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  Subjects -> NUTRITION AND DIETETICS (Total: 201 journals)
Showing 1 - 64 of 64 Journals sorted by number of followers
American Journal of Clinical Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 176)
British Journal Of Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 96)
Clinical Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 94)
International Journal of Obesity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 93)
International Journal of Sport Nutrition & Exercise Metabolism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 88)
European Journal of Clinical Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 75)
Advances in Food and Nutrition Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 62)
Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 61)
Food Science & Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 59)
Obesity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 58)
Advances in Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 55)
Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 52)
Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition (JPGN)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 52)
Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 52)
Diabetes, Metabolic Syndrome and Obesity     Open Access   (Followers: 48)
American Journal of Food and Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 48)
Nutrition in Clinical Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
Journal of Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42)
Annual Review of Nutrition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 40)
Nutrition Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
European Journal of Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
Food & Nutrition Research     Open Access   (Followers: 35)
Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity     Open Access   (Followers: 31)
Nutrition & Dietetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Public Health Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Journal of Nutrition, Health and Aging     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Journal of Renal Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Current Opinion in Clinical Nutrition & Metabolic Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Eating and Weight Disorders - Studies on Anorexia, Bulimia and Obesity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Appetite     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Obesity Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Current Nutrition & Food Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Journal of Obesity     Open Access   (Followers: 24)
Childhood Obesity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
International Journal of Nutrition and Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 23)
International Journal of Eating Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Nutrition Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Clinical Nutrition ESPEN     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Advances in Eating Disorders : Theory, Research and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Comparative Exercise Physiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Nutrition & Diabetes     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
International Journal of Food Safety, Nutrition and Public Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Topics in Clinical Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Clinical Obesity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
American Journal of Botany     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Canadian Journal of Dietetic Practice and Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Nutrition & Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
African Journal of Food, Agriculture, Nutrition and Development     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Journal of Nutrition and Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Advanced Nutrition and Human Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Nutrition and Dietary Supplements     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Eating Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Nutrition in Gerontology and Geriatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Maternal & Child Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Nutrition Today     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Nutrition Research Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Nutrition and Cancer     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Food, Culture and Society: An International Journal of Multidisciplinary Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
BMC Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Annual Review of Food Science and Technology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Nutrients     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Health, Population and Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Clinical Nutrition Insight     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Nutrition Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
BMJ Nutrition, Prevention & Health     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Asian Journal of Clinical Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Food and Foodways: Explorations in the History and Culture of     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Advances in Digestive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
International Journal of Food Sciences and Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Nutrition Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Frontiers in Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Ecology of Food and Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
International Journal for Vitamin and Nutrition Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Food and Nutrition Research     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Dietary Supplements     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
American Journal of Food Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Pediatric Obesity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Nutritional Neuroscience : An International Journal on Nutrition, Diet and Nervous System     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Obesity Facts     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Nutrition & Food Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Proceedings of the Nutrition Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Current Nutrition Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Amino Acids     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Nutrition and Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Hunger & Environmental Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of the American College of Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Current Developments in Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Food Chemistry and Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Food Science and Nutrition Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Molecular Nutrition & Food Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Child Health and Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Current Research in Nutrition and Food Science     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Food and Nutrition Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Nutrition - Science en évolution     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Nutrition Bytes     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Food Digestion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
South African Journal of Clinical Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Bangladesh Journal of Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Plant Foods for Human Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Genes & Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Pharmacy and Nutrition Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Universal Journal of Food and Nutrition Science     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Nutrition and Metabolic Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Metabolism and Nutrition in Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Medical Nutrition and Nutraceuticals     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Nutrition, Pharmacology, Neurological Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
World Food Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Agriculture, Food Systems, and Community Development     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Frontiers in Sustainable Food Systems     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Aktuelle Ernährungsmedizin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Nutrición Hospitalaria     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
PharmaNutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Revista Española de Nutrición Humana y Dietética     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Ernährung & Medizin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Perspectivas en Nutrición Humana     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Pakistan Journal of Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Oil Crop Science     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Acta Portuguesa de Nutrição     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Open Nutrition Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Spices and Aromatic Crops     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Food Quality and Safety     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Nutritional & Environmental Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Progress in Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Endocrinología, Diabetes y Nutrición (English Edition)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Revista Chilena de Nutricion     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Renal Nutrition and Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, Transplant and Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Bioactive Carbohydrates and Dietary Fibre     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Nigerian Food Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Lifestyle Genomics     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Nutritional Science     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Food and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
The Australian Coeliac     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Endocrinología, Diabetes y Nutrición     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Amerta Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Archive of Food and Nutritional Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Open Obesity Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Food and Environmental Virology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Case Reports in Clinical Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
European Journal of Nutrition & Food Safety     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Food Science and Nutrition Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Human Nutrition & Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Food Frontiers     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Food & Nutritional Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Plant Production Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian Journal of Obesity, Diabetes and Endocrinology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Jurnal Penelitian Gizi dan Makanan     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Ethnic Foods     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Clinical Nutrition Experimental     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
RBONE - Revista Brasileira de Obesidade, Nutrição e Emagrecimento     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cahiers de Nutrition et de Diététique     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Indian Journal of Nutrition and Dietetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Canadian Food Studies / La Revue canadienne des études sur l'alimentation     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Mexicana de Trastornos Alimentarios     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
RBNE - Revista Brasileira de Nutrição Esportiva     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Jurnal Gizi dan Dietetik Indonesia : Indonesian Journal of Nutrition and Dietetics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Clinical Nutrition Open Science     Open Access  
Food Hydrocolloids for Health     Open Access  
npj Science of Food     Open Access  
Functional Foods in Health and Disease     Open Access  
Journal of Nutraceuticals and Herbal Medicine     Open Access  
Arab Journal of Nutrition and Exercise     Open Access  
Nutrire     Hybrid Journal  
UNICIÊNCIAS     Open Access  
Lifestyle Journal     Open Access  
Archivos Latinoamericanos de Nutrición     Open Access  
Revista Salud Pública y Nutrición     Open Access  
Open Food Science Journal     Open Access  
Segurança Alimentar e Nutricional     Open Access  
Indonesian Food and Nutrition Progress     Open Access  
Journal of Medicinal Herbs and Ethnomedicine     Open Access  
La Ciencia al Servicio de la Salud y Nutrición     Open Access  
Jurnal Riset Kesehatan     Open Access  
Jurnal Gizi Indonesia / The Indonesian Journal of Nutrition     Open Access  
Hacettepe University Faculty of Health Sciences Journal     Open Access  
Gazi Sağlık Bilimleri Dergisi     Open Access  
Media Gizi Indonesia     Open Access  
Jurnal Gizi Klinik Indonesia     Open Access  
NFS Journal     Open Access  
Journal of Nutrition & Intermediary Metabolism     Open Access  
Food and Waterborne Parasitology     Open Access  
Journal of Nutritional Ecology and Food Research     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Nutritional Disorders & Therapy     Open Access  
DEMETRA : Alimentação, Nutrição & Saúde     Open Access  
Nigerian Journal of Nutritional Sciences     Full-text available via subscription  
African Journal of Biomedical Research     Open Access  
Journal of the Australasian College of Nutritional and Environmental Medicine     Full-text available via subscription  
Médecine & Nutrition     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Sensory Studies     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Muscle Foods     Hybrid Journal  

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European Journal of Nutrition
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.408
Citation Impact (citeScore): 3
Number of Followers: 36  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1436-6215 - ISSN (Online) 1436-6207
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2467 journals]
  • Choline supplementation for preterm infants: metabolism of four
           Deuterium-labeled choline compounds

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      Abstract: Background Supply of choline is not guaranteed in current preterm infant nutrition. Choline serves in parenchyma formation by membrane phosphatidylcholine (PC), plasma transport of poly-unsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) via PC, and methylation processes via betaine. PUFA-PC concentrations are high in brain, liver and lung, and deficiency may result in developmental disorders. We compared different deuterated (D9-) choline components for kinetics of D9-choline, D9-betaine and D9-PC. Methods Prospective study (1/2021–12/2021) in 32 enterally fed preterm infants (28 0/7–32 0/7 weeks gestation). Patients were randomized to receive enterally a single dose of 2.7 mg/kg D9-choline-equivalent as D9-choline chloride, D9-phosphoryl-choline, D9-glycerophosphorylcholine (D9-GPC) or D9-1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-PC(D9-POPC), followed by blood sampling at 1 + 24 h or 12 + 60 h after administration. Plasma concentrations were analyzed by tandem mass spectrometry. Results are expressed as median (25th/75th percentile). Results At 1 h, plasma D9-choline was 1.8 (0.9/2.2) µmol/L, 1.3 (0.9/1.5) µmol/L and 1.2 (0.7/1.4) µmol/L for D9-choline chloride, D9-GPC and D9-phosphoryl-choline, respectively. D9-POPC did not result in plasma D9-choline. Plasma D9-betaine was maximal at 12 h, with lowest concentrations after D9-POPC. Maximum plasma D9-PC values at 12 h were the highest after D9-POPC (14.4 (9.1/18.9) µmol/L), compared to the other components (D9-choline chloride: 8.1 [5.6/9.9] µmol/L; D9-GPC: 8.4 (6.2/10.3) µmol/L; D9-phosphoryl-choline: 9.8 (8.6/14.5) µmol/L). Predominance of D9-PC comprising linoleic, rather than oleic acid, indicated fatty-acyl remodeling of administered D9-POPC prior to systemic delivery. Conclusion D9-Choline chloride, D9-GPC and D9-phosphoryl-choline equally increased plasma D9-choline and D9-betaine. D9-POPC shifted metabolism from D9-betaine to D9-PC. Combined supplementation of GPC and (PO) PC may be best suited to optimize choline supply in preterm infants. Due to fatty acid remodeling of (PO) PC during its assimilation, PUFA co-supplementation with (PO) PC may increase PUFA-delivery to critical organs. This study was registered (22.01.2020) at the Deutsches Register Klinischer Studien (DRKS) (German Register for Clinical Studies), DRKS00020502. Study registration This study was registered at the Deutsches Register Klinischer Studien (DRKS) (German Register for Clinical Studies), DRKS00020502.
      PubDate: 2022-12-03
       
  • Impact of energy density on energy intake in children and adults: a
           systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

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      Abstract: Purpose The energy density (ED) of a diet can be leveraged to prevent weight gain or treat overweight and obesity. By lowering the ED of the diet, energy intake can be reduced while maintaining portion size. However, a reliable meta-analysis of data from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) is missing. Therefore, this meta-analysis synthesized the evidence of ED manipulation on energy intake in RCTs. Methods The systematic literature search of multiple databases according to PRISMA criteria considered RCTs investigating the objectively measured energy intake from meals with different ED (lower ED (median 1.1 kcal/g) versus higher ED (median 1.5 kcal/g)) under controlled conditions. Subgroup analyses for age (children versus adults), meal type (preload versus entrée design), and intervention length (1 meal versus > 1 meal) were performed to achieve the most homogeneous result. Results The meta-analysis of 38 included studies demonstrated that lowering ED considerably reduced energy intake – 223 kcal (95% CI: – 259.7, – 186.0) in comparison to the higher ED interventions. As heterogeneity was high among studies, subgroup analyses were conducted. Heterogeneity decreased in subgroup analyses for age and meal type combined, strengthening the results. An extended analysis showed a positive linear relationship between ED and energy intake. Dietary ED did not affect the amount of food intake. Conclusion Manipulating ED substantially affects energy intake whereas food intake remains constant. Thus, this approach can be regarded as a powerful tool for weight management through nutrition therapy. Registration on 08/08/2021: CRD42021266653.
      PubDate: 2022-12-02
       
  • Adipocytokine plasma level changes in a 24-month dietary and physical
           activity randomised intervention trial in postmenopausal women

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      Abstract: Background Adipocytokines are signaling molecules secreted by adipose tissue contributing to the control of body fat, energy expenditure and secretion of insulin and cytokines. They have been related to the development of obesity, type-2 diabetes, cardiovascular diseases and cancer. Diet and physical activity (PA) may have beneficial effects on their level. We evaluated the effects of a 24-month dietary and/or PA intervention on plasma levels of adipocytokines as a secondary analysis in the DAMA (Diet, physical Activity and Mammography) trial. Methods The 234 study participants (healthy postmenopausal women with high breast density, 50–69 years, non-smokers, no hormone therapy) were randomised to four arms: (1) isocaloric dietary intervention mainly based on plant-foods; (2) moderate-intensity PA intervention with at least 1 h/week of supervised strenuous activity; (3) both interventions; (4) general recommendations on healthy dietary and PA patterns. Leptin, resistin and adiponectin were measured at baseline and at the end of the intervention. Analyses were performed using Tobit regression. Results After 24 months, women randomised to PA intervention (arms #2 + #3) showed significant lower level of leptin (37.5% lower) and resistin (65.6% lower) compared to the control group (arms #1 + #4). No significant differences emerged in adiponectin levels. No significant differences in leptin, resistin and adiponectin levels at follow-up emerged in women randomised to the dietary intervention (arms #1 + #3) in comparison with controls (arms #2 + #4). Conclusion This study supports the effectiveness of PA, even at moderate intensity, in improving the leptin and resistin profile in postmenopausal women. Trial registration number: ISRCTN28492718, date of trial registration 17/05/2012.
      PubDate: 2022-12-01
       
  • Retraction Note to: The efficacy of early iron supplementation on
           postpartum depression, a randomized double‑blind placebo‑controlled
           trial

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      PubDate: 2022-12-01
       
  • Comment to “Recommendation on an updated standardization of serum
           magnesium reference ranges”

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      PubDate: 2022-12-01
       
  • Effect of curcumin supplementation on exercise-induced muscle damage: a
           narrative review

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      Abstract: Abstract Curcumin, a natural polyphenol extracted from turmeric, is a potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory agent. In the past few decades, curcumin’s ability to impact chronic inflammatory conditions such as metabolic syndrome, arthritis, and cancer has been widely researched, along with growing interest in understanding its role in exercise-induced muscle damage (EIMD). EIMD impacts individuals differently depending on the type (resistance exercise, high-intensity interval training, and running), intensity, and duration of the exercise. Exercise disrupts the muscles’ ultrastructure, raises inflammatory cytokine levels, and can cause swelling in the affected limb, a reduction in range of motion (ROM), and a reduction in muscular force-producing capacity. This review focuses on the metabolism, pharmacokinetics of various brands of curcumin supplements, and the effect of curcumin supplementation on EIMD regarding muscle soreness, activity of creatine kinase (CK), and production of inflammatory markers. Curcumin supplementation in the dose range of 90–5000 mg/day can decrease the subjective perception of muscle pain intensity, increase antioxidant capacity, and reduce CK activity, which reduces muscle damage when consumed close to exercise. Consumption of curcumin also improves muscle performance and has an anti-inflammatory effect, downregulating the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, including TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-8. Curcumin may also improve oxidative capacity without hampering training adaptations in untrained and recreationally active individuals. The optimal curcumin dose to ameliorate EIMD is challenging to assess as its effect depends on the curcumin concentration in the supplement and its bioavailability.
      PubDate: 2022-12-01
       
  • Adequacy of calcium and vitamin D nutritional status in a nationally
           representative sample of Irish teenagers aged 13–18 years

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      Abstract: Context and purpose In light of the key roles of vitamin D and calcium in adolescent bone health, there is a critical need for representative data on nutritional status for both micronutrients in teenagers. The present work used data from the recent representative National Teens’ Food Survey II (2019–2020) to assess calcium and vitamin D intakes of teenagers in Ireland, including adequacy of such intakes, as well as, for the first time, to characterise serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) concentrations and their determinants. Methods Usual calcium and vitamin D intake estimates were generated using food intake data (via 4-day weighed food records) from a nationally representative sample of teenagers aged 13–18 years in Ireland (n 428). Serum 25(OH)D was measured (via LC–MS/MS) in the 57.5% (n 246) who provided a blood sample. Results Sixty-seven and 94% of Irish teenagers had intakes of calcium and vitamin D below the respective Estimated Average Requirements values, reflecting a high degree of inadequacy of intake for both micronutrients (and higher in girls than boys; P < 0.001). In addition, 21.7% and 33.1% of teenagers had serum 25(OH)D < 30 nmol/L (risk of vitamin D deficiency) and 30–49.9 nmol/L (inadequacy), respectively. Extended winter sampling, being aged 16–18 years, low total vitamin D intake, being overweight/obese or being of non-white skin type were significant (P < 0.05) predictors of serum 25(OH)D < 30 nmol/L. Conclusions There was a high prevalence of inadequacy of intake of calcium and vitamin D in Irish teenagers, and a fifth were at increased risk of vitamin D deficiency.
      PubDate: 2022-12-01
       
  • Prevalence and novel risk factors for vitamin D insufficiency in elite
           athletes: systematic review and meta-analysis

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      Abstract: Background and purpose Vitamin D insufficiency may be common among elite athletes, but prevalence is unclear, and some potentially important risk factors are uncertain. The present study aimed to (a) estimate the prevalence of vitamin D insufficiency in elite athletes, and (b) examine differences in prevalence between the sexes, and between adults and adolescents, from recent studies which used a contemporary definition of insufficiency. Methods Four databases (Web of Science, SPORTDiscus, PubMed, and Sports Medicine and Education Index) were searched for studies in elite athletes. Literature selection, data extraction, and risk of bias assessment were conducted independently by two researchers. Vitamin D insufficiency was defined as 25(OH)D < 50 nmol/L. Meta-analysis was conducted, using R software x64 4.0.2, to provide estimates of prevalence of insufficiency for adults and adolescents, and to examine between-sex differences in risk of insufficiency. Results From the initial 943 literature search hits, 51 studies were eligible with 5456 participants, 33 studies in adults (12/33 in winter and spring), 15 studies in adolescents (6/15 in winter and spring) and 3 studies with age of study participants not given. Prevalence of vitamin D insufficiency from meta-analysis was 30% (95% CI 22–39%) in adults and prevalence was higher, though not significantly so, at 39% (95% CI 25–55%) in adolescents. Differences in the prevalence of insufficiency between the sexes for the eight studies which provided within-study comparisons was not significant (RR = 1.0; 95% CI 0.79–1.26). Evidence quality was moderate. Conclusions Prevalence of vitamin D insufficiency (≤ 50 nmol/L) in elite athletes is high, suggesting a need for greater attention to prevention and treatment. Prevalence estimates in the present study are conservative due to a relative lack of studies in winter. While there was no evidence of higher risk among women than men in the present study, there was less evidence on women.
      PubDate: 2022-12-01
       
  • Association between coffee consumption with serum lipid profile in
           ELSA-Brasil study: a metabolomic approach

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      Abstract: Purpose This study evaluated the association between coffee consumption and serum lipid profile in the Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil). Methods This is a cross-sectional study on baseline data from participants of the cohort ELSA-Brasil. Only participants of São Paulo Research Center who underwent a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy examination of lipid profile were included (N = 4736). Coffee intake was categorized into four categories (cups/day, in reference cup size of 50 mL, which is the household measure adopted in Brazil): never/almost never, ≤ 1, 1–3, and > 3. Serum lipid profile [i.e., Total Cholesterol (TC), Total Triglycerides (TG), Very Low-Density Lipoprotein-cholesterol (VLDL-c), Low-Density Lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-c), High-Density Lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-c), Triglyceride-rich Lipoprotein Particles (TRLP) and subfractions particles] was analyzed. To estimate the effect of coffee consumption on serum lipid profile, multivariate Generalized Linear Models were performed. Results Compared to participants who never or almost never drink coffee, individuals who consumed more than 3 cups/day showed an increase in concentrations of TC (β: 4.13; 95% CI 0.81, 7.45), TG (β: 9.53; 95% CI 1.65, 17.42), VLDL-c (β: 1.90; 95% CI 0.38, 3.42), TRLP (β: 8.42; 95% CI 1.24, 15.60), and Very Small-TRLP and Medium-TRLP subfractions (β: 7.36; 95% CI 0.21, 14.51; β: 2.53; 95% CI 0.89, 4.16, respectively), but not with HDL-c and LDL-c. Among individuals with low (≤ 1 cup/day) and moderate (1–3 cups/day) coffee consumption, no significant associations with lipids was observed. Conclusion High coffee consumption (more than 3 cups per day) was associated with an increase in serum lipids, namely TC, TG, VLDL-c, and TRL particles, highlighting the importance of a moderate consumption of this beverage.
      PubDate: 2022-12-01
       
  • Prospective dietary polyunsaturated fatty acid intake is associated with
           trajectories of fatty liver disease: an 8 year follow-up study from
           adolescence to young adulthood

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      Abstract: Background and aim Dietary fat intake has long been associated with fatty liver. Our study aimed to determine the effect of dietary fats on longitudinal fatty liver index (FLI) trajectories from adolescence to young adulthood. Methods Nine hundred eighty-five participants in the Raine Study, Perth, Western Australia, Australia, had cross-sectional assessments at ages 14, 17, 20 and 22 years, during which anthropometric measurements and blood tests were obtained. FLI trajectories were derived from the longitudinal FLI results. Dietary fat intake was measured with a semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire at 14 years and log multinominal regression analyses were used to estimate relative risks. Results Three FLI trajectories were identified and labelled as stable-low (79.1%, N = 782), low-to-high (13.9%, N = 132), and stable-high (7%, N = 71). The low-to-high group associated with an increased intake of the long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids EPA, DPA and DHA (RR 1.27, 95% CI 1.10–1.48) relative to the stable-low group. Compared to the stable-low group, omega-6 and the ratio of omega-6 to omega-3 in the stable-high group were associated with an increased relative risk of 1.34 (95% CI 1.02–1.76) and 1.10 (95% CI 1.03–1.16), respectively. Conclusion For those at high risk of fatty liver in early adolescence, high omega-6 fatty acid intake and a high ratio of omega-6 to omega-3 fatty acids are associated with increased risk of fatty liver. There should be caution in assuming these associations are causal due to possible undetected and underestimated confounding factors.
      PubDate: 2022-12-01
       
  • Association between dietary inflammatory index score and muscle mass and
           strength in older adults: a study from National Health and Nutrition
           Examination Survey (NHANES) 1999–2002

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      Abstract: Purpose Chronic low-grade systemic inflammation affects muscle protein metabolism. The dietary inflammatory index (DII®) is a tool designed to assess the inflammatory potential of the diet. The available data on the association between DII and sarcopenia are limited. We aimed to investigate the association of the DII with components of sarcopenia in individuals over 50 years of age. Methods This cross-sectional study used the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 1999–2002 dataset. Body composition was measured, and isokinetic strength of the knee extensors (peak force) was evaluated. Low muscle mass and strength were defined using sex-specific thresholds. Energy-adjusted DII (E-DII™) scores were calculated using 24-h dietary recall data. Regression models were fit to evaluate the association between E-DII scores and low muscle mass and low muscle strength, alone and combined. Results Mean age of study participants was 62.1 ± 9.5 years, and 138 participants (7.4%) belonged to the combination group of low muscle mass and low muscle strength. In multivariable-adjusted regression models, higher E-DII score was associated with lower appendicular skeletal muscle index (ASMI) (β =  − 0.03, P  < 0.001, P trend <0.001), and lower peak force (β =  −2.15, P  = 0.04, P trend = 0.01) and higher likelihood for these components combined (OR = 1.12, 95% CI 1.01–1.25, P = 0.03). Conclusion Higher E-DII score is associated with lower muscle mass and muscle strength, and increased likelihood for the combination of low muscle mass and low muscle strength in older adults. This has important implications for healthy aging.
      PubDate: 2022-12-01
       
  • Diet quality, common genetic polymorphisms, and bladder cancer risk in a
           New England population-based study

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      Abstract: Purpose We examined the interaction between common genetic bladder cancer variants, diet quality, and bladder cancer risk in a population-based case–control study conducted in New England. Methods At the time of enrollment, 806 bladder cancer cases and 974 controls provided a DNA sample and completed a diet history questionnaire. Diet quality was assessed using the 2010 Alternate Healthy Eating Index (AHEI-2010) score. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) reported in genome-wide association studies to be associated with bladder cancer risk were combined into a polygenic risk score and also examined individually for interaction with the AHEI-2010. Adjusted odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated using logistic regression. Results A 1-standard deviation increase in polygenic risk score was associated with higher bladder cancer risk (OR, 1.34; 95% CI 1.21–1.49). Adherence to the AHEI-2010 was not associated with bladder cancer risk (OR, 0.99; 95% CI 0.98–1.00) and the polygenic risk score did not appear to modify the association between the AHEI-2010 and bladder cancer risk. In single-SNP analyses, rs8102137 (bladder cancer risk allele, C) modified the association between the AHEI-2010 total score and bladder cancer risk, with the strongest evidence for the AHEI-2010 long chain fat guideline (OR for TT, 0.92; 95% CI 0.87–0.98; OR for CT, 1.02; 95% CI 0.96–1.08; OR for CC, 1.03; 95% CI 0.93–1.14; p for interaction, 0.02). Conclusions In conclusion, rs8102137 near the cyclin E1 gene ( CCNE1 ) may be involved in gene–diet interactions for bladder cancer risk.
      PubDate: 2022-12-01
       
  • Soy product intake and risk of incident disabling dementia: the JPHC
           Disabling Dementia Study

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      Abstract: Purpose We evaluated the association between total soy, soy product (natto, miso and tofu) and isoflavone intake and incident disabling dementia in a Japanese population. Methods We conducted a population-based prospective study in 18,991 men and 22,456 women. Intake of soy products and isoflavone was calculated using a validated food frequency questionnaire when participants were 45–74 years old (1995 and 1998). Incident disabling dementia was defined by the daily living disability status related to dementia in the long-term care insurance program of Japan from 2006 to 2016. Multivariate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of disabling dementia were calculated by quintiles of total soy, individual soy product and isoflavone intake, using Cox proportional hazard regression models. Results Total soy product intake was not associated with disabling dementia risk in both men and women. By individual soy products, natto intake was marginally inversely associated with disabling dementia in women (trend P = 0.050). When we stratified by age, this inverse association was clearer in women aged under 60 years (multivariate HR for the highest versus lowest quintile was 0.78, 95% CI 0.59–1.04, trend P = 0.020 for those aged under 60 years and 0.90, 95% CI 0.77–1.05, trend P = 0.23 for those aged 60 years and older, respectively). Any soy product or isoflavone intake was not associated with disabling dementia risk in men. Conclusions Although total soy product intake was not associated with disabling dementia risk, natto intake may contribute to reducing the risk of disabling dementia in women, especially in those aged under 60 years.
      PubDate: 2022-12-01
       
  • Association between ultra-processed food consumption and cognitive
           performance in US older adults: a cross-sectional analysis of the NHANES
           2011–2014

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      Abstract: Purpose This study evaluated the association between ultra-processed food (UPF) consumption and cognitive performance among older US adults. Methods This cross-sectional study assessed 3632 participants aged 60+ years from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2011–14. Cognitive performance was assessed using the Consortium to Establish a Registry for Alzheimer’s Disease (CERAD), Word Learning test, Animal Fluency test, and the Digit Symbol Substitution test (DSST). Dietary intake was assessed using two 24-h diet recalls. Food items were classified according to the NOVA system, a classification based on the nature, extent, and purpose of industrial food processing. Linear regression models were used to evaluate the association of dietary share of UPF (% of daily energy intake) (categorized as tertiles) and cognitive test scores, adjusting for socio-demographic variables, physical activity, smoking status, and chronic diseases (cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, and depression). Models excluding participants with pre-existing diseases were carried out to address potential reverse causality. Results On average, UPF accounted for 53% of total energy intake, ranging from 33 to 70% across extreme tertiles. Inverted U-shape association between UPF consumption and Animal fluency and DSST was observed. No significant associations were observed between the UPF intake tertiles and the cognitive test results. Nonetheless, UPF consumption was significantly associated with worse performance in Animal Fluency in older adults without pre-existing diseases (P < 0.05). Conclusion UPF consumption was associated with worse performance in Animal Fluency among older people without pre-existing diseases. Decreasing UPF consumption may be a way to improve impaired cognition among older adults.
      PubDate: 2022-12-01
       
  • Normal and unusual days for dietary intake during the 12 months after a
           breast cancer diagnosis in women

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      Abstract: Purpose There are several reasons to report days as being unusual with regard to dietary intake, including special occasions and celebrations. For breast cancer patients during the 12 month post-surgery period, unusual days may also include days that are affected by being a cancer patient. The aim of this study was to study dietary intake on “normal” and “unusual” days, and to study what is reported in “free text fields” of a food diary. Methods Women (n = 456), mean age 55.5 years newly diagnosed with invasive breast cancer (stage I/II) were included in this clinical study. “Normal” and “unusual” days in general, over time and during the week and weekends were studied using repeated administration of a 7-day pre-coded food diary. Results The breast cancer patients reported 26% of all days as unusual. The intake of energy, most nutrients, especially alcohol and sugar, red and processed meat, and sweets, cakes, and snacks was 5–126% higher, whereas intake of fiber, fruit and berries, vegetables, and dairy products was 7–17% lower on unusual than on normal days (P < 0.001). The same pattern was seen for normal/unusual days during the weekdays, weekends and over time. Finally, 99% of the breast cancer patients used the free text fields to report additional intake with a mean energy of 1.1 MJ/day. Conclusion For breast cancer patients during the 12-month post-surgery period, unusual days are important drivers of total intake, especially for alcohol. The free text fields in the pre-coded food diary contributed substantially to the total intake.
      PubDate: 2022-12-01
       
  • Effects of a 4-month active weight loss phase followed by weight loss
           maintenance on adaptive thermogenesis in resting energy expenditure in
           former elite athletes

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      Abstract: Purpose Despite adaptive thermogenesis (AT) being studied as a barrier to weight loss (WL), few studies assessed AT in the resting energy expenditure (REE) compartment after WL maintenance. The aim of this study was twofold: (1) to understand if AT occurs after a moderate WL and if AT persists after a period of WL maintenance; and (2) if AT is associated with changes in body composition, hormones and energy intake (EI). Methods Ninety-four participants [mean (SD); BMI, 31.1(4.3)kg/m2; 43.0(9.4)y; 34% female] were randomized to intervention (IG, n = 49) or control groups (CG, n = 45). Subjects underwent a 1-year lifestyle intervention, divided in 4 months of an active WL followed by 8 months of WL maintenance. Fat mass (FM) and fat-free mass (FFM) were measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and REE by indirect calorimetry. Predicted REE (pREE) was estimated through a model using FM, FFM. EI was measured by the “intake-balance” method. Results For the IG, the weight and FM losses were − 4.8 (4.9) and − 11.3 (10.8)%, respectively (p < 0.001). A time–group interaction was found between groups for AT. After WL, the IG showed an AT of -85(29) kcal.d−1 (p < 0.001), and remained significant after 1 year [AT = − 72(31)kcal.d−1, p = 0.031]. Participants with higher degrees of restriction were those with an increased energy conservation (R = − 0.325, p = 0.036 and R = − 0.308, p = 0.047, respectively). No associations were found between diet adherence and AT. Following a sub-analysis in the IG, the group with a higher energy conservation showed a lower WL and fat loss and a higher initial EI. Conclusion AT in REE occurred after a moderate WL and remained significant after WL maintenance. More studies are needed to better clarify the mechanisms underlying the large variability observed in AT and providing an accurate methodological approach to avoid overstatements. Future studies on AT should consider not only changes in FM and FFM but also the FFM composition.
      PubDate: 2022-12-01
       
  • Reply to “Recommendation on an updated standardization of serum
           magnesium reference ranges,” Jeroen H.F. de Baaij et al.

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      PubDate: 2022-10-07
       
  • CORDIOPREV and the traditional Mediterranean diet—Authors' response

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      PubDate: 2022-10-03
       
  • Correction to: Long‑term effect of a dietary intervention with
           two‑healthy dietary approaches on food intake and nutrient density in
           coronary patients: results from the CORDIOPREV trial

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      PubDate: 2022-10-03
       
  • CORDIOPREV and the traditional Mediterranean diet

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      PubDate: 2022-10-03
       
 
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