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  Subjects -> NUTRITION AND DIETETICS (Total: 201 journals)
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Eating and Weight Disorders - Studies on Anorexia, Bulimia and Obesity
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.572
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 24  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1124-4909 - ISSN (Online) 1590-1262
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2469 journals]
  • Emotional dysregulation and linguistic patterns as a defining feature of
           patients in the acute phase of anorexia nervosa

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      Abstract: Purpose This research aims to analyze the relationship between emotional regulation and the symbolic process in autobiographical narratives of a group of individuals diagnosed with restrictive anorexia nervosa (AN), compared to a non-clinical group. The study is framed within multiple code theory (MCT) (Bucci, 1997; 2021), which considers mind–body integration. The purposes of this study are to investigate whether participants of the AN group will show greater alexithymia and emotional dysregulation than the non-clinical group; and whether the specific linguistic and symbolic features, such as somato-sensory words, affect words, and difficulty in the symbolizing process will predict the AN group. Methods Twenty-nine female participants hospitalized with AN during an acute phase (mean age 19.8 ± 4.1) and 36 non-clinical female participants (mean age 21 ± 2.4) were selected through snow-ball sampling. The participants completed the Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS-20), the Profile of Mood of State (POMS), the Emotion Regulation Questionnaire (ERQ), and the Relationship Anecdotes Paradigm Interview (RAP). The RAP interview was audio-recorded and transcribed to apply the Referential Process (RP) Linguistic Measures. A T test for paired samples and a logistic binary regression was performed. Results AN presented a significantly higher emotional dysregulation through the ERQ, TAS20 and POMS measures. Specifically, AN showed higher ER expression/suppression strategies, fewer functional cognitive strategies, higher alexithymia, and higher mood dysregulation. Specific linguistic features such as sensory-somatic, word affect, and difficulty in RP symbolizing predict the AN group (R2 = 0.349; χ2 = 27,929; df = 3; p = .001). Conclusions Emotional dysregulation is connected to AN symptoms and autobiographical narratives. The results can help a clinical assessment phase showing specific linguistic features in AN patients. Level of evidence Level II, controlled trial without randomization.
      PubDate: 2022-08-08
       
  • Food addiction and emotional eating are associated with intradaily
           rest–activity rhythm variability

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      Abstract: Purpose The aim of the present investigation was to study the associations among parameters characterizing eating behavior and actimetry-derived indices of circadian rhythm of motor activity. Methods The study involved 81 healthy participants (average age: 21.5 ± 9.6 y, women: 77.8%). Each study participant provided personal data, filled out the Yale Food Addiction Scale and the Dutch Eating Behavior Questionnaire, and wore a wrist actimeter for 7 consecutive days to record motor activity. Using time series treatments, we obtained: (a) three cosinor-derived parametric indices [Medline Estimating Statistics of Rhythm (MESOR), amplitude, and acrophase], and (b) four non-parametric indices [interdaily stability, intradaily variability (I.V.), most active 10-h period (M10), and least active 5-h period] characterizing the 24-h rhythm of motor activity. A multiple regression analysis adjusted for age, sex, and BMI was performed to assess the associations among the studied indicators. Results It was shown that I.V. is a predictor of symptoms of food addiction (β = 0.242, P = 0.037) and emotional eating (β = 0.390, P = 0.004), MESOR is a predictor of symptoms of food addiction (β = 0.342, P = 0.003), and M10 predicts restraint (β = 0.257, P = 0.015) and emotional eating (β = 0.464, P = 0.001). Conclusion It was shown for the first time that an increase in symptom counts of food addiction is associated with an increase in the average level and fragmentation of 24-h rhythm of motor activity. Level of evidence Level V, cross-sectional descriptive study.
      PubDate: 2022-08-06
       
  • The prevalence and risk factors of screen-based disordered eating among
           university students: a global systematic review, meta-analysis, and
           meta-regression

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      Abstract: Purpose The purpose of this review was to estimate the prevalence of screen-based disordered eating (SBDE) and several potential risk factors in university undergraduate students around the world. Methods An electronic search of nine data bases was conducted from the inception of the databases until 1st October 2021. Disordered eating was defined as the percentage of students scoring at or above established cut-offs on validated screening measures. Global data were also analyzed by country, research measure, and culture. Other confounders in this review were age, BMI, and sex. Results Using random-effects meta-analysis, the mean estimate of the distribution of effects for the prevalence of SBDE among university students (K = 105, N = 145,629) was [95% CI] = 19.7% [17.9%; 21.6%], I2 = 98.2%, Cochran's Q p value = 0.001. Bayesian meta-analysis produced an estimate of 0.24, 95% credible intervals [0.20, 0.30], τ = 92%. Whether the country in which the students were studying was Western or non-Western did not moderate these effects, but as either the mean BMI of the sample or the percentage of the sample that was female increased, the prevalence of SBDE increased. Conclusions These findings support previous studies indicating that many undergraduate students are struggling with disordered eating or a diagnosable eating disorder, but are neither receiver effective prevention nor accessing accurate diagnosis and available treatment. It is particularly important to develop ever more valid ways of identifying students with high levels of disordered eating and offering them original or culturally appropriate and effective prevention or early treatment. Level of evidence I, systematic review and meta-analysis.
      PubDate: 2022-08-04
       
  • Dietary patterns and eating behaviors on the border between healthy and
           pathological orthorexia

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      Abstract: Purpose The obsession with healthy eating associated with restrictive behaviors is called Orthorexia Nervosa (OrNe). Nevertheless, some studies suggest that orthorexia can also be a non-pathological interest in healthy eating which is called Healthy Orthorexia (HeOr). First, one of the main objectives of this study is to compare HeOr, OrNe and eating behaviors in different dietary patterns (vegan, vegetarian and omnivore). Second is to reveal the relationship between HeOr, OrNe and eating behaviors (cognitive restraint, uncontrolled eating, and emotional eating). Lastly, to determine the potential predictors of HeOr and OrNe. Methods Participants (N = 426 with an omnivorous diet; N = 415 with a vegan diet, N = 324 with a vegetarian diet) completed a web-based descriptive survey, the Teruel Orthorexia Scale and the Three-Factor Eating Questionnaire-R 21. Results HeOr and OrNe were more common in individuals following both vegan and vegetarian diets. Individuals following a vegan or a vegetarian diet had lower body mass index and higher body image satisfaction than individuals following an omnivorous diet. Cognitive restraint and following a vegan or a vegetarian diet were the two main predictors of both HeOr and OrNe. Cognitive restraint was positively associated with both HeOr and OrNe (more strongly correlated with OrNe), whereas uncontrolled eating and emotional eating behaviors were positively related to OrNe and negatively related to HeOr. Conclusion The present study contributes to a better understanding of the some similarities and differences between HeOr and OrNe. It also points to higher rates of orthorexia in individuals following a vegan or vegetarian diet and represents a further step towards developing prevention and intervention programs by identifying risk factors for OrNe. Level V Cross-sectional descriptive study.
      PubDate: 2022-08-02
       
  • Correction to: Increased prevalence of eating disorders in Japan since the
           start of the COVID-19 pandemic

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      PubDate: 2022-08-01
       
  • Correction to Intuitive Eating Scale‑2: psychometric properties and
           clinical norms among individuals seeking treatment for an eating disorder
           in private practice

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      PubDate: 2022-08-01
       
  • Nutri‑Score vs NutrInform Battery front‑of‑pack labelling systems:
           weight of scientific evidence matters

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      PubDate: 2022-08-01
       
  • Front-of-pack (FOP) labelling systems, nutrition education, and obesity
           prevention: nutri-score and nutrinform battery need more research

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      PubDate: 2022-08-01
       
  • Orthorexia nervosa and executive dysfunction: symptomatology is related to
           difficulties with behavioral regulation

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      Abstract: Purpose This research explored whether orthorexia nervosa is associated with deficits in executive function. Methods A non-clinical sample of participants (n = 405; 80% women, 53% white, mean age = 24, mean body mass index = 25) completed the Orthorexia Nervosa Inventory (ONI) and the Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function—Adult version (BRIEF-A). Results ONI scores were weakly to moderately correlated with all BRIEF-A scales (p < 0.001 for eight scales, p < 0.05 for one scale), exhibiting the greatest correlations with the scales assessing behavioral regulation: Emotional Control (r = 0.34), Inhibition (r = 0.30), Set Shifting (r = 0.25), and Self-Monitoring (r = 0.28). Hierarchical regression analyses revealed that eight of these nine relationships remained significant (p < 0.001 for five scales including all behavioral regulation scales, p < 0.01 for two scales, p < 0.05 for one scale) after controlling for demographic variables (e.g., gender, body mass index, age, education level) and diagnoses of an eating disorder, obsessive–compulsive disorder, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, autism, and learning disability. Conclusion These findings suggest that, despite unique manifestations, orthorexia and anorexia may possess an overlapping neuropsychological profile marked by deficits in executive function, which may negatively impact daily life. Level of evidence Level V, descriptive cross-sectional study.
      PubDate: 2022-08-01
       
  • Latent trajectories of symptom change during cognitive-behavior therapy
           predict post-treatment worsening of symptoms: a preliminary examination
           among outpatients with bulimia-spectrum eating disorders

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      Abstract: Purpose Up to 44% of individuals with bulimia nervosa (BN) experience worsening of symptoms after cognitive behavior therapy (CBT). Identifying risk for post-treatment worsening of symptoms using latent trajectories of change in eating disorder (ED) symptoms during treatment could allow for personalization of treatment to improve long-term outcomes Methods Participants (N = 56) with BN-spectrum EDs received 16 sessions of CBT and completed digital self-monitoring of eating episodes and ED behaviors. The Eating Disorder Examination was used to measured ED symptoms at post-treatment and 3-month follow-up. Latent growth mixture modeling of digital self-monitoring data identified latent growth classes. Kruskal–Wallis H tests examined effect of trajectory of change in ED symptoms on post-treatment to follow-up symptom change. Results Multi-class models of change in binge eating, compensatory behaviors, and regular eating improved fit over one-class models. Individuals with high frequency-rapid response in binge eating (H(1) = 10.68, p =0 .001, η2 = 0.24) had greater recurrence of compensatory behaviors compared to individuals with low frequency-static response. Individuals with static change in regular eating exhibited greater recurrence of binge eating than individuals with moderate response (H(1) = 8.99, p = 0.003, η2 = 0.20). Conclusion Trajectories of change in ED symptoms predict post-treatment worsening of symptoms. Personalized treatment approaches should be evaluated among individuals at risk of poor long-term outcomes. Level of evidence IV, evidence obtained from multiple time series. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov registration number NCT03673540, registration date: September 17, 2018.
      PubDate: 2022-08-01
       
  • Phase 2 of family-based treatment: an exploratory assessment of clinician
           practices

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      Abstract: Purpose In manualized family-based treatment (FBT) for eating disorders, phase 1 of the 3-phase treatment—during which parents are put in control of eating-related issues—is perhaps the most critical phase, and is comprehensively addressed in the manual. Phase 2, during which control over eating is gradually returned to the patient, is more variable and the manual dedicates less space to this phase. The purpose of the current exploratory study was to assess Phase 2 practices of clinicians providing FBT and to compare these practices to the guidance offered in the manual. Methods In the current study, a survey assessing Phase 2 practices was sent to clinicians. Twenty-seven providers responded. Two providers reported that they did not provide FBT in an outpatient setting. One reported not currently providing outpatient FBT but had in the past. The remaining providers were currently providing FBT in an outpatient setting. Results No items addressing the core interventions of Phase 2, including encouraging age-appropriate independent eating, were endorsed by 100% of respondents as being addressed 100% of the time in Phase 2. Conclusion Responses reflected some adherence to the manual, along with examples of therapist drift and incorporation of therapeutic interventions that are not described in the FBT manual. Adherence to manualized treatments may improve outcome for some patients, while allowing for flexibility to address clinical situations that are not addressed in the manual. Level of evidence V. Opinions of respected authorities, based on descriptive studies, narrative reviews, clinical experience, or reports of expert committees.
      PubDate: 2022-08-01
       
  • Validation of the Arabic version of the ORTO-R among a sample of Lebanese
           young adults

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      Abstract: Background Within the literature, there is a variety of different measurement methods for orthorexic behaviours. The ORTO-15 is the one that attracted most research attention. Many scholars criticized the ORTO-15 for its unstable factor structure and over-estimation of the prevalence of orthorexia nervosa. For this purpose, Rogoza and Donini (Eat Weight Disord 26:887–895, 2020) re-assessed the original data and created a new tool, ORTO-R. The development of the ORTO-R theoretically solved many ambiguities associated with its parent measure. However, to date, no study, including the original one, tested the validity of the ORTO-R, leaving its utility somewhat speculative. Methods We gathered data from 363 Lebanese individuals, who answered the ORTO-R questions and a set of measures used to determine the validity of the scale (eating attitudes, perfectionism, body dissatisfaction, self-esteem, anxiety, and depression). Within this study, we analysed the internal consistency of the scale and different aspects of its validity (factorial, convergent, and divergent). Results Results supported all expectations; we successfully confirmed a one-factor measurement model of the ORTO-R, which appeared to be internally consistent. The ORTO-R score correlated positively to other orthorexic behaviours as well as to disordered eating attitudes, perfectionism, anxiety, and depression. It was also negatively related to self-esteem, but was unrelated to body dissatisfaction. Conclusion The ORTO-R may be deemed as a valid instrument for the assessment of orthorexic behaviours. Level of evidence V: Opinions of authorities, based on descriptive studies, narrative reviews, clinical experience, or reports of expert committees.
      PubDate: 2022-08-01
       
  • What do Italian healthcare professionals think about orthorexia
           nervosa' Results from a multicenter survey

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      Abstract: Purpose Orthorexia nervosa (ON) is an obsession for healthy and proper nutrition. Diagnostic criteria for ON are lacking and the psychopathology of ON is still a matter of debate in the clinical and scientific community. Our aim was to better understand the Italian clinical and scientific community’s opinion about ON. Methods Anonymous online survey for Italian healthcare professionals, implemented with the REDCap platform and spread through a multicenter collaboration. Information was gathered about socio-demographic, educational and occupational features, as well as about experience in the diagnosis and treatment of EDs. The main part of the survey focused on ON and its features, classification and sociocultural correlates. Results The survey was completed by 343 participants. Most responders (68.2%) considered ON as a variant of Eating Disorders (EDs), and 58.6% a possible prodromal phase or evolution of Anorexia Nervosa (AN). Most participants (68.5%) thought the next DSM should include a specific diagnostic category for ON, preferably in the EDs macro-category (82.1%). Moreover, 77.3% of responders thought that ON deserves more attention on behalf of researchers and clinicians, and that its treatment should be similar to that for EDs (60.9%). Participants thinking that ON should have its own diagnostic category in the next DSM edition had greater odds of being younger (p = 0.004) and of considering ON a prodromic phase of another ED, such as AN (p = 0.039). Discussion Our survey suggests that the scientific community still seems split between those who consider ON as a separate disorder and those who do not. More research is still needed to better understand the construct of ON and its relationship with EDs; disadvantages and advantages of giving ON its own diagnosis should be balanced. Level of evidence V (descriptive cohort study).
      PubDate: 2022-08-01
       
  • Experiencing eight psychotherapy approaches devoted to eating disorders in
           a single-day workshop increases insight and motivation to engage in care:
           a pilot study

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      Abstract: Purpose For patients with eating disorders (EDs), early engagement in care is usually considered a positive prognostic factor. The aim of the study was to investigate how a single-day intervention devoted to early, brief, experiential exposure to a variety of psychotherapy approaches might support commitment to change and the decision to engage in care in patients with EDs. Methods One hundred and sixty-nine adult outpatients newly diagnosed with an ED took part in a single-day workshop for groups of up to ten patients, where they experienced eight psychotherapeutic approaches. Motivation to change care and level of insight were assessed at baseline and 10 days after the intervention. Results Motivation and commitment to take active steps toward change (expressed by the “Committed Action” composite score) significantly improved after the intervention (p < 0.001), and a significant number of patients specifically moved from “contemplation” to “action” stage (p < 0.001). The improvement of motivation to change was significantly associated with an increase in insight capacity (p < 0.001), and this increase was observed for almost all related dimensions such as recognition of illness or awareness of need for psychological treatment. Conclusion A single-day session devoted to experiencing a range of group psychotherapies increased patients’ insight and motivation to actively engage in care. To confirm potential longer-term benefits of this intervention, further studies are needed to explore the contribution of each approach and process specifically involved in patients' increased motivation for care, as well as the clinical characteristics of patients associated with better outcomes. Level of evidence V: Opinions of respected authorities, based on descriptive studies, narrative reviews, clinical experience, or reports of expert committees.
      PubDate: 2022-08-01
       
  • Digital self-harm is associated with disordered eating behaviors in adults

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      Abstract: Purpose Eating-disorder psychopathology is associated with self-harm behaviors. With much time spent and many social interactions taking place online, self-cyberbullying has emerged as a new form of self-harm that is digital. The current study examined digital self-harm in adults and its associations with eating-disorder psychopathology and behaviors. Methods Participants were adults (N = 1794) who completed an online cross-sectional survey. Participants reported whether they had ever posted mean things about themselves online, whether they had ever anonymously bullied themselves online and completed measures of eating-disorder psychopathology and disordered eating behaviors. Results Digital self-harm was reported by adults across demographic characteristics and across the lifespan, although there were some significant differences in demographic characteristics associated with reported digital self-harm. Participants who engaged in digital self-harm were younger than those denying digital self-harm. Eating-disorder psychopathology and disordered eating behaviors were significantly higher among individuals reporting digital self-harm compared with age-matched controls. Conclusions This was the first study to examine digital self-harm among adults and the first study to examine associations of digital self-harm with eating-disorder psychopathology and disordered eating behaviors. Importantly, digital self-harm is reported by adults and therefore is not limited to youth. Our findings that digital self-harm is associated with disordered eating suggests that digital self-harm is a clinically significant topic that needs further research to inform clinical practice and clinical research. Level of evidence Level III, Evidence obtained from well-designed cohort or case-controlled analytic studies.
      PubDate: 2022-08-01
       
  • Neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) variations in relationship with
           childhood maltreatment in patients with anorexia nervosa: a retrospective
           cohort study

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      Abstract: Purpose Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a serious mental illness. It is frequently accompanied by a history of childhood maltreatment (CM) that may constitute a specific ecophenotype in patients with eating disorders necessitating special assessment and management. This retrospective study tested whether in patients with AN, CM-related chronic stress may manifest through low-grade inflammation reflected by an increase in white blood cell ratios (neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio, NLR, platelet-to-lymphocyte ratio, and monocyte-to-lymphocyte ratio). Methods Participants (N = 206) were enrolled at an eating disorder daycare unit in Montpellier, France, from March 2013 and January 2020. CM was assessed using the childhood trauma questionnaire (CTQ). The Eating Disorder Examination Questionnaire (EDE-Q) and the MINI were used to assess AN severity and the other clinical characteristics, respectively. Results NLR was higher in patients with AN and history of CM (p = 0.029) and in patients with AN and history of emotional abuse (p = 0.021), compared with patients with AN without history of CM. In multivariate analysis, emotional abuse (β = 0.17; p = 0.027) contributed significantly to NLR variability. Conclusion In patients with AN, NLR is a low-grade inflammation marker that is influenced by various sociodemographic, clinical and biological factors. It is more directly affected by some CM types, especially emotional abuse, than by the presence/absence of CM history. Future studies should focus on mediators between CM and increased inflammation, such as interoceptive awareness, emotional dysregulation, food addiction, and stress sensitization. Level of evidence III. Evidence obtained from well-designed cohort or case–control analytic studies.
      PubDate: 2022-08-01
       
  • Development, validation and clinical use of the Eating Behaviors
           Assessment for Obesity (EBA-O)

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      Abstract: Introduction Obesity is a major health problem with an increasing risk of mortality, associated with comorbidities and high rates of dropout. Research demonstrated that pathological eating behaviors could help to phenotype obese patients thus tailoring clinical interventions. Therefore, our aim was to develop (study 1), validate (study 2), and test in a clinical setting (study 3) the Eating Behaviors Assessment for Obesity (EBA-O). Method Study 1 included the exploratory factor analysis (EFA) and McDonald’s ω in a general population sample (N = 471). Study 2 foresaw the confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) and convergent validity in 169 participants with obesity. Study 3 tested the capability of the EBA-O to characterize eating behaviors in a clinical sample of 74 patients with obesity. Results Study 1. EFA identified five factors (i.e., food addiction, night eating, binge eating, sweet eating, and prandial hyperphagia), explaining 68.3% of the variance. The final EBA-O consisted of 18 items. McDonald’s ω ranged between 0.80 (hyperphagia) and 0.92 (binge eating), indicating very good reliability. Study 2. A second-order five-factor model, through CFA, showed adequate fit: relative chi-square (χ2/df) = 1.95, CFI = 0.93, TLI = 0.92, RMSEA = 0.075, and SRMR = 0.06, thus suggesting the appropriateness of the EBA-O model. Significant correlations with psychopathological questionnaires demonstrated the convergent validity. Study 3. Significant associations between EBA-O factors and emotional-related eating behaviors emerged. Conclusion The EBA-O demonstrated to be a reliable and easy-to-use clinical tool to identify pathological eating behaviors in obesity, particularly useful for non-experts in eating disorders. Level of evidence Level V, descriptive research.
      PubDate: 2022-08-01
       
  • Increased prevalence of eating disorders in Japan since the start of the
           COVID-19 pandemic

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      Abstract: Purpose The study aimed to investigate the effect of the COVID-19 pandemic on the prevalence of eating disorders in Japan. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of new patients with eating disorders who visited an outpatient eating disorders clinic of a single university hospital in Tokyo, Japan, from April 2020 to March 2021 (FY2020) and April 2019 to March 2020 (FY2019). We determined whether the onset or course in each patient in FY2020 was associated with the COVID-19 pandemic and classified COVID-19-associated medical histories into the following categories: (1) fatness phobia, (2) acceleration of dieting, (3) family relationships, (4) social factors, and (5) mood change. We performed the Kolmogorov–Smirnov test to compare the cumulative distribution of disease onset by month in FY2020 and FY2019. Results We reviewed the records of 112 and 77 patients with eating disorders in FY2020 and FY2019, respectively. The onset or course of 35 patients (31.3%) in FY2020 was associated with the COVID-19 pandemic. We classified 14 patients to fatness phobia category, 11 to acceleration of dieting, 4 to family relationships, 2 to social factors, and 4 to mood change. No COVID-19-associated cases were associated with fear of contracting the disease. The cumulative distribution of disease onset differed significantly in FY2020 and FY2019 (D = 0.248; P = 0.007). Conclusion This chart review suggests that the COVID-19 pandemic may increase the prevalence of eating disorders. Level of evidence III, cohort study.
      PubDate: 2022-08-01
       
  • Phonological working memory is adversely affected in adults with anorexia
           nervosa: a systematic literature review

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      Abstract: Purpose Cognitive restraint has potentiating and deleterious effects on working memory (WM) in anorexia nervosa (AN). Conflicting evidence may be due to heterogeneity of tasks examining different WM components (e.g., verbal/auditory versus visuospatial), and differences in adolescent versus adult AN. Additionally, differential cognitive profiles of restricting versus binge/purging subtypes, comorbid psychiatric disorders and psychotropic medication use may confound findings. Methods To address these conflicts, 25 studies, published between 2016 and 2021, investigating WM in children, adolescents and adults with AN were systematically reviewed using PRISMA guidelines. Results In 71% of WM tasks, no difference in performance between AN patients and age-matched controls was reported, while 29% of WM tasks showed worse performance. Adults with AN displayed deficits in 44% of the verbal/auditory tasks, while performance remained unaffected in 86% of visuospatial tasks. Conclusion Examining age groups and WM subsystems separately revealed novel findings of differentially affected WM components in AN. Comorbidities and psychotropic medications were common among AN participants and should be regarded as critical confounding factors for WM measures. Future studies examining different components of WM, acknowledging these confounding factors, may reveal specific deficits in AN to aid treatment improvement strategies. Level of evidence I, systematic review.
      PubDate: 2022-08-01
       
  • Young people and parents’ views towards individual cognitive remediation
           therapy–qualitative findings from a feasibility randomised controlled
           trial

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      Abstract: Purpose Cognitive Remediation Therapy (CRT) has been used mostly in adults. Randomised Controlled Trials (RCTs) in anorexia nervosa (AN) have shown that CRT enhances cognitive flexibility, abstract thinking and is associated with quality-of-life improvement. More research is needed in younger populations. Methods A single-centre feasibility RCT with young people (YP) with AN was conducted in an inpatient setting. A secondary aim of this study was to explore patient satisfaction and parents' views towards CRT to inform further development and implementation of CRT in YP. YP were asked to complete a therapy feedback questionnaire and write a letter with their views on CRT. Parents were asked to complete a questionnaire exploring their perceptions of CRT. Data were analysed using inductive thematic and deductive content analysis. Results Both YP and parents valued CRT. Its engaging and pragmatic nature and its focus on thinking styles were perceived as a novel aspect. Parents expressed the need to be involved in the sessions to be able to continue to support their children at home. Conclusions This study confirms previous qualitative findings. Should a fully powered RCT be conducted, it would be important to take into account these findings to further adapt the content of the CRT sessions to the YP needs and to consider their parents’ involvement in the sessions, which could also increase the likelihood of parents’ engagement in providing their feedback. Level of evidence Level I: Evidence obtained from one randomized controlled trial.
      PubDate: 2022-08-01
       
 
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