Subjects -> FOOD AND FOOD INDUSTRIES (Total: 395 journals)
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    - FOOD AND FOOD INDUSTRIES (277 journals)

FOOD AND FOOD INDUSTRIES (277 journals)            First | 1 2     

Showing 201 - 62 of 62 Journals sorted alphabetically
Journal of Medical Nutrition and Nutraceuticals     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Medicinal Food     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Medicinal Herbs and Ethnomedicine     Open Access  
Journal of Muscle Foods     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Nutritional Ecology and Food Research     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Nuts     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Plant Stress Physiology     Open Access  
Journal of Sensory Studies     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Spices and Aromatic Crops     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Texture Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
JSFA reports     Full-text available via subscription  
Jurnal Pengabdi     Open Access  
Jurnal Teknologi & Industri Hasil Pertanian     Open Access  
Jurnal Teknologi Dan Industri Pangan     Open Access  
Latin American Perspectives     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Lebensmittelchemie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Legume Science     Open Access  
LWT - Food Science and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Malaysian Journal of Halal Research Journal     Open Access  
Measurement : Food     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Meat and Muscle Biology     Open Access  
Meat Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Meat Technology     Open Access  
Meyve Bilimi     Open Access  
Mustafa Kemal Üniversitesi Tarım Bilimleri Dergisi     Open Access  
NFS Journal     Open Access  
Nigerian Food Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
NJAS : Wageningen Journal of Life Sciences     Hybrid Journal  
npj Science of Food     Open Access  
Nutrition and Dietary Supplements     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Nutrition Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Obesity Facts     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Oilseeds and fats, Crops and Lipids     Open Access  
Open Bioactive Compounds Journal     Open Access  
Open Food Science Journal     Open Access  
Pakistan Journal of Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Perspectivas en Nutrición Humana     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
PHAGE     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Quality Assurance and Safety of Crops & Food     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Quality of Life     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Renewable Agriculture and Food Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Research & Reviews : Journal of Food Science and Technology     Open Access  
Research Journal of Seed Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Review of Agricultural, Food and Environmental Studies     Hybrid Journal  
Reviews in Aquaculture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Revista Complutense de Ciencias Veterinarias     Open Access  
Revista Verde de Agroecologia e Desenvolvimento Sustentável     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Savannah Journal of Research and Development     Open Access  
Segurança Alimentar e Nutricional     Open Access  
Selçuk Tarım ve Gıda Bilimleri Dergisi     Open Access  
Sri Lanka Journal of Food and Agriculture     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Starch / Staerke     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Sustainable Food Production     Open Access  
TECA : Tecnologia i Ciència dels Aliments     Open Access  
Theory and Practice of Meat Processing     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Translational Animal Science     Open Access  
Trends in Food Science & Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
UNICIÊNCIAS     Open Access  
Universal Journal of Food and Nutrition Science     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
University of Sindh Journal of Animal Sciences     Open Access  
Urban Agricultural & Regional Food Systems     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Vitae     Open Access  
World Food Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)

  First | 1 2     

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Renewable Agriculture and Food Systems
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.593
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 15  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1742-1705 - ISSN (Online) 1742-1713
Published by Cambridge University Press Homepage  [352 journals]
  • U.S. organic agriculture: 30 years after the Organic Foods Production Act
           of 1990. Introduction to themed issue

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      Authors: Dimitri; Carolyn, Delate, Kathleen, Oberholtzer, Lydia
      Pages: 579 - 580
      PubDate: 2022-11-28
      DOI: 10.1017/S1742170522000278
       
  • Oral histories of three pioneers in organic agriculture research

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      Authors: Figueroa; Shayne Leslie
      Pages: 581 - 587
      Abstract: This article offers a window onto the experience of three researchers who influenced the direction of organic agriculture research from the 1980s through today. Kathleen Delate, Catherine Greene and Deborah Stinner have all contributed important work in the field, from organizing and executing research projects to analyzing the collecting hard data that provided insight into the numerous environmental and economic benefits of organic agriculture. Their stories share many similar biographical markers, from the importance of food and nature in childhood memories to trailblazing projects in the early 2000s.
      PubDate: 2022-10-03
      DOI: 10.1017/S1742170522000266
       
  • Thirty years of organic dairy in the United States: the influences of
           farms, the market and the organic regulation

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      Authors: Dimitri; Carolyn, Nehring, Richard
      Pages: 588 - 602
      Abstract: The US organic milk food system has several interesting characteristics. The product has been enthusiastically embraced by consumers, resulting in increased retail sales of organic milk. The processing sector is oligopolistic, with three dominant firms. At the farm level, the definition and enforcement of regulations relating to access to pasture and transitioning livestock have been the subject of controversy and slow to change to meet the needs of the sector. This paper uses two sources of the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) data (Agricultural Resource Management Survey and Organic Survey) and other evidence to trace changes in the discourse about organic dairy, the market, processing and farm sector, along with the evolution of the regulation. Concern over inconsistencies in the language and enforcement of the regulation at the farm level continued throughout the 30-year period. We find evidence of strong and continued growth of the organic dairy sector at the farm level, among all regions of the US. The amount of pasture available per cow increased as the access to outdoor rules tightened. In 2016 many dairies failed to meet the 30% threshold for feed from grazing. Another key finding, which may underlie the internal debates, is that the profitability of large-scale organic dairies in the West substantially increased in 2016. The organic dairies in other regions did not experience this improvement, although their profitability remained similar to prior years. While there is evidence of problems with the regulation, we note that the structure of the processing sector is an important but overlooked dimension. Thus, additional research into the farmer–processor relationship is needed to improve our understanding of the dynamics of the organic dairy farm sector.
      PubDate: 2022-11-28
      DOI: 10.1017/S1742170522000254
       
  • The international trade of U.S. organic agri-food products: export
           opportunities, import competition and policy impacts

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      Authors: Boys; Kathryn A., Zhang, Siqi, Hooker, Neal H.
      Pages: 603 - 617
      Abstract: International markets are an important destination and source of U.S. organic agri-food products. This paper offers new insights concerning the current status and trends of U.S. organic imports and exports U.S. policies relevant to the international trade of U.S. organic agri-food products are described, characterizing specific products and partners. In addition, the impact of organic equivalency agreements (OEAs), which the U.S. has signed with Canada, the EU, Japan, South Korea and Switzerland, are examined to determine the extent to which they facilitate trade. Using highly disaggregated international trade data (HS-10) from the U.S. International Trade Commission and Statistics Canada, this analysis finds that fresh agricultural products dominate both U.S. exports and imports. Between 2017 and 2019, apples grapes, strawberries and spinach were the predominant fresh exports, while tomato sauces, vinegar and roasted coffee are the most exported processed food products. A significant majority of these exports are destined for Canada and Mexico. The most imported organic agri-food products include unroasted coffee, bananas, olive oil and soybeans. There is much more diversity in the country of origin of these imports with Mexico, Peru, Brazil, Spain and Argentina among the major organic food suppliers to the U.S. OEAs allow for mutual recognition of national organic standards between countries. This analysis finds that, while, in aggregate, OEAs were not found to impact U.S. organic imports or exports, results evaluating individual agreements do suggest that they can be effective trade policy instruments. In particular, the U.S.–Canada and the U.S.–Switzerland OEAs were found to be effective in facilitating U.S. exports. Taken together these findings offer important insights into current trade patterns, and U.S. international market and organic policy opportunities.
      PubDate: 2022-08-12
      DOI: 10.1017/S1742170522000163
       
  • Blanket NOP rules and regional realities: from the field

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      Authors: Miller; Emily M., Hendrickson, Mary, Murakami, Christopher, Clark, Kerry
      Pages: 644 - 648
      Abstract: There are fewer Certified Organic producers in the Mid-South US (southern half of Missouri, western Kentucky and Tennessee, northern Arkansas and eastern Oklahoma) than in other regions of the country such as the Upper Midwest, West Coast, or Northeastern US. Taus et al. (2013) The Professional Geographer 65, 87–102, posit that these clusters suggest regional characteristics impact adoption of organic agriculture and admit that regional studies lack consensus on the role of factors that drive adoption. This paper seeks to understand if there are regionally distinct challenges and opportunities for organic production in the region. Fourteen certified organic producers in Missouri were interviewed and areas of challenges and opportunities specific to their certification were identified within the three a priori themes of (1) biophysical characteristics, (2) marketing infrastructure and (3) financial feasibility. We suggest directions for future policy support from the National Organic Program (NOP) and bolstered feedback structures within the National Organic Standards Board to address regional disparities.
      PubDate: 2022-04-27
      DOI: 10.1017/S1742170521000041
       
  • Multi-criteria sustainability performance assessment of horticultural
           crops using DEA and ELECTRE IV methods

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      Authors: Banaeian; Narges, Zangeneh, Morteza, Golinska-Dawson, Paulina
      Pages: 649 - 659
      Abstract: This paper presents a novel approach to multi-criteria sustainability performance assessment of horticultural crops. The crops are ranked by the decision-making method ELECTRE IV with environmental, energy and technological criteria. In total eight indicators are taken into consideration and calculated based on primary data collected from over 260 farms in northern Iran. Additionally, Data Envelopment Analysis is used to calculate the technical efficiency and potential for energy saving by different management of the production units. The novel contribution of this study is the comparison of several horticultural products (oranges, kiwis, persimmons and tangerines), when most of the previous studies have focused on one product. Moreover, novel calculations of the carbon footprint are presented for oranges, tangerines and persimmons. This paper also includes the first study on the environmental impact of persimmon fruit's production. The obtained results show that energy efficiency for orange, tangerine, kiwi and persimmon products: 1.1, 0.84, 0.53 and 1.22, respectively. In each hectare of kiwi orchards, the amount of CO2 emissions of 1219 kg and the ecological footprint of 3.21 hectares have been calculated, which is statistically significant compared to orange, tangerine and persimmon. The chemical and fuel inputs have the greatest potential for reducing energy consumption in the studied products. Results of ELECTRE IV showed that kiwi is the most sustainable selection for the studied region followed by orange, persimmon and tangerine, respectively. Kiwi has also relatively low technical efficiency. This means that this product has the greatest potential for a reduction of energy consumption, while maintaining the same amount of crop. It is recommended to include the development of kiwi orchards in the policies of Guilan, but with more careful management of the production inputs.
      PubDate: 2022-10-13
      DOI: 10.1017/S1742170522000242
       
  • Risk and uncertainty of plastic mulch adoption in raspberry production
           systems

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      Authors: Madrid; B., Goldberger, J. R., Miles, C. A., DeVetter, L. W.
      Pages: 660 - 671
      Abstract: Agriculture plays a central role in providing food security and essential goods globally. Producers must consider and manage risk to ensure that the production system and its associated individuals are capable of enduring unexpected and disruptive events. Analyzing the different types of risk and accompanying uncertainties that growers experience can be essential to better reflect and understand the realities of their circumstances, but these concepts are not always accounted for in the adoption process. Drawing on the importance of risk and uncertainty, this study aims to assess the different types of risk and uncertainties involved in the risk decision-making process of the processed raspberry industry, where plastic mulch is a new production technique. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with participants involved in the use, research, outreach, manufacturing, and distribution of plastic mulch, specifically polyethylene (PE) mulch and soil-biodegradable mulch (BDM). Findings indicate that risk can be present in various forms including production, price, and hidden risks, with production and price risks being the most significant to all participants. When accounting for overall risk, PE mulch was considered riskier to industry representatives but less risky to growers and most research and outreach specialists. BDM was considered risky due to the uncertainties about durability, degradability, and the unknown impacts on the environment if BDM fragments do not degrade readily. The application of PE mulch and/or BDM can be beneficial for the raspberry production systems but will require time for additional research and effort to disseminate information to a wider agricultural audience.
      PubDate: 2022-10-19
      DOI: 10.1017/S1742170522000291
       
  • Welfare impacts of conservation agriculture adoption on smallholder maize
           farmers in South Africa

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      Authors: Oduniyi; Oluwaseun Samuel, Chagwiza, Clarietta, Wade, Tara
      Pages: 672 - 682
      Abstract: Climate change and soil degradation are the issues depleting the soil's ability to promote good yield. One of the ways to combat this is the practice of conservation agriculture (CA). This study was carried out to explore and investigate the impact of CA. Multinomial endogenous switching regression model and cross-sectional data were used to investigate the determinants and the impact of the adoption of CA on the income of smallholder maize farmers in Mpumalanga Province, South Africa. Three categories of CA (minimum tillage, crop diversification and a combination of both minimum tillage and crop diversification) were considered. The empirical results revealed that regardless of the choices of CA practices adopted by the maize farmers, the income realized was higher for adopters than for non-adopters of CA practices. The average treatment effect for the adopters of both minimum tillage and crop diversification was the highest, showing an increase in income by 60.31% (R15575.99/$996.57USD) compared to the non-adopters. The policy implication for these results is that there is a need to promote the adoption of CA practices, particularly a combination of both minimum tillage and crop diversification, given their significant impact on farmer income, an important welfare outcome that has significant implications on food security and poverty alleviation.
      PubDate: 2022-10-24
      DOI: 10.1017/S1742170522000308
       
  • The value of additional calf–mother contact in milk choice: an
           analysis of US consumers

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      Authors: Boaitey; Albert, Lai, Yufeng, Kehoe, Sylvia
      Pages: 683 - 694
      Abstract: In recent decades, there has been an increase in public concerns about the animal welfare impacts of many farm practices. The transition to systems that are perceived to increase animal welfare is however, hampered by the lack of transparency regarding farming practices, information gaps and poor value signaling. Using the case of milk choice, this study investigates US consumer (N = 1020) preferences for systems that allow for additional calf-dam (mother) contact, dehorning and the role of different formats of information (i.e., text and images). The study applies a multi-profile (Case 3) best-worst scoring approach. Data were analyzed using mixed logit and latent class models. The results indicate that consumers signal significantly higher values for production systems that allow for more calf-dam contact. These preferences differ by consumer segments. Consumers also expressed positive values for dehorning with pain mitigation. The results further show that a seemingly small addition to textual information treatment, i.e., providing consumers with pictures associated with calf-dam contact practices generates statistically significant premiums. Sensitivity to additional information was high amongst female and urban consumers. The findings of this study highlight the demand incentives for the creation of niche markets for calf management practices in the dairy industry.
      PubDate: 2022-10-27
      DOI: 10.1017/S1742170522000333
       
  • Farmers' preferences for sustainable intensification attributes in
           sorghum-based cropping systems: evidence from Mali

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      Authors: Badolo; Felix, Kotu, Bekele Hundie, Oyinbo, Oyakhilomen, Sanogo, Karamoko, Birhanu, Birhanu Zemadim
      Pages: 695 - 706
      Abstract: Sorghum plays a crucial role in the rural economy and nutrition of rural households in Mali. Yet the productivity of this crop is constrained by limited adoption of agricultural intensification technologies, which could be partly because technology development does not properly consider farmers' preferences. This study with smallholder farmers in southern Mali aimed to assess farmers' preferences for different attributes of sorghum technologies through the lens of sustainable intensification. The study used a discrete choice experiment, a method which involves asking individuals to state their preference over hypothetical alternative scenarios, goods or services. We considered six attributes corresponding to different domains of sustainable intensification: grain yield, risk of yield loss, soil fertility, nutrition, labor requirement and fodder yield. We analyzed the data using the mixed logit model, while considering the multinomial logit model as a robustness check. The findings revealed that smallholder farmers are strongly interested in transitioning from their existing sorghum-based cropping systems to those that closely align with these domains of sustainable intensification. However, there were diverse preferences among all the smallholder farmers studied, and between distinct sub-groups of smallholder farmers characterized by their social networks and agroecological zones, which yield relevant policy implications. Overall, these results support the growing research and development prioritization and policy interests toward scaling sustainable intensification among farmers, with a particular focus on human nutrition.
      PubDate: 2022-11-04
      DOI: 10.1017/S1742170522000345
       
  • The benefits and barriers of geographical indications to producers: A
           review

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      Authors: Cardoso; Vitória Aparecida, Lourenzani, Ana Elisa Bressan Smith, Caldas, Marcellus Marques, Bernardo, Cristiane Hengler Corrêa, Bernardo, Roberto
      Pages: 707 - 719
      Abstract: Consumers are increasingly demanding information regarding the characteristics of products, their place of origin and methods of production. A Geographical Indication (GI) can be understood as a way to meet these demands, as it protects the origin of the product, as well as its characteristics. In addition to contributing to territorial development, GI signs have the potential to add value to products and help producers to become more competitive. However, some authors argue that there are barriers that can prevent the benefits of GI from reaching producers. Therefore, this article aims to identify the barriers and benefits of GI for producers. To reach this end, a Systematic Literature Review was carried out. As a result, it was observed that among the main benefits offered by the GI are higher prices, access to markets and preservation of cultural identity. Regarding the challenges, it was highlighted the existence of inefficient institutions, organizational problems, power asymmetry and appropriation of value by the most powerful agents of the supply chain. To conclude, this paper shows that the difficulties and benefits of GI to producers are not absolute and vary from region to region. In this sense, further research on the impact of GI, especially in developing countries, is necessary. The results here presented may be used as a base for future research that search to identify the importance of GI for producers and may also contribute to the development of actions or public policies related to GI.
      PubDate: 2022-11-10
      DOI: 10.1017/S174217052200031X
       
  • Russia's Role in the Contemporary International Agri-Food Trade System -
           Edited by Stephen K. Wegren and Frode Nilssen (2022). Palgrave Macmillan.
           347pp. ISBN 978-3-030-77450-9. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-77451-6

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      Authors: Mkuna; Eliaza
      Pages: 720 - 721
      PubDate: 2022-10-24
      DOI: 10.1017/S1742170522000321
       
  • Price promotion of organic foods and consumer demand

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      Authors: Chen; Danhong, Jaenicke, Edward C., Yan, Ji, Tian, Kun, Nayga, Rodolfo M.
      Pages: 618 - 623
      Abstract: Existing studies have examined the demand elasticities for organic products only in select categories, and their results for consumers' sensitivity to price changes are inconsistent. Evidence regarding the effects of price promotions on the demand for organic foods vs non-organic foods is scarce. This study aims to (1) examine the own-price elasticities of organic foods vs non-organic counterparts both with and without a promotion in a variety of product categories, and (2) investigate how the distinctive promotion effects between organic and non-organic counterparts depend on food category features. Using purchase data for 36 food categories from the 2015 Nielsen Consumer Panel, we find differential own-price elasticities for organic and non-organic foods, regardless of whether the product is purchased with a promotion. When the products are purchased with a promotion, we find stronger price promotion effects of organic virtues than non-organic virtues and weaker price promotion effects of organic vices than conventional vices. Price promotions of organic foods are more likely to induce health-conscious consumers to switch from conventional purchases to organic purchases in virtues.
      PubDate: 2021-09-11
      DOI: 10.1017/S1742170521000399
       
  • An overview of organic, grassfed dairy farm management and factors related
           to higher milk production

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      Authors: Snider; Miriam A., Ziegler, Sara E., Darby, Heather M., Soder, Kathy J., Brito, André F., Beidler, Brent, Flack, Sarah, Greenwood, Sabrina L., Niles, Meredith T.
      Pages: 624 - 632
      Abstract: Organic, grassfed (OGF) dairy, which requires higher pasture and forage dry matter intake compared with standard organic dairy practices, is unique both in its management needs and in production challenges. The OGF dairy sector is rapidly growing, with the expansion of this industry outpacing other dairy sectors. There is a lack of research outlining OGF dairy production practices, producer-identified research needs or social factors that affect OGF systems. The objectives of this study were to, with a group of OGF dairy producers, (1) assess information regarding current production practices and producer knowledge, and (2) identify agronomic and social factors that may influence milk production on OGF farms across the United States. A mail survey, focused on demographics, forage and animal management, knowledge, and satisfaction of their farm, was developed and distributed in 2019, with 167 responses (47% response rate). The majority of producers indicated they belonged to the plain, or Amish-Mennonite, community. Milk production was greater on farms that had Holstein cattle, as compared to farms with Jerseys and mixed breeds, and employed intensive pasture rotation. Furthermore, most producers reported the use of supplements such as molasses and kelp meal, which can improve milk production, but also increase feed costs. Producers who indicated that they were at least satisfied with their milk production also reported high levels of knowledge of grazing management and cow reproductive performance. Comparison of response data from plain/non-plain respondents revealed that those that did not identify as plain were more likely to utilize certain government programs, had different priorities and utilized technology more frequently. Based on these results, more research exploring financial and production benchmarks, effective communication strategies to reach OGF producers and methods to improve cattle production through improved forage quality is needed.
      PubDate: 2021-08-04
      DOI: 10.1017/S1742170521000284
       
  • Perspectives on organic transition from transitioning farmers and farmers
           who decided not to transition

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      Authors: Stephenson; Garry, Gwin, Lauren, Schreiner, Chris, Brown, Sarah
      Pages: 633 - 643
      Abstract: Despite continuous growth in demand for organic food and farm products, US domestic supply is not keeping pace. Increasing domestic supply requires, in part, that more farms transition to certified organic production. This in turn requires a better understanding of the transition process. This paper reports on a national survey of farmers transitioning to organic certification through participation in the United States Department of Agriculture's (USDA) Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) Environmental Quality Incentives Program Organic Initiative (EQIP-OI). Our analysis focuses on what motivates farmers to undertake transition to organic certification and what obstacles they confront in the process. The survey population included farmers in the midst of the transition process and farmers who began transition but decided not to pursue organic farming, allowing us to compare both groups to farmers who successfully transitioned to certified organic. Because farmers do not control all of the factors that influence their success, we use a ‘spheres of influence’ framework to analyze obstacles at four levels: the farm, local and regional infrastructure, the marketplace and policy. Our results improve our understanding of the transition process and apply to a wide range of stakeholders and service providers who support farmers in different ways, through crop research, infrastructure development, market development and policy.
      PubDate: 2021-05-05
      DOI: 10.1017/S1742170521000119
       
 
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