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  Subjects -> NUTRITION AND DIETETICS (Total: 201 journals)
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Indian Journal of Nutrition and Dietetics
Number of Followers: 1  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0022-3174 - ISSN (Online) 2348-621X
Published by Informatics Publishing Limited Homepage  [20 journals]
  • Development of Fruit and Vegetable Based Millet Pasta

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      Authors: Dayakar Rao Benhur, Shreeja Kulla, Israel Raj Alladi
      Pages: 1 - 7
      Abstract: Incorporation of nutricereals, fruits and vegetables into daily dietaries is a food design strategy that can add several health benefits. Pasta, a well-known food product, is obtained from extrusion process by mixing wheat semolina and water. Replacing wheat with millets and water with fruit/vegetable pulp in the development of pasta may enhance its nutritional quality and lowers its carbohydrate levels, which will benefit for diabetic and cancer patients. The aim of the current study is to formulate the millet-based pasta with locally available fruit/vegetables. In this study, different proportion of diverse ingredients such as barnyard millet semolina, papaya, gogu and tapioca were used. Pasta was developed in five different formulations with barnyard millet, papaya and gogu incorporation; gogu and papaya were added up to 15 and 30 %, respectively. Among five proportions, combination of papaya (20 %) and gogu (5 %) addition to barnyard millet-based pasta has the highest organoleptic score. Addition of fruit/vegetable has improved dietary fiber and total mineral content by 89.30 and 12.61 %, respectively.
      PubDate: 2023-12-30
      DOI: 10.21048/IJND.2023.60.SP4.34115
       
  • Nutritional and Nutraceutical Advantages of Small Millets and Their Role
           in Prevention of Life Style Disorders

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      Authors: Chandankumar K. P., Jayadeep A., Sridevi A. Singh
      Pages: 8 - 21
      Abstract: Millets in general and the small millets in particular, consumed in whole form with its botanical parts such as endosperm, bran and germ, are rich in nutrients and phyto-nutrients. Important cultivated small millets are finger millet, little millet, kodo millet, foxtail millet, barnyard millet and proso millet. Each millet is unique in their content of nutrients and phyto-components with health beneficial effects or nutraceuticals. Bioactive components in the millet include- phenolic acids, flavonoids, phytosterols, tocopherols, carotenoids, small peptides, dietary fibre, etc. These components as well as small millet fractions can influence the biochemical and molecular pathways in metabolic syndrome and play key role in prevention of life style disorders.
      PubDate: 2023-12-30
      DOI: 10.21048/IJND.2023.60.SP4.36276
       
  • Promoting Millets Production for Ensuring Food and Nutrient Security in
           Tamil Nadu

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      Authors: Geethalakshmi V.
      Pages: 22 - 30
      Abstract: Millets offer significant advantages in terms of production and consumption. They have a lower water requirement compared to other crops and are resilient in nature. Furthermore, when positioned correctly in the market, millets can yield higher returns even in their raw form. Additionally, millets are packed with nutrients, surpassing those found in traditional grains. Millets have been a traditional food, nutritive and by processing it could be made preferable to consumers of all age groups. Livestock feed has greatly benefited from this material. Therefore, it is imperative to prioritize research and development in the areas of production, processing, and value chain management. Over the course of a century's worth of dedicated research and development efforts, TNAU has successfully introduced 5 high-yielding hybrids and 33 varieties in sorghum, 10 high-yielding hybrids and 9 varieties in pearl millet, as well as 15 varieties in finger millet and 21 varieties in small millets. State and Central Governments have also initiated various mission mode projects since last 10 years for promotion of millets among farmers and consumers. Millet product processing interventions are focused on improving nutritional value, convenience and shelflife. New extruded products (vermicelli and noodles), flakes, savory snacks, nutrition bars, cookies, etc. are being developed to attract youth. Raising awareness of the health and nutritional benefits of millet products is imperative for India, which has substantial youth population. Thus promoting millets will enable better returns to farmers and also ensure nutritive food for the people.
      PubDate: 2023-12-30
      DOI: 10.21048/IJND.2023.60.SP4.36277
       
  • Millets in India: Current Scenario and the Way Forward

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      Authors: Prema Ramachandran, Kalaivani K.
      Pages: 31 - 41
      Abstract: Millets are small-seeded plants with a short growing season, low water requirements and high disease resistance. Millet cultivation can potentially improve food security of marginal farmers in areas affected by drought due to climate change. But they are not the preferred crops in other areas because of low yield, short shelf life, low demand and non-remunerative selling price. There had been a progressive reduction in millet consumption over decades partly due to ready availability of subsidized rice and wheat through Public Distribution System (PDS) and partly because of the drudgery in processing of millets and difficulty in making tasty millet preparations. Industrial level processing methods to improve organoleptic properties often result in reduction in fiber content. Carbohydrate protein and fat content of millets are similar to cereals; they are gluten-free. Millets have higher vitamins, calcium, iron, phyto-nutrients and anti-oxidant content as compared to rice and wheat. Bio-availability of calcium and iron in millet-based diets is low because of the high fibre and phytate content. Millet-based meals with high fibre contents lows intestinal transit and provides satiety. Millets contain resistant starch which gets digested and absorbed slowly. The high phytonutrient and anti-oxidant content of millets has been shown to have a protective role in the prevention of non-communicable diseases in animals and may help in reducing CVD risk in human beings. Reintroducing millets into habitual Indian diets may help in the dietary management of over-nutrition, blood sugar in diabetic persons, halt the rise in lipid levels and reduce the risk of cardiovascular diseases.
      PubDate: 2023-12-30
      DOI: 10.21048/IJND.2023.60.SP4.36278
       
  • Millets for Nutrition Security in India

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      Authors: Shobana S., Anjana R. M., Mohan V.
      Pages: 42 - 57
      Abstract: Millets are nutri-cereals, ancient crops, farmer friendly, climate resilient, energy-efficient and sustainable crops. The nutritional properties of each millet are unique but overall, they are nutritionally superior to white rice and refined wheat when consumed in whole grain forms. Millets being rich in complex carbohydrates contain higher levels of insoluble fibre and are rich in vitamins and minerals. Pigmented millets are rich in phytochemicals such as phenolic compounds and are reported to have several health benefits which include antioxidant, antimicrobial and blood sugar and cholesterol lowering properties etc. These were established through in vitro, animal feeding and human feeding trials. In India refined grain-based diets which are deficient in pulses are being consumed. There is therefore a need for alternative cereal staples and this is where millets can help. Processing is known to impact the nutritional properties of millets. Dehulling / polishing reduces dietary fibre, vitamins and mineral contents while increasing available carbohydrates. Such millets are nutritionally inferior as they can increase the glycemic load. Characterization of millet germplasm, landraces for nutritional property and phytochemicals can be helpful to identify millets with superior nutritional qualities. The glycemic index of millet foods ranges from low to high, is unique for each millet food. Inclusion of pulses and soluble fibres in millet foods is helpful in lowering the glycemic response. Continuous glucose monitoring studies showed that finger millet diets as compared to white rice diets produced 18% lower fasting insulin levels. Studies on the drivers and barriers of millet consumption, millet consumption patterns will provide more insights on the preferred forms of millet foods. There is a need for data base on the nutritional and glycemic properties of millets and this can help create a millet food atlas. Collaboration between different stake holders along millet value chain is essential to promote healthier forms of millets in this population.
      PubDate: 2023-12-30
      DOI: 10.21048/IJND.2023.60.SP4.36279
       
  • Mighty Millets for Food, Nutrition and Health Security

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      Authors: Israel Oliver King E. D., Hariharan G. N., Soumya Swaminathan, Akshaya Kumar Panda, Anbuvahini ., Dhanya C. S., Gayatri Venkataraman, Girigan G., Gopinath R., Goutham. R, Hossain M. D., Kartik Charan Lenka, Nithya D. J., Prabavathy V. R., Prashant K. Parida, Ramasubramanian R., Rengalakshmi R., Sangeetha Rajeesh, Shakeela V., Sivan Kalyani Velu, Sivan V. V., Velvizhi S.
      Pages: 58 - 64
      Abstract: The United Nations General Assembly declared 2023 as the International Year of Millets to promote the nutritional benefits and climate resilience of millets, an ancient food for over half a million people in Asia and Africa. Millets are produced in over 130 countries and are cultivated in rainfed regions, providing income and livelihood security to farmers. They are also known as ‘Smart Food’ due to their high protein, antioxidants, and micronutrient content, making them popular among celiac disease sufferers and those on gluten-free diets. However, global millet cultivation has declined significantly in the last five decades, with a 22.5 lakh ha area per decade decline. India is the largest producer of millets, with 37.5% of the total global output. The decline may be attributed to limitations in crop improvement efforts, shift towards high-value cash crops, inadequate policies, and low farm profitability. The M.S. Swaminathan Research Foundation organized an International conference on Mighty Millets for food, nutrition, and health security in August 2023. The paper emphasizes the need to achieve Food, Nutrition, and Health security through millets, adding gaps and priorities in research, innovation, development, extension, and policy domain to sustain efforts. Addressing these gaps and priorities is timely and imperative to sustain the efforts and ensure the sustainability of millets as a sustainable food source for millions of people worldwide.
      PubDate: 2023-12-30
      DOI: 10.21048/IJND.2023.60.SP4.36280
       
  • Biofortified Pearl Millet Varieties for Sustainable Agriculture among
           farming community in Theni District, Tamil Nadu

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      Authors: Ramyasivaselvi M., Kowsalya S., Juliet Hepziba S.
      Pages: 65 - 77
      Abstract: Pearl millet (Pennisetum glaucum-Bajra) is a unique and important nutri cereal for food and nutritional security and drought-tolerant coarse-grain cereal. Pearl Millet offers a plethora of health benefits and is also good for the environment with low water and input requirements for production. The present study was framed to assess the suitable biofortied Pearl millet variety under rainfed situation in Theni District and its nutritional security, and farmer revenue. The primary objective of the trial was to evaluate newly released different biofortified varieties, technologies, management practices and post-harvest management at farmers’ fields under real farming situations under different agroclimatic regions. The On-farm trial was conducted during Kharif season, to study the performance of different short-duration and high-yielding Biofortified pearl millet varieties for sustainable Agriculture in rainfed regions of Theni District. Randomized Block Design (RBD) was used to arrange the experimental plot in five replications with Dhanasakthi, ABV 04 and CO10 biofortified pearl millet varieties. The recommended cultivation practices were followed during the trail period. As part of the study, training cum method demonstration was conducted on different storage techniques. Need based skill trainings cum method demonstrations were conducted to 60 farmers. Experiments results relvealed that Dhanasakthi variety matured on 81 days followed by ABV 04 (83.66 days). The Pearl millet variety CO10 matured on 91.16 days. The greater number of productive tillers (6.36) was recorded in CO10 variety followed by 5.7 in ABV 04. The highest panicle length was recorded (40.90 cm) in CO10 followed by Dhanasakthi (29.33 cm). The highest yield was recorded in CO10 (33.64 q/ha) followed by ABV 04. Regarding the Benefit Cost Ratio (BCR), CO10 recorded 4.31 followed by ABV 04 (2.79). The study conclude that CO10 Pearl millet variety is highly adopted by the farmers compared to two other varieties. Regarding storage technique, They prefer to store the grains by sand layer technology and pepper seed powder in IRRI Bag. The farmers gained knowledge on value chain management from 48-70 percentage. This knowledge and skills on value chain management of biofortified pearl millet varieties would help them to get an idea to start entrepreneur units in their villages for sustainable income generation.
      PubDate: 2023-12-30
      DOI: 10.21048/IJND.2023.60.SP4.36281
       
 
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  Subjects -> NUTRITION AND DIETETICS (Total: 201 journals)
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