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  Subjects -> NUTRITION AND DIETETICS (Total: 201 journals)
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Current Opinion in Clinical Nutrition & Metabolic Care
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.521
Citation Impact (citeScore): 4
Number of Followers: 26  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1363-1950 - ISSN (Online) 1473-6519
Published by LWW Wolters Kluwer Homepage  [297 journals]
  • Editorial introductions

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      Abstract: imageNo abstract available
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Jul 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Editorial: Obesity, metabolic dysfunction and the liver: from exclusion to
           inclusion

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      Authors: Kalea; Anastasia Z.; Klimis-Zacas, Dorothy
      Abstract: No abstract available
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Jul 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Genetic and epigenetic nutritional interactions influencing obesity risk
           and adiposity outcomes

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      Authors: Ramos-Lopez; Omar; Riezu-Boj, Jose Ignacio; Milagro, Fermin I.
      Abstract: imagePurpose of review This article aims to critically overview the current interplay of genetic/epigenetic factors and several nutritional aspects influencing obesity susceptibility and adiposity outcomes for obesity management and weight status monitoring.Recent findings Single nucleotide polymorphisms located in or near genes participating in energy homeostasis, fatty acid metabolism, appetite control, brain regulation, and thermogenesis have been associated with body composition measures (body weight, body mass index, waist circumference, body fat percentage, and visceral adipose tissue) depending on nutrient intakes, dietary patterns, and eating behaviors. Moreover, studies analyzing interactions between the epigenome and dietary intakes in relation to adiposity outcomes are reported. The main epigenetic mechanisms include methylation levels of promoter sequences, telomere length, and micro-ribonucleic acid expression profiles, whereas covalent histone modifications remain less studied.Summary Exploring potential interactions between the genetic/epigenetic background and nutritional features is improving the current understanding of the obesity physiopathogenesis and the usefulness of translating this precision information in the clinical setting for weight gain prediction, the design of personalized nutrition therapies as well as individual responsiveness estimation to dietary advice. The analysis of further relationships between the genotype, the epigenotype and other precision markers including the gut microbiota and the metabolome is warranted.
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Jul 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Intrahepatic triglyceride content: influence of metabolic and genetics
           drivers

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      Authors: Dearlove; David J.; Hodson, Leanne
      Abstract: imagePurpose of review Intrahepatic triglyceride (IHTG) content is determined by substrate flux to, fatty acid synthesis and partitioning within, and triglyceride disposal from the liver. Dysregulation of these processes may cause IHTG accumulation, potentially leading to nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. The aetiology of IHTG accumulation has not been fully elucidated; however, environmental factors and heritability are important. Here, we review recent evidence regarding the contribution of metabolic and genetic components of IHTG accumulation.Recent findings Obesity and insulin resistance are the primary metabolic drivers for IHTG accumulation. These risk factors have pronounced and seemingly overlapping effects on all processes involved in determining IHTG content. The strong and interchangeable associations between obesity, insulin resistance and IHTG make it challenging to determine their relative contributions. Genome-wide association studies have identified a growing list of single nucleotide polymorphisms associated with IHTG content and recent work has begun to elucidate their mechanistic effects. The mechanisms underlying metabolic and genetic drivers of IHTG appear to be distinct.Summary Both metabolic and genetic factors influence IHTG content by apparently distinct mechanisms. Further work is needed to determine metabolic and genetic interaction effects, which may lead to more personalized and potentially efficacious therapeutic interventions. The development of a comprehensive polygenic risk score for IHTG content may help facilitate this.
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Jul 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Omega-3 fatty acids and metabolic partitioning of fatty acids within the
           liver in the context of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

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      Authors: Calder; Philip C.
      Abstract: imagePurpose of review Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is now the most prevalent form of liver disease globally, affecting about 25% of the world's adult population. It is more common in those living with obesity, where it may affect as many as 80% of individuals. The aim of this article is to describe recent human studies evaluating the influence of omega-3 fatty acids on de novo lipogenesis (DNL) and hepatic fatty acid partitioning between incorporation into triacylglycerols (TAGs) and β-oxidation, to discuss the relevance of these effects in the context of NAFLD, and to provide an overview of the mechanisms that might be involved.Recent findings The omega-3 fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) decrease hepatic DNL and partition fatty acids away from TAG synthesis and toward β-oxidation. EPA and DHA affect multiple hepatic transcription factors resulting in down-regulation of the DNL pathway and upregulation of β-oxidation. The net result is decreased accumulation of hepatic TAG and lowering of circulating TAG concentrations. Human trials demonstrate that EPA and DHA can decrease liver fat in patients with NAFLD.Summary Increased intake of EPA and DHA may reduce the likelihood of hepatic TAG accumulation and could be used to reduce liver fat in patients with NAFLD.
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Jul 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Editorial: Type 2 diabetes therapeutics: weight loss and other strategies

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      Authors: Magkos; Faidon; Mittendorfer, Bettina
      Abstract: imageNo abstract available
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Jul 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Gastrointestinal effects of diets low in fermentable oligosaccharides,
           disaccharides, monosaccharides and polyols

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      Authors: Quigley; Eamonn M.M.
      Abstract: imagePurpose of review Food ingestion is an exacerbator of gastrointestinal symptoms, regardless of origin. Sufferers mistakenly assume that they have suffered an allergic reaction to a given food. Although classical IgE-mediated allergic reactions are rarely culpable, evidence for a role for intolerance to certain carbohydrates in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and related conditions increases. This review assesses the status of a commonly implicated group of poorly absorbed carbohydrates (fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides and polyols – FODMAPs) in gastrointestinal pathophysiology.Recent findings Although evidence of efficacy for low FODMAP diets in IBS accumulates, the magnitude of this effect has declined in recent studies. Comparisons to other dietary approaches have revealed conflicting results; some suggest superiority, others find parity. Concerns had been raised regarding long-term nutritional, psychological and microbiological impacts of FODMAP restriction; providing that the diet is administered in the recommended manner, these do not appear to be clinically important. The mechanisms whereby FODMAPs cause gastrointestinal symptoms continue to be explored.Summary FODMAPS induce gastrointestinal symptoms in susceptible individuals and their restriction provides clinical benefits. The magnitude of these benefits, the superiority of FODMAP restriction over other dietary approaches and the mechanisms of its effects continue to be defined.
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Jul 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Carbohydrate intake – current knowledge on weight management

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      Authors: Bayer; Sandra; Holzapfel, Christina
      Abstract: imagePurpose of review Carbohydrates are the main contributor to daily energy intake and, thus, might play an essential role in the development and treatment of obesity. This nonsystematic literature overview summarized current knowledge about the association between carbohydrate intake (quantity and quality) and weight management.Recent findings There is scientific evidence for the association between the quality of carbohydrates and body weight or metabolic parameters (e.g. fasting glucose). Thus, dietary intake of high-quality carbohydrates should be preferred over food with a low carbohydrate quality. In contrast, heterogeneous data are available for the association between the amount of carbohydrate intake and anthropometric parameters (e.g. body weight, body fat). Regulation of dietary intake and body weight is complex. For instance, gene-diet interactions might play a role in carbohydrate intake and metabolism.Summary There is evidence for the association between intake of high-quality carbohydrates and body weight. However, for the treatment of obesity, a negative energy balance is crucial. The success in weight loss was independent of the quantity and quality of carbohydrate intake. To sum up, recently published literature does not change the current opinion about carbohydrate intake and obesity.
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Jul 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • 3D printed foods-carbs from the lab for better health

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      Authors: Singh; Jyoti; Kaur, Jaspreet; Rasane, Prasad; Kaur, Sawinder
      Abstract: imagePurpose of review The purpose of the review is to describe carbohydrate based 3D food printing technology in light of how it is affected by the use of various ingredients of ink and the properties associated with carbohydrate inks used for printing. Special focus is diverted to evaluate its effect on texture and corresponding health implications associated with carbohydrate based printed foods.Recent findings The focus of 3D food printed products has revolved around texture modulation and carbohydrates are the best possible additives to achieve this modification. Carbohydrate based inks are used to design healthy texturized printed foods to provide various health benefits to consumer in addition to satisfy their aesthetic requirements. Other ingredients such as prebiotics and probiotics are major adjuncts that add value to these carbohydrates based 3D food printed foods and may have synergistic effects.Summary Although much of the current attention is on texture modulation, health aspects of the foods naturally drive the future course of research associated with the carbohydrate based 3D food printed foods.
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Jul 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Nutritional priorities in patients with severe COVID-19

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      Authors: Puthucheary; Zudin A.; Rice, Todd W.
      Abstract: imagePurpose of review The COVID-19 pandemic has altered the profile of critical care services internationally, as professionals around the globe have struggled to rise to the unprecedented challenge faced, both in terms of individual patient management and the sheer volume of patients that require treatment and management in intensive care. This review article sets out key priorities in nutritional interventions during the patient journey, both in the acute and recovery phases.Recent findings The current review covers the care of the acutely unwell patient, and the evidence base for nutritional interventions in the COVID-19 population. One of the biggest differences in caring for critically ill patients with acute respiratory failure from COVID-19 is often the time prior to intubation. This represents specific nutritional challenges, as does nursing patients in the prone position or in the setting of limited resources. This article goes on to discuss nutritional support for COVID-19 sufferers as they transition through hospital wards and into the community.Summary Nutritional support of patients with severe COVID-19 is essential. Given the longer duration of their critical illness, combined with hypermetabolism and energy expenditure, patients with COVID-19 are at increased risk for malnutrition during and after their hospital stay.
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Jul 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
 
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