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  Subjects -> NUTRITION AND DIETETICS (Total: 201 journals)
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Indian Journal of Nutrition and Dietetics
Number of Followers: 1  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0022-3174 - ISSN (Online) 2348-621X
Published by Informatics Publishing Limited Homepage  [20 journals]
  • Maternal Employment and Nutritional Status of Preschool Children

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      Authors: Wahida Yasmeen, Md. Motiur Rahman, Hafiza Sultana, Tanmoy Saha, Syeda Tahmina Ferdous Jinia, Foisal Mahammad Mosiul Alom
      Pages: 321 - 333
      Abstract: The early childhood development is the most crucial and the mother’s care and attention is essential. The inevitable changes like women entering the workplace have an effect on child growth and development. The purpose of the study was to compare the nutritional status of preschool children between employed and unemployed mothers. The study was conducted in the urban community of Rajshahi city from January to December, 2018. The comparative cross sectional study was conducted among 400 children aged fewer than five years with their respondents. Respondents were selected by a purposive sampling method and data were collected by semi-structured questionnaire by face to face interview. Nutritional status was assessed by anthropometric measurements. The mean age of the employed and unemployed mothers were 30.79±2.99 and 30.58±2.89 years respectively. Most of the employed mothers (91.0%) practiced exclusive breast-feeding for 6 months. Among the unemployed mothers, 64.0% practiced, which was a high statistical difference (p<0.05). There was highly significant statistical difference among mothers of two groups regarding starting complementary feeding as p=0.004. There was no significant statistical difference regarding children’s Mid Upper Arm Circumference (MUAC) classification. Weight for Age (WAZ) - score, Height for Age (HAZ)-score and Weight for Height (WHZ) - score of employed and unemployed mother’s children showed a significant difference (p<0.05). The study showed that maternal employed status play an essential role in determining child health care practice, which may influence a child’s health and development in later life.
      PubDate: 2023-09-01
      DOI: 10.21048/IJND.2023.60.3.31381
       
  • Nutritional Quality of Diets of Adults (20-40 Years) in Delhi, India

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      Authors: Srishti Mediratta, Pulkit Mathur
      Pages: 334 - 350
      Abstract: Rise in prevalence of diet related non communicable diseases can be prevented by following balanced and healthy diets. The study aimed to assess adequacy of nutrient and food group intakes along with frequency of consumption of foods High in Fat, Sugar and Salt (HFSS). The study was a cross-sectional study with non-probability purposive sampling method. A total of 589 adults (20-40 years) were selected from housing colonies from four geographical zones of city. Dietary intake was assessed using 24-hour dietary recall method. Frequency and amount of foods consumed was recorded using a semi quantitative Food Frequency Questionnaire (FFQ). The differences in food groups and nutrient intakes across socio-demographic groups were assessed using Independent sample t-test and Mann-Whitney U test. Statistical significance was assumed at 5% level (p<0.05). Most participants had nutrient intakes lower than the EAR for calcium (97%), zinc (98%), riboflavin (100%), niacin (68%), vitamin B6 (96%) and vitamin A (60%). All participants had lower intakes of pulses, green leafy vegetables, other vegetables, fruits, milk and milk products, oilseed and nuts when compared to the recommended intakes. HFSS foods-sweet plain biscuits (46%), fried namkeen (37%), roasted namkeen (30%), non-carbonated drinks (29%) and deep-fried foods (25%) were eaten regularly by more than one fourth of participants. Participants occasionally consumed pizzas (60%), chat (54%), dosa (50%) and burgers (48%). Therefore, reducing the share of foods high in fat, sugar and salt and enabling healthier selection of food groups through behaviour change communication strategies will ensure adequate nutrient intakes.
      PubDate: 2023-09-01
      DOI: 10.21048/IJND.2023.60.3.32325
       
  • Nutrition Care Process and its Impact on Remission of “Diabesity” and
           Allied Factors Post Roux-En Y Gastric Bypass Bariatric Surgery - A
           Case-Control Cohort Study

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      Authors: Vanisha S. Nambiar, Charul Jha
      Pages: 351 - 367
      Abstract: With a rising trend in obesity, diabetes and bariatric surgeries in India, nutrition care and management of patients post-surgery is still a cause of concern. To assess the impact of the nutrition care process on remission of “diabesity” and associated factors post Roux-en YGastric Bypass (RYGB) bariatric surgery. A single-point, hospital-based, Cohort- Case-Control, 3-month longitudinal study of 73 RYGB patients enrolled based on consent. Experimental (E) group (n=36) received nutritional care through personal counselling, group counselling and digital means under 3 broad management categories: 1) Pre-surgery nutritional assessment, diagnosis and counselling (deficiencies and diet), 2) Post-surgery diet progression, nutritional therapy for early and late complications, physical activity progression and behaviour related eating complications; and 3) Guidance and recommendations for lifelong follow-ups and importance of supplementation, as compared to the Control (C) group (n=37) which received care as per old protocols. Pre-post indicators related to weight loss and remission of diabetes were done as per the American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery guidelines and quality of life post bariatric surgery was done as per Bariatric Analysis and Reporting Outcome System (BAROS). All data were analyzed using SPSS-23 software. Post 3 mos. significant (≤0.001) weight loss (34 kg vs. 29 kg), remission in diabetes (49% vs. 34%) and improved quality of life scores were recorded in the experimental group as compared to the control group. A customized 3-section Nutritional Care Process is recommended in all bariatric surgery settings for improved nutritional and quality of life outcomes post-surgery.
      PubDate: 2023-09-01
      DOI: 10.21048/IJND.2023.60.3.33104
       
  • Impact of Physical Activity on BMI and Thyroid Function in Obese Women

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      Authors: Nita Ann Johnson, Kowsalya S.
      Pages: 368 - 377
      Abstract: Overnutrition is emerging as a major problem in all segments of the population due to the steep reduction in physical activity and is associated with thyroid dysfunction. One hundred overnourished women were enrolled in the intervention study aimed at assessing the impact of improving physical activity in women on body weight, BMI and thyroid function. On the basis of the BMI during the initial screening, these women were divided into four groups (OWIG1, OWIG2, OBIG3 and OBIG4). The groups were randomly assigned exercise routines of 30 minutes and 45 minutes to be done at home for five days a week for 26 weeks. In all these women the serum TSH, T3 and T4 levels were estimated at zero, thirteen and twenty-six weeks of intervention. A significant reduction in pre- and post-weight and BMI levels was observed. A uniform negative association (p=<0.005) indicated the significance of the exercise intervention with anthropometric parameters. Positively uniform correlations between the exercise intervention and the thyroid function tests during the entire study period were found at p=<0.05 (sig. <0.001) level of significance. Exercise significantly explained weight to 43% and BMI to 64%; while it did not show significance for serum thyroid levels. Tackling overnutrition and associated health hazards requires a combination of interventions such as increase in physical activity and approaches to bring about behaviour change for addressing modifiable risk factors.
      PubDate: 2023-09-01
      DOI: 10.21048/IJND.2023.60.3.34813
       
  • Chemical Composition, Characterization and Antioxidant Property of a Food
           Additive Prepared from Vigna Mungo (Black Gram Lentils) Plant Waste

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      Authors: Deepjyoti Mazumder, Alakes Narzary, Suresh K. Nath
      Pages: 378 - 388
      Abstract: Assam is a state of North East India and the tribal and non-tribal people here use different naturally available food materials and modify those through traditional processes for preservation and utilization for the purpose. An ethnic food additive called Khar, prepared from Vigna mungo (Black gram lentils) plant waste; its chemical parameters and antioxidant properties has been studied in this work. The pH, alkalinity, hardness, metal content, and functional groups present in the ash sample and the extract are determined using titration method, atomic absorption spectrophotometer, SEM-EDX and FTIR. Some essential minerals present in the sample are K, Na, Mg, Ca, Cu, Mn, Fe, etc. and the basic property of this additive makes it as a good antacid.
      PubDate: 2023-09-01
      DOI: 10.21048/IJND.2023.60.3.33129
       
  • Anti-Lipase and Antioxidant Activities of the Selected Plant Materials

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      Authors: Vidhi Khatlawala, Viraj Roghelia
      Pages: 389 - 397
      Abstract: Pancreatic lipase plays an important role in the efficient digestion of triglycerides. Its action on lipids produces fatty acids, accumulating in excess into various tissues leading to dyslipidaemia and associated co-morbidities. Thus, inhibition of pancreatic lipase is one of the preferable ways to prevent such conditions. The present study is aimed to evaluate the anti-lipase and antioxidant activities of the leaves of Magnifera indica L. (mango), Psidium guajava L. (guava) and Moringa olifera L. (moringa), and fresh rhizomes of Zingiber officinale R. (ginger), Curcuma longa L. (turmeric), and Curcuma amada R. (mango ginger). The selected samples were dehydrated, powdered, and extracted using absolute ethanol. The extracts were analysed for total phenols, flavonoids, DPPH radical scavenging activity and anti-lipase activity. Among the selected leaves, mango leaves had the highest total phenolic content (6300 mg GAE /100 g), total flavonoid content (6930 mg RE /100 g) and highest DPPH radical scavenging activity (14497.3 mgTE /100 g). The highest lipase inhibition (89.07%) was observed in guava leaves. In rhizomes, turmeric contained the highest total phenolic content (6570 mg GAE /100 g) and flavonoid content (14760 mg RE /100 g). Mango ginger possessed the highest DPPH radical scavenging activity of 9038.7 mg TE /100 g and lipase inhibition of 44.83%. The study concludes that guava leaves and mango ginger possess the highest anti-lipase activity among the selected leaves and rhizomes.
      PubDate: 2023-09-01
      DOI: 10.21048/IJND.2023.60.3.33246
       
  • A Comparative Study on Several Meat Analogues and Development of a
           Nutritionally Enriched Meat Analogue

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      Authors: Sweata Rani Rai, Ushasee Garai
      Pages: 398 - 411
      Abstract: Vegetarian food products have gained more popularity in the recent market because of consumer’s developing increased health issues awareness and environmental issues and concern. Meat analogues are products that can replace meat by mimicking its functionality, by exhibiting similar product properties and sensory attributes which can be achieved by the fibrous nature of certain plant-based ingredients. The present study was undertaken to assess the knowledge, attitude and practice of young adults of West Bengal on understanding of meat analogues followed by development of a gluten free meat analogue enriched with vitamin D2 and calcium. An online survey was carried out amongst the participants of the study to assess the acceptability of meat analogue using a KAP module. The product was developed using two functional ingredients- jackfruit and soya chunks. The product was further enriched with sun dried mushroom and ragi to enhance nutritional value of the product. Sensory and physical attributes was evaluated. Texture Profile Analysis (TPA) was done using TA.TX texture analyser of the most approved variation.70% of the respondents were aware of meat analogues, 93.3% stated that they have never consumed meat analogues and 67.7% reported of meat analogue as a healthy alternative. Sample 3C was the most approved variation containing jack fruit (26.7%), soya chunk powder (11.4%), gram flour (4%), dried oyster mushroom (3.8%), beetroot (3.8%), ragi (3.8%), Carboxy Methyl Cellulose or CMC (2.8%), sunflower oil (2.8%), salt (1.9%) and water (30.4%). The texture profile based on hardness, adhesiveness, springiness, cohesiveness, gumminess, resilience was very promising showing negligible variation compared with the standard thereby increasing product’s acceptability by consumers.
      PubDate: 2023-09-01
      DOI: 10.21048/IJND.2023.60.3.32371
       
  • Product Development of Baked Soya and Makhana Cookies with Hypolipidemic
           Properties

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      Authors: Ruhi Grewal, Tarvinder Jeet Kaur
      Pages: 412 - 421
      Abstract: Disturbed lipid profile refers to the abundance or lack of lipoprotein component which is a repercussion of ruined and impaired lipoprotein metabolism involving degraded levels of total cholesterol, triglycerides, non high density, low density and high density lipoproteins. Scientific studies have proven that nutrition has a pivotal role in the management of hyperlipidemia. Keeping this in view, a research project was planned to develop the soya and makhana baked goods with hypolipidemic properties. Present study was performed on product development, sensory evaluation, standardization and nutritional calculation of baked soya and makhana cookies enriched with hypolipidemic mixture so as to nutritionally improve the disturbed lipid parameters. Hypolipidemic nutritional mixture was developed using chia seeds, almonds, wheat bran and mango seed powder. Baked soya and makhana cookies were enriched using developed hypolipidemic nutritional mixture at different incorporation levels. These products were tested for their suitability using 9 point hedonic scale and nutritional value was calculated using RDA 2020 and IFCT 2017. The most acceptable mean sensory scores of baked soya and whole wheat cookies enriched with hypolipidemic mixture at 12 and 15% incorporation levels were 7.75±0.75 and 7.59±0.91 respectively. Statistically, baked cookies with hypolipidemic properties had significant higher content of dietary fiber, monounsaturated fatty acids and linoleic acid. Baked soya and makhana cookies with hypolipidemic properties had high level of nutrients which are scientifically responsible for nutritionally managing and improving the perturbed lipid parameters accompanied by acceptable organoleptic scores.
      PubDate: 2023-09-01
      DOI: 10.21048/IJND.2023.60.3.33110
       
  • Phytochemical Screening and GC-MS Analysis of Bioactive Constituents of
           Methanolic Extract from Raphanus sativus Leaves Powder

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      Authors: Nafila P.M., Shemi George S.R.
      Pages: 422 - 430
      Abstract: Radish leaves belong to the Brassicaceae family. Radish leaves are the ancient long green foliage leafy vegetables consumed all over the world. It is consumed more often due to their health benefits. The radish leaves are abundantly available at nominal cost. They are good source of calcium and phosphorous. The radish leaves are known for its hypolipidemic activity. The present study was designed to determine the phytochemical properties present in the radish leaves powder. The radish leaves powder were shade dried to retain its chemical properties. The GC-MS analysis of radish leaves were performed with methanolic extract of radish leaves powder obtained the number of molecular compounds present. The compounds showed antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activities.
      PubDate: 2023-09-01
      DOI: 10.21048/IJND.2023.60.3.32298
       
  • A Study on Extraction Methods and Primary Toxicity Level of Bio Colourants

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      Authors: Yoshia Leela J., Sridevi Sivakami PL.
      Pages: 431 - 446
      Abstract: Bio-colourants for food are extracted from plant sources that it is becoming a huge demand in the global market of processed foods and confectionaries. Natural colours play a vital role in food safety and also in meeting the needs of food consumption practices for the growing crisis in the availability of healthy foods. Aim of the bio colours is to replace synthetic colours like sunset yellow FCF, Allura Red, Ponceau 4R, Amaranth and Brown HT as they are becoming a wide range of threat to the human race, especially in bringing psychological changes in children and adolescents. Usually bio-colourants are extracted from almost all the parts of a plant. But majority of the colours are extracted from leaves and barks, whereas few colours in specific are extracted from fruits, seeds and some from petals of flowers. In this study, bio-colouring agents such as madder roots (Rubia cordifolia), eucalyptus bark (Eucalyptus grandis), annatto seeds (Bixaorellana), roselle petals (Hibiscus sabdariffa) and tamarind seeds (Tamarindus indica) were identified and used in extraction of colours. The colours obtained were of different shades of red like: sangria red, rusty red and yellow red. These natural food colours were extracted from their natural sources through two processes:10 per cent aqueous extraction (reflux, boiling) and powdering the substances. The pH of the extracts was taken to know their level of hydrogen ion concentration. To verify,if these extracts are edible and stable, preliminary toxicology study was carried out in brine shrimp assay. On the other hand, every fourth day the discolouring of the extracts was constantly measured using Food Colour Reader. The aqueous extracts showed discolouring and formation of microbial layer even when preserved in refrigerator in sterilized glass bottles, whereas the powdered substances remained the same with no discolouring or microbial activity in it. The toxicity study has practically proved that the powdered substances in various concentrations of 100, 250, 500, 1000 and 1500 µg/ml has the overall lowest mortality rate in consideration to mean and standard deviation (M ± SD) of 11.7 ± 10.7, than to the aqueous extraction samples of 73.7 ± 22.8 respectively. This study is carried out to promote and incorporate bio-colours in foods that can be consumed on daily basis, replacing the commercially available hazardous food colourants.
      PubDate: 2023-09-01
      DOI: 10.21048/IJND.2023.60.3.34814
       
  • Foodborne Diseases - A Public Health Challenge

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      Authors: Gayathri M., Seeja Thomachan Panjikkaran, Aneena E.R., Suman K.T., Lakshmy P.S., Sharon C.L.
      Pages: 447 - 459
      Abstract: +Foodborne diseases are caused by consuming foods contaminated with toxic chemicals or biotoxins or foods containing bacteria, viruses, fungi, parasites, or foods containing bacteria, viruses, fungi, or parasites. Foodborne infections are a major global health problem that causes substantial morbidity and mortality around the world. Each year, over 600 million people are affected by foodborne diseases. Children under five years are particularly at a high risk comprising 30% of the total foodborne deaths annually. Foodborne diseases are classified as foodborne infection, foodborne intoxication and foodborne toxic infection. Ingestion of viable pathogens like bacteria, viruses, parasites and protozoa along with the food leads to food infection. Ingestion of preformed toxins, previously generated by bacteria in food, are causes foodborne intoxication. Staphylococcal intoxication and botulism are some examples of food intoxication. Foodborne toxic infection is caused by microorganisms that create toxins in situ after being eaten with food, infecting the intestine. Cholera, listeriosis and Clostridium perfringens gastroenteritis are some examples of toxic infections. Foodborne diseases can be prevented by proper sanitation and hygiene, using safe raw materials and using the right temperature to prepare and store food. Safe food handling practices can be ensured by following HACCP (Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point) and FSSAI (Food Safety and Standards Authority of India) guidelines. Foodborne disease will continue to be a major hazard around the world, but with effective sanitation and hygiene, prevention is not difficult.
      PubDate: 2023-09-01
      DOI: 10.21048/IJND.2023.60.3.29867
       
  • Millet: The Food for Millennium

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      Authors: Roja Ghosh, Sarita Mishra, Heleena Jati
      Pages: 460 - 469
      Abstract: Millet is one of the cereal grains that belong to the grass family. It's widely consumed in developing countries and India. Millet is a rich source of nutrition. The food products and beverages made out of them have many health benefits. Different types of millets have their specialties. Sorghum grain is completely gluten-free and rich in iron, protein, and fiber. Finger millet is a source of natural calcium and iron. It helps cure anemia and improves bone health. Pearl millet consists of magnesium which helps in reducing respiratory problems. Millets are highly nutritious, non-glutinous, and non-acid-forming foods. Millets have many nutritional and health-promoting properties, especially the high fiber content. Millets hydrate our colon to keep us from being constipated. Niacin in millet can help to lower cholesterol. Millets contain major and minor nutrients in good amounts along with dietary fiber. They are rich in nutrition and dietary fiber. They serve as a good source of protein, micronutrients, and phytochemicals. The millets contain 7-12% protein, 2-5% fat, 65-75% carbohydrates, and 15-20% dietary fiber. The essential amino acid profile of the millet protein is better than various cereals such as maize. Millet contains fewer cross linked prolamins, which may be an additional factor contributing to the higher digestibility of the millet protein. Millets are more nutritious than fine cereals. Small millets are a good source of phosphorous and iron. Millet contributes to antioxidant activity with phytates, polyphenols, tannins, anthocyanins, phytosterols, and pinacosanols present in having an important role in aging and metabolic diseases. All millets possess high antioxidant activity. There are several varieties of millets. Pearl millet (bajra), sorghum millet (jowar), buckwheat (kuttu), amaranth (rajgira), finger millet (nachni / ragi), foxtail millet (Kangana), little millet (samai), kodo millet (kodon), barnyard millet (Sanwa) and proso millet (chena) are some of the types. The nutritional value, availability, and huge production of the grain have dragged the special attention of stakeholders. This article deals with three major aspects that Millet as a substitute food against rice, the nutritional benefit of millet, and awareness of millet consumption in common people.
      PubDate: 2023-09-01
      DOI: 10.21048/IJND.2023.60.3.33191
       
  • Assessment of Nutritional Status of Undernourished Children (12 to 23
           Months) in a Flood-Affected Zone in Samastipur District of Bihar, India

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      Authors: Sushma Mongbijam, Sunita Kumari, Gitanjalin Chaudhary
      Pages: 470 - 475
      Abstract: Malnutrition refers to a broad range of health issues, including undernutrition and overnutrition."Undernutrition" is a condition marked by stunting (a low height-to-age ratio), wasting (a low weight-to-height ratio), and underweight (a low weight-to-age ratio) as well as micronutrient deficiencies or insufficiencies. The aim of the study was to assess the nutritional status of undernutrition young children (12 to 23 months) in the flood-affected zone in Samastipur district of Bihar, India. A structured questionnaire was used to gather general information such as age, gender, family size, economic status, and clinical signs. Dietary intake data was collected using the 24-hour recall method, which resulted that the mean height and weight of the subjects were 76.90 ± 2.99 cm and 8.50 ± 0.73 kg respectively. It was found that the majority of the subjects were breastfed milk as well as weaning food only 2-3 times, in which the mean nutrient intake of energy, protein, calcium, and iron was 500.88 ± 68.15 Kcal (50.28%), 4.85 ± 0.55 (43.00%), 169.86 ± 19.42 (35.88%) mg and 1.85 ± 1.82 mg (23.25%) respectively, in which the dietary intake was comparatively low when compared with the EAR and RDA by ICMR. It was concluded that the selected subjects did not receive adequate nutrition to maintain their health and nutritional status and were undernourished.
      PubDate: 2023-09-01
      DOI: 10.21048/IJND.2023.60.3.34616
       
 
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