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  Subjects -> NUTRITION AND DIETETICS (Total: 201 journals)
Showing 1 - 64 of 64 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acta Portuguesa de Nutrição     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Digestive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Advances in Eating Disorders : Theory, Research and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Advances in Food and Nutrition Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 60)
Advances in Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 55)
African Journal of Biomedical Research     Open Access  
African Journal of Food, Agriculture, Nutrition and Development     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Aktuelle Ernährungsmedizin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
American Journal of Botany     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
American Journal of Clinical Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 162)
American Journal of Food and Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 46)
American Journal of Food Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Amerta Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Amino Acids     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 52)
Annual Review of Food Science and Technology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Annual Review of Nutrition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 39)
Appetite     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Arab Journal of Nutrition and Exercise     Open Access  
Archive of Food and Nutritional Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Archivos Latinoamericanos de Nutrición     Open Access  
Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Asian Journal of Clinical Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Bangladesh Journal of Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Bioactive Carbohydrates and Dietary Fibre     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
BMC Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
BMJ Nutrition, Prevention & Health     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
British Journal Of Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 91)
Cahiers de Nutrition et de Diététique     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Canadian Food Studies / La Revue canadienne des études sur l'alimentation     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Canadian Journal of Dietetic Practice and Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Case Reports in Clinical Nutrition     Open Access  
Childhood Obesity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Clinical Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 89)
Clinical Nutrition ESPEN     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Clinical Nutrition Experimental     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Clinical Nutrition Insight     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Clinical Nutrition Open Science     Open Access  
Clinical Obesity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Comparative Exercise Physiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Current Developments in Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Current Nutrition & Food Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Current Nutrition Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Current Opinion in Clinical Nutrition & Metabolic Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Current Research in Nutrition and Food Science     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
DEMETRA : Alimentação, Nutrição & Saúde     Open Access  
Diabetes, Metabolic Syndrome and Obesity     Open Access   (Followers: 48)
Eating and Weight Disorders - Studies on Anorexia, Bulimia and Obesity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Ecology of Food and Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Egyptian Journal of Obesity, Diabetes and Endocrinology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Endocrinología, Diabetes y Nutrición     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Endocrinología, Diabetes y Nutrición (English Edition)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Ernährung & Medizin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
European Journal of Clinical Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 74)
European Journal of Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
European Journal of Nutrition & Food Safety     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Food & Nutrition Research     Open Access   (Followers: 34)
Food and Environmental Virology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Food and Foodways: Explorations in the History and Culture of     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Food and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Food and Nutrition Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Food and Waterborne Parasitology     Open Access  
Food Digestion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Food Frontiers     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Food Hydrocolloids for Health     Open Access  
Food Quality and Safety     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Food Science & Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 59)
Food, Culture and Society: An International Journal of Multidisciplinary Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Frontiers in Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Frontiers in Sustainable Food Systems     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Functional Foods in Health and Disease     Open Access  
Gazi Sağlık Bilimleri Dergisi     Open Access  
Genes & Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Hacettepe University Faculty of Health Sciences Journal     Open Access  
Human Nutrition & Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian Journal of Nutrition and Dietetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Indonesian Food and Nutrition Progress     Open Access  
International Journal for Vitamin and Nutrition Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity     Open Access   (Followers: 30)
International Journal of Child Health and Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Eating Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
International Journal of Food Safety, Nutrition and Public Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
International Journal of Food Science and Nutrition Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Food Sciences and Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
International Journal of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, Transplant and Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Nutrition and Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 23)
International Journal of Nutrition, Pharmacology, Neurological Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Obesity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 90)
International Journal of Sport Nutrition & Exercise Metabolism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 83)
Journal of Advanced Nutrition and Human Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Agriculture, Food Systems, and Community Development     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Dietary Supplements     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Eating Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Ethnic Foods     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Food & Nutritional Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Food and Nutrition Research     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Food Chemistry and Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Food Science and Nutrition Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Health, Population and Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50)
Journal of Hunger & Environmental Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Medical Nutrition and Nutraceuticals     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Medicinal Herbs and Ethnomedicine     Open Access  
Journal of Muscle Foods     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Nutraceuticals and Herbal Medicine     Open Access  
Journal of Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
Journal of Nutrition & Intermediary Metabolism     Open Access  
Journal of Nutrition and Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Nutrition in Gerontology and Geriatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Nutrition, Health and Aging     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Journal of Nutritional & Environmental Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Nutritional Disorders & Therapy     Open Access  
Journal of Nutritional Ecology and Food Research     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Nutritional Science     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Obesity     Open Access   (Followers: 24)
Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition (JPGN)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 52)
Journal of Pharmacy and Nutrition Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Renal Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal of Renal Nutrition and Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Sensory Studies     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Spices and Aromatic Crops     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 60)
Journal of the American College of Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of the Australasian College of Nutritional and Environmental Medicine     Full-text available via subscription  
Jurnal Gizi dan Dietetik Indonesia : Indonesian Journal of Nutrition and Dietetics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Jurnal Gizi Indonesia / The Indonesian Journal of Nutrition     Open Access  
Jurnal Gizi Klinik Indonesia     Open Access  
Jurnal Penelitian Gizi dan Makanan     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Jurnal Riset Kesehatan     Open Access  
La Ciencia al Servicio de la Salud y Nutrición     Open Access  
Lifestyle Genomics     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Lifestyle Journal     Open Access  
Maternal & Child Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Médecine & Nutrition     Full-text available via subscription  
Media Gizi Indonesia     Open Access  
Metabolism and Nutrition in Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Molecular Nutrition & Food Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
NFS Journal     Open Access  
Nigerian Food Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Nigerian Journal of Nutritional Sciences     Full-text available via subscription  
npj Science of Food     Open Access  
Nutrición Hospitalaria     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Nutrients     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Nutrire     Hybrid Journal  
Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Nutrition & Dietetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Nutrition & Food Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Nutrition & Diabetes     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
Nutrition & Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Nutrition - Science en évolution     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Nutrition and Cancer     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Nutrition and Dietary Supplements     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Nutrition and Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Nutrition and Metabolic Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Nutrition Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Nutrition Bytes     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Nutrition in Clinical Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
Nutrition Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Nutrition Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Nutrition Research Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Nutrition Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
Nutrition Today     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Nutritional Neuroscience : An International Journal on Nutrition, Diet and Nervous System     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Obesity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 56)
Obesity Facts     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Obesity Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Oil Crop Science     Open Access  
Open Food Science Journal     Open Access  
Open Nutrition Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Open Obesity Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Pakistan Journal of Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Pediatric Obesity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Perspectivas en Nutrición Humana     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
PharmaNutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Plant Foods for Human Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Plant Production Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Proceedings of the Nutrition Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Progress in Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Public Health Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
RBNE - Revista Brasileira de Nutrição Esportiva     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
RBONE - Revista Brasileira de Obesidade, Nutrição e Emagrecimento     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Chilena de Nutricion     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Revista Española de Nutrición Humana y Dietética     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Revista Mexicana de Trastornos Alimentarios     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Salud Pública y Nutrición     Open Access  
Segurança Alimentar e Nutricional     Open Access  
South African Journal of Clinical Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
The Australian Coeliac     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Topics in Clinical Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
UNICIÊNCIAS     Open Access  
Universal Journal of Food and Nutrition Science     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
World Food Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)

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Food and Nutrition Bulletin
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.768
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 6  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0379-5721 - ISSN (Online) 1564-8265
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1174 journals]
  • Sustaining Agriculture and Nutrition Interventions: Continued Engagement
           of Village Model Farmers in Nepal

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      Authors: Shiva Bhandari, Edward A. Frongillo, Rojee Suwal, Pepijn Schreinemachers, Aman Sen Gupta, Christine E. Blake, Narayan Prasad Tiwari, Kenda Cunningham
      Abstract: Food and Nutrition Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      Background:In homestead food production (HFP) programs, village model farmers (VMFs), after training, implement agriculture and nutrition activities to improve household knowledge and practices. Little evidence exists on what enables VMFs to remain actively engaged and for impacts to be sustained.Objective:To examine variables explaining active engagement of VMFs, at least 4 years post-training, in an HFP program in Nepal.Methods:We used cross-sectional data, collected from 2018 to 2019, among 4750 VMFs of Suaahara, a multisectoral nutrition program. We assessed whether respondents registered their HFP group with the local government, conducted regular group meetings, discussed vegetable growing and chicken rearing practices with group members, or engaged in saving and credit activities in their HFP group. Outcome variable was a count of these 4 activities in which the VMF engaged. Socioeconomic, demographic, and programmatic explanatory variables were identified a priori and by bivariate analysis and were adjusted in ordinal regression models accounting for clusters.Results:On average, VMFs engaged in 1.4 activities. Having attended primary or secondary school (adjusted odds ratios [AOR] = 1.39), being a female community health volunteer (AOR = 1.27), being from an advantaged caste/ethnic group (AOR = 1.34), receiving additional trainings (AOR = 1.56) and inputs (AOR = 1.31) were associated with more active engagement of VMFs.Conclusion:Village model farmers receiving more training and inputs were more likely to remain actively engaged. Female community health workers, people from higher caste/ethnic groups, and those with primary or secondary education were more likely to remain active VMFs and could be targeted for this role in HFP programs leading to sustained impact.
      Citation: Food and Nutrition Bulletin
      PubDate: 2022-06-21T05:40:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03795721221106588
       
  • Food Insecurity Among the Adult Population of Colombia Between 2016 and
           2019: The Post Peace Agreement Situation

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      Authors: Kate Sinclair, Theresa Thompson-Colón, Sara Eloísa Del Castillo Matamoros, Eucaris Olaya, Hugo Melgar-Quiñonez
      Abstract: Food and Nutrition Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      Background:In 2016, a Peace Agreement, explicitly addressing the right to food, was signed, marking the end of more than 50 years of armed conflict and the longest war in the Americas. The expectation was that the years to follow would be marked by rapid social and political change, with the potential to improve food security.Objectives:(i) Ascertain changes in the prevalence of food insecurity in Colombia between 2016 and 2019; (ii) examine which population subgroups (eg, urban women, rural women, urban men, and rural men) were most vulnerable; and (iii) determine significant individual-level factors predicting food insecurity in these 2 years.Methods:This study used the Gallup World Poll 2016 and 2019 nationally representative samples of Colombian adults aged 15 and older for the analyses (n ≈ 1000 per year). Food insecurity was measured using the Food Insecurity Experience Scale. Descriptive statistics and logistic regression analyses were conducted using IBM SPSS Complex Samples (version 26).Results:Food insecurity in Colombia increased by 7 percental points between 2016 and 2019 (from 33% to 40%); women living in rural areas in 2019 reported the highest prevalence (50%). Results from logistic analysis confirm low income, unemployment, and lack of social support were significant predictors of food insecurity in both years. In 2019, gender, low education, and lack of autonomy were also significant predictors. Further research on the determinants of food insecurity is necessary to inform Colombian policies and programs that address food insecurity. The urgency to act is more apparent than ever, given the country’s worsening food security profile.
      Citation: Food and Nutrition Bulletin
      PubDate: 2022-05-25T05:05:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03795721221100890
       
  • Sensory Trial of Quintuple Fortified Salt—Salt Fortified With Iodine,
           Iron, Folic Acid, Vitamin B12, and Zinc—Among Consumers in New Delhi,
           India

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      Authors: Seema Puri, Tejmeet Kaur Rekhi, Tinku Thomas, Meena Haribhau Jadhav, Venkatesh Mannar, Levente L. Diosady
      Abstract: Food and Nutrition Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Micronutrient deficiencies are a cause of significant public health burden and loss of gross domestic product, especially in developing countries. Multiple fortified salt can potentially address this challenge at scale and in a cost-effective manner.Objective:This laboratory-based sensory trial evaluated the acceptability of quintuple fortified salt (Q5FS), that is, iodized salt (IS) fortified with additional 4 micronutrients: iron, folic acid, vitamin B12, and zinc. Iodized salt and double fortified salt (DFS), that is, IS fortified with iron, are used for comparison.Methods:Forty-five respondents were recruited by open invitations to the university staff and their families. Each study participant rated 10 food items each in a set of 3 identical preparations differing only in the salt used. A 5-point hedonic scale was used to rate each dish on 6 sensory attributes: appearance, color, aroma, taste, texture, and aftertaste. Finally, the dish was rated on the attribute of overall acceptability—a subjective combined score based on all sensory attributes considered together.Results:Among the 3 salt types, there was no difference in scores for the sensory attributes of appearance, aroma, taste, texture, and aftertaste, and the attribute of overall acceptability. Color in IS scored significantly higher than in Q5FS and DFS, but there was no difference between the scores of DFS and Q5FS.Conclusions:The 3 salts IS, DFS, and Q5FS are comparable to each other in all sensory properties, except for color. This study concludes that Q5FS is organoleptically acceptable under ideal conditions.
      Citation: Food and Nutrition Bulletin
      PubDate: 2022-05-09T05:24:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03795721221078361
       
  • Understanding Discrepancies in Nutritional Outcomes Among Under-Fives in
           Laos: A Mixed-Methods Study Using the Positive Deviance Approach

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      Authors: Sayvisene Boulom, Daniëlle M. Bon, Dirk Essink, Sengchanh Kounnavong, Jacqueline E. W. Broerse
      Abstract: Food and Nutrition Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Stunting is one of the main contributing factors in the under-five mortality rate worldwide. In Laos, the prevalence of stunting remains high, particularly in mountainous rural areas. To prevent stunting, insight into positive deviant behaviors can help understand how people can cope or adapt in resource-poor settings.Objective:This study aims to analyze the practices and underlying factors that explain discrepancies in nutritional outcomes in children under the age of 5 in remote mountainous areas in Laos.Methods:This mixed-methods study included all children under the age of 5 living in 6 selected villages. Anthropometric measurements were taken, and a Z-score for stunting was calculated to select the positive and negative deviant children. To identify the causes of discrepancies in childhood stunting, household questionnaires, focus group discussions, observations, and individual interviews with family members and health workers were conducted.Results:Fifty-five percent of children were stunted. Inappropriate care and feeding practices were observed such as providing unbalanced diets and not attending health facilities. Positive deviant mothers were less likely to follow inappropriate practices, experienced less food insecurity, and had higher motivation and autonomy, which resulted in prioritizing their children’s health. An active role of fathers seemed to benefit positive practices within households.Conclusions:The combination of many different practices in which positive deviant families are doing slightly better resulted in less stunting of children. Those practices are related to the household resources, such as access to food and social support; and the mother’s motivation, autonomy, and perspectives on child health.
      Citation: Food and Nutrition Bulletin
      PubDate: 2022-05-04T06:32:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03795721221096187
       
  • Home-Grown School Feeding: Implementation Lessons From a Pilot in a Poor
           Ethnic Minority Community in Vietnam

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      Authors: Sabina Di Prima, Dai Nguyen Dinh, Demi D. Reurings, E. Pamela Wright, Dirk Essink, Jacqueline E. W. Broerse
      Abstract: Food and Nutrition Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Undernutrition threatens the health and future of preschool children in disadvantaged remote communities. Home-grown school feeding (HGSF) in nursery schools could positively impact children’s nutrition while creating multiple benefits for the whole community. However, evidence is lacking on implementation of HGSF within multi-sectoral programs in remote areas.Objective:This study assessed an HGSF pilot intervention, part of a nutrition-sensitive agriculture (NSA) program, in a mountain ethnic minority community in Vietnam. It aimed to identify the changes brought about by the intervention, in particular diversity of children’s food, food sources, barriers and facilitators to change, and future challenges and strategies.Methods:Mixed-methods assessment covered school meal diversity, cost, and food sources but the key focus was on observed changes resulting from the HGSF intervention and perceived barriers and facilitators to its implementation. Data were collected mainly through semi-structured interviews (n = 30) and seven focus group discussions (n = 76).Results:School meals contributed to increasing diversity of food consumed by children. Above 30% of foods used were home-grown. Respondents reported increased school attendance; children’s food preferences and hygiene practices improved as did parents’ caring and feeding practices. Local food systems became less cash-crop-oriented and more self-reliant, contributing to household food security and income generation. Social capital increased. Positive changes were attributed to HGSF and synergy among NSA program components. Poverty and limited resilience to external shocks threatened sustainability.Conclusions:Implementing HGSF within an NSA program in a mountainous ethnic minority area with a high prevalence of undernutrition benefitted children and their communities.
      Citation: Food and Nutrition Bulletin
      PubDate: 2022-04-26T09:41:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03795721221088962
       
  • Four-Year Effects of a 2-year Nutrition- and Gender-Sensitive Agricultural
           Program on Women’s Nutritional Status, Knowledge, and Empowerment in
           Rural Burkina Faso

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      Authors: Lilia Bliznashka, Elodie Becquey, Marie T. Ruel, Deanna K. Olney
      Abstract: Food and Nutrition Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Little is known about the sustained effects of nutrition- and gender-sensitive agricultural programs (NSAPs) after they end.Objectives:To examine the 4-year effects (2010-2014) of a 2-year NSAP (2010-2012) on women’s outcomes in rural Burkina Faso.Methods:We used baseline (2010) and endline (2012) data from a cluster-randomized controlled trial of Helen Keller International’s Enhanced Homestead Food Production (EHFP) program and baseline (2014) data from a new program. We included 134 women: 82 who participated in the 2-year EHFP program (treatment) and 52 who did not (control). We examined program (2010-2012), post-program (2012-2014), and overall 4-year effects (2010-2014) using difference-in-difference analysis (DID).Results:We found significant positive program effects (2010-2012) on women’s underweight prevalence (DID: 16.44 percentage points [pp]; P = .09) and on women’s knowledge about appropriate age to introduce liquids (DID: 28.40 pp; P = .01). Although there were no significant postprogram effects (2012-2014), differences found in 2012 between the treatment and control group were sustained resulting in an overall 4-year (2010-2014) reduction in women’s underweight prevalence (DID: 18.26 pp; P = .02) and an improvement in women’s knowledge about appropriate age to introduce liquids (DID: 31.29 pp; P = .02). We observed no postprogram or overall 4-year effects on women’s knowledge of child feeding and handwashing practices or women’s empowerment.Conclusions:Nutrition- and gender-sensitive agricultural programs demonstrate potential for sustained improvements in women’s nutritional status and nutritional knowledge. Postprogram assessments of NSAPs should be embedded in program evaluations to help further understand the potential of NSAPs to generate sustainable impacts on women’s outcomes.
      Citation: Food and Nutrition Bulletin
      PubDate: 2022-04-19T08:52:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03795721221090380
       
  • Effect of Nutrition Interventions Before and/or During Early Pregnancy on
           Low Birth Weight in Sub-Saharan Africa: A Systematic Review and
           Meta-Analysis

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      Authors: Melesse Niguse Kuma, Dessalegn Tamiru, Girma Beressa, Tefera Belachew
      Abstract: Food and Nutrition Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      Background:This review aimed at synthesizing evidence on the effectiveness of nutritional interventions that were carried out before and/or during early pregnancy versus the control groups on reducing the risk of low weight at birth in sub-Saharan Africa.Methods:We have searched on MEDLINE, SCOPUS, CINAHL, HINARI, and Cochrane Library of systematic review databases for published articles in English language from 2010 to 2021 years. For unpublished studies, we searched on Google scholar. Randomized controlled trial studies of nutritional interventions carried out before/or during early pregnancy in sub-Saharan Africa to improve low birth weight were considered. The data were extracted and pooled using the Joanna Briggs Institute software. The effect size was calculated using fixed-effect models. Mantel-Haenszel method was used to calculate the relative risk with their respective 95% CI. Heterogeneity was assessed using the standard chi-square and I 2 tests.Results:Seven studies were included in the review with a total of 5934 participants. Three types of nutritional interventions were identified: iron supplementations, lipid-based supplementations, and nutritional education and counseling. We have identified only one intervention started during preconception. The meta-analysis showed that none of the identified nutrition interventions had a statistically significant effect on low birth weight.Conclusions:Based on the review evidence, nutritional interventions before and/or during early pregnancy in sub-Saharan Africa had no significant effect on low birth weight. However, since our evidence was derived from a small number of trials and participants, a large-scale randomized controlled trials review might be required to elucidate the finding.
      Citation: Food and Nutrition Bulletin
      PubDate: 2022-04-13T08:31:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03795721221078351
       
  • Barriers to Management of Moderate Acute Malnutrition Among Children Aged
           6 to 59 Months in Damot Pulassa, Wolaita, South Ethiopia: A
           Phenomenological Study of Mothers and Health Service Providers

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      Authors: Debritu Nane, Anne Hatløy, Bernt Lindtjørn
      Abstract: Food and Nutrition Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Management of children with moderate acute malnutrition (MAM) needs to improve to reduce the transition from MAM to severe acute malnutrition (SAM).Objective:This study aimed to assess barriers to management of MAM among children aged 6 to 59 months in Damot Pulassa, Wolaita, South Ethiopia.Method:This descriptive phenomenological design used 6 focus group discussions with mothers or caregivers of children aged 6 to 59 months and 10 in-depth interviews with health service providers. Data were analyzed using Colaizzi’s descriptive phenomenological method.Result:Six themes were identified: Possible reasons for MAM; identification of a child with MAM; management services of MAM; maternal-level barriers; service provider-level barrier; and suggestions to improve the service. Shortage of food and money, selling out of self-produced food without having sufficient reserves at home, large household size, shame on having children with malnutrition, occasional house-to-house screening for MAM, family-initiated screening, leaving the management responsibility of children with MAM to the family, no provision of supplementary food, and lack of repeated follow-up visits were the main obstacles for managing MAM.Conclusion:Maternal-level barriers and service provider-level barriers affect the management of MAM negatively in Damot Pulassa, Wolaita. Children with MAM living in the area ineligible for food supplementation could deteriorate to SAM. The provision of nutrition counseling to the mothers of children with MAM without food supplementation placed children with MAM at increased risk of negative outcomes. Thus, the government should give more attention and facilitation in promoting supplementary food into the existing management of MAM.
      Citation: Food and Nutrition Bulletin
      PubDate: 2022-04-01T09:12:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03795721221088817
       
  • The Associations Between Maternal Socioeconomic Factors and Adequacy of
           Energy and Macronutrient Intakes in Pregnant Women From Yucatan, Mexico

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      Authors: Dulce Romero-Villanueva, Federico Dickinson, José Luis Batún, María Teresa Castillo-Burguete, Hugo Azcorra
      First page: 148
      Abstract: Food and Nutrition Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Socioeconomic factors influence diet quality during pregnancy. However, dearth of evidence about the influence on energy and macronutrients adequacy calls for research.Objective:To analyze the association between socioeconomic factors and adequacy rates of energy and macronutrients intakes in pregnant women from Merida, Yucatan, Mexico.Methods:During September to December 2019, we applied a socioeconomic questionnaire and three 24-hour dietary recalls to 83 pregnant females resident in Merida, Yucatan. Energy and macronutrient intakes were compared with the estimated trimester-specific energy and macronutrient requirements to calculate adequacies (%). Outcome variables were average adequacy of energy, carbohydrates, total fat, and protein intakes and the main predictors were maternal education, monthly family income, working status, and marital status. Descriptive statistics of adequacy were calculated for each category of predictors. The association between socioeconomic factors and outcome variables was analyzed through simple and multiple linear regression models.Results:Adequacy rates of energy and macronutrients decreased as education and familial income levels increased, as well as among unemployed women. Consistently with these results, simple linear regressions showed that years of education, family income, and working status (i.e., women working to earn money), were negatively associated with adequacy rates of energy and macronutrients intakes. When all predictors and covariates were included in a multiple linear regression model, only having a job was significantly associated with adequacy rates. Marital status was not associated with outcomes.Conclusions:Women in disadvantaged socioeconomic conditions (unemployed and low levels of education and familial income) show greater energy and macronutrient intakes.
      Citation: Food and Nutrition Bulletin
      PubDate: 2022-02-10T09:15:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03795721221077723
       
  • A Nutrition Behavior Change Program Moderately Improves Minimum Diet
           Diversity and Handwashing Behaviors Among Tea Workers in Assam and Tamil
           Nadu, India

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      Authors: Christina Nyhus Dhillon, Marieke Vossenaar, Bärbel Weiligmann, Neha Sanwal, Eric W. Djimeu, Mirjam Kneepkens, Biju Mushahary, Genevieve Stone, Lynnette M. Neufeld
      First page: 159
      Abstract: Food and Nutrition Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      Many workers in global supply chains remain nutritionally vulnerable despite the income they earn. The Seeds of Prosperity (SOP) program was implemented in Tamil Nadu and Assam, India, for tea supply chain workers (estate workers, small holder farmers, and farmer workers). The aim was to enhance demand for diverse and nutritious foods, and improve practices related to handwashing. The program used a behavior change communication approach wherein participants received weekly 1-hour group sessions with messaging on dietary diversity for 5 weeks and handwashing for 4 weeks. An impact evaluation was conducted to estimate changes in reported dietary and hygiene knowledge and behaviors among women. The study used a longitudinal quasiexperimental design in a subsample of program participants at baseline and postintervention among both intervention and comparison. There was a small but significant increase in mean dietary diversity (DD) for all 4 worker groups (ranging from DD score changes of 0.3 to 0.7; P < .05) and in the proportion of women meeting the minimum dietary diversity in 2 of the 4 groups. Similarly, a significant increase in the mean number of handwashing moments was observed in 2 of the worker groups. An increase in home garden use was observed in 1 of the 4 worker groups. While the SOP program resulted in improvements in dietary diversity, most tea farming women still do not achieve minimum dietary diversity. Nutritious food access may be an important constraint to further improvement.
      Citation: Food and Nutrition Bulletin
      PubDate: 2022-02-17T09:14:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03795721211070706
       
  • Validity and Reproducibility of a Semiquantitative Multiple-Choice Food
           Frequency Questionnaire in Iranian Adults

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      Authors: Alireza Zimorovat, Fatemeh Moghtaderi, Mojgan Amiri, Hamidreza Raeisi-Dehkordi, Matin Mohyadini, Mohammad Mohammadi, Sadegh Zarei, Elham Karimi-Nazari, Masoud Mirzaei, Azadeh Nadjarzadeh, Amin Salehi-Abargouei
      First page: 171
      Abstract: Food and Nutrition Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      Previous multiple-choice food-based food frequency questionnaires (FFQs) were not validated against weighed dietary records (WDRs) in Iran. This study investigated the validity and reproducibility of a multiple-choice semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire (SQ-FFQ) in adults living in central Iran. Patients with diabetes and their spouses were asked to complete 3 SQ-FFQs by interview, and nine 3-day WDRs, over 9 months. They provided 2 blood samples to assess serum calcium, magnesium, zinc, and vitamin C levels. The Pearson and intraclass correlation coefficients were calculated to assess reproducibility and validity. The degree of misclassification was explored using a contingency table of quartiles which compare the information between third FFQ and WDRs. The method of triads was incorporated to assess validity coefficients between estimated intakes using third FFQ, WDRs, and biochemical markers and assumed true intakes. A total of 180 participants aged 48.9 ± 8.4 years completed the study. Compared to WDRs, FFQs overestimated all nutrient intakes except for iron. The median intraclass correlation between FFQs was 0.56. The median de-attenuated, age, sex, and education adjusted partial correlation coefficients for validity were 0.17 and 0.26 for FFQ1-WDRs and FFQ3-WDRs, respectively. The FFQ3 validity coefficients for vitamin C, calcium, magnesium, and zinc were 0.13, 0.62, 0.89, and 0.66, respectively, using the triads method. The median exact agreement and complete disagreement between FFQ3 and WDRs were 33% and 6%, respectively. The SQ-FFQ seems to be an acceptable tool to assess the long-term dietary intake for future large-scale studies in this population.
      Citation: Food and Nutrition Bulletin
      PubDate: 2022-02-22T08:59:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03795721221078353
       
  • Nutrition Literacy Measurement Tool With Multiple Features for Chinese
           Adults

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      Authors: Yunqiu Zhang, Qing Sun, Min Zhang, Guangju Mo, Huaqing Liu
      First page: 189
      Abstract: Food and Nutrition Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Nutrition literacy is an emerging term which is increasingly used in policy and research. Progression is limited by the lack of an accepted method to measure nutrition literacy in Chinese adult, even research in this area is growing.Objective:The objective of this study is to develop a valid instrument to assess nutrition literacy in Chinese adults.Methods:The process involved 2 steps: constructed nutrition literacy conceptual framework, and developed potential items of scale based on literature review; and conducted 2 rounds of Delphi consultation to select items of the preliminary questionnaire.Results:In Delphi survey, the content validity index for each domain, level, and dimension of nutrition literacy was 1.0, coefficient of variation was less than 0.10, and Kendall’s coefficient of concordance was greater than 0.83. All of the 2 domains, 3 levels, and 6 dimensions initially formulated by our research team were reserved in the conceptual framework of nutrition literacy. Furthermore, a 43-item nutrition literacy measurement scale was established. Each item kept in the final scale reaches a high degree of concentration and a high degree of coordination, with the mean of importance ranging from 4.38 to 5.00.Conclusions:A nutrition literacy measurement scale with multiple features was established for Chinese adults, providing an operationalized tool to assess comprehensively nutrition literacy for research and practice in the field of nutrition, diet, and health.
      Citation: Food and Nutrition Bulletin
      PubDate: 2022-01-13T09:02:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03795721211073221
       
  • Linking Climate Change Adaptation Strategies and Nutrition Outcomes: A
           Conceptual Framework

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      Authors: Lesley Macheka, Tatenda Mudiwa, Prosper Chopera, Admire Nyamwanza, Peter Jacobs
      First page: 201
      Abstract: Food and Nutrition Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      Background:The relationship between climate adaptation strategies and nutrition security is poorly understood and often unclear. Although several adaptation strategies have been implemented to mitigate the impact of climate change, there is still a lack of conclusive evidence or studies on the interrelationships between adopted climate change adaptation strategies and nutrition outcomes.Objective:This study aimed at developing a conceptual framework that links climate change, adaptation strategies and nutrition and show the indicators that can be used to assess the impact of climate adaptation strategies on nutrition.Methodology:The proposed conceptual framework was developed through a literature review.Results:A generic conceptual framework that could be used to assess the impact of adopted climate change adaptation strategies on nutrition outcomes was developed. The framework consists of 5 key elements: Agro-food system, context characteristics, adaptation strategies, climatic shocks and stress, and system output. The principles used in designing the conceptual framework include systems approach, contingency theory, and system output.Conclusion:The developed framework offers a channel to evaluate adopted climate change adaptation strategies and their impact on nutrition outcomes. Such a conceptual framework can also be used in selecting and identifying more suitable climate adaptation strategies given specific contextual environments.
      Citation: Food and Nutrition Bulletin
      PubDate: 2022-02-24T09:10:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03795721221078362
       
  • Impacts of COVID-19 Pandemic on Household Food Security and Access to
           Social Protection Programs in the Philippines: Findings From a Telephone
           Rapid Nutrition Assessment Survey

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      Authors: Imelda Angeles-Agdeppa, Charina A. Javier, Charmaine A. Duante, Ma. Lynell V. Maniego
      First page: 213
      Abstract: Food and Nutrition Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      This study assessed the status and factors that affected the food security of Filipino households and their access to social protection programs and coping mechanisms during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic in the Philippines. A rapid nutrition assessment survey through telephone interview was conducted on November 3 to December 3, 2020, among households covered in the 2019 Expanded National Nutrition Survey (ENNS) to compare the status of household food security before and during the pandemic. A total of 9 provinces and highly urbanized areas were selected as study sites based on risk to COVID-19 infection categorized as low, medium, and high. A total of 5717 households with contact numbers participated in the study. Results showed that almost two-thirds (62.1%) of the households experienced moderate to severe food insecurity when strict community quarantines started. The increase in the proportion of moderate to severe food insecurity was higher in the low- and medium-risk areas of COVID-19 infection than in high-risk areas (P < .05). The poorest households were 1.7 times more likely to become moderate to severely food insecure compared to middle-income households. No money to buy food (22.1%) was the top concern of food-insecure households. Purchasing food on credit, borrowing food from family, and loans from relatives and friends are the top coping strategies of food-insecure households. The results imply the need to extend assistance equitably to households and areas with fewer resources and minimal or no benefactors.
      Citation: Food and Nutrition Bulletin
      PubDate: 2022-02-24T09:13:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03795721221078363
       
  • Vegetables for Healthy Diets in Low- and Middle-Income Countries: A
           Scoping Review of the Food Systems Literature

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      Authors: Jody Harris, Winson Tan, Jessica E. Raneri, Pepijn Schreinemachers, Anna Herforth
      First page: 232
      Abstract: Food and Nutrition Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Vegetables are an essential element in healthy diets, but intakes are low around the world and there is a lack of systematic knowledge on how to improve diets through food system approaches.Methods:This scoping review assessed how studies of food systems for healthy diets have addressed the role of vegetables in low- and middle-income countries. We apply the PRISMA guidelines for scoping reviews to narratively map the literature to an accepted food systems framework and identify research gaps.Results:We found 1383 relevant articles, with increasing numbers over 20 years. Only 6% of articles looked at low-income countries, and 93% looked at single-country contexts. Over half of articles assessed vegetables as a food group, without looking at diversity within the food group. 15% looked at traditional vegetables. Issues of physical access to food were among the least studied food system topics in our review (7% of articles). Only 15% of articles used a comprehensive food system lens across multiple dimensions. There is also a research gap on the impacts of different policy and practice interventions (13% of articles) to enable greater vegetable consumption.Conclusions:Food system studies necessarily drew on multiple disciplines, methods and metrics to describe, analyze, and diagnose parts of the system. More work is needed across disciplines, across contexts, and across the food system, including understanding interventions and trade-offs, and impacts and change for diets particularly of marginalized population groups. Filling these gaps in knowledge is necessary in order to work toward healthy vegetable-rich diets for everyone everywhere.
      Citation: Food and Nutrition Bulletin
      PubDate: 2022-01-07T09:24:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03795721211068652
       
  • Aquatic Animal Foods for Nutrition Security and Child Health

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      Authors: Lora L. Iannotti, Ivy Blackmore, Rachel Cohn, Feng Chen, Emmanuel A. Gyimah, Melissa Chapnick, Austin Humphries
      First page: 127
      Abstract: Food and Nutrition Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Aquatic animal source foods (AASF) can provide vital nutrients and bioactive factors essential for human health, yet disparities in consumption patterns prevail globally. Limited evidence exists for the implications of AASF access on child health outcomes.Objective:This study aimed to examine global AASF intakes longitudinally in association with critical nutrient intakes and childhood stunting and anemia.Methods:The analysis draws from compiled longitudinal country data (1993-2013) based on a constructed conceptual framework encompassing social and ecological factors that influence fish consumption and human health. Longitudinal generalized linear models were used to estimate the association of apparent AASF intake on country-level nutrient availability (docosahexaenoic acid [DHA], choline, vitamin B12, iron, and zinc) and prevalence of undernourishment, child stunting, and child anemia.Results:Across 175 countries, the median per capita daily apparent intake of all AASF was 37.87 g, with marginally significant differences observed between countries with low (46.65 g) versus high child mortality (23.50 g). The combined category of all AASF was significantly associated with increased total apparent intakes of DHA, choline, and vitamin B12 and reduced child stunting. Finfish (pelagic and demersal) and crustaceans inversely correlated with child stunting, while apparent intakes of mollusks and crustaceans were associated with reduced child anemia.Conclusions:This study uniquely showed that AASF were associated with improved child health outcomes and the critical nutrients necessary for growth, development, and maintaining health throughout the life course. Policies should ensure increased access to AASF across food systems and within sustainable healthy diets globally.
      Citation: Food and Nutrition Bulletin
      PubDate: 2021-12-15T02:22:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03795721211061924
       
 
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