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  Subjects -> NUTRITION AND DIETETICS (Total: 201 journals)
Showing 1 - 64 of 64 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acta Portuguesa de Nutrição     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Digestive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Advances in Eating Disorders : Theory, Research and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Advances in Food and Nutrition Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 63)
Advances in Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 56)
African Journal of Biomedical Research     Open Access  
African Journal of Food, Agriculture, Nutrition and Development     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Aktuelle Ernährungsmedizin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
American Journal of Botany     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
American Journal of Clinical Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 178)
American Journal of Food and Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 49)
American Journal of Food Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Amerta Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Amino Acids     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 52)
Annual Review of Food Science and Technology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Annual Review of Nutrition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 40)
Appetite     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Arab Journal of Nutrition and Exercise     Open Access  
Archive of Food and Nutritional Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Archivos Latinoamericanos de Nutrición     Open Access  
Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Asian Journal of Clinical Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Bangladesh Journal of Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Bioactive Carbohydrates and Dietary Fibre     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
BMC Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
BMJ Nutrition, Prevention & Health     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
British Journal Of Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 96)
Cahiers de Nutrition et de Diététique     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Canadian Food Studies / La Revue canadienne des études sur l'alimentation     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Canadian Journal of Dietetic Practice and Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Case Reports in Clinical Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Childhood Obesity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Clinical Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 94)
Clinical Nutrition ESPEN     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Clinical Nutrition Experimental     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Clinical Nutrition Insight     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Clinical Nutrition Open Science     Open Access  
Clinical Obesity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Comparative Exercise Physiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Current Developments in Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Current Nutrition & Food Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Current Nutrition Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Current Opinion in Clinical Nutrition & Metabolic Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Current Research in Nutrition and Food Science     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
DEMETRA : Alimentação, Nutrição & Saúde     Open Access  
Diabetes, Metabolic Syndrome and Obesity     Open Access   (Followers: 48)
Eating and Weight Disorders - Studies on Anorexia, Bulimia and Obesity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Ecology of Food and Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Egyptian Journal of Nutrition and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian Journal of Obesity, Diabetes and Endocrinology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Endocrinología, Diabetes y Nutrición     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Endocrinología, Diabetes y Nutrición (English Edition)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Ernährung & Medizin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
European Journal of Clinical Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 75)
European Journal of Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
European Journal of Nutrition & Food Safety     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Food & Nutrition Research     Open Access   (Followers: 35)
Food and Environmental Virology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Food and Foodways: Explorations in the History and Culture of     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Food and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Food and Nutrition Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Food and Waterborne Parasitology     Open Access  
Food Digestion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Food Frontiers     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Food Hydrocolloids for Health     Open Access  
Food Quality and Safety     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Food Science & Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 59)
Food, Culture and Society: An International Journal of Multidisciplinary Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Frontiers in Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Frontiers in Sustainable Food Systems     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Functional Foods in Health and Disease     Open Access  
Gazi Sağlık Bilimleri Dergisi     Open Access  
Genes & Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Hacettepe University Faculty of Health Sciences Journal     Open Access  
Human Nutrition & Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian Journal of Nutrition and Dietetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Indonesian Food and Nutrition Progress     Open Access  
International Journal for Vitamin and Nutrition Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity     Open Access   (Followers: 31)
International Journal of Child Health and Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Eating Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
International Journal of Food Safety, Nutrition and Public Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
International Journal of Food Science and Nutrition Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Food Sciences and Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
International Journal of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, Transplant and Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Nutrition and Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 23)
International Journal of Nutrition, Pharmacology, Neurological Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Obesity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 93)
International Journal of Sport Nutrition & Exercise Metabolism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 88)
Journal of Advanced Nutrition and Human Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Agriculture, Food Systems, and Community Development     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Dietary Supplements     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Eating Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Ethnic Foods     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Food & Nutritional Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Food and Nutrition Research     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Food Chemistry and Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Food Science and Nutrition Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Health, Population and Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 52)
Journal of Hunger & Environmental Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Medical Nutrition and Nutraceuticals     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Medicinal Herbs and Ethnomedicine     Open Access  
Journal of Muscle Foods     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Nutraceuticals and Herbal Medicine     Open Access  
Journal of Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42)
Journal of Nutrition & Intermediary Metabolism     Open Access  
Journal of Nutrition and Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Nutrition in Gerontology and Geriatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Nutrition, Health and Aging     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Journal of Nutritional & Environmental Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Nutritional Disorders & Therapy     Open Access  
Journal of Nutritional Ecology and Food Research     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Nutritional Science     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Obesity     Open Access   (Followers: 24)
Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition (JPGN)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 52)
Journal of Pharmacy and Nutrition Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Renal Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal of Renal Nutrition and Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Sensory Studies     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Spices and Aromatic Crops     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 61)
Journal of the American College of Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of the Australasian College of Nutritional and Environmental Medicine     Full-text available via subscription  
Jurnal Gizi dan Dietetik Indonesia : Indonesian Journal of Nutrition and Dietetics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Jurnal Gizi Indonesia / The Indonesian Journal of Nutrition     Open Access  
Jurnal Gizi Klinik Indonesia     Open Access  
Jurnal Penelitian Gizi dan Makanan     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Jurnal Riset Kesehatan     Open Access  
La Ciencia al Servicio de la Salud y Nutrición     Open Access  
Lifestyle Genomics     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Lifestyle Journal     Open Access  
Maternal & Child Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Médecine & Nutrition     Full-text available via subscription  
Media Gizi Indonesia     Open Access  
Metabolism and Nutrition in Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Molecular Nutrition & Food Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
NFS Journal     Open Access  
Nigerian Food Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Nigerian Journal of Nutritional Sciences     Full-text available via subscription  
npj Science of Food     Open Access  
Nutrición Hospitalaria     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Nutrients     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Nutrire     Hybrid Journal  
Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Nutrition & Dietetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Nutrition & Food Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Nutrition & Diabetes     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
Nutrition & Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Nutrition - Science en évolution     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Nutrition and Cancer     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Nutrition and Dietary Supplements     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Nutrition and Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Nutrition and Metabolic Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Nutrition Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Nutrition Bytes     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Nutrition in Clinical Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
Nutrition Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Nutrition Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Nutrition Research Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Nutrition Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
Nutrition Today     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Nutritional Neuroscience : An International Journal on Nutrition, Diet and Nervous System     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Obesity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 58)
Obesity Facts     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Obesity Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Oil Crop Science     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Open Food Science Journal     Open Access  
Open Nutrition Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Open Obesity Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Pakistan Journal of Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Pediatric Obesity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Perspectivas en Nutrición Humana     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
PharmaNutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Plant Foods for Human Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Plant Production Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Proceedings of the Nutrition Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Progress in Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Public Health Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
RBNE - Revista Brasileira de Nutrição Esportiva     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
RBONE - Revista Brasileira de Obesidade, Nutrição e Emagrecimento     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Chilena de Nutricion     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Revista Española de Nutrición Humana y Dietética     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Revista Mexicana de Trastornos Alimentarios     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Salud Pública y Nutrición     Open Access  
Segurança Alimentar e Nutricional     Open Access  
South African Journal of Clinical Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
The Australian Coeliac     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Topics in Clinical Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
UNICIÊNCIAS     Open Access  
Universal Journal of Food and Nutrition Science     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
World Food Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)

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Nutrire
Number of Followers: 0  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Online) 2316-7874
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2467 journals]
  • Dillenia indica fruit extract alleviates sucrose-induced fatty liver and
           improves serum biochemical alterations in mice

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      Abstract: Purpose Dillenia indica (DI) has been reported to possess anti-hyperglycaemic properties along with various other medicinal values. The purpose of the present study is to investigate the effect of aqueous fruit extract of DI on sucrose-induced fatty liver and other serum biochemical alterations in male mice. Methods Swiss albino male mice of 3–4 months of age were used for the experiment. Animals were divided into six different groups; Group 1 served as control and allowed free access to water and food ad libitum. Group II served as positive model group and given 10% sucrose solution in drinking water for 90 days. Group III animals were given maximum dose of DI (500 mg/kg, i.p) as selected for the present study. Group IV, V, and VI were given three different doses of DI fruit extract (50, 250, and 500 mg/kg, i.p) along with 10% sucrose solution as in positive control group for 90 days. After completion of treatment, animals were sacrificed and data were analyzed. Results A significant increase in body weight and relative liver weight along with elevation in serum glucose, ALT, triglyceride (TGL), creatinine, and cholesterol level were observed in animal group provided with 10% sucrose solution. In contrast, groups receiving DI fruit extract with sucrose expressed a significant (P ≤ 0.05) and dose-dependent improvement in the serum biochemical profile and reduced fat accumulation in the liver. Conclusion It can be concluded that, DI fruit extract has beneficial protective action against sucrose induced hyperglycemia and fatty liver in experimental animals.
      PubDate: 2023-01-17
       
  • Monosodium glutamate aggravates lipopolysaccharide-induced liver injury
           via inflammation and oxidative stress in rats

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      Abstract: Purpose Available epidemiological reports have indicated an increase in the incidence of liver damage globally. Monosodium glutamate (MSG) is a widely used food additive in many processed foods which has been associated with tissue injury. However, there is a paucity of information on its effect on hepatic injury. Therefore, the present study examined the possible influence of high intake of MSG on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced liver injury. Methods Twenty-eight healthy male Wistar rats were used for the study. MSG (1500 mg/kg) was administered orally for 14 days while LPS (0.25 mg/kg) was administered intraperitoneally for 7 days. Results Administration of MSG to rats with hepatocyte injury intensified liver damage with a marked increase in the activities of serum aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, and alkaline phosphatase. Moreover, MSG aggravated (P < 0.05) LPS-mediated hepatic oxidative stress as evidenced by a marked decrease in enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants with a concomitant increase in lipid peroxidation. The increase in inflammatory biomarkers, in addition to histological damage in the liver, was aggravated following the administration of MSG to rats with liver injury. Conclusion Taken together, MSG exacerbated liver injury via mechanisms relating to increased oxidative stress and inflammation. Graphical abstract
      PubDate: 2023-01-13
       
  • Assessment and prediction of malnutrition and sarcopenia in liver
           cirrhosis patients

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      Abstract: Background Malnutrition and sarcopenia are prognostic indicators of overall survival in patients and it has a serious effect on the prognosis of people with liver cirrhosis. Malnutrition in decompensated cirrhosis ranges from 60 to 100% while 20–30% patients with compensated cirrhosis are malnourished. Aim The objective of this study was to see how prevalent malnutrition and sarcopenia were among LC patients, at a tertiary hospital in Ludhiana, Punjab, and to look into additional parameters that could be linked to malnutrition using PG-SGA. Methods In this study, 500 adult patients, diagnosed with liver cirrhosis were recruited for assessment and prediction of malnutrition and sarcopenia. PG-SGA was used for malnutrition assessment and sarcopenia was assessed with SARC-F, muscle strength, muscle quality and physical performance tests. Nutritional status and sarcopenia assessment techniques were compared to clinical and demographic data. Results Almost half of the study population was malnourished and having sarcopenia (40–50%). Alcohol was one of the most common cause of liver cirrhosis. Nutritional status was significantly associated with Child Pugh score, GI symptoms. HGS and SMI had median values of 24 kg and 41.0 cm2/m2, respectively. These values were significantly higher in men than in women. Conclusion Malnutrition was prevalent in 40% of the population. Nutrition intervention and patients’ prognosis may be improved if sarcopenia and malnutrition are detected early. Findings of the study suggest that PG-SGA and SARC-F could be used for assessment of malnutrition and sarcopenia in early stages of liver cirrhosis instead of going for CT-based sarcopenia assessment.
      PubDate: 2023-01-13
       
  • Leucine suppresses glucose absorption with concomitant modulation of
           metabolic activities linked to postprandial hyperglycemia in jejunums of
           isolated rats’ small intestines

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      Abstract:   Purpose Postprandial hyperglycemia arising from increased intestinal glucose absorption has been implicated in the pathophysiology of diabetes mellitus. The present study investigated the inhibitory activity of leucine on intestinal glucose absorption and its effect on glucose metabolism, redox imbalance, cholinergic and purinergic homeostasis in jejunums of isolated rats’ small intestines. Methods Isolated jejunum was incubated with different concentrations (30–240 μg/mL) of leucine in the presence of 11.1 mM glucose for 2 h at 37 °C. Negative control consisted of jejunums incubated with only glucose, while incubation with no glucose and/or leucine served as normal control. Acarbose was used as the standard antidiabetic drug. Results Incubation of jejunum with glucose significantly elevated intestinal glucose absorption with concomitant depletion in glutathione level, superoxide dismutase, catalase, and ATPase activities. It also significantly elevated malondialdehyde level, acetylcholinesterase, ENTPDase, glucose-6-phosphatase, fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase, glycogen phosphorylase, and amylase activities. These levels and activities were significantly reversed in jejunums incubated with leucine. In silico studies further revealed potent molecular interaction of leucine with SGLT1 and GLUT2. Conclusion These results indicate that leucine inhibition of intestinal glucose absorption involves mitigation of intestinal oxidative stress and cholinergic dysfunction, with concomitant modulation of intestinal purinergic and glucogenic activities. These suggests leucine to be a potent nutraceutical in the management of postprandial hyperglycemia in diabetics.
      PubDate: 2023-01-10
       
  • Valorization of fruit peel waste for the formulation of low-gluten
           phytonutrient-rich savory snacks

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      Abstract: Purpose Fruit and vegetable-based industry alone generates 25–30% of phytonutrient-rich wastes. This biomass is usually discarded in landfills, which creates health and ecological hazards. Method Considering this, the main objective of the study was to develop a low-glycemic orange peel cake, apple peel cookies, and individual/triple peel laddus (pomegranate, apple, and orange) using maida, brown rice, and finger millet flour, respectively, and to evaluate their sensorial aspects. The quality of the triple peel laddu mix was analyzed through nutrient value, protein digestibility, antioxidant, and antidiabetic property. Results The results showed that the mean score of overall acceptability of the orange peel cake was towards the category of “liked slightly,” while the apple peel cookies and pomegranate peel laddus scored a maximum score of “liked extremely” by selected panelists using 5-point Likert scale. Furthermore, triple peel laddu mix (g−1) showed 5.51% protein, 11.0% fiber, and 74.25 ± 2.06% protein digestibility. Interestingly, triple peel laddu exhibited 82.3 ± 1.07% DPPH radical scavenging activity and 58.4 ± 1.14% alpha-amylase inhibition activity. Furthermore, the shelf life of triple peel laddu mix was retained for 45 days at 4 °C with no observed microbial contamination. Conclusion Conclusively, the utilization of such low-cost fruit peel waste will not only be useful to formulate healthy value-added food products but will also be helpful to manage fruit peel waste.
      PubDate: 2022-12-28
       
  • Neuroprotective effects of Zingiber officinale against lead-induced
           toxicity in Wistar rats

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      Abstract: Purpose This study investigated the protective and antioxidative effect of aqueous root extract of ginger (Zingiber officinale) (AREG) against lead (Pb)-induced neurotoxicity in adult Wistar rats. Methods Twenty (20) adult Wistar rats were randomly divided into four groups (A–D) of five animals each: Group A served as the control group, Group B received 100 mg/kg body weight of Pb only, Group C received 100 mg/kg body weight of AREG pre-treatment 1 h before administration of 100 mg/kg body weight of Pb, and Group D received 100 mg/kg body weight of AREG only. At the end of the experiment, neurobehavioral activity, lipid peroxidation, antioxidant enzymes activity, and histology of the cerebrum and cerebellum were evaluated. Results Rats treated with Pb alone had a significant reduction in final body weight, absolute brain weight, SOD, and CAT activity when compared to control. Similarly, there was a significant reduction in ambulation and rearing episodes as well as a significant increase in immobility and self-grooming activities in rats treated with Pb alone, thus indicating impaired locomotor functions. A significant elevation in lipid peroxidation was also observed. However, pretreatment of rats with AREG attenuated the effects induced by Pb. Conclusion Based on the results, AREG is a promising neuroprotective agent for preventing Pb-induced impairment of locomotor functions and dysregulation of antioxidant enzymes activity. It could be a viable alternative to other synthetic medicines utilized in the attenuation of Pb-induced toxicity.
      PubDate: 2022-12-28
       
  • Dryopteris dilatata leaf extract ameliorates streptozotocin-induced
           diabetic nephropathy in male Wistar rat

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      Abstract: Background Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is a serious consequence of diabetes mellitus (DM), and it is linked to higher morbidity and mortality in diabetic patients. The quest for cheap therapeutic strategy with lesser side effects remains a major health concern. However, Dryopteris dilatata is a commonly found flavonoid-rich plant with plethora of therapeutic potentials. This study investigated the effect of methanol extract of D. dilatata (MEDd) on streptozotocin-induced diabetic nephropathy in male Wistar rat. Methods Animals were randomly selected into five groups (n = 5) and were treated as follows; group 1 received distilled water (10 mL/kg), group 2 received only STZ (60 mg/kg), groups 3 and 4 received STZ then 400 and 800 mg/kg of MEDd, respectively, while group 5 received STZ then pioglitazone (10 mg/kg). Following 14 days of treatment, animals were euthanized, and blood as well as pancreas and kidney tissues were collected for further studies. Results Our results revealed that MEDd significantly reduced STZ-induced hyperglycemia in diabetic rats. Markers of oxidative injury (MDA, nitrite, and GSH) were also significantly ameliorated in the pancreas and kidney of the diabetic rats following treatment with MEDd. However, renal function markers (creatinine and urea) were significantly attenuated with marked decreased in organ weight in the diabetic rats after treatment with MEDd. Also, serum insulin and corticosterone levels were restored following MEDd treatment. Conclusion Methanol extract of D. dilatata demonstrated anti-diabetogenic and reno-protective potential by enhancing in vivo reno-pancreatic antioxidant defense system.
      PubDate: 2022-12-28
       
  • Comparative studies of yoghurt produced from animal and selected imitation
           vegetable milk

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      Abstract: Abstract In this study, the possibility of producing yoghurt from both plant and animal sources was explored. Hence, a comparative study was carried out on the yoghurt samples that were produced from cow milk (CM), oat flakes (OM), and African yam beans (Sphenostylis stenocarpa) (AYB). The physicochemical and organoleptic properties, as well as the microbial stability of the yoghurt samples, were analyzed using standard methods. The proximate compositions (moisture, fat, protein, fibre, ash, and carbohydrate) of the samples were 85.50–86.45, 0.25–2.95, 5.42–6.10, 0.09–1.18, 0.94–0.88, and 3.56–7.43%, respectively. Meanwhile, their total solids ranged between 13.55 and 14.50 for the three yoghurt samples CM, OM, and AYB, respectively. The proximate results showed that all the chemical compositions, except their ash content, significantly (p < 0.05) differed in all the three samples. The ranges of the total viable bacteria count of the sample CM, OM, and AYB were 1.58–3.0 × 109, 1.95–4.0 × 108, and 5.50–1.1 × 109 cfu/mL during the 14 days of refrigeration storage, respectively. A decrease in the count was noticed on the third day thereby leading to the deterioration of the yoghurt samples and reduction in the composition with storage. The sensory evaluation results showed no significant differences (p ≤ 0.05) in the aroma, taste, and overall acceptability of the three yoghurt samples. This work has shown the potential of vegetable milk as an alternative source of milk. It is interesting to note that this plant-based yoghurt has longer shelf life and higher fiber content with improved compositional values and consumer’s acceptability than the animal-based yoghurt.
      PubDate: 2022-12-13
       
  • Glycemic response of volunteers to the consumption of supplements and food
           formulas for oral and/or enteral nutrition

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      Abstract: Purpose The objective of this study was to determine the glycemic index (GI) and glycemic load (GL) of three products from the Brazilian market used as a supplement and food formula for oral and/or enteral nutrition. Methods The volunteers (n = 16) attended Food Research Center weekly for six weeks after a 10–12-h overnight fasting. Blood was sampled in the fasting state (t = 0) and at 15 min, 30 min, 45 min, 60 min, 90 min, and 120 min after starting to eat each evaluated meal: glucose solution (reference food, three times) and three products: Cubitan® vanilla (specific for wounds healing), Diasip® chocolate, and Diasip® vanilla (diabetic supplements). GI was determined by calculating the area under the glycemic response curve using the trapezoidal rule and ignoring the areas below the fasting line and considering the GI of glucose to be 100. To determine GL, it was considered the amount of carbohydrates available in a standard serving of the product and GI. Results The three products studied showed low GI and low GL (Cubitan® GI = 35, GL = 6; Diasip® chocolate GI = 49, GL = 7; Diasip® vanilla GI = 47, GL = 7), with significant differences from those and the reference food, but no significant difference between them. Similar results were also observed for the blood glucose peak, which occurred 30 min after the consumption of all products. Conclusions GI and GL of the products were considerably lower than those of the reference food. The products evaluated presented a low glycemic response, shown by a glycemic response curve with a slightly accentuated shape and no high peaks.
      PubDate: 2022-11-21
      DOI: 10.1186/s41110-022-00182-8
       
  • Possible mechanisms involved in the prevention and reversal of
           chlorpromazine-induced testicular damage by taurine and coenzyme-Q10 in
           rats

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      Abstract: Objective Oxidative and nitrergic aberrations have important consequences in reproductive organs. Previous research has shown that long-term use of chlorpromazine (CPZ) causes reproductive problems by causing oxidative and nitrergic stress in the testes. The impacts of taurine (TAU) and co-enzyme Q-10 (COQ-10) alone, or combination of both treatments, in the prevention and reversal of CPZ-mediated testicular oxidative and nitrergic damages in male Wister rats were investigated in this study. Ten milligrams per kilogram of oral saline, 150 mg/kg of TAU and 10 mg/kg of COQ-10, or combination of both drugs (TAU + COQ-10) were given to animals for the period of 56 days, or in combination with CPZ (30 mg/kg) treatment from days 29 to 56 in the drug alone or preventive-treatment groups. In the reversal treatment pattern, the animals were given CPZ or saline for 56 days before administration of TAU, COQ-10, or the combination from days 29 to 56. The serum and testes were then tested for protein, enzymatic, non-enzymatic levels, and biomarkers of oxidative and nitrergic stress. The testes’ histopathologic features were also examined. Results The superoxide-dismutase and catalase activities were increased when TAU and COQ-10 were supplemented separately or in their combined treatment. In the testis of naive and CPZ-treated rats, both drugs increased glutathione, glutathione-peroxidase, peroxiredoxin-4, sulphydryl, L-carnitine, and protein levels. In both preventive and reversal studies, TAU and COQ-10 reduced CPZ-induced elevated levels of hydrogen peroxide, protein carbonyl, malondialdehyde, nitrite, and peroxynitrite in the testes of rats. In addition, taurine and COQ-10 protected and reversed testicular histomorphological damage caused by chlorpromazine. Conclusions By increasing testicular enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants, inhibiting reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, and protecting testicular tissues, TAU and COQ-10 together prevented and reversed CPZ-mediated testicular oxidative and nitrergic stresses.
      PubDate: 2022-11-03
      DOI: 10.1186/s41110-022-00180-w
       
  • Erythrocyte membrane integrity and protein activity in high-fat diet fed
           male Wistar rats

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      Abstract:    Purpose High-fat diet (HFD) has been reported to induce systemic inflammation and oxidative stress that may affect the structural integrity of erythrocytes and alter their ability to undergo deformation. This study was therefore designed to investigate the effect of HFD feeding on erythrocyte membrane integrity and protein activity in male Wistar rats. Methods Ten animals (100–120 g) were grouped equally and exposed to either standard diet or HFD (25% fat) for 42 days. Thereafter, retro-orbital sinus blood was collected under anesthesia (thiopental), and aliquots were analyzed for erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), osmotic fragility, and mean corpuscular fragility. Erythrocyte ghost membranes were also isolated from blood sample aliquots and analyzed for total protein concentration, malondialdehyde (MDA), Na+K+-ATPase activity, Ca2+Mg2+-ATPase activity, and intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-4 level. Results Osmotic fragility and mean corpuscular fragility were significantly increased (P < 0.05) in the HFD-fed group compared to control. ESR (mm/h) (64.60 ± 2.34 vs. 21.20 ± 1.53), membrane MDA (µMol) (3.66 ± 0.86 vs. 0.43 ± 0.08), and ICAM-4 (ng/ml) (1.68 ± 0.23 vs. 0.49 ± 0.16) levels were also increased (P < 0.05) in the group 2 (HFD) compared to group 1 (standard diet). Compared to standard diet group, erythrocyte membrane total protein concentration (10.46 ± 0.96 vs 6.00 ± 0.38 g/dl) and Na+K+ATPase activity (1.37 ± 0.22 vs 0.22 ± 0.03 × 107 µmol pi/mg protein/h) was reduced (P < 0.05) in the HFD group, while Ca2+Mg2+-ATPase exhibited a 27.9% increase in activity. Conclusion This study suggests that HFD may compromise the structural and functional integrity of erythrocytes by activating systemic inflammation, erythrocyte membrane, and protein oxidation as well as dysregulated membrane ATPase activity required to maintain erythrocyte deformability in male Wistar rat.
      PubDate: 2022-11-02
      DOI: 10.1186/s41110-022-00181-9
       
  • Alkaloid extract of Lannea egregia leaf inhibits carbohydrate digestive
           enzymes and modulates gluconeogenic and nucleotide-hydrolyzing enzyme
           activities in oxidative isolated psoas muscles injury

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      Abstract:   Background Lannea egregia leaf has been reported to be effective in the management/treatment of different ailments. Objectives Antioxidant and modulatory effect of alkaloid-rich extract of Lannea egregia leaf (AELE) on gluconeogenic and nucleotide-hydrolyzing enzyme activities in isolated psoas muscles (ex vivo) were investigated. Methods Five male albino rats were used, psoas muscles were harvested, and were induced via 0.1 mM FeSO4 (ex vivo). Treatment was done via various concentrations of AELE. Hence, oxidative stress biomarkers, cholinergic, purinergic, and some carbohydrate-metabolizing enzyme activities of the AELE were determined. Results The in vitro results revealed AELE has a strong inhibitory ability against α-amylase and α-glucosidase. However, treatment of psoas muscles incubated with FeSO4 with various concentrations of AELE significantly enhanced the antioxidant, E-NTPDase, PDE-5 activities as well as glycogen levels. In addition, AELE significantly decreased lipid peroxidation level, cholinergic, ATPase, and all carbohydrate metabolism enzymes studied as well as lipase activities. Conclusion Therefore, the obtained results suggest the therapeutic potential of AELE leaf as a possible anti-diabetic agent.
      PubDate: 2022-10-17
      DOI: 10.1186/s41110-022-00179-3
       
  • Moringa oleifera–supplemented diet maintains gastric and brain tissue
           structural integrity, hematopoietic system, and neurobehavior in Wistar
           Rats

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      Abstract: Background Moringa oleifera has been studied to possess numerous phytochemicals. However, the combined effect of supplementation with Moringa oleifera diet on brain and gastric tissue maintenance and the hematopoietic system is lacking. In addition, food supplementation with vegetable rich in antioxidants has been found to reduce inflammation in the body by boosting the body’s endogenous antioxidant system. However, the impact of Moringa oleifera–supplemented diet on the gastric tissues and cells, brain tissues, hematological changes, and possible locomotor and anxiolytic-like effect was investigated in this study. Methods Three phases containing 5 groups with 6 rats per group were examined after repeated administration of different percentages (1%, 5%, 10%, and 20%) of Moringa oleifera–supplemented for 7, 14, and 28 days. The stomach and brain tissue (hippocampus, striatum, and cerebral cortex) histology, parietal and mucus cell count, hematological changes, and locomotor and anxiety-like assessment were evaluated. Results The weight difference across the phases did not show any significant effect. Locomotor and exploration increase significantly (P < 0.05; M1, M5, M10, M20) while anxiety-like behavior reduce significantly (P < 0.05; M5, M10, M20) in all phases. Hematology shows significant (P < 0.05; M20) decreased WBC after 14 days. RBC, PVC, HB, and platelet significantly increase (P < 0.05; M1, M5, M10, M20) after 7, 14, and 28 days at different percentage concentrations. Parietal cells decrease significantly (P < 0.05; M20) in the gastric gland after 7 and 14 days and (P < 0.05; M1, M5, M10, M20) after 28 days. After 7 days, mucus cell expression and mucin production significantly increased (P < 0.05; M5, M20) but following 14 and 28 days, significantly (P < 0.05; M1, M5, M10, M20) decreased mucus cell expression was observed. Histological assessment of the stomach shows moderately sloughed mucosa epithelial cell layer and intracellular mucin production while the hippocampus, striatum, and cerebral cortex reveal no pathological lesion in all the phases. Conclusion Moringa oleifera–supplemented diet increases locomotor and improves hematological indices and gastric cells and histoarchitecture of the brain tissues in the rats.
      PubDate: 2022-10-10
      DOI: 10.1186/s41110-022-00174-8
       
  • Pro-inflammatory diet index is negatively associated with physical
           performance in postmenopausal women: a cross-sectional study

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      Abstract: Purpose To investigate whether a high dietary inflammatory index (DII) is associated with lower physical performance in postmenopausal women (PW). Methods A cross-sectional study, evaluating 113 postmenopausal women (± 60 years old) was performed. Volunteers were divided based on the inflammatory potential of the diet (pro-inflammatory or anti-inflammatory diet). Physical performance was assessed by the 10-m fast (10MWT) and 4-m usual (4MWT) walking speed tests. The maximum voluntary isometric contraction (CIVM) of the lower limbs, body mass index (BMI), and body composition were also assessed. The generalized linear model was used to evaluate the relationship between the DII (pro-inflammatory score) and walking speed. Results From the 113 postmenopausal women assessed, 83 were classified as having with a pro-inflammatory diet. A lower walking speed, 4MWT (p < 0.015) and 10MWT (p < 0.020), and higher intakes of energy (p < 0.001), carbohydrate (p < 0.001), and lipids (< 0.001) were observed in the PW with a pro-inflammatory score when compared to the anti-inflammatory score. The pro-inflammatory score was positively associated with the time to perform 4MWT (B 0.217; SE 0.096; p < 0.024) and 10MWT (B 0.365; SE 0.171; p < 0.030); regardless of age, weight, HRT, abdominal fat, muscle strength, and use of medicines. Conclusion. A diet with a high DII is associated with a lower walking speed in PW. Future randomized clinical trials should evaluate whether the improvement in DII towards an anti-inflammatory score can increase the physical performance in postmenopausal women.
      PubDate: 2022-10-06
      DOI: 10.1186/s41110-022-00178-4
       
  • Carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic risk assessment of lead in traditional
           and industrial canned black olives from Iran

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      Abstract: Purpose Olive is one of the oldest foods used by humans. The black olives are richer in flavonoids content. The present study aimed to determine the lead contents in industrial and traditional canned black olive (CBO) in different parts of Iran (North, West, and South) and calculation of dietary risk of lead. Methods Lead contamination in industrial samples (A) and traditional canned olive samples from different regions (B, C, and D) was analyzed by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). The risk of dietary exposure to lead was also determined by method proposed by WHO (World Health Organization), US Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA), and Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (JECFA). Results The average concentration of lead was 0.26 mg/kg for industrial samples. The lead content in traditional samples was significantly higher than industrial samples (p < 0.05). The estimated weekly intakes of both types of canned olive did not exceed the provisional tolerable weekly intake (PTWI). The hazard quotient (HQ) was less than 1 for industrial and traditional canned olives. The results also show that the carcinogenic risks for olives from regions A, C, and D were lower than the 1 × 10−6 and did not pose a significant hazard for adults. While the samples of region B were higher than 10−6 and lower than 10−4 and so is acceptable for adults, whereas for children, ELCR values of some traditional samples (regions B and C) were higher than 1E-4 and pose carcinogenic risk. Conclusion The levels of lead were significantly different between traditional and industrial CBO samples. Collectively, industrial canned olive consumption in Iranian (both adults and children) diet does not pose a risk regarding lead.
      PubDate: 2022-10-05
      DOI: 10.1186/s41110-022-00172-w
       
  • The use of exclusive enteral nutritional therapy in children and
           adolescents with active Crohn’s disease: an integrative review

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      Abstract: Purpose Crohn’s disease (CD) consists of a state of chronic inflammation that can affect the entire length of the gastrointestinal tract, from the mouth to the anus. Symptoms include diarrhea, abdominal pain, and fever. Corticosteroid therapy has been widely used as the main therapeutic option to induce clinical remission and minimize the deleterious effects of inflammation. However, patients who make continuous use of corticosteroids are likely to develop Cushing’s syndrome. Exclusive enteral nutrition (EEN) is considered the first-line treatment for inducing clinical remission in children and adolescents with active Crohn’s disease. This study aimed to evaluate the use of EEN in inducing remission of CD in children and adolescents and discuss the impact of the EEN on patients’ growth, clinical and endoscopic remission, nutritional aspects, differences between formulas, and the impact on the gut microbiota. Methods This is a narrative review. A search for scientific articles was carried out in the PUBMED database, the SciELO electronic library, and the LILACS databases. Results Five randomized clinical trials, 7 non-randomized clinical trials, and 5 retrospective studies with document analysis were included. In total, the studies covered 660 children and adolescents, with different degrees of initial CD activity. All 17 articles evaluated had, as a common result, a success of EEN to induce remission of active Crohn’s disease. Conclusion EEN is an effective therapy for inducing clinical remission in pediatric patients with active CD, and it is associated with an improvement in the quality of life in this population.
      PubDate: 2022-10-05
      DOI: 10.1186/s41110-022-00177-5
       
  • The effects of chronic nanoselenium treatment on sciatic nerve injury:
           behavioral and biochemical responses

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      Abstract: Background Nanoselenium as a free radical scavenger suggested being a neuroprotective agent in some neuronal diseases. As the neuropathic pain could be a consequence of a defect in antioxidant defenses and changes in oxidative stress parameters, the present study was planned to investigate the effect of nanoselenium particles on pain-related behaviors and spinal antioxidant defense parameters in the sciatic nerve injury model. Methods Adult male albino Wistar rats (n = 32) were randomly allocated to the four experimental groups: control group, neuropathy group with chronic constriction injury of the sciatic nerve (CCI), CCI + nanoselenium, CCI + vehicle. The CCI model was used to create neuropathic pain-related symptoms. Nanoselenium or vehicle was injected intraperitoneally for 14 days. The behavioral evaluation was carried out to assess the pain threshold by the radiant heat and von Frey tests. Malondialdehyde (MAD), superoxide dismutase (SOD) levels, and catalase activity in the spinal cord were evaluated to investigate the possible relation. Results Our data displayed that CCI triggered neuropathic pain-related behaviors in rats. Chronic treatment with nanoselenium meaningfully improved pain threshold (P < 0.001; F = 37.86, F = 29. 82) and decreased the level of MDA (P < 0.01; F = 33.16) and increased the SOD level (P < 0.001; F = 13.43) and catalase activity (P < 0. 05; F = 10.17) in the spinal cord of CCI rats. Conclusion Chronic nanoselenium treatment can improve pain-related behavior and is associated with a reduction in MDA level and increasing in SOD level and catalase activity in the spinal cord of the CCI rats. Nanoselenium provides a therapeutic alternative for the treatment of neuropathic pain by alteration in lipid peroxidation and antioxidant defense system factors.
      PubDate: 2022-09-06
      DOI: 10.1186/s41110-022-00176-6
       
  • Solanum dasyphyllum leaf extract reduces inflammation in
           carrageenan-induced air pouch in rats by inhibition of cyclooxygenase-2
           and inducible nitric oxide synthase

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      Abstract: Purpose Solanum dasyphyllum Schumach. & Thonn leaf is a vegetable used in folkloric medicine to alleviate pain, fever-related illnesses and inflammatory arthritis. This study was designed to evaluate the mechanism of anti-inflammatory activity of the ethylacetate fraction of methanol extract of S. dasyphyllum (SdEAF) in carrageenan-induced air pouch in rats. Methods The anti-inflammatory activity of SdEAF was investigated in carrageenan-induced air pouch. Pouch exudates volume, neutrophil counts, protein, nitrites, TNF-α, malondialdehyde and reduced glutathione (GSH) levels were determined. Cyclooxygenase-2 and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expressions were also determined. The fingerprint of SdEAF was obtained using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Results The SdEAF significantly reduced exudates volume after 24 h and 72 h of intrapouch carrageenan injection. The SdEAF also significantly reduced exudates neutrophil counts, protein, nitrites, TNF-α and malondialdehyde while GSH was increased. The SdEAF reduced expressions of cyclooxygenase-2 and iNOS in carrageenan pouch tissues. The fingerprint of SdEAF revealed caffeic acid, rutin and quercetin relative to standard compounds. Conclusion Ethylacetate fraction of methanol extract of S. dasyphyllum leaves exhibited anti-inflammatory activities mediated through inhibition of neutrophil recruitment, tumor necrosis factor release and cyclooxygenase-2 up regulation.
      PubDate: 2022-09-06
      DOI: 10.1186/s41110-022-00175-7
       
  • Correction to: Prevalence and determinants of double burden of
           malnutrition in Bangladesh: evidence from a nationwide cross‑sectional
           survey

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      PubDate: 2022-08-30
      DOI: 10.1186/s41110-021-00148-2
       
  • The relationship between grip strength with health-related quality of life
           and mortality in hemodialysis patients

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      Abstract: Purpose Hemodialysis (HD) is a therapeutic modality that enables the highest survival for individuals with chronic kidney disease (CKD). In contrast, HD contributes to the pro-inflammatory state and may negatively affect the muscle strength and quality of life (QoL) of these individuals. To date, few studies have evaluated the association between decrease in strength and QoL in HD patients. Thus, our objective was to assess whether diminished muscle strength is associated with worse health related QoL and mortality. Methods We included patients aged ≥ 18 years on HD. Clinical and demographic data were collected from patients’ medical records. Clinical data, nutritional status (laboratory, anthropometry, bioimpedance analysis) and health-related QoL (World Health Organization’s quality of life questionnaire, WHOQOL-Bref) were analyzed at baseline. Mortality was recorded for 32 months. Results Among the 105 patients evaluated, the median age was 52 (43–64) years, and males were predominant (n = 73; 70%). The general median of QoL was 66.8 ± 11.9. Approximately 30% of patients were considered to have a worse QoL and 12,4% to have low muscle strength. This was not associated with QoL and mortality. HD vintage greater then to 5 years was associated with higher dissatisfaction in the perception of the environmental domain and overall QoL. Conclusion Our data suggest that low muscle strength was not associated with health-related QoL using the WHOQOL-Bref instrument and mortality.
      PubDate: 2022-08-29
      DOI: 10.1186/s41110-022-00171-x
       
 
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