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  Subjects -> NUTRITION AND DIETETICS (Total: 201 journals)
Showing 1 - 64 of 64 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acta Portuguesa de Nutrição     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Digestive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Advances in Eating Disorders : Theory, Research and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Advances in Food and Nutrition Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 63)
Advances in Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 55)
African Journal of Biomedical Research     Open Access  
African Journal of Food, Agriculture, Nutrition and Development     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Aktuelle Ernährungsmedizin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
American Journal of Botany     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
American Journal of Clinical Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 178)
American Journal of Food and Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 48)
American Journal of Food Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Amerta Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Amino Acids     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 52)
Annual Review of Food Science and Technology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Annual Review of Nutrition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 40)
Appetite     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Arab Journal of Nutrition and Exercise     Open Access  
Archive of Food and Nutritional Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Archivos Latinoamericanos de Nutrición     Open Access  
Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Asian Journal of Clinical Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Bangladesh Journal of Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Bioactive Carbohydrates and Dietary Fibre     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
BMC Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
BMJ Nutrition, Prevention & Health     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
British Journal Of Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 96)
Cahiers de Nutrition et de Diététique     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Canadian Food Studies / La Revue canadienne des études sur l'alimentation     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Canadian Journal of Dietetic Practice and Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Case Reports in Clinical Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Childhood Obesity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Clinical Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 94)
Clinical Nutrition ESPEN     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Clinical Nutrition Experimental     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Clinical Nutrition Insight     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Clinical Nutrition Open Science     Open Access  
Clinical Obesity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Comparative Exercise Physiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Current Developments in Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Current Nutrition & Food Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Current Nutrition Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Current Opinion in Clinical Nutrition & Metabolic Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Current Research in Nutrition and Food Science     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
DEMETRA : Alimentação, Nutrição & Saúde     Open Access  
Diabetes, Metabolic Syndrome and Obesity     Open Access   (Followers: 48)
Eating and Weight Disorders - Studies on Anorexia, Bulimia and Obesity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Ecology of Food and Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Egyptian Journal of Nutrition and Health     Open Access  
Egyptian Journal of Obesity, Diabetes and Endocrinology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Endocrinología, Diabetes y Nutrición     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Endocrinología, Diabetes y Nutrición (English Edition)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Ernährung & Medizin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
European Journal of Clinical Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 75)
European Journal of Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
European Journal of Nutrition & Food Safety     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Food & Nutrition Research     Open Access   (Followers: 35)
Food and Environmental Virology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Food and Foodways: Explorations in the History and Culture of     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Food and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Food and Nutrition Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Food and Waterborne Parasitology     Open Access  
Food Digestion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Food Frontiers     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Food Hydrocolloids for Health     Open Access  
Food Quality and Safety     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Food Science & Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 59)
Food, Culture and Society: An International Journal of Multidisciplinary Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Frontiers in Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Frontiers in Sustainable Food Systems     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Functional Foods in Health and Disease     Open Access  
Gazi Sağlık Bilimleri Dergisi     Open Access  
Genes & Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Hacettepe University Faculty of Health Sciences Journal     Open Access  
Human Nutrition & Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian Journal of Nutrition and Dietetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Indonesian Food and Nutrition Progress     Open Access  
International Journal for Vitamin and Nutrition Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity     Open Access   (Followers: 31)
International Journal of Child Health and Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Eating Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
International Journal of Food Safety, Nutrition and Public Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
International Journal of Food Science and Nutrition Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Food Sciences and Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
International Journal of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, Transplant and Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Nutrition and Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 23)
International Journal of Nutrition, Pharmacology, Neurological Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Obesity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 93)
International Journal of Sport Nutrition & Exercise Metabolism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 88)
Journal of Advanced Nutrition and Human Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Agriculture, Food Systems, and Community Development     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Dietary Supplements     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Eating Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Ethnic Foods     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Food & Nutritional Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Food and Nutrition Research     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Food Chemistry and Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Food Science and Nutrition Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Health, Population and Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 52)
Journal of Hunger & Environmental Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Medical Nutrition and Nutraceuticals     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Medicinal Herbs and Ethnomedicine     Open Access  
Journal of Muscle Foods     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Nutraceuticals and Herbal Medicine     Open Access  
Journal of Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42)
Journal of Nutrition & Intermediary Metabolism     Open Access  
Journal of Nutrition and Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Nutrition in Gerontology and Geriatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Nutrition, Health and Aging     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Journal of Nutritional & Environmental Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Nutritional Disorders & Therapy     Open Access  
Journal of Nutritional Ecology and Food Research     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Nutritional Science     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Obesity     Open Access   (Followers: 24)
Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition (JPGN)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 52)
Journal of Pharmacy and Nutrition Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Renal Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal of Renal Nutrition and Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Sensory Studies     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Spices and Aromatic Crops     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 61)
Journal of the American College of Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of the Australasian College of Nutritional and Environmental Medicine     Full-text available via subscription  
Jurnal Gizi dan Dietetik Indonesia : Indonesian Journal of Nutrition and Dietetics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Jurnal Gizi Indonesia / The Indonesian Journal of Nutrition     Open Access  
Jurnal Gizi Klinik Indonesia     Open Access  
Jurnal Penelitian Gizi dan Makanan     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Jurnal Riset Kesehatan     Open Access  
La Ciencia al Servicio de la Salud y Nutrición     Open Access  
Lifestyle Genomics     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Lifestyle Journal     Open Access  
Maternal & Child Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Médecine & Nutrition     Full-text available via subscription  
Media Gizi Indonesia     Open Access  
Metabolism and Nutrition in Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Molecular Nutrition & Food Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
NFS Journal     Open Access  
Nigerian Food Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Nigerian Journal of Nutritional Sciences     Full-text available via subscription  
npj Science of Food     Open Access  
Nutrición Hospitalaria     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Nutrients     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Nutrire     Hybrid Journal  
Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Nutrition & Dietetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Nutrition & Food Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Nutrition & Diabetes     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
Nutrition & Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Nutrition - Science en évolution     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Nutrition and Cancer     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Nutrition and Dietary Supplements     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Nutrition and Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Nutrition and Metabolic Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Nutrition Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Nutrition Bytes     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Nutrition in Clinical Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
Nutrition Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Nutrition Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Nutrition Research Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Nutrition Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
Nutrition Today     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Nutritional Neuroscience : An International Journal on Nutrition, Diet and Nervous System     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Obesity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 58)
Obesity Facts     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Obesity Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Oil Crop Science     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Open Food Science Journal     Open Access  
Open Nutrition Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Open Obesity Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Pakistan Journal of Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Pediatric Obesity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Perspectivas en Nutrición Humana     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
PharmaNutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Plant Foods for Human Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Plant Production Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Proceedings of the Nutrition Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Progress in Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Public Health Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
RBNE - Revista Brasileira de Nutrição Esportiva     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
RBONE - Revista Brasileira de Obesidade, Nutrição e Emagrecimento     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Chilena de Nutricion     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Revista Española de Nutrición Humana y Dietética     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Revista Mexicana de Trastornos Alimentarios     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Salud Pública y Nutrición     Open Access  
Segurança Alimentar e Nutricional     Open Access  
South African Journal of Clinical Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
The Australian Coeliac     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Topics in Clinical Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
UNICIÊNCIAS     Open Access  
Universal Journal of Food and Nutrition Science     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
World Food Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)

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Similar Journals
Journal Cover
European Journal of Nutrition
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.408
Citation Impact (citeScore): 3
Number of Followers: 36  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1436-6215 - ISSN (Online) 1436-6207
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2467 journals]
  • The polyphenol epigallocatechin gallate lowers circulating catecholamine
           concentrations and alters lipid metabolism during graded exercise in man:
           a randomized cross-over study

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      Abstract: Purpose Physical exercise is shown to mitigate catecholamine metabolites; however, it is unknown if exercise-induced increases in sympatho-adrenal activity or catecholamine metabolites are influenced by ingestion of specific catechins found within green tea. This study explored the impact of epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) ingestion on catecholamine metabolism during graded cycle exercise in humans. Methods Eight males (22.4 ± 3.3 years, BMI:25.7 ± 2.4 kg.m2) performed a randomised, placebo-controlled, single-blind, cross-over trial after consumption (1450 mg) of either EGCG or placebo (PLAC) and performed graded cycling to volitional exhaustion. Venous bloods were taken at rest, 2 h post-ingestion and after every 3-min stage. Blood variables were analysed for catecholamines, catecholamine metanephrines and metabolic variables at rest, 2 h post-ingestion (POST-ING), peak rate of lipid oxidation (FATpeak), lactate threshold (LT) and peak rate of oxygen consumption (VO2peak). Data were analysed using SPSS (Version 26). Results Resting catecholamine and metanephrines were similar between trials. Plasma adrenaline (AD) was lower in ECGC treatment group between trials at FATpeak (P < 0.05), LT (P < 0.001) and VO2peak (P < 0.01). Noradrenaline (NA) was lower under EGCG at POST (P < 0.05), FATpeak (P < 0.05), LT (P < 0.01) and VO2peak (P < 0.05) compared to PLAC. Metanephrines, glucose and lactate increased similarly with exercise intensity in both trials. Lipid oxidation rate was 32% lower in EGCG at FATpeak (EGCG 0.33 ± 0.14 vs. PLAC 0.49 ± 0.11 g.min−1, P < 0.05). Cycle time to exhaustion was similar (NS). Conclusion Acute EGCG supplementation reduced circulating catecholamines but not; metanephrine, glucose or lactates, response to graded exercise. Lower circulating catecholamines may explain a lower lipid oxidation rate.
      PubDate: 2023-01-25
       
  • Dietary oily fish intake reduces the risk of all-cause mortality in
           frequent fish consumers of Amerindian ancestry living in coastal Ecuador:
           the Atahualpa project

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      Abstract: Purpose To assess the relationship between dietary oily fish intake and all-cause mortality in a population of frequent fish consumers of Amerindian ancestry living in rural Ecuador. Methods Individuals aged ≥ 40 years enrolled in the prospective population-based Atahualpa Project cohort received annual questionnaires to estimate their dietary oily fish intake. Only fish served broiled or cooked in the soup were included for analysis. Poisson regression and Cox-proportional hazards models adjusted for demographics, education level and cardiovascular risk factors were obtained to estimate mortality risk according to the amount of oily fish intake stratified in tertiles. Results Analysis included 909 individuals (mean age: 55.1 ± 12.8 years) followed by a median of 7.5 ± 3 years. Mean oily fish intake was 9.4 ± 5.7 servings per week. A total of 142 (16%) individuals died during the follow-up. The mortality rate for individuals in the first tertile de oily fish intake (0.0–6.29 servings) was 2.87 per 100 person-years, which decreased to 1.78 for those in the third tertile (10.59–35.0 servings). An adjusted Cox-proportional hazards model showed that individuals allocated to the second (HR 0.61; 95% CI 0.41–0.92) and third (HR 0.60; 95% CI 0.40–0.91) tertiles of dietary oily fish intake had significantly lower mortality risk than those in the first tertile. Conclusion Sustained oily fish intake of more than six servings per week reduces mortality risk in middle-aged and older adults of Amerindian ancestry.
      PubDate: 2023-01-25
       
  • Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D status of a large Chinese population from 30
           provinces by LC–MS/MS measurement for consecutive 3 years: differences
           by age, sex, season and province

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      Abstract: Purpose We aimed to describe the vitamin D status and its distribution in different age groups, sexes, seasons, and provinces of a large Chinese population. Methods This study retrospectively analyzed 1,528,685 results of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) in the central laboratory of KingMed Diagnostics. The samples were from the individuals aged 0–119 years old in 30 provinces of China. Serum 25(OH)D was measured by an accurate commercial liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC–MS/MS) method from January 2017 to December 2019. The subjects were stratified by age, sex, the season of blood collection, and the province of residence. Results The median 25(OH)D concentration was 25.5 ng/mL (interquartile range (IQR) 18.7–32.7 ng/mL) in males and 20.8 ng/mL (IQR 14.4–28.2 ng/mL) in females. Overall, the median 25(OH)D concentration decreased with age in both males and females. Males had a 0.2–2.4 ng/mL higher median 25(OH)D concentration than females in different age groups. Vitamin D deficiency (25(OH)D < 15 ng/mL for the individuals under 14 years old; < 20 ng/mL for the individuals over 14 years old) was found in 21.3% of males and 43.6% of females. Significant seasonal variation of serum 25(OH)D concentrations was repeatedly observed in 3 years, with median concentration higher in summer (25.3 ng/mL (IQR 19.3–31.9 ng/mL)) and lower in winter (18.5 ng/mL (IQR 12.3–26.6 ng/mL)). Vitamin D status varied by province. The median 25(OH)D concentration was the highest in Hainan (31.0 ng/mL (IQR 24.9–39.2 ng/mL)) and the lowest in Qinghai (14.4 ng/mL (IQR 9.6–20.0 ng/mL)). 25(OH)D2 was detected in 12.2% of the results, and no significant seasonal variation was observed. Conclusion In China, vitamin D deficiency is prevalent in the population participating in clinical vitamin D measurement. Age and sex differences in vitamin D levels were observed in our study. Seasonal variation and provincial differences are important aspects of serum vitamin D status. 25(OH)D2 cannot be ignored entirely in clinical measurement practice in China.
      PubDate: 2023-01-24
       
  • Effects of anti-inflammatory dietary patterns on non-alcoholic fatty liver
           disease: a systematic literature review

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      Abstract: Purpose Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the leading chronic hepatic condition. Low-grade chronic inflammation contributes to disease progression. Diet has protective effects on hepatic health and inflammatory pathways. The purpose of this review is to systematically review and describe the effects of anti-inflammatory dietary patterns on NAFLD. Methods The Cochrane CENTRAL Library, Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Embase, MEDLINE and Web of Science databases were searched. A total of 252 records were identified, 7 of which were included in this review. The revised Cochrane risk-of-bias tool was used to conduct a quality assessment for randomised trials. Certainty of evidence was assessed using the grading of recommendations, assessment, development, and evaluation tool. Results Of the 7 included studies, 6 were classified as low risk of bias and studies ranged from high to very low certainty of evidence. In the randomised-controlled studies systematically reviewed, either adherence to the Mediterranean, DASH, or FLiO diet was studied, against usual care or energy matched controls, with a total of 255 participants. Anti-inflammatory dietary pattern adherence significantly reduced the severity of most hepatic and inflammatory markers, and secondary outcomes. A minority of outcomes were improved significantly more than controls. Conclusion Anti-inflammatory dietary patterns showed benefits to NAFLD risk factors, severity markers and inflammatory markers compared to the control diet. It is unclear whether reductions in the evaluated parameters are related solely to the anti-inflammatory diet or weight loss resulting from caloric restriction, as improvements in control groups were also evidenced. Current limited body of evidence indicates need for further research including isocaloric dietary patterns, longer interventions, measures of inflammatory markers, and studies including normal-weight subjects to confirm findings at higher certainty. PROSPERO Registration CRD42021269382.
      PubDate: 2023-01-24
       
  • Adherence to the EAT-Lancet diet is associated with a lower risk of type 2
           diabetes: the Danish Diet, Cancer and Health cohort

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      Abstract: Purpose Type 2 diabetes is a global health problem. While a healthy diet lowers risk of type 2 diabetes, less is known about diets with low climate impact. This study aimed to investigate adherence to the EAT-Lancet diet and risk of type 2 diabetes in a Danish setting. Methods In the Danish Diet, Cancer and Health cohort, dietary data were collected using a validated 192-item food frequency questionnaire, at recruitment in 1993–1997. In total, 54,232 participants aged 50–64 years at baseline with no previous cancer or diabetes diagnoses were included in the current analyses. The EAT-Lancet diet score was used to assess adherence to the EAT-Lancet diet. Participants scored 0 (non-adherence) or 1 (adherence) point for each of the 14 dietary components of the diet score (range 0–14 points). Participants were followed through register linkage until type 2 diabetes diagnosis or censoring. Hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated using multivariable-adjusted Cox regression models. Results During a median 15-year follow-up period, 7130 participants developed type 2 diabetes. The hazard ratio for developing type 2 diabetes was 0.78 (95% CI 0.71; 0.86) for those with highest EAT-Lancet diet scores (11–14 points) compared to those with lowest scores (0–7 points) after adjusting for potential confounders. After further adjusting for potential mediators, including BMI, the corresponding hazard ratio was 0.83 (95% CI 0.76; 0.92). Conclusion Greater adherence to the EAT-Lancet diet was associated with a lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes in a middle-aged Danish population.
      PubDate: 2023-01-23
       
  • Plant-based and vegetarian diets: an overview and definition of these
           dietary patterns

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      Abstract: Purpose This paper aims to present an overview of the definitions of “plant-based and “vegetarian diets” adopted by different organizations worldwide, proposing new standard definitions and discussing the notion of vegetarianism as a restrictive dietary pattern. Methods An extensive literature review on the different definitions of vegetarian and plant-based diets was conducted. Definitions of different international vegetarian and vegan organizations were also taken into account. Objective definitions for vegetarian and plant-based diets, as well as for their subcategories, were proposed. Other aspects related to how vegetarian diets are viewed and defined were also discussed. Results We proposed that a vegetarian diet should be defined as “a dietary pattern that excludes meat, meat-derived foods, and, to different extents, other animal products”. This definition would include, among others, ovolactovegetarian and vegan diets. The proposed definition for a plant-based diet was “a dietary pattern in which foods of animal origin are totally or mostly excluded”. Other types of diets, such as flexitarian and pescetarian diets, could be considered plant-based. A vegetarian diet should not be considered restrictive. Instead, terms such as alternative or non-conventional could be used to define it and to distinguish it from the conventional diet adopted by most of the Western population. Conclusion This paper was able to elaborate objective definitions of vegetarian and plant-based diets. Standardizing nomenclatures may reduce misinterpretation and confusion in this field of study.
      PubDate: 2023-01-22
       
  • Re-exploring the requirement of dietary iodine intake in Chinese female
           adults based on ‘iodine overflow theory’

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      Abstract: Purpose We re-explored the basal iodine requirement based on healthy Chinese female and a new iodine overflow theory was proposed for iodine balance study. Methods Thirty-six Chinese healthy female adults (age 20.7 ± 1.1) were recruited for this study, which included 40 days low iodine depletion period and six stages of 30 days supplementation period. Uniform diets with low iodine were provided and the content of iodine in the diet was regulated by dairy products. The total iodine intake from food and the total iodine excretion through 24-h urine and staged feces were completely gathered and monitored. The incremental (Δ) intake and excretion over the range were calculated. Results The iodine intake and excretion were 13.6 μg/day and 48.6 μg/day at the first stage, respectively. The incremental iodine intakes and excretions were 21.1 μg/day to 120.3 μg/day and 25.8 μg/day to 105.4 μg/day for the supplementation stages, respectively. According to the ‘iodine overflow theory’, the zero iodine balance (Δ iodine intake = Δ iodine excretion) derived from a mixed effect model indicated a mean iodine intake of 52.2 μg/d (1.0 μg/d kg). The RNI for iodine to healthy Chinese female adult was 73.1 μg/d (1.4 μg/d kg). Conclusion A daily iodine intake of 52.2 μg/d may meet the basal iodine requirement for healthy Chinese female adults, and Chinese female may need more than 20% iodine intake than male based on the ‘iodine overflow theory’. The trial was registered at the Chinese Clinical Trial Registry in May 2018 (No: ChiCTR1800016184).
      PubDate: 2023-01-18
       
  • Substituting meat for mycoprotein reduces genotoxicity and increases the
           abundance of beneficial microbes in the gut: Mycomeat, a randomised
           crossover control trial

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      Abstract: Purpose The high-meat, low-fibre Western diet is strongly associated with colorectal cancer risk. Mycoprotein, produced from Fusarium venanatum, has been sold as a high-fibre alternative to meat for decades. Hitherto, the effects of mycoprotein in the human bowel have not been well considered. Here, we explored the effects of replacing a high red and processed meat intake with mycoprotein on markers of intestinal genotoxicity and gut health. Methods Mycomeat (clinicaltrials.gov NCT03944421) was an investigator-blind, randomised, crossover dietary intervention trial. Twenty healthy male adults were randomised to consume 240 g day−1 red and processed meat for 2 weeks, with crossover to 2 weeks 240 g day−1 mycoprotein, separated by a 4-week washout period. Primary end points were faecal genotoxicity and genotoxins, while secondary end points comprised changes in gut microbiome composition and activity. Results The meat diet increased faecal genotoxicity and nitroso compound excretion, whereas the weight-matched consumption of mycoprotein decreased faecal genotoxicity and nitroso compounds. In addition, meat intake increased the abundance of Oscillobacter and Alistipes, whereas mycoprotein consumption increased Lactobacilli, Roseburia and Akkermansia, as well as the excretion of short chain fatty acids. Conclusion Replacing red and processed meat with the Fusarium-based meat alternative, mycoprotein, significantly reduces faecal genotoxicity and genotoxin excretion and increases the abundance of microbial genera with putative health benefits in the gut. This work demonstrates that mycoprotein may be a beneficial alternative to meat within the context of gut health and colorectal cancer prevention.
      PubDate: 2023-01-18
       
  • Astaxanthin promotes mitochondrial biogenesis and antioxidant capacity in
           chronic high-intensity interval training

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      Abstract: Purpose Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species are required for exercise-induced molecular adaptations; however, excessive exercise may cause cellular oxidative distress. We postulate that astaxanthin (ASX) can neutralize oxidative distress and stimulate mitochondrial biogenesis in high-intensity exercise-trained mice. Methods Six-week-old mice (n = 8/group) were treated with ASX (10 mg/kg BW) or placebo. Training groups participated in 30 min/day high-intensity interval training (HIIT) for 6 weeks. Gastrocnemius muscle was collected and assayed following the exercise training period. Results Compared to the HIIT control mice, the ASX-treated HIIT mice reduced malonaldehyde levels and upregulated the expression of Nrf2 and FOXO3a. Meanwhile, the genes NQO1 and GCLC, modulated by Nrf2, and SOD2, regulated by FOXO3a, and GPx4, were transcriptionally upregulated in the ASX-treated HIIT group. Meanwhile, the expression of energy sensors, AMPK, SIRT1, and SIRT3, increased in the ASX-treated HIIT group compared to the HIIT control group. Additionally, PGC-1α, regulated by AMPK and SIRT1, was upregulated in the ASX-treated HIIT group. Further, the increased PGC-1α stimulated the transcript of NRF1 and Tfam and mitochondrial proteins IDH2 and ATP50. Finally, the ASX-treated HIIT mice had upregulations in the transcript level of mitochondrial fusion factors, including Mfn1, Mfn2, and OPA1. However, the protein level of AMPK, SIRT1, and FOXO3a, and the transcript level of Nrf2, NQO1, PGC-1α, NRF1, Mfn1, Mfn2, and OPA1 decreased in the HIIT control group compared to the sedentary control group. Conclusion Supplementation with ASX can reduce oxidative stress and promote antioxidant capacity and mitochondrial biogenesis during strenuous HIIT exercise in mice.
      PubDate: 2023-01-17
       
  • Vitamin D status of 3-year-old children in Denmark: determinants and
           associations with bone mineralisation and blood lipids

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      Abstract: Purpose Low vitamin D status is a global problem and has been associated with reduced skeletal and cardiometabolic health. However, evidence in young children is lacking. We, therefore, aimed to characterise vitamin D status in toddlers, identify its determinants, and explore if vitamin D status was associated with bone mineralisation and lipid profile. Methods We used cross-sectional data from 3-year-old children (n = 323) living in Denmark (latitude: 55°N). Bone mineralisation (n = 108) was measured by DXA. Blood samples were analysed for serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (s-25(OH)D) by LC–MS/MS, triacylglycerol, and total, low- and high density lipoprotein cholesterol. Results Mean ± SD s-25(OH)D was 69 ± 23 nmol/L, but varied with season. During winter, 38% had inadequate s-25(OH)D (< 50 nmol), whereof 15% had deficiency (< 30 nmol/L); these numbers were only 7 and 1% during summer. In terms of status determinants, supplement use (66% were users) was associated with s-25(OH)D (P < 0.001), whereas dietary vitamin D intake (median [25–75th percentile] of 1.3 [0.9–1.9] µg/d), sex, parental education, BMI, and physical activity were not. There were no associations between s-25(OH)D and blood lipids or bone measurements, using either unadjusted or adjusted regression models. Conclusion More than 1/3 of Danish toddlers had inadequate vitamin D intake during winter, but acceptable mean vitamin D status. In addition to season, supplement use was the main determinant of vitamin D status, which was, however, not associated with bone mineralisation or lipid profile. The results support recommendations of vitamin D supplements during winter at northern latitudes, but potential health effects need further investigation.
      PubDate: 2023-01-13
       
  • Apple preload increased postprandial insulin sensitivity of a high
           glycemic rice meal only at breakfast

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      Abstract: Purpose The possible impact of preload food on insulin sensitivity has yet been reported. This study aimed to investigate the glycemic and insulinemic effect of an apple preload before breakfast, lunch and early supper, based on high glycemic index (GI) rice meals. Methods Twenty-three healthy participants in Group 1 and 14 participants in Group 2 were served with the reference meal (white rice containing 50 g of available carbohydrate) or experimental meals (apple preload and rice, each containing 15 and 35 g of available carbohydrate). The meals were either served at 8:00 for breakfast, 12:30 for lunch or 17:00 for early supper to explore the possible effect of time factor. The group 1 assessed the postprandial and subsequent-meal glycemic effect of the test meals by continuous glucose monitoring (CGM), along with subjective appetite; The group 2 further investigated the glycemic and insulin effect by blood collection. Results The apple preload lowered the blood glucose peak value by 33.5%, 31.4% and 31.0% in breakfast, lunch and supper, respectively, while increased insulin sensitivity by 40.5% only at breakfast, compared with the rice reference. The early supper resulted significantly milder glycemic response than its breakfast and lunch counterparts did. The result of CGM tests was consistent with that of the fingertip blood tests. Conclusion Apple preload performed the best at breakfast in terms of enhancing the insulin sensitivity. The preload treatment could effectively attenuate postprandial GR without increasing the area under insulin response curve in any of the three meals.
      PubDate: 2023-01-12
       
  • Correction to: Food insecurity and physical multimorbidity among adults
           aged ≥ 50 years from six low- and middle-income countries

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      PubDate: 2023-01-11
       
  • Lycium chinense Miller fruit extract lowers liver enzyme levels in
           subjects with mild hepatic dysfunction: a randomized, double-blind,
           placebo-controlled clinical trial

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      Abstract: Purpose In our previous study, we showed that Lycium chinense Miller fruit extract (LFE) exerted hepatoprotective effects in mice. In the current study, we examined the effect of LFE on liver enzyme levels in subjects with mild hepatic dysfunction. Methods A total of 90 subjects, aged 19 to 70 years old, with abnormal alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels, were randomly placed into either an LFE (n = 45) treatment group or a placebo group (n = 45). During the 12-week clinical trial, subjects in each group received either LFE or placebo capsules, and were instructed to take four tablets per day (1760 mg/day). The primary outcome of the study was the changes of ALT and γ-glutamyltransferase (GGT) levels in each subject. The safety of LFE supplementation was assessed and adverse events were recorded. Results LFE supplementation for 12 weeks resulted in a significant reduction of ALT (P = 0.0498) and GGT (P = 0.0368) levels in comparison to the placebo. No clinically significant changes were observed in any safety parameters. Conclusion These results suggest that LFE can be applied to subjects with mild hepatic dysfunction with no possible side effects. Trial registration This study was registered at the Clinical Research Information Service (CRIS) as no. KCT0003985.
      PubDate: 2023-01-11
       
  • Ultra-processed food (UPF) intake in pregnancy and maternal and neonatal
           outcomes

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      Abstract: Purpose Ultra-processed food (UPF), as defined by the NOVA classification, is related to lower diet quality, which may adversely affect maternal health and neonatal outcomes. This study aims to describe nutrient intake of pregnant women by the share of UPF in the diet and to identify associations between UPF intake and maternal and neonatal outcomes. Methods In this cross-sectional study, pregnant women (n = 206) were recruited upon arrival to the obstetrics ward for delivery, and asked to complete a Food Frequency Questionnaire (FFQ), and questionnaires regarding environmental exposures, and socio-demographic characteristics. Neonatal measurements and clinical data were obtained following delivery. UPF energy intake was expressed as absolute and in terms of percent from total energy. Women with high intake of energy from UPF were compared to those with low intake. Results Among 206 pregnant women, dietary intake of UPF ranged from 15.6% to 43.4% of total energy in the first and fourth quartiles of UPF consumption, respectively. Women in the fourth quartile of energy from UPF had lower intakes of vitamin C, beta-carotene, vitamin B6, and potassium, which is indicative of inferior diet quality. Percent energy from UPF was associated with maternal obesity (BMI ≥ 30) (OR = 1.06, 95% CI: 1.06, 1.10, p = 0.008) and shorter male infant ano-genital distance (AGD) (B = −1.9, 95% CI: −3.5, −0.24, p = 0.02). Conclusions UPF intake during pregnancy is associated with undesirable maternal and neonatal outcomes and more research is needed to confirm these findings.
      PubDate: 2023-01-06
       
  • Intake of marine and plant-derived n-3 fatty acids and development of
           atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease in the Danish Diet, Cancer and
           Health cohort

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      Abstract: Purpose The objective of this study was to investigate the association between intake of seafood and plant-derived n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) and development of total atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) and acute major ischemic events. Methods A total of 53,909 men and women were enrolled between 1993 and 1997 into the Danish Diet, Cancer and Health cohort and followed through nationwide Danish registries for development of total ASCVD defined as a first registration of myocardial infarction, peripheral artery disease, or ischemic stroke due to large artery atherosclerosis or small-vessel occlusion. At recruitment, the intake of the major marine n-3 PUFA, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and the plant-derived n-3 PUFA, alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), was assessed using a validated food frequency questionnaire. Statistical analyses were conducted using sex-stratified multivariable Cox proportional hazard regression models. Results During a median of 13.5 years of follow-up, 3958 participants developed ASCVD including 3270 patients with an acute major ischemic event. In multivariable analyses including adjustment for established risk factors, we found no associations for intake of ALA, but indications of inverse associations between intake of EPA, DHA and EPA + DHA and the rate of total ASCVD and acute major ischemic events. Conclusions A high intake of marine n-3 PUFA was associated with a lower risk of total ASCVD and acute major ischemic events, whereas no association could be demonstrated for the plant-derived ALA.
      PubDate: 2023-01-02
       
  • Associations of healthy dietary patterns with mortality among people with
           prediabetes

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      Abstract: Purpose To examine the associations of healthy dietary patterns with cardiometabolic biomarkers and all-cause mortality among individuals with prediabetes. Methods This cohort study included 8363 adults with prediabetes from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999–2014. Healthy dietary patterns including Alternate Healthy Eating Index-2010 (AHEI-2010), Alternate Mediterranean Diet score (AMED), Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension score (DASH), and Healthy Eating Index-2015 (HEI-2015) were calculated based on 24-h dietary recall data. Mortality status was obtained by linkage to National Death Index records. Cardiometabolic biomarkers, including blood glucose, insulin, HbA1c, C-reactive protein (CRP), and lipids, were measured at recruitment. Results During 61,991 person-years of follow-up, 991 deaths occurred. Comparing the extreme quartiles, the multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for all-cause mortality were 0.65 (0.49, 0.85) for AHEI-2010 (P-trend = 0.002), 0.68 (0.50, 0.92) for AMED (P-trend = 0.004), 0.72 (0.53, 0.98) for DASH (P-trend = 0.03), and 0.78 (0.58, 1.05) for HEI-2015 (P-trend = 0.08). Besides, the HRs (95% CIs) for all-cause mortality per 20-percentile increment in scores were 0.78 (0.67, 0.90) for AHEI-2010 (P = 0.001), 0.73 (0.62, 0.86) for AMED (P < 0.001), 0.84 (0.69, 1.02) for DASH (P = 0.08), and 0.86 (0.74, 1.00) for HEI-2015 (P = 0.04). In addition, higher dietary scores were associated with favorable blood glucose, insulin, HOMA-IR, blood lipids, and CRP (all P-trend < 0.05). The high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and CRP explained 1.53–9.21% of the associations between dietary patterns and all-cause mortality (P < 0.05). Conclusions Diets with higher AHEI-2010, AMED, DASH, and HEI-2015 were associated with improved cardiometabolic factors and lower all-cause mortality among individuals with prediabetes. These findings suggest that multiple healthy dietary patterns instead of a one-size-fits-all diet plan might be beneficial and acceptable for individuals with prediabetes.
      PubDate: 2022-12-27
       
  • Pooled analysis of epigenome-wide association studies of food consumption
           in KORA, TwinsUK and LLS

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      Abstract: Purpose Examining epigenetic patterns is a crucial step in identifying molecular changes of disease pathophysiology, with DNA methylation as the most accessible epigenetic measure. Diet is suggested to affect metabolism and health via epigenetic modifications. Thus, our aim was to explore the association between food consumption and DNA methylation. Methods Epigenome-wide association studies were conducted in three cohorts: KORA FF4, TwinsUK, and Leiden Longevity Study, and 37 dietary exposures were evaluated. Food group definition was harmonized across the three cohorts. DNA methylation was measured using Infinium MethylationEPIC BeadChip in KORA and Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip in the Leiden study and the TwinsUK study. Overall, data from 2293 middle-aged men and women were included. A fixed-effects meta-analysis pooled study-specific estimates. The significance threshold was set at 0.05 for false-discovery rate-adjusted p values per food group. Results We identified significant associations between the methylation level of CpG sites and the consumption of onions and garlic (2), nuts and seeds (18), milk (1), cream (11), plant oils (4), butter (13), and alcoholic beverages (27). The signals targeted genes of metabolic health relevance, for example, GLI1, RPTOR, and DIO1, among others. Conclusion This EWAS is unique with its focus on food groups that are part of a Western diet. Significant findings were mostly related to food groups with a high-fat content.
      PubDate: 2022-12-26
       
  • Impact of Antarctic krill oil supplementation on skeletal muscle injury
           recovery after resistance exercise

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      Abstract: Background Antarctic krill oil (KO) is a natural source of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs), and is rich in phospholipids, Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), astaxanthin, flavonoids, vitamins, trace elements, and other bioactive substances. KO has been confirmed to have anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects. n-3 PUFAs also have been purported to improve the recovery of muscular performance. Moreover, the phospholipids present in KO can enhance n-3 PUFA bioavailability because of its higher absorption rate in plasma compared to fish oil. Astaxanthin, found in Antarctic KO, is a red carotenoid and powerful antioxidant that inhibits oxidative stress after intense exercise. Hence, we examined the effect of KO supplementation on the recovery of exercise by measuring muscular performance, oxidant/antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity, and the markers of muscle damage following a rigorous bout of resistance exercise. Methods 30 college-aged resistance-trained males (20.4 ± 0.92 years, 74.09 ± 7.23 kg, 180.13 ± 4.72 cm) were randomly supplemented with 3 g/d KO or placebo (PL) for 3 days and continued to consume after resistance exercise for 3 days until the experiment finished. Before supplementation, pre-exercise performance assessments of knee isokinetic strength, 20 m sprint, hexagon test, and blood serum creatine kinase (CK), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), superoxide dismutase (SOD), total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC), reactive oxygen species (ROS), malondialdehyde (MDA), interleukin-2 (IL-2), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) were completed. Then after 3 days of supplementation, participants completed a bout of muscle-damaging exercise, and subsequently, they performed and repeated the exercise performance assessments and blood-related indicators tests immediately (0 h), as well as at 6, 24, 48, and 72 h post-muscle-damaging exercise. Results Compared to the PL group, the serum CK of KO group was significantly lower at 24 h and 48 h post-exercise; the hexagon test time of the KO group was significantly lower than that of the PL group at 6 h and 24 h post-exercise; the KO group’s isokinetic muscle strength showed different degrees of recovery than that of the PL group at 24 h and 48 h, and even over-recovery at 72 h post-exercise; the SOD level of the KO group was significantly higher than that of the PL group at 0, 6, and 24 h after exercise; the T-AOC level of the KO group was significantly higher than that of the PL group at 0, 6, and 72 h after exercise; the MDA level of the KO group was significantly lower than that of the PL group at 6 h; and there was no significant difference in serum IL-2, IL-6, and TNF-α between the two groups. Conclusion Our results demonstrated that 3 g/d KO supplementation and continued supplementation after exercise can alleviate exercise-induced muscle damage (EIMD) and promote post-exercise recovery.
      PubDate: 2022-12-25
       
  • Alcohol consumption: context and association with mortality in Switzerland

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      Abstract: Purpose Non-communicable diseases generate the largest number of avoidable deaths often caused by risk factors such as alcohol, smoking, and unhealthy diets. Our study investigates the association between amount and context of alcohol consumption and mortality from major non-communicable diseases in Switzerland. Methods Generalized linear regression models were fitted on data of the cross-sectional population-based National Nutrition Survey menuCH (2014–2015, n = 2057). Mortality rates based on the Swiss mortality data (2015–2018) were modeled by the alcohol consumption group considering the amount and context (i.e., during or outside mealtime) of alcohol consumption and potential confounders. The models were checked for spatial autocorrelation using Moran’s I statistic. Integrated nested Laplace approximation (INLA) models were fitted when evidence for missing spatial information was found. Results Higher mortality rates were detected among drinkers compared to non-drinkers for all-cancer (rate ratio (RR) ranging from 1.01 to 1.07) and upper aero-digestive tract cancer (RR ranging from 1.15 to 1.20) mortality. Global Moran’s I statistic revealed spatial autocorrelation at the Swiss district level for all-cancer mortality. An INLA model led to the identification of three districts with a significant decrease and four districts with a significant increase in all-cancer mortality. Conclusion Significant associations of alcohol consumption with all-cancer and upper aero-digestive tract cancer mortality were detected. Our study results indicate the need for further studies to improve the next alcohol-prevention scheme and to lower the number of avoidable deaths in Switzerland.
      PubDate: 2022-12-24
       
  • Association between serum uric acid and prostate cancer risk in East Asian
           populations: a Mendelian randomization study

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      Abstract: Purpose Previous observational studies showed that serum uric acid (SUA) was associated with prostate cancer, but the causal relationship is unclear. This study aimed to explore the potential causal association between SUA and prostate cancer risk using Mendelian randomization (MR) analyses in the East Asian populations. Methods Publicly available summary-level genome-wide association studies (GWAS) data on SUA were obtained from a genome-wide meta-analysis of three Japanese cohorts (121,745 subjects). The GWAS data on prostate cancer were derived from Biobank Japan (109,347 subjects with 5,408 cases and 103,939 controls). A total of 34 SUA-related single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (P value < 5 × 10–8) were identified as instrumental variables. The inverse variance weighted method was used as the primary method to compute the odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) for per standard deviation increase in SUA. MR Egger, weighted median, and weighted mode were also applied to test the robustness of the results. Results Genetically predicted SUA was positively associated with prostate cancer risk using inverse variance weighted (OR = 1.12; 95% CI 1.00–1.26; P = 0.043). The positive association was robust when MR Egger (OR = 1.16; 95% CI 1.01–1.34; P = 0.048), weighted median (OR = 1.18; 95% CI 1.03–1.36; P = 0.018), and weighted mode (OR = 1.14; 95% CI 1.01–1.29; P = 0.041) were used. Conclusion There were potential causal associations between higher genetically predicted SUA levels and increased prostate cancer risk. Further, MR studies with more valid SNPs and more cancer cases are needed. Validation of the findings is also recommended.
      PubDate: 2022-12-21
       
 
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