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  Subjects -> NUTRITION AND DIETETICS (Total: 201 journals)
Showing 1 - 64 of 64 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acta Portuguesa de Nutrição     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Digestive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Advances in Eating Disorders : Theory, Research and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Advances in Food and Nutrition Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 60)
Advances in Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 55)
African Journal of Biomedical Research     Open Access  
African Journal of Food, Agriculture, Nutrition and Development     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Aktuelle Ernährungsmedizin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
American Journal of Botany     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
American Journal of Clinical Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 162)
American Journal of Food and Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 46)
American Journal of Food Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Amerta Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Amino Acids     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 52)
Annual Review of Food Science and Technology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Annual Review of Nutrition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 39)
Appetite     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Arab Journal of Nutrition and Exercise     Open Access  
Archive of Food and Nutritional Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Archivos Latinoamericanos de Nutrición     Open Access  
Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Asian Journal of Clinical Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Bangladesh Journal of Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Bioactive Carbohydrates and Dietary Fibre     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
BMC Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
BMJ Nutrition, Prevention & Health     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
British Journal Of Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 91)
Cahiers de Nutrition et de Diététique     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Canadian Food Studies / La Revue canadienne des études sur l'alimentation     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Canadian Journal of Dietetic Practice and Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Case Reports in Clinical Nutrition     Open Access  
Childhood Obesity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Clinical Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 89)
Clinical Nutrition ESPEN     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Clinical Nutrition Experimental     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Clinical Nutrition Insight     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Clinical Nutrition Open Science     Open Access  
Clinical Obesity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Comparative Exercise Physiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Current Developments in Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Current Nutrition & Food Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Current Nutrition Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Current Opinion in Clinical Nutrition & Metabolic Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Current Research in Nutrition and Food Science     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
DEMETRA : Alimentação, Nutrição & Saúde     Open Access  
Diabetes, Metabolic Syndrome and Obesity     Open Access   (Followers: 48)
Eating and Weight Disorders - Studies on Anorexia, Bulimia and Obesity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Ecology of Food and Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Egyptian Journal of Obesity, Diabetes and Endocrinology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Endocrinología, Diabetes y Nutrición     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Endocrinología, Diabetes y Nutrición (English Edition)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Ernährung & Medizin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
European Journal of Clinical Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 74)
European Journal of Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
European Journal of Nutrition & Food Safety     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Food & Nutrition Research     Open Access   (Followers: 34)
Food and Environmental Virology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Food and Foodways: Explorations in the History and Culture of     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Food and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Food and Nutrition Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Food and Waterborne Parasitology     Open Access  
Food Digestion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Food Frontiers     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Food Hydrocolloids for Health     Open Access  
Food Quality and Safety     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Food Science & Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 59)
Food, Culture and Society: An International Journal of Multidisciplinary Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Frontiers in Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Frontiers in Sustainable Food Systems     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Functional Foods in Health and Disease     Open Access  
Gazi Sağlık Bilimleri Dergisi     Open Access  
Genes & Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Hacettepe University Faculty of Health Sciences Journal     Open Access  
Human Nutrition & Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian Journal of Nutrition and Dietetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Indonesian Food and Nutrition Progress     Open Access  
International Journal for Vitamin and Nutrition Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity     Open Access   (Followers: 30)
International Journal of Child Health and Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Eating Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
International Journal of Food Safety, Nutrition and Public Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
International Journal of Food Science and Nutrition Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Food Sciences and Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
International Journal of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, Transplant and Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Nutrition and Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 23)
International Journal of Nutrition, Pharmacology, Neurological Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Obesity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 90)
International Journal of Sport Nutrition & Exercise Metabolism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 83)
Journal of Advanced Nutrition and Human Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Agriculture, Food Systems, and Community Development     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Dietary Supplements     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Eating Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Ethnic Foods     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Food & Nutritional Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Food and Nutrition Research     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Food Chemistry and Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Food Science and Nutrition Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Health, Population and Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50)
Journal of Hunger & Environmental Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Medical Nutrition and Nutraceuticals     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Medicinal Herbs and Ethnomedicine     Open Access  
Journal of Muscle Foods     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Nutraceuticals and Herbal Medicine     Open Access  
Journal of Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
Journal of Nutrition & Intermediary Metabolism     Open Access  
Journal of Nutrition and Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Nutrition in Gerontology and Geriatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Nutrition, Health and Aging     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Journal of Nutritional & Environmental Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Nutritional Disorders & Therapy     Open Access  
Journal of Nutritional Ecology and Food Research     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Nutritional Science     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Obesity     Open Access   (Followers: 24)
Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition (JPGN)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 52)
Journal of Pharmacy and Nutrition Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Renal Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal of Renal Nutrition and Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Sensory Studies     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Spices and Aromatic Crops     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 60)
Journal of the American College of Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of the Australasian College of Nutritional and Environmental Medicine     Full-text available via subscription  
Jurnal Gizi dan Dietetik Indonesia : Indonesian Journal of Nutrition and Dietetics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Jurnal Gizi Indonesia / The Indonesian Journal of Nutrition     Open Access  
Jurnal Gizi Klinik Indonesia     Open Access  
Jurnal Penelitian Gizi dan Makanan     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Jurnal Riset Kesehatan     Open Access  
La Ciencia al Servicio de la Salud y Nutrición     Open Access  
Lifestyle Genomics     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Lifestyle Journal     Open Access  
Maternal & Child Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Médecine & Nutrition     Full-text available via subscription  
Media Gizi Indonesia     Open Access  
Metabolism and Nutrition in Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Molecular Nutrition & Food Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
NFS Journal     Open Access  
Nigerian Food Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Nigerian Journal of Nutritional Sciences     Full-text available via subscription  
npj Science of Food     Open Access  
Nutrición Hospitalaria     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Nutrients     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Nutrire     Hybrid Journal  
Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Nutrition & Dietetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Nutrition & Food Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Nutrition & Diabetes     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
Nutrition & Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Nutrition - Science en évolution     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Nutrition and Cancer     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Nutrition and Dietary Supplements     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Nutrition and Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Nutrition and Metabolic Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Nutrition Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Nutrition Bytes     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Nutrition in Clinical Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
Nutrition Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Nutrition Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Nutrition Research Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Nutrition Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
Nutrition Today     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Nutritional Neuroscience : An International Journal on Nutrition, Diet and Nervous System     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Obesity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 56)
Obesity Facts     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Obesity Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Oil Crop Science     Open Access  
Open Food Science Journal     Open Access  
Open Nutrition Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Open Obesity Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Pakistan Journal of Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Pediatric Obesity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Perspectivas en Nutrición Humana     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
PharmaNutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Plant Foods for Human Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Plant Production Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Proceedings of the Nutrition Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Progress in Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Public Health Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
RBNE - Revista Brasileira de Nutrição Esportiva     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
RBONE - Revista Brasileira de Obesidade, Nutrição e Emagrecimento     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Chilena de Nutricion     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Revista Española de Nutrición Humana y Dietética     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Revista Mexicana de Trastornos Alimentarios     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Salud Pública y Nutrición     Open Access  
Segurança Alimentar e Nutricional     Open Access  
South African Journal of Clinical Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
The Australian Coeliac     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Topics in Clinical Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
UNICIÊNCIAS     Open Access  
Universal Journal of Food and Nutrition Science     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
World Food Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)

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Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition (JPGN)
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.376
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 52  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0277-2116 - ISSN (Online) 1536-4801
Published by LWW Wolters Kluwer Homepage  [297 journals]
  • Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition—The Highlights
           of 2021

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Belli; Dominique C.; Gupta, Sandeep K.
      Abstract: imageNo abstract available
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Jun 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Lessons Learned From the Long-Term Use of Enzyme Replacement Therapy in
           the Treatment of Lysosomal Acid Lipase Deficiency

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      Authors: Strong; Alanna; Ficicioglu, Can
      Abstract: imageNo abstract available
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Jun 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Beneficial Role of Microbial Transglutaminase in the Pathogenetic
           Mechanisms of Coeliac Disease

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      Authors: Treppiccione; Lucia; Picarelli, Antonio; Rossi, Mauro
      Abstract: imageCoeliac disease (CD) is caused by immunological intolerance to wheat gluten and related proteins of rye and barley. Consequently, gluten-free (GF) products have been developed but technological implementation is required to improve their intrinsic rheological properties. One alternative for increasing the functional properties of GF foodstuff is the incorporation of microbial transglutaminase (mTG), which allows for the cross-linking of proteins that can substitute for the gluten network in the bakery industry. mTG has been, however, suggested to mimic tissue transglutaminase and to be immunogenic in CD patients. Recently, both mTG and gliadin were found to be transported to the endoplasmic reticulum of enterocytes, suggesting cross-presentation and potential interaction with immune cells in CD. Although pathogenetic activity of mTG has not been found to date, these data naturally raise concerns among clinicians and patients about the use of mTG as a food additive. On the contrary, different studies have shown that treatment with mTG was effective in reducing the inflammatory immune response of gluten in CD. In this article, we take advantage of recent advances in gut physiology and CD pathogenesis to revise the literature data on mTG. An updated and unbiased overview of the role of mTG in this pathology allowed us to definitively highlight the beneficial use of this food additive by CD patients.
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Jun 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Comparison of the Lipidomic Signature of Fatty Liver in Children and
           Adults: A Cross-Sectional Study

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      Authors: Mann; Jake P.; Jenkins, Benjamin; Furse, Samuel; Snowden, Stuart G.; Alisi, Anna; Draijer, Laura G.; Karnebeek, Kylie; Kelly, Deirdre A.; Koot, Bart G.; Mosca, Antonella; Salvestrini, Camilla; van Mourik, Indra; Vreugdenhil, Anita; Zilbauer, Matthias; Koulman, Albert
      Abstract: imageObjective: Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is an increasingly common condition in children characterised by insulin resistance and altered lipid metabolism. Affected patients are at increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and children with NAFLD are likely to be at risk of premature cardiac events. Evaluation of the plasma lipid profile of children with NAFLD offers the opportunity to investigate these perturbations and understand how closely they mimic the changes seen in adults with cardiometabolic disease.Methods: We performed untargeted liquid chromatography—mass spectrometry (LC–MS) plasma lipidomics on 287 children: 19 lean controls, 146 from an obese cohort, and 122 NAFLD cases who had undergone liver biopsy. Associations between lipid species and liver histology were assessed using regression adjusted for age and sex. Results were then replicated using data from 9500 adults with metabolic phenotyping.Results: More severe paediatric NAFLD was associated with lower levels of long chain, polyunsaturated phosphatidylcholines (pC) and triglycerides (TG). Similar trends in pC and TG chain length and saturation were seen in adults with hepatic steatosis; however, many of the specific lipids associated with NAFLD differed between children and adults. Five lipids replicated in adults (including PC(36:4)) have been directly linked to death and cardiometabolic disease, as well as indirectly via genetic variants.Conclusion: These findings suggest that, whilst similar pathways of lipid metabolism are perturbed in paediatric NAFLD as in cardiometabolic disease in adults, the specific lipid signature in children is different.
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Jun 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Expression of IL-37 Correlates With Immune Cell Infiltrate and Fibrosis in
           Pediatric Autoimmune Liver Diseases

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      Authors: Griessmair; Lucas; Pirringer, Laura; Mountford, Steffeni; Sendelhofert, Andrea; Makeschin, Marie-Christine; Koletzko, Sibylle; Mayr, Doris; Bufler, Philip
      Abstract: imageObjectives: The activation of innate immune mechanisms is key for chronic liver injury. Interleukin-37 (IL-37) is a profound inhibitor of innate and adaptive immune responses, and its overexpression protects mice from liver inflammation and fibrosis. Here, we characterize the hepatic inflammatory infiltrate and expression of IL-37 in children with autoimmune liver diseases.Methods: We compared the inflammatory microenvironment of the liver in a retrospective cohort of children with primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC), autoimmune sclerosing cholangitis (ASC) and autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) by immunohistochemistry. The expression of IL-37 was quantified in liver parenchyma and portal tracts. Double immunofluorescence was used for detection of IL-37 in specific cell types and colocalization with Smad3.Results: AIH is characterized by a dense lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate whereas ASC shows high numbers of granulocytes in portal tracts. IL-37 expression correlates positively with liver inflammation and fibrosis, the number of infiltrating immune cells and serum markers for hepatic inflammation. IL-37 is mainly expressed in hepatocytes, cholangiocytes and infiltrating immune cells. Double staining revealed IL-37 positivity in T helper and regulatory T cells (Treg), Kupffer (KC) and hepatic stellate cells (HSC). IL-37 colocalizes with intranuclear pSmad3L in areas of liver inflammation.Conclusions: Pediatric ASC separates from PSC and AIH by a granulocyte-rich portal infiltrate. Upregulation of IL-37 with liver injury, the expression in Treg as well as KC and HSC and the colocalization of IL-37 with pSmad3L in cholangiocytes and hepatocytes suggest a modulating role to limit hepatic inflammation and fibrosis in pediatric autoimmune liver diseases.
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Jun 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Outcomes Analyses of Pediatric Acute Liver Failure Subjects Listed for
           Liver Transplantation

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      Authors: Kulkarni; Sakil S.; Goss, Charles W.; Khan, Adeel S.; Nadler, Michelle L.; Stoll, Janis M.; Doyle, Maria B.; Turmelle, Yumirle P.; Rudnick, David A.
      Abstract: imageBackground: We characterized recent outcomes in US pediatric acute liver failure (PALF) subjects listed for liver transplantation (LT) using the Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients (SRTR) database.Methods: Pediatric subjects listed for LT from 2002 to 2015 were assigned to the “PALF” group based on status 1/1A listing, INR>2, no hepatic artery thrombosis, and no primary graft nonfunction (N = 397). Subjects were assigned to the “non-PALF” group if listed with any status other than 1/1A (N = 4509).Results: The PALF group had more infants
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Jun 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Porto-Sinusoidal Vascular Disease: A Pediatric Study of 30 Patients

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      Authors: Girard; Chloé; Laborde, Nolwenn; Marbach, Clothilde; Mas, Emmanuel; Bureau, Christophe; Broué, Pierre
      Abstract: imageObjectives: Porto-sinusoidal vascular disease (PSVD) refers to a broad spectrum of histological lesions and phenotypic expressions. There are only a few reported pediatric cases in the literature. The primary outcomes of this study were to describe the phenotype of children with PSVD, to specify their mode of presentation and their clinical, biological, histological, and radiological characteristics as well as to identify their underlying etiologies.Methods: This is a descriptive, retrospective, and monocentric study of children followed at our reference center for rare vascular liver diseases.Results: Our study included 30 children ages 2months to 17.4years at the time of diagnosis. in most cases, the diagnosis was made incidentally without manifestation of any clinical symptom but rather on the finding of splenomegaly on physical examination (n = 9) or biological abnormalities (n = 13). In the other cases, the main presenting symptom was an upper gastrointestinal bleeding (n = 6). At the first visit, liver laboratory values were either normal (37%) or slightly disturbed. Anemia and/or thrombocytopenia associated with hypersplenism were found in 60% of patients. Liver biopsy was necessary for diagnosis. A total of 80% of cases had no identified etiology. After a median follow-up of 4.5 years, 33% had not developed portal hypertension (PHT) and we reported the first pediatric case of hepatocellular carcinoma in PSVD children.Conclusions: PSVD is responsible for nonspecific symptomatology with variable evolution sometimes marked by serious complications requiring invasive treatments or even liver transplantation. Regular monitoring is essential to prevent, detect, and treat complications.
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Jun 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Long-Term Sebelipase Alfa Treatment in Children and Adults With Lysosomal
           Acid Lipase Deficiency

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      Authors: Burton; Barbara K.; Sanchez, Alejandra Consuelo; Kostyleva, Maria; Martins, Ana Maria; Marulkar, Sachin; Abel, Florian; Barić, Ivo
      Abstract: imageObjectives: Sebelipase alfa is approved for treatment of lysosomal acid lipase deficiency (LAL-D). This single-arm, open-label study (NCT02112994) evaluated sebelipase alfa efficacy and safety in patients with LAL-D.Methods: Patients>8 months of age diagnosed with LAL-D received sebelipase alfa 1.0 mg/kg by intravenous infusion every other week (qow) for up to 144 weeks. Dose escalation to 3.0 mg/kg qow and subsequently to 3.0 mg/kg weekly was permitted, per protocol; dose reductions for tolerability were permitted to 0.35 mg/kg qow. Descriptive statistical analyses were conducted.Results: Thirty-one patients were enrolled and treated. Baseline median alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) levels were 63.5 and 65.5 U/L, respectively. Twenty-eight patients completed 96 weeks of treatment, and 25 continued into the extended treatment period; 19 completed 144 weeks. From baseline to week 144, median ALT and AST levels changed by −42.0 and −22.0 U/L, respectively, median liver and spleen volumes changed from 1.4 to 1.3 and from 2.6 to 2.3 multiples of normal, respectively, median low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels decreased by 52.6 mg/dL, and median high-density lipoprotein cholesterol increased by 9.8 mg/dL. Liver biopsies showed mostly improved or stable histopathology at 48 and 96 weeks versus baseline. Infusion-associated reactions were mild (n = 1) or moderate (n = 2). One patient (a candidate for liver transplant at baseline) discontinued treatment because of liver transplant (unrelated to treatment). Two patients tested positive for nonneutralizing, anti-drug antibodies on 1 occasion each.Conclusion: Sebelipase alfa was well tolerated and resulted in sustained improvements in liver and lipid parameters.
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Jun 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Evolution of International Pediatric Endoscopic Practice Changes During
           the Coronavirus Disease 2019 Pandemic

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      Authors: Ruan; Wenly; Fishman, Douglas S.; Lerner, Diana G.; Furlano, Raoul I.; Thomson, Mike; Walsh, Catharine M.
      Abstract: imageObjectives: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has drastically altered endoscopic practices. We initially reported the international impact of COVID-19 on pediatric endoscopic practice. This follow-up study aimed to assess changes 7 months following the initial survey to delineate practice change patterns as the pandemic evolved.Methods: Pediatric gastroenterologists who responded to the initial survey were re-surveyed seven months later using Research Electronic Data Capture (REDCap). The survey recorded information on changes in pediatric endoscopic practice patterns, including COVID-19 screening and testing processes and personal protective equipment (PPE) utilization. Additionally, endoscopists’ risk tolerance of COVID-19 transmission was evaluated.Results: Seventy-five unique institutions from 21 countries completed surveys from the 145 initial responses (51.7% response rate). Procedural volumes increased at most institutions (70.7%) and most were performing previously postponed cases (90.7%). Ninety-seven percent of institutions were performing pre-endoscopy screening with 78.7% testing all patients. Many institutions (34.7%) have performed procedures on COVID-19 positive patients. There was significantly less PPE reuse (P 
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Jun 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Use of Cluster Analysis to Identify Subtypes of Pediatric Functional
           Nausea

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      Authors: Sullivan; Erin C.; Fortunato, John E.; Gray, Elizabeth; Tarbell, Sally E.
      Abstract: imageObjective: The aim of the study was to evaluate whether there are clinical subtypes in children with functional nausea based on comorbidities and responses to the Nausea Profile questionnaire.Methods: Patients from the Neurointestinal and Motility Program clinical registry at Lurie Children's Hospital were included if they met Rome IV criteria for functional nausea. Patients completed the Nausea Profile, a multidimensional measure of nausea with gastrointestinal, emotional, and somatic subscales. Comorbidities were assessed by chart review and self-report measures. Latent class analysis was used to identify patient groups based on comorbidities. To assess if model-identified groups were predictive of differences in nausea quality, Nausea Profile subscale means were compared between groups and used to predict group membership. Conversely, k-means analysis was used to divide the sample into groups based upon Nausea Profile subscale scores, to determine if identified groups had different comorbidities.Results: Seventy-two patients (n = 53 girls) with a mean age (±SD) 14.5 ± 2.9 were included. Two clinical subtypes were identified based on comorbidities, with responses on the emotional subscale of the Nausea Profile predicting group membership (P 
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Jun 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Neonatal Antibiotics and Food Allergy Are Associated With FGIDs at
           4–6 Years of Age

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      Authors: Kamphorst; Kim; Vlieger, Arine M.; Oosterloo, Berthe C.; Garssen, Johan; van Elburg, Ruurd M.
      Abstract: imageObjectives: Antibiotics may contribute to the development of functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs). This study aimed to determine whether antibiotics during the first week of life, infantile colic in the first year of life, gut-associated immune markers at 1 year of age, and allergies at 4–6 years of age in term-born children were associated with a higher prevalence of FGIDs at 4–6 years of age.Methods: A prospective observational cohort of 436 term-born infants was followed up at the age of 4–6 years; 151 received broad-spectrum antibiotics (AB+), and 285 healthy controls (AB−). Validated Questionnaire On Pediatric Gastrointestinal Symptoms-Rome III and International Study of Asthma and Allergy in Childhood questionnaires were sent to parents of 418 available children. The independent t-test, chi-squared test or non-parametric test and logistic multivariate regression analyses were used.Results: In total, 340 of 418 (81%) questionnaires were completed. Only the presence of functional abdominal pain was significantly higher in AB+ than AB− (4% vs 0.4%, respectively, P  = 0.045). Children with food allergy fulfilled significantly more often the criteria for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and abdominal migraine (26% vs 9%, P  = 0.002 and 7% vs 1%, P  = 0.043, respectively) compared to non-allergic children. No differences in FGIDs existed at the age of 4–6 years between children with and without a history of infantile colic. There were significant differences in gut-associated immune markers between children with and without FGIDs.Conclusion: Antibiotics during the first week of life resulted in a higher risk for functional abdominal pain at 4–6 years. Furthermore, food allergy was associated with IBS and abdominal migraine at 4–6years.
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Jun 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Mechanical Complications in Central Lines Using Taurolidine Versus Ethanol
           Lock Therapy in Children With Intestinal Failure

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Strauss; Jaclyn; Boctor, Dana Liza; Silverman, Jason A.; Casey, Linda
      Abstract: imageObjectives: Ethanol lock therapy (ELT) is effective in reducing rates of catheter-related-bloodstream infections (CRBSI) in the pediatric intestinal failure (IF) population; however, ELT may increase the risk of line occlusion and breakage, significantly impacting preservation of vascular access. During a period of ethanol shortage, Health Canada temporarily approved the use of taurolidine lock therapy (TLT) in pediatric iF patients previously utilizing ELT. This provided a unique opportunity to directly compare rates of central venous catheter (CVC) complications, including CRBSi, breaks, occlusions, repairs and replacements in patients who utilized both ELT and TLT.Methods: A retrospective study of pediatric IF patients managed by three Western Canadian intestinal rehabilitation programs was performed. Event rates in patients who used both ELT and TLT during the study period were compared using Poisson regression analysis.Results: In 13 patients with 10,187 catheter days (CDs), TLT (vs ELT) had lower rates of CVC breaks (1.11 vs 5.19/1000 CDs, P 
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Jun 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Long-Term Functional Outcomes of an Anorectal Malformation French National
           Cohort

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      Authors: Schmitt; Françoise; Scalabre, Aurélien; Mure, Pierre Yves; Borrione, Claude; Lemelle, Jean Louis; Sharma, Dyuti; De Napoli, Stéphan; Irtan, Sabine; Levard, Guillaume; Becmeur, François; Buisson, Philippe; Fourcade, Laurent; Arnaud, Alexis; De Vries, Philine; Branchereau, Sophie; Garignon, Cynthia; Sauvat, Frédérique; Kalfa, Nicolas; Lardy, Hubert; Jochault-Ritz, Sandy; Sapin, Emmanuel; Coridon, Hélène; Margaryan, Marc; Pouzac, Myriam; Carfagna, Luana; Polimerol, Marie Laurence; Varlet, François; Sarnacki, Sabine; Cretolle, Célia; Podevin, Guillaume
      Abstract: imageObjectives: The present study aimed to assess long-term functional outcomes of children with anorectal malformations (ARMs) across a network of expert centers in France.Methods: Retrospective cross-sectional study of patients ages 6–30 years that had been surgically treated for ARM. Patient and ARM characteristics (eg, level, surgical approach) and functional outcomes were assessed in the different age groups.Results: Among 367 patients, there were 155 females (42.2%) and 212 males (57.8%), 188 (51.2%) cases with, and 179 (48.8%) higher forms without, perineal fistula. Univariate and multivariate statistical analyses with logistic regression showed correlation between the level of the rectal blind pouch and voluntary bowel movements (odds ratio [OR] = 1.84 [1.31–2.57], P 
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Jun 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Perianal Crohn Disease Is More Common in Children and Is Associated With
           Complicated Disease Course Despite Higher Utilization of Biologics: A
           Population-based Study From The epidemiology group of the Israeli IBD
           Research Nucleus (epiIIRN)

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      Authors: Atia; Ohad; Focht, Gili; Lujan, Rona; Ledder, Oren; Greenfeld, Shira; Kariv, Revital; Dotan, Iris; Yanai, Henit; Gabay, Hagit; Balicer, Ran; Haklai, Ziona; Nevo, Daniel; Turner, Dan
      Abstract: imageBackground and Objectives: Both perianal and pediatric-onset Crohn disease (CD) disease are associated with complicated disease course and higher drug utilization. we aimed to explore the differences between pediatric and adult-onset perianal CD and their disease course.Methods: We included all patients with newly diagnosed CD from 2005 to 2019 at two Israeli Health Maintenance Organizations, covering 78% of the population. A combination of ICD-9 codes, radiology and procedures was used to define fistulizing perianal CD (PCD) and its severity according to the association with simple and complex perianal disease.Results: A total of 12,905 patients were included (2186 [17%] pediatric-onset, 10,719 [83%] adults), with a median follow-up of 7.8 years. PCD was diagnosed in 1530 (12%) patients, with higher incidence in children (308 [14%] children vs 1222 adults [11%]; P 
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Jun 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • A Healthcare Physician Can Be Trained to Perform Intestinal Ultrasound in
           Children With Inflammatory Bowel Disease

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      Authors: van Wassenaer; Elsa A.; van Rijn, Rick R.; de Voogd, Floris A.E.; Noels, Floor L.; Deurloo, Eline E.; van Schuppen, Joost; Verbeke, Jonathan I.M.L.; Gecse, Krisztina B.; D’Haens, Geert R.; Benninga, Marc A.; Koot, Bart G.P.
      Abstract: imageObjectives: Training healthcare physicians to perform intestinal ultrasound (IUS) during outpatient visits with equal accuracy as radiologists could improve clinical management of IBD patients. We aimed to assess whether a healthcare-physician can be trained to perform IUS, with equal accuracy compared with experienced radiologists in children with iBD, and to assess inter-observer agreement.Methods: Consecutive children, 6 to 18 years with IBD or suspicion of IBD, who underwent ileo-colonoscopy were enrolled. iUS was performed independently by a trained healthcare-physician and a radiologist in 1 visit. Training existed of an international training curriculum for IUS. Operators were blinded for each other's IUS, and for the ileocolonoscopy. Difference in accuracy of IUS by the healthcare-physician and radiologist was assessed using areas under the ROC curve (AUROC). Inter-observer variability was assessed in terminal ileum (TI), transverse colon (TC) and descending-colon (DC), for disease activity (ie, bowel wall thickness [BWT]>2 mm with hyperaemia or fat-proliferation, or BWT>3 mm).Results: We included 73 patients (median age 15, interquartile range [IQR]:13–17, 37 [51%] female, 43 [58%] with Crohn disease). AUROC ranged between 0.71 and 0.81 for the healthcare-physician and between 0.67 and 0.79 for radiologist (P  > 0.05). Inter-observer agreement for disease activity per segment was moderate (K: 0.58 [SE: 0.09], 0.49 [SE: 0.12], 0.52 [SE: 0.11] respectively for TI, TC, and DC).Conclusions: A healthcare- physician can be trained to perform IUS in children with IBD with comparable diagnostic accuracy as experienced radiologists. The interobserver agreement is moderate. Our findings support the usage of IUS in clinical management of children with IBD.
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Jun 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Risk of Post-Resection Recurrence in Pediatric Crohn Disease

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      Authors: Gray; Ashley; Boyle, Brendan; Michel, Hilary K.; Wright, Molly; Dotson, Jennifer L.; Maltz, Ross M.
      Abstract: imageBackground: Ileocecectomy related to stricturing, fistula formation, or medically refractory disease is commonly required in patients with Crohn disease (CD). Limited research exists in endoscopic recurrence (ER) in pediatric inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). In this study, we sought to determine ER rates and the impact of therapy duration before surgery in pediatric patients with CD.Methods: This was a single-center retrospective review of patients with CD between the ages of 2 to 20 years who required ileocecectomy between January 2015 and December 2019 at Nationwide Children's Hospital. Follow-up endoscopies, laboratory values, medications, and sPCDAI scores were recorded at 6, 12, 24, and 36 months post-resection wherever available. Modified Rutgeert scores (mRS) were independently assigned to post-resection colonoscopy images by 3 trained investigators. Post-resection outcomes were compared between patients on CD therapy>30 days before resection (late surgery) to those started on CD therapy
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Jun 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • The Impact of Compliance During Exclusive Enteral Nutrition on Faecal
           Calprotectin in Children With Crohn Disease

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      Authors: Mckirdy; Shona; Russell, Richard K.; Svolos, Vaios; Gkikas, Konstantinos; Logan, Michael; Hansen, Richard; Gerasimidis, Konstantinos
      Abstract: imageIt remains unclear whether suboptimal response to exclusive enteral nutrition (EEN) in some children with Crohn disease (CD) is explained by poor compliance. The present study measured faecal gluten immunogenic peptides (GIP), a biomarker of gluten intake, in 45 children (3– 17 years) with CD, and explored associations with faecal calprotectin (FC) levels at 33 and 54 days of EEN. FC decreased in patients with undetectable GIP at both 33 and 54 days of EEN (mean decrease, 33 days: −743 mg/kg, 54 days: –1043 mg/kg, P 
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Jun 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Spanish National Registry of Paediatric Coeliac Disease: Changes in the
           Clinical Presentation in the 21st Century

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      Authors: Solís; David Pérez; Pascual, Ma Luz Cilleruelo; Sangrador, Carlos Ochoa; Burriel, Jose Ignacio García; Visus, Félix Sánchez-Valverde; Arocena, Francisco Javier Eizaguirre; Calatayud, Salvador Garcia; Nodal, Eva Martinez-Ojinaga; Aliaga, Ester Donat; Torres, Josefa Barrio; Villasante, Gemma Castillejo de; Cid, Ma del Carmen Miranda; Peral, Ricardo Torres; Lopez, Raquel Vecino; Ruiz, Mercedes Juste; Ramos, Honorio Armas; Garcia, Patricia Barros; Leis, Rosaura; Alberdi, Rosa Solaguren; Quero, José Carlos Salazar; GarciaRomero, Ruth; Clastillo, Luis Ortigosa del; Quintana, Luis Peña; Telleria, Pedro Urruzuno; Franch, Pilar Codoñer; Casales, Zuriñe Garcia; Mas, Maria Lluïsa Masiques; Poblet, Gonzalo Galicia; Costa, Cecilia Martinez; Serrano, Elena Balmaseda; Allué, Isabel Polanco; Koninck, Carmen Ribes; Riechmann, Enriqueta Román
      Abstract: imageObjectives: Over the last several decades, there has been a tendency towards a predominance of less symptomatic forms of coeliac disease (CD) and an increase in the patient age at diagnosis. This study aimed to assess the clinical presentation and diagnostic process of paediatric CD in Spain.Methods: A nationwide prospective, observational, multicentre registry of new paediatric CD cases was conducted from January 2011 to June 2017. The data regarding demographic variables, type of birth, breast-feeding history, family history of CD, symptoms, height and weight, associated conditions, serological markers, human leukocyte antigen (HLA) phenotype, and histopathological findings were collected.Results: In total, 4838 cases (61% girls) from 73 centres were registered. The median age at diagnosis was 4 years. Gastrointestinal symptoms were detected in 71.4% of the patients, and diarrhoea was the most frequent symptom (45.9%). The most common clinical presentation was the classical form (65.1%) whereas 9.8% ofthe patients were asymptomatic. There was a trend towards an increase in the age at diagnosis, proportion of asymptomatic CD cases, and usage of anti-deamidated gliadin peptide antibodies and HLA typing for CD diagnosis. There was, however, a decreasing trend in the proportion of patients undergoing biopsies. Some of these significant trend changes may reflect the effects of the 2012 ESPGHAN diagnosis guidelines.Conclusions: Paediatric CD in Spain is evolving in the same direction as in the rest of Europe, although classical CD remains the most common presentation form, and the age at diagnosis remains relatively low.
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Jun 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Utilization and Effectiveness of eHealth Technology in the Follow-up of
           Celiac Disease: A Systematic Review

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      Authors: Månsson; Alice Loft; Meijer-Boekel, Caroline; Mårild, Karl
      Abstract: imageObjectives: To systematically review the literature on the utilization and effectiveness of electronic-health technologies (eHealth), such as smartphone applications, in managing patients with celiac disease (CD).Methods: PubMed, Scopus, and the Cochrane Library were all searched (until February 2021). Inclusion criteria were full-text English articles reporting original data on the use of eHealth technologies in the follow-up of CD patients, with no age restriction. Exclusion criteria were studies only using non-interactive websites and phone consultation as the primary eHealth method. The results were summarized narratively.Results: Using identified keywords, 926 unique studies were identified. After title and abstract screening by two independent reviewers, 26 studies were reviewed in full text. Finally, eight studies were included in this systematic review, and their quality appraised using standardized forms. Of the eight studies, six were randomized-controlled trials, one mixed-methods study, and one cross-sectional, observational study. Studies were assessed to be of “low” to “moderate” methodological quality. Studied eHealth technologies included web-based interventions, smartphone applications, text messaging, and online consultations. The most consistently reported effects related to improved quality of life (number of studies = 4), knowledge on CD (n = 3), and dietary adherence (n = 2); notably, only one study reported reduced costs of eHealth vs. standard (in-office) care.Conclusions: Although eHealth has the potential to improve the management of CD, so far, the research in the field is scarce and generally of low-moderate methodological quality. Hence, the effectiveness of eHealth in CD management remains uncertain, and more high-quality evidence is required before its utility is known.
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Jun 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Laparo-Endoscopic Rendez-Vous in the Treatment of
           Cholecysto-Choledocolithiasis in the Pediatric Population

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      Authors: Cisarò; Fabio; Pane, Alessandro; Scottoni, Federico; Pizzol, Antonio; Romagnoli, Renato; Calvo, Pier Luigi; Reggio, Dario; Gennari, Fabrizio
      Abstract: imageObjectives: The incidence of choledocolithiasis is reported to be increasing in children. As for the adult population, several different therapeutic strategies have been described, however it is unclear which of those should be considered the gold standard. There is evidence-based literature in adults that supports a combined “rendez-vous” endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography-laparoscopic cholecystectomy technique. This allows management of the choledocholithiasis during the same anesthetic episode as the cholecystectomy. By contrast, there are just two case reports in children reporting this approach. The aim of this study is to report our experience with this technique in a series of children with choledocholithiasis.Methods: All patients who underwent the “rendez-vous technique” at our institution between 2009 and 2020 were reviewed and evaluated for outcomes and complications.Results: Eleven children with cholecysto-choledocholithiasis were evaluated: the procedure was successful in 10 whereas in one patient it was aborted due to technical difficulties. All patients resolved their clinical condition without major complications.Conclusion: To our knowledge, this is the first consistent series of “rendez-vous technique” in the pediatric population, proving its feasibility and safety.
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Jun 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Endoluminal Functional Lumen Imaging Probe Is Safe in Children Under Five
           Years Old

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      Authors: Hoskins; Brett; Almazan, Erik; Mogul, Douglas; Ng, Kenneth
      Abstract: imageBackground: Endoluminal functional lumen imaging probe (EndoFLIP) is a minimally invasive, novel device that uses high-resolution impedance planimetry to measure important parameters of the gastrointestinal lumen that aid in the diagnosis of esophageal disorders. EndoFLiP is approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for children 5 years and older. We sought to compare its safety and luminal characteristics between children under 5 years of age with children 5 years and older.Methods: A single-center retrospective review was performed to identify all patients
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Jun 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Study to Assess the Effect of
           Two Probiotics on the Preterms’ Gut Microbiota

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      Authors: Moreno-Sanz; Bárbara; Montes, María Teresa; Manzano, Susana; Espinosa-Martos, Irene; Cárdenas, Nivia; Esteban, Sergio; Cruz, Marta; Jiménez, Esther; de Pipaón, Miguel Sáenz
      Abstract: imageObjective: To evaluate the effect of a new probiotic strain combination, Ligilactobacillus salivarius subsp infantis PS11603 and Bifidobacterium longum PS10402, on gut bacterial colonization of preterm infants.Methods: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study was conducted in preterm infants from 28 weeks + 0days to 30 weeks + 6days of gestation. Thirty preterm infants were randomly selected after birth to receive either probiotics or placebo. Stool samples were collected before product intake and then sequentially during the first weeks of their admission. Classical microbiological, metagenomics and multiplex immunological analyses were performed to assess the bacterial and immune profile of the samples.Results: Twenty-seven infants completed the study (14 vs 13, probiotic and placebo groups). A higher number of participants were colonized by Lactobacilli in the probiotic group than in the placebo group (93% vs 46%; P  = 0.013). Similar results were obtained when analysing bifidobacterial colonization (100% vs 69%; P  = 0.041). Earlier colonization was observed in the probiotics group versus the placebo group, specifically 5 weeks for Lactobacillus and 1 week for Bifidobacterium. Although no effect was observed in the faecal immunological profile, a decreasing trend could be observed in Th17 response during the first week of probiotic treatment. None of the adverse events (AEs) registered were related to product intake.Conclusion: Probiotic supplementation with L salivarius PS11603 and B longum subsp. infantis PS10402 enhanced an earlier colonization of Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium in preterm infants’ guts in 5 and 1 week, respectively. A higher number of infants were colonized by Lactobacilli with the probiotics’ intake at the end of the study.
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Jun 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Infant Formulas With Postbiotics: An Updated Systematic Review

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      Authors: Szajewska; Hania; Kołodziej, Maciej; Skórka, Agata; Pieścik-Lech, Małgorzata
      Abstract: imageObjectives: Infant formulas (IF) with postbiotics, defined as inanimate microorganisms and/or their components that confer a health benefit on the host, are available. We systematically updated evidence on the safety and health effects of administering iF with postbiotics (with or without other modifications) compared with standard IF.Methods: The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, and EMBASE databases were searched to December 2021.Results: Eleven randomized controlled trials were included. Using the Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool 2, for the primary outcomes, 5 trials had an overall high risk of bias, and 6 trials had some concerns of bias. Most data were available on IF fermented with Bifidobacterium breve C50 and Streptococcus thermophilus (BB/ST). These formulas, compared with the standard IF, were safe and well tolerated. Postbiotic formulas with additional modifications (ie, formula fermented with BB/ST & prebiotics, partly fermented formula with BB/ST and prebiotics with or without modified milk fat, partly fermented antiregurgitation formula with BB/ST and prebiotics) were generally safe and well tolerated but did not offer clear benefits replicated in other studies. Only limited data were available on formula fermented with Lactobacillus paracasei CBA L74.Conclusions: IF with postbiotics evaluated so far are safe and well tolerated by infants who cannot be breastfed. No firm conclusion can, however, be reached regarding the clinical effects and benefit of one formula over another. It seems reasonable to discuss with healthcare providers current evidence regarding specific modifications in infant formulas and let them decide whether the expected benefits meet expectations and are worth the cost.
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Jun 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Impact of Nutrition Support Team in Achieving Target Calories in Children
           Admitted in Pediatric Intensive Care Unit

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      Authors: Zeeshan; Arsheen; Nairn, Qurat ul Ain; Jawwad, Muhammad; Saeed, Amna Afzal; Abbas, Qalab; Hague, Anwar ul
      Abstract: imageObjective: To determine the impact of nutrition support team (NST) on achieving an early target caloric goal in mechanically ventilated children admitted in pediatric intensive care unit (PICU).Methods: An early enteral nutrition protocol (EENP) was implemented by NST to ensure early and adequate nutrition provision to PICU patients. All children (1 month– 18 years) that were admitted in PICU for>2days and received mechanical ventilation, with no contraindications to enteral feed, were included and data was compared with those of pre-intervention. The adequacy of energy intake was defined as 70% achievement of target energy intake on the third day of admission. Chi-square/t-test was used to determine the difference between different variables pre and post intervention.Results: Total 180 patients (99 and 81 in pre- and post-intervention group, respectively) were included. Overall, 115 (63.9%) received adequate calories (70%) on third day of admission. Of which 69 (85.2%) were from post intervention (P 
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Jun 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Intestinal Inflammation is Significantly Associated With Length Faltering
           in Preterm Infants at Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Discharge

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      Authors: Thai; Julie D.; Cherkerzian, Sara; Filatava, Evgenia J.; Luu, Ngan; Yamamoto, Hidemi S.; Fichorova, Raina N.; Belfort, Mandy B.; Gregory, Katherine E.
      Abstract: imageObjective: The aim of the study was to assess intestinal inflammatory measures, urinary intestinal fatty acid-binding protein (IFABP), and fecal calprotectin (FC) by gestational age (GA) and postmenstrual age (PMA) and determine the association between intestinal inflammation and growth in preterm infants from birth to hospital discharge. We hypothesized that intestinal inflammation is associated with adverse growth in preterm infants.Methods: We assayed repeated measures of IFABP and FC in 72 hospitalized preterm infants (
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Jun 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • How Broad Should Gram-Negative Coverage Be for Febrile Parenteral
           Nutrition Dependent Short Bowel Syndrome Patients'

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      Authors: Stultz; Jeremy S.; Fly, James H.; Bagga, Bindiya; Arnold, Sandra R.; Algotar, Anushree; Lee, Kelley R.
      Abstract: imageBroader spectrum Gram-negative antibiotics are commonly utilized empirically for central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSI) in febrile short bowel syndrome (SBS) patients receiving home parenteral nutrition compared to those used empirically for inpatient-acquired CLABSI. This analysis reports 57 CLABSI in 22 patients with SBS admitted from the community and 78 inpatient-acquired CLABSI in 76 patients over a 5-year period. Proportional Gram-negative CLABSI was similar between the SBS and inpatient-acquired cohorts (43.8% vs42.3%, respectively, P  = 0.78). 1.8% and 10.3% (P = 0.125) of Gram-negative CLABSI were non-susceptible to ceftriaxone and 0% and 3.8% (P = 0.52) were non-susceptible to ceftazidime in the SBS and inpatient-acquired cohorts, respectively. In the SBS cohort, home ethanol lock therapy and prior culture results impacted Gramnegative pathogen distribution. Broader empiric Gram-negative coverage for CLABSI among SBS patients compared to inpatients is unnecessary. Third-generation cephalosporins represent appropriate empiric Gramnegative agents for febrile SBS patients presenting from the community to our institution.
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Jun 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Proposal of a Questionnaire for Acute Food Protein-induced Enterocolitis
           Syndrome Diagnosis

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      Authors: Sopo; Stefano Miceli; Mastellone, Francesco; Sinatti, Dario; Gelsomino, Mariannita
      Abstract: No abstract available
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Jun 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Consensus Recommendations for Eosinophilic Gastrointestinal Disease
           Nomenclature

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      Authors: Bose; Paroma; Chang, Joy W.; Dellon, Evan S.; Furuta, Glenn T.; Aceves, Seema S.; Gonsalves, Nirmala
      Abstract: imageNo abstract available
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Jun 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
 
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