterinary medicine)     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Parasite Science     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Acta Veterinaria Hungarica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Tropical Animal Health and Production     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Veterinary Research Communications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of the South African Veterinary Association     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Archivos de Medicina Veterinaria     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Veterinary Science Development     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Polish Journal of Veterinary Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Veterinary Medicine: Research and Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Veterinary Quarterly     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
ILAR Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Tanzania Veterinary Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Tropical Veterinarian     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Acta Veterinaria     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revue Marocaine des Sciences Agronomiques et Vétérinaires     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Global Journal of Animal Scientific Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intas Polivet     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Buletin Peternakan : Bulletin of Animal Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cogent Food & Agriculture     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Veterinary Dentistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Applied Animal Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Austral Journal of Veterinary Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Veterinary Science & Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Theoretical and Applied Veterinary Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Veterinary and Animal Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Archiva Zootehnica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Turkish Journal of Veterinary Research     Open Access  
EUREKA : Health Sciences     Open Access  
Revista Colombiana de Ciencia Animal     Open Access  
Iraqi Journal of Veterinary Sciences     Open Access  
Ukrainian Journal of Veterinary and Agricultural Sciences     Open Access  
Chilean Journal of Agricultural & Animal Sciences     Open Access  
CES Medicina Veterinaria y Zootecnia     Open Access  
Compendio de Ciencias Veterinarias     Open Access  
Ciencia Veterinaria     Open Access  
Nepalese Veterinary Journal     Open Access  
Salud y Tecnología Veterinaria     Open Access  
Veterinary Parasitology : X     Open Access  
Jurnal Medik Veteriner     Open Access  
Rassegna di Diritto, Legislazione e Medicina Legale Veterinaria     Open Access  
Veterinaria (Montevideo)     Open Access  
Analecta Veterinaria     Open Access  
Veterinarski Glasnik     Open Access  
Jurnal Sain Veteriner     Open Access  
Revista de Ciência Veterinária e Saúde Pública     Open Access  
Veterinary Parasitology : Regional Studies and Reports     Full-text available via subscription  
Revue Vétérinaire Clinique     Full-text available via subscription  
Folia Veterinaria     Open Access  
FAVE Sección Ciencias Veterinarias     Open Access  
Revista Ciencias Veterinarias     Open Access  
Spei Domus     Open Access  
Revista de Educação Continuada em Medicina Veterinária e Zootecnia     Open Access  
Revista Veterinaria     Open Access  
Journal of the Selva Andina Research Society     Open Access  
Revista de Ciências Agroveterinárias     Open Access  
Nigerian Veterinary Journal     Open Access  
Schweizer Archiv für Tierheilkunde     Hybrid Journal  
Macedonian Veterinary Review     Open Access  
Revista Complutense de Ciencias Veterinarias     Open Access  
Revista de Salud Animal     Open Access  
Revista de Medicina Veterinaria     Open Access  
Revista MVZ Córdoba     Open Access  
Avances en Ciencias Veterinarias     Open Access  
InVet     Open Access  

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School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
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Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


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