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  Subjects -> NUTRITION AND DIETETICS (Total: 201 journals)
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Food and Nutrition Bulletin
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.768
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 6  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0379-5721 - ISSN (Online) 1564-8265
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1175 journals]
  • Editorial

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      Authors: Corey O’Hara, Irwin H. Rosenberg, Barbara Bowman, Daniel Hoffman, Beatrice Lorge Rogers
      Pages: 379 - 380
      Abstract: Food and Nutrition Bulletin, Volume 43, Issue 4, Page 379-380, December 2022.

      Citation: Food and Nutrition Bulletin
      PubDate: 2022-11-25T06:13:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03795721221140233
      Issue No: Vol. 43, No. 4 (2022)
       
  • Factors Associated With Postpartum Weight Retention in African Women: A
           Systematic Review

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      Authors: Jahdiel Kossou, Halimatou Alaofè, Waliou Amoussa Hounkpatin, Jaurès Lokonon
      Abstract: Food and Nutrition Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      Background and Objective:The obesity epidemic among women in Africa is a health problem, and many studies attribute it to childbearing. However, most studies of postpartum weight retention (PPWR) occur in high-income countries. Therefore, this review sought to identify the potential factors affecting PPWR among African women.Methods:Four databases were searched from January 2000 to December 2020: Medline/PubMed, Google scholar, Ajol research, FreeFullPDF. The quality of included studies was assessed using the Newcastle Ottawa Scale.Results:Fifteen studies (5 from west, 4 from south, 3 from east, 2 from central, and 1 from north) were included: 8 cohort and 7 prospective cohort studies. Two studies examined the effect of obesity and weight gain during pregnancy on PPWR, 3 studies assessed the effect of childbirth, 4 examined the effect of breastfeeding, 4 assessed the impact of morbidities such as HIV, and 2 looked at food insecurity. Five studies demonstrated that postpartum weight is due to residual pregnancy weight gain and childbirth weight gain and is accentuated as parity increases (n = 2). Breastfeeding has a controversial effect, while morbidity (n = 4) and food insecurity (n = 4) contributed to weight loss. The variation in weight was also influenced by cultural practices (n = 1), prepregnancy weight (n = 1), and socioeconomic status (n = 1). On all domains, only 3 included studies were of good quality.Conclusions:Pregnancy weight gain, childbirth, breastfeeding, morbidity, and food insecurity were associated with PPWR. However, preexisting factors must be considered when developing PPWR modification strategies. In addition, due to the limited number of studies included, robust conclusions cannot be drawn.
      Citation: Food and Nutrition Bulletin
      PubDate: 2022-11-23T07:00:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03795721221134566
       
  • Industry Self-Regulation of Food Fortification Compliance: Piloting the
           Micronutrient Fortification Index in Nigeria

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      Authors: Tobi Durotoye, Ike Ilegbune, Dominic Schofield, Victor Ajieroh, Oluchi Ezekannagha
      Abstract: Food and Nutrition Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Sustaining large-scale and good-quality food fortification requires strategies that incentivize food processors to invest in and consistently meet national food fortification standards where they exist. A standardized Micronutrient Fortification Index (MFI) piloted in Nigeria has provided a ranking of fortified branded products for each participating company based on a score aggregating the effectiveness and efficiency of the company’s systems and levels of product fortification. The MFI has demonstrated the significance of brands as a focal point for investment and industry accountability in food fortification and the power of harnessing the competitive nature of businesses to drive their food fortification performance.Results:The initiative started with a pilot consisting of well-known brands of 4 companies and has since expanded participation to 15 companies, representing 31 brands, having completed the first entire ranking cycle. The publicly listed brands on the Index now cover approximately 80% of the flour milling market, 40% of the edible oils market, and 88% of the sugar market in Nigeria, reaching over an estimated 134 million people in the country in 2022 (Based on analysis by TechnoServe Supporting African Processors of Fortified Foods [SAPFF] program in Nigeria. Underlying information as supplied by industry participants.). The data inputs are made through company-owned digital portals, and the results are published on a secure, web-based public portal which also serves as a gateway for stakeholders to access related information on micronutrient fortification and food quality (https://technoserve-mfi.web.app/). The ultimate aim of the MFI is to serve as a leverage for private sector efforts to both digitalize quality assurance and business processes linked to industrial automation and to harness their competitiveness through voluntary participation in the Index to drive improved food fortification performance based on industry best practices and quality benchmarks.
      Citation: Food and Nutrition Bulletin
      PubDate: 2022-11-09T11:30:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03795721221132610
       
  • Building the Commitment of the Private Sector and Leveraging Effective
           Partnerships to Sustain Food Fortification

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      Authors: Tobi Durotoye, Rizwan Yusufali, Victor Ajieroh, Oluchi Ezekannagha
      Abstract: Food and Nutrition Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      The private sector is a critical partner in achieving the universally adopted Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)—UNDP 2022. As part of a national strategy to address malnutrition (SDG2), Large-Scale Food Fortification of commonly consumed staple foods and condiments with vitamins and minerals is a proven intervention that requires the concerted engagement of multiple actors in a country’s agri-food and public health ecosystems. Lessons from TechnoServe’s Strengthening African Processors of Fortified Foods (SAPFF) Program, implemented from 2016 to 2022 in Kenya, Nigeria, and Tanzania with support from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, provide essential learnings about how to effectively engage, motivate, and improve the food fortification performance of the industry in compliance with national standards, through capacity building, responsive technical assistance, and multistakeholder engagement that builds trust and accountability of industry in the fight against malnutrition.
      Citation: Food and Nutrition Bulletin
      PubDate: 2022-10-12T05:09:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03795721221123699
       
  • Training to Build Nutrition Capacity in the Nigerian Agricultural Sector:
           Initial Assessment and Future Directions

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      Authors: Olutayo Adeyemi, Olapeju Phorbee, Folake Samuel, Rasaki Sanusi, Wasiu Afolabi, Namukolo Covic, Adeyinka Onabolu, Victor Ajieroh
      Abstract: Food and Nutrition Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      Background:In response to calls to increase nutrition-sensitive agriculture (NSA), the Federal Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development developed the Nigeria Agricultural Sector Food Security and Nutrition Strategy 2016-2025 (AFSNS). Capacity development activities to facilitate the AFSNS implementation subsequently commenced.Objective:This study analyzed the processes and outputs of initial capacity development efforts, examined findings from the analysis using existing literature, and identified critical next steps for nutrition capacity development in the Nigerian agriculture sector.Methods:The study reviewed documents including a proposal for nutrition training of agriculture sector actors, reports of meetings held among 6 resource persons who designed and/or delivered training, training reports, participants’ pre- and posttraining assessments, and participants’ training evaluation. Interviews were conducted with 2 resource persons involved in training design and delivery. Documents and interviews were coded and analyzed to identify emergent themes. Participants’ pre- and posttests results were compared using paired t test in Stata 12.0.Results:Knowledge and practice gaps were more extensive than had been anticipated. Training had some but limited effects on knowledge scores at the federal level. Modules addressing implementation practices had to be scaled down for participants to keep up with the learning pace. Existing literature indicates that such training would have been better planned as part of a broader sectoral nutrition workforce strategy, to facilitate greater tailoring of training to participants’ job roles.Conclusion:Effective AFSNS implementation requires developing and operationalizing a comprehensive short-, medium- and long-term Agriculture Sector Nutrition Capacity Development Strategy for Nigeria.
      Citation: Food and Nutrition Bulletin
      PubDate: 2022-09-21T04:48:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03795721221123870
       
  • Stakeholders, Relationships, and Coordination: 2015 Baseline Study of
           Needed Enablers for Bridging Agriculture-Nutrition Gaps in Nigeria

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      Authors: Olutayo Adeyemi, Victor Ajieroh, Larry Umunna, Francis Aminu, Adeyinka Onabolu
      Abstract: Food and Nutrition Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Renewed efforts by the Nigerian government to address malnutrition have led to nutrition actions by several sectors, including the agriculture sector. However, the success of these actions depends on the characteristics of the stakeholders involved, including their relationships and coordination.Objective:This article reports a 2015 study of nutrition-sensitive agricultural stakeholders in Nigeria that assessed what the stakeholders do, where they work and how they are organized to improve nutrition. The study provides a baseline for assessing progress and measuring stakeholder and coordination changes in the Nigerian nutrition-sensitive agriculture landscape.Methods:Semi-structured interviews (n = 17) and focus group discussions (n = 2) were held with federal, state, and local government level stakeholders; reviews of stakeholder program documents were also conducted.Results:The study identified 7 groups of nutrition-sensitive agriculture stakeholders and several coordination challenges. Political leadership, advocacy and provision of material and human resource support by nongovernmental organizations, and donor interest and funding have been vital for mobilizing nutrition-sensitive agriculture. Still, although stakeholders frequently highlighted that nutrition was an important consideration in their interventions, nutrition goals and activities and/or indicators to measure outcomes were not regularly communicated. Also, while coordination mechanisms existed, there appeared to be minimal actual cross-sectoral partnerships because of inadequate trust, competition, and conflicts over institutional turf and mandates.Conclusions:Needed enablers for improving nutrition-sensitive agriculture in Nigeria included improved stakeholder nutrition literacy, as well as enhanced stakeholder engagement facilitated by role definition, clarification, and consensus. Exploring different approaches to coordination may also be necessary.
      Citation: Food and Nutrition Bulletin
      PubDate: 2022-09-01T07:00:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03795721221119249
       
  • Transforming Nigerian Food Systems Through Their Backbones: Lessons From a
           Decade of Staple Crop Biofortification Programing

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      Authors: Ekin Birol, Jennifer Foley, Caitlin Herrington, Rewa Misra, Bho Mudyahoto, Wolfgang Pfeiffer, Michael Tedla Diressie, Paul Ilona
      Abstract: Food and Nutrition Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      This article presents the evolution of the biofortification program in Nigeria over the last decade and the role of interdisciplinary research in informing cost-effective, efficient, and inclusive development; implementation; and scaling of this program. Launched in 2011 to improve Nigeria’s food systems to deliver accessible and affordable nutrients through commonly consumed staples, the Nigeria biofortification program was implemented through an effective partnership between the CGIAR and public, private, and civil society sectors at federal, state, and local levels. By the end of 2021, several biofortified varieties of Nigeria’s 2 main staples, namely cassava and maize, were officially released for production by smallholders, with several biofortified varieties of other key staples (including pearl millet, rice, and sorghum) either under testing or in the release pipeline. In 2021, the program was estimated to benefit 13 million Nigerians consuming biofortified cassava and maize varieties. The evidence on the nutritional impact, consumer and farmer acceptance, and cost-effective scalability of biofortified crops documented by the program resulted in the integration of biofortified crops in several key national public policies and social protection programs; private seed and food company products/investments, as well as in humanitarian aid.
      Citation: Food and Nutrition Bulletin
      PubDate: 2022-08-26T05:20:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03795721221117361
       
  • Childhood Stunting and Wasting Following Independence in South Sudan

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      Authors: Daniel J. Hoffman, Ismail Kassim, Biram Ndiaye, Mark E. McGovern, Huyen Le, Kiross Tefera Abebe, Mohamed Ag Ayoya
      First page: 381
      Abstract: Food and Nutrition Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      Background:South Sudan has experienced ongoing civil and environmental problems since gaining independence in 2011 that may influence childhood nutritional status.Objective:To estimate the prevalence of undernutrition among children in South Sudan in 2018 and 2019 compared to the prevalence in 2010.Methods:Data on height and weight were collected using a 2-stage stratified sample framework in which households were randomly selected at the county level and nutritional status was calculated for all children under 5 years of age to determine height-for-age, weight-for-height, and weight-for-age Z-scores (HAZ, WHZ, and WAZ) and the prevalence of stunting, wasting, and underweight. Linear and logistic regression analyses were used to determine factors associated with nutritional status and the odds ratio for nutritional outcomes.Results:In 2010, the mean HAZ, WHZ, and WAZ was −0.78, −0.82, and −1.15, respectively, and the prevalence of stunting, wasting, and underweight was 30%, 23%, and 32%, respectively. In 2018 and 2019, the mean HAZ, WHZ, and WAZ was −0.50, −0.70, −0.77 and −0.53, −0.77, −0.76, respectively. The prevalence of stunting, wasting, and underweight in 2018 and 2019 was 17%, 14%, 15% and 16%, 16%, 17%, respectively. Age was negatively associated with all nutritional indices and girls had higher HAZ, WHZ, and WAZ and a lower mid upper arm circumference (P < .01) compared to boys. The risk of poor nutritional outcomes was associated with vaccine status and varied by state of residence.Conclusions:Following independence in 2010, the prevalence of undernutrition in South Sudan decreased, but the risk for undernutrition varied by state and efforts to address food security and health need to ensure equitable access for all children in South Sudan.
      Citation: Food and Nutrition Bulletin
      PubDate: 2022-10-17T07:54:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03795721221128126
       
  • Does Crop Diversity Influence Household Food Security and Women’s
           Individual Dietary Diversity' A Cross-Sectional Study of Malawian
           Farmers in a Participatory Agroecology and Nutrition Project

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      Authors: Ibukun Owoputi, Nola Booth, Isaac Luginaah, Hanson Nyantakyi-Frimpong, Lizzie Shumba, Laifolo Dakishoni, Esther Lupafya, Catherine Hickey, Rachel Bezner Kerr
      First page: 395
      Abstract: Food and Nutrition Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Agroecological methods have the potential to impact nutrition and food security, however, to date there is limited research evaluating this approach.Objective:A 5-year participatory research project with farming households in north and central Malawi was designed to train farmers on agroecological practices, alongside raising awareness on nutrition and gender equity. This cross-sectional study aimed to explore the relationships between crop diversity, food security at the household level, and individual diversity for women, within the context of an agroecology, nutrition education, and farmer mentoring program.Methods:Participating farmers were trained in and experimented with different farming methods. These farmers subsequently trained other farmers on these short-term agroecological practices and provided mentorship using community-based educational methods designed to address both household food security and nutrition. In year 4 of the intervention, a cross-sectional survey assessed farm practices, food security, and individual dietary diversity of 851 participating households.Results:Households with lower crop diversity were significantly less likely to be food secure (odds ratios [OR] = 0.829, P < .001). Women in households with higher crop diversity were more likely to have higher individual dietary diversity (OR = 1.120, P < .01), eat vitamin A rich foods (OR = 1.176, P < .01), and legumes, nuts, and seeds (OR = 1.141, P < .01).Conclusions:These findings suggest that within a participatory agroecological training combined with community-based nutrition education with a focus on social equity, crop diversity is associated with less household food insecurity and poorer diet quality for rural farming households. Crop diversity may improve dietary diversity by making nutritious foods more available.
      Citation: Food and Nutrition Bulletin
      PubDate: 2022-09-28T12:07:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03795721221126787
       
  • Sustaining Agriculture and Nutrition Interventions: Continued Engagement
           of Village Model Farmers in Nepal

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      Authors: Shiva Bhandari, Edward A. Frongillo, Rojee Suwal, Pepijn Schreinemachers, Aman Sen Gupta, Christine E. Blake, Narayan Prasad Tiwari, Kenda Cunningham
      First page: 412
      Abstract: Food and Nutrition Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      Background:In homestead food production (HFP) programs, village model farmers (VMFs), after training, implement agriculture and nutrition activities to improve household knowledge and practices. Little evidence exists on what enables VMFs to remain actively engaged and for impacts to be sustained.Objective:To examine variables explaining active engagement of VMFs, at least 4 years post-training, in an HFP program in Nepal.Methods:We used cross-sectional data, collected from 2018 to 2019, among 4750 VMFs of Suaahara, a multisectoral nutrition program. We assessed whether respondents registered their HFP group with the local government, conducted regular group meetings, discussed vegetable growing and chicken rearing practices with group members, or engaged in saving and credit activities in their HFP group. Outcome variable was a count of these 4 activities in which the VMF engaged. Socioeconomic, demographic, and programmatic explanatory variables were identified a priori and by bivariate analysis and were adjusted in ordinal regression models accounting for clusters.Results:On average, VMFs engaged in 1.4 activities. Having attended primary or secondary school (adjusted odds ratios [AOR] = 1.39), being a female community health volunteer (AOR = 1.27), being from an advantaged caste/ethnic group (AOR = 1.34), receiving additional trainings (AOR = 1.56) and inputs (AOR = 1.31) were associated with more active engagement of VMFs.Conclusion:Village model farmers receiving more training and inputs were more likely to remain actively engaged. Female community health workers, people from higher caste/ethnic groups, and those with primary or secondary education were more likely to remain active VMFs and could be targeted for this role in HFP programs leading to sustained impact.
      Citation: Food and Nutrition Bulletin
      PubDate: 2022-06-21T05:40:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03795721221106588
       
  • Improving Calcium Status of Women: Results of a Study of Bio-Availability
           of Calcium From Slaked Lime Fortified Rice

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      Authors: Nurun Nahar Naila, Subhasish Das, Afsana Mim Khandaker, Rahvia Alam, Jamie Westcott, Julie Long, Nancy F. Krebs, M. Munirul Islam, Tahmeed Ahmed
      First page: 429
      Abstract: Food and Nutrition Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Fortification of rice with slaked lime is an acceptable and inexpensive way to combat calcium (Ca) deficiency. However, bioavailability of calcium after intake of slaked lime fortified rice is yet to be investigated.Objective:To measure the fractional absorption of Ca (FAC) from slaked lime fortified cooked rice.Design:We conducted an experimental study using stable isotopes of Ca to measure FAC during a single morning test meal containing rice fortified with slaked lime. Participants (n = 22) were given slaked lime fortified rice 3 times a day for 4 days. On the morning of the fifth day, the participants were served the same amount of rice as previous the 4 days at the breakfast test meal with an accurately measured amount of 44Ca stable isotope oral tracer followed by an intravenous injection of 42Ca. Urine was collected over the next 24 hours in 3 consecutive 8-hour pools. Fractional absorption of Ca was calculated from the measurement of the relative enrichment of the of each administered tracer 44Ca and 42Ca using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.Results:The mean Ca concentration in the test meal was 879.5 ± 152.9 µg/g with a coefficient of variance (CV) of 17.2%. Although Ca absorption efficiency decreases with higher calcium intake, the total amount of calcium absorbed from test meal using FAC = 0.391 calculated from the third 8-hour urine pool was 69.0 (CV of 15.6) mg.Conclusions:We showed that one-fifth of daily calcium recommendation for women of reproductive age could be met by ingesting ∼200 g cooked slake fortified rice.
      Citation: Food and Nutrition Bulletin
      PubDate: 2022-09-28T07:09:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03795721221117624
       
  • The Ecuadorian School Food Environment: Association With Healthy and
           Unhealthy Food and Beverage Consumption and BMI

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      Authors: M. Margaret Weigel, Rodrigo X. Armijos
      First page: 439
      Abstract: Food and Nutrition Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Schools can play an important role in promoting healthy child diet and body weight. However, this issue is understudied in Latin American and other populations undergoing nutrition and epidemiologic transition.Objectives:2018 Ecuadorian National Health and Nutrition Survey data were used to examine the association of school food sources with healthy and unhealthy food intake and body mass index (BMI) in primary (n = 12,632) and secondary students (n = 6617).Methods:Data on school food environment characteristics were collected by questionnaire, intakes of fruits, vegetables, plain water, sweetened beverages, processed snacks, and fast foods by food frequency questionnaire, and BMI using measured weight and height. Data were analyzed using multivariable methods.Results:The major school food sources were competitive foods sold by commercial outlets (73%), School Breakfast Program (SBP; 52%), and home-packed items (37%). Most (69%) competitive food outlets sold fruits and vegetables but only 44% offered free clean drinking water and 60% sold prohibited “red traffic light” foods. Primary and secondary students who bought competitive foods consumed sweetened beverages, processed snacks, and fast food more frequently than nonpurchasers (P = .0001). Those who packed home foods had higher fruit and vegetable intakes (P = .0001). Plain water intakes were reduced among all SBP participants (P = .0001). However, primary students in the SBP consumed fast foods less frequently (P = .0001) and had lower average BMI and odds for being obese compared to nonparticipants (P = .0001).Conclusion:The findings from this nationally representative study underscore the important contribution of the school food environment to child nutrition.
      Citation: Food and Nutrition Bulletin
      PubDate: 2022-08-22T05:16:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03795721221116447
       
  • Health Care Providers’ Knowledge, Attitude, and Practice Regarding
           Facility-Based Management of Children With Severe Acute Malnutrition in
           Bangladesh

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      Authors: Md Ridwan Islam, Shah Mohammad Fahim, Md. Golam Rasul, Mohammad Jyoti Raihan, Nafi Mohammad Ali, Md Mofijul Islam Bulbul, Tahmeed Ahmed
      First page: 465
      Abstract: Food and Nutrition Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Severe acute malnutrition (SAM) contributes to a substantial number of child deaths globally per year. The mortality rates can be lowered markedly if guideline-based management protocol is properly followed. However, case-fatality rates in resource-poor centers remain high even after introducing the guidelines. Perhaps, the lack of adequate knowledge leading to inappropriate management by the health care providers is responsible for such burden.Objective:We aimed to evaluate health care providers’ knowledge, attitude, and practice regarding the facility-based management of children with SAM in Bangladesh.Methods:This was a qualitative study where data were collected cross-sectionally from 4 district and 2 tertiary care hospitals. Twenty-six semi-structured in-depth interviews were conducted among the doctors and nurses involved in inpatient care of SAM. Twenty-eight hours of observation were done in each facility to obtain information regarding the management practices.Results:The doctors had substantial knowledge in managing children with SAM in the facilities. However, knowledge of nurses was found suboptimal when evaluated based on the national guideline. Both doctors and nurses demonstrated favorable attitude toward management of childhood SAM. Identification of SAM at the facilities was poor due to lack of practice in relation to anthropometric measurements. In addition, improper practices related to blood glucose testing, dehydration monitoring, essential micronutrient administration, and follow-up of children with SAM were observed.Conclusion:The study results underscore the importance of taking appropriate measures to enhance knowledge and ensure proper practice in relation to inpatient care of children with SAM according to the national guideline in Bangladesh.
      Citation: Food and Nutrition Bulletin
      PubDate: 2022-08-19T05:51:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03795721221116710
       
  • Using Household Consumption Data to Flag Low Nutrient Access

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      Authors: Astrid Mathiassen, Margarita Lovon, Barbara Baille, Kathryn Ogden, Susanna Sandström
      First page: 479
      Abstract: Food and Nutrition Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Information on food consumption, dietary diversity, and nutrient inadequacies are key for informing food security and nutrition programming. Household- and individual-level data together provide the most complete information, but individual dietary modules are not always feasible in humanitarian contexts due to cost and time constraints.Objective:This article asks to what extent it is possible to use food consumption data which is commonly collected at household level through food security and vulnerability surveys, to assess the household’s access to vitamin A and iron.Methods:The validation analysis uses household food consumption and expenditure surveys from Guatemala, Honduras, Nepal, and Uganda and the adult male equivalent approach for calculating nutrient access.Results:The results show a positive significant correlation between the frequency of consumption and adequacy as estimated from comprehensive household food consumption modules, with correlation in the range of 0.4 to 0.7. Frequency thresholds for distinguishing between adequate and inadequate nutrient access, based on how often foods rich in the relevant nutrient are eaten during 1 week, mostly fulfill standard sensitivity and specificity criteria.Conclusions:The article concludes that in humanitarian contexts, a frequency-based proxy for nutrient access based on household data commonly collected in emergency assessments and through monitoring systems can be used and can support this particular data gap. As a rule of thumb, a frequency threshold of 7 should be used for vitamin A and of 12 for iron.
      Citation: Food and Nutrition Bulletin
      PubDate: 2022-10-12T05:12:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0379572121989219
       
  • Mandatory Versus Voluntary Implementation of Salt Iodization Program for
           the Last Two Decades in Ethiopia: A Comparative Review of Existing
           Literatures

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      Authors: Agize Asfaw, Dessalegn Tamiru, Tefera Belachew
      First page: 500
      Abstract: Food and Nutrition Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Ethiopian government was implementing mandatory salt iodization program for the last decade to eliminate iodine deficiency disorders, but several recent studies reported a mixed findings.Objective:This review aimed to assess the difference in implementation of iodized salt program 10 years before and after mandatory salt iodization being implemented in Ethiopia since 2011.Methods:In Ethiopia, legislation that enforces salt producers to iodize all salts used for human consumption started in February, 2011. All studies about iodine deficiency and iodized salt conducted in Ethiopia in the last 2 decades were searched. Searches were performed in PubMed database. Google Scholar, Iodine Global Network, and Ethiopian Public Health Institute websites were also searched.Results:A total of 235 titles and abstracts were identified. After scanning the abstracts and full papers, 43 articles were remained for final data synthesis. In this review, all studies conducted before 2011 reported a urinary iodine concentration (UIC) value of 30%. On the other hand, among studies conducted after 2011, 88.9% reported UIC value 30%. Household availability of adequately iodized salt increased from nearly 20% in pre 2011 to more than 50% in post 2011 period.Conclusion:Despite the efforts made by the Ethiopian government on mandatory salt iodization for the last decade, iodine deficiency is sustained in the country. Moreover, the goal of universal salt iodization program is offtrack and needs urgent revision.Registration:Registered on PROSPERO register with reg. no CRD42021251124.
      Citation: Food and Nutrition Bulletin
      PubDate: 2022-07-29T07:00:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03795721221114523
       
 
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