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  Subjects -> NUTRITION AND DIETETICS (Total: 201 journals)
Showing 1 - 64 of 64 Journals sorted by number of followers
American Journal of Clinical Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 177)
British Journal Of Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 96)
Clinical Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 94)
International Journal of Obesity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 93)
International Journal of Sport Nutrition & Exercise Metabolism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 88)
European Journal of Clinical Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 75)
Advances in Food and Nutrition Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 62)
Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 61)
Food Science & Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 59)
Obesity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 58)
Advances in Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 55)
Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 52)
Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition (JPGN)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 52)
Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 52)
Diabetes, Metabolic Syndrome and Obesity     Open Access   (Followers: 48)
American Journal of Food and Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 47)
Nutrition in Clinical Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
Journal of Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42)
Annual Review of Nutrition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 40)
Nutrition Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
European Journal of Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
Food & Nutrition Research     Open Access   (Followers: 35)
Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity     Open Access   (Followers: 31)
Nutrition & Dietetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Public Health Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Journal of Nutrition, Health and Aging     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Journal of Renal Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Current Opinion in Clinical Nutrition & Metabolic Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Eating and Weight Disorders - Studies on Anorexia, Bulimia and Obesity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Appetite     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Obesity Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Current Nutrition & Food Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Journal of Obesity     Open Access   (Followers: 24)
Childhood Obesity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
International Journal of Nutrition and Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 23)
International Journal of Eating Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Nutrition Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Clinical Nutrition ESPEN     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Advances in Eating Disorders : Theory, Research and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Comparative Exercise Physiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Nutrition & Diabetes     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
International Journal of Food Safety, Nutrition and Public Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Topics in Clinical Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Clinical Obesity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
American Journal of Botany     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Canadian Journal of Dietetic Practice and Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Nutrition & Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
African Journal of Food, Agriculture, Nutrition and Development     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Journal of Nutrition and Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Advanced Nutrition and Human Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Nutrition and Dietary Supplements     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Eating Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Nutrition in Gerontology and Geriatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Maternal & Child Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Nutrition Today     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Nutrition Research Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Nutrition and Cancer     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Food, Culture and Society: An International Journal of Multidisciplinary Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
BMC Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Annual Review of Food Science and Technology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Nutrients     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Health, Population and Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Clinical Nutrition Insight     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Nutrition Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
BMJ Nutrition, Prevention & Health     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Asian Journal of Clinical Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Food and Foodways: Explorations in the History and Culture of     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Advances in Digestive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
International Journal of Food Sciences and Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Nutrition Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Frontiers in Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Ecology of Food and Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
International Journal for Vitamin and Nutrition Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Food and Nutrition Research     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Dietary Supplements     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
American Journal of Food Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Pediatric Obesity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Nutritional Neuroscience : An International Journal on Nutrition, Diet and Nervous System     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Obesity Facts     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Nutrition & Food Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Proceedings of the Nutrition Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Current Nutrition Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Amino Acids     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Nutrition and Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Hunger & Environmental Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of the American College of Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Current Developments in Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Food Chemistry and Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Food Science and Nutrition Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Molecular Nutrition & Food Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Child Health and Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Current Research in Nutrition and Food Science     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Food and Nutrition Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Nutrition - Science en évolution     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Nutrition Bytes     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Food Digestion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
South African Journal of Clinical Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Bangladesh Journal of Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Plant Foods for Human Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Genes & Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Pharmacy and Nutrition Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Universal Journal of Food and Nutrition Science     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Nutrition and Metabolic Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Metabolism and Nutrition in Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Medical Nutrition and Nutraceuticals     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Nutrition, Pharmacology, Neurological Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
World Food Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Agriculture, Food Systems, and Community Development     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Frontiers in Sustainable Food Systems     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Aktuelle Ernährungsmedizin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Nutrición Hospitalaria     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
PharmaNutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Revista Española de Nutrición Humana y Dietética     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Ernährung & Medizin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Perspectivas en Nutrición Humana     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Pakistan Journal of Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Oil Crop Science     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Acta Portuguesa de Nutrição     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Open Nutrition Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Spices and Aromatic Crops     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Food Quality and Safety     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Nutritional & Environmental Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Progress in Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Endocrinología, Diabetes y Nutrición (English Edition)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Revista Chilena de Nutricion     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Renal Nutrition and Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, Transplant and Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Bioactive Carbohydrates and Dietary Fibre     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Nigerian Food Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Lifestyle Genomics     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Nutritional Science     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Food and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
The Australian Coeliac     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Endocrinología, Diabetes y Nutrición     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Amerta Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Archive of Food and Nutritional Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Open Obesity Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Food and Environmental Virology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Case Reports in Clinical Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
European Journal of Nutrition & Food Safety     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Food Science and Nutrition Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Human Nutrition & Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Food Frontiers     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Food & Nutritional Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Plant Production Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian Journal of Obesity, Diabetes and Endocrinology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Jurnal Penelitian Gizi dan Makanan     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Ethnic Foods     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Clinical Nutrition Experimental     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
RBONE - Revista Brasileira de Obesidade, Nutrição e Emagrecimento     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cahiers de Nutrition et de Diététique     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Indian Journal of Nutrition and Dietetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Canadian Food Studies / La Revue canadienne des études sur l'alimentation     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Mexicana de Trastornos Alimentarios     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
RBNE - Revista Brasileira de Nutrição Esportiva     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Jurnal Gizi dan Dietetik Indonesia : Indonesian Journal of Nutrition and Dietetics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Clinical Nutrition Open Science     Open Access  
Food Hydrocolloids for Health     Open Access  
npj Science of Food     Open Access  
Functional Foods in Health and Disease     Open Access  
Journal of Nutraceuticals and Herbal Medicine     Open Access  
Arab Journal of Nutrition and Exercise     Open Access  
Nutrire     Hybrid Journal  
UNICIÊNCIAS     Open Access  
Lifestyle Journal     Open Access  
Archivos Latinoamericanos de Nutrición     Open Access  
Revista Salud Pública y Nutrición     Open Access  
Open Food Science Journal     Open Access  
Segurança Alimentar e Nutricional     Open Access  
Indonesian Food and Nutrition Progress     Open Access  
Journal of Medicinal Herbs and Ethnomedicine     Open Access  
La Ciencia al Servicio de la Salud y Nutrición     Open Access  
Jurnal Riset Kesehatan     Open Access  
Jurnal Gizi Indonesia / The Indonesian Journal of Nutrition     Open Access  
Hacettepe University Faculty of Health Sciences Journal     Open Access  
Gazi Sağlık Bilimleri Dergisi     Open Access  
Media Gizi Indonesia     Open Access  
Jurnal Gizi Klinik Indonesia     Open Access  
NFS Journal     Open Access  
Journal of Nutrition & Intermediary Metabolism     Open Access  
Food and Waterborne Parasitology     Open Access  
Journal of Nutritional Ecology and Food Research     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Nutritional Disorders & Therapy     Open Access  
DEMETRA : Alimentação, Nutrição & Saúde     Open Access  
Nigerian Journal of Nutritional Sciences     Full-text available via subscription  
African Journal of Biomedical Research     Open Access  
Journal of the Australasian College of Nutritional and Environmental Medicine     Full-text available via subscription  
Médecine & Nutrition     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Sensory Studies     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Muscle Foods     Hybrid Journal  

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Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Eating and Weight Disorders - Studies on Anorexia, Bulimia and Obesity
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.572
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 25  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1124-4909 - ISSN (Online) 1590-1262
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2467 journals]
  • Integrating evidence-based PTSD treatment into intensive eating disorders
           treatment: a preliminary investigation

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      Abstract: Purpose Given data suggesting common co-occurrence and worse outcomes for individuals with eating disorders (EDs) and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), it is critical to identify integrated treatment approaches for this group of patients. Past work has explored the feasibility and initial efficacy of intervention approaches that draw on evidence-based treatments for both EDs and PTSD; however, this work remains limited in scope. In the current study, we explored the feasibility and naturalistic outcomes of PTSD treatment delivered within the context of intensive ED treatment. Method Participants were 57 adult men and women with DSM-5 EDs and comorbid PTSD who completed a course of either Prolonged Exposure (PE; n = 22) or Cognitive Processing Therapy (CPT; n = 35) (Msessions = 10.40; SD = 5.13) and weekly validated measurements of clinical symptoms while enrolled in ED programming. Results Multi-level models for PTSD symptoms indicated a significant linear effect of time, such that participants demonstrated significant decreases over time in PTSD symptoms, regardless of treatment modality. Conclusion Our preliminary investigation provides support for the feasibility and efficacy of an integrated approach to treating EDs and PTSD. It is critical for future work to undertake randomized tests of this integrated approach using large, heterogeneous samples. Level of evidence Level IV, multiple time series with intervention
      PubDate: 2022-11-19
       
  • Effects of fitspiration content on body image: a systematic review

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      Abstract: Purpose Fitspiration (also known as “fitspo”) aims to inspire individuals to exercise and have healthy habits, but emerging research indicates that exposure to it can have a negative impact on body image. This study aims to analyze the relationship between individuals’ exposure to fitspiration content and body image measures or associated variables (e.g., appearance comparison). Materials and methods A comprehensive search of peer-reviewed papers published in English between 2000 and August 2022 was conducted in PubMed, PsycINFO and Google Scholar, based on the PICOS model. To be included, studies had to analyze the relationship between exposure to fitspiration content (I) and body image or associated variables (O) in adolescents and adults (P). Study methodological quality was assessed using an adaptation of the EPHPP Quality Assessment Tool for Quantitative Studies. Outcome data were synthesized narratively and by vote counting. Results Twenty articles met the eligibility criteria and were included. Nineteen studies analyzed the relationship between fitspiration and body image, twelve analyzed the association between exposure to fitspiration and physical appearance comparison tendencies, and nine analyzed the association between fitspiration content and mood. One study analyzed the association between frequency of viewing fitspiration content and motives for exercise. Results showed that exposure to "fitspiration" increased individuals’ body dissatisfaction, physical appearance comparisons, and negative mood, especially in younger populations. Conclusions Fitspiration has been seen as a new and prolific digital trend, considered beneficial for health. However, our results showed that fitspo is associated with negative body image, especially in younger populations that are more exposed to this content. Most of the studies were conducted in females and young age participants, which limits the extrapolation of results by gender and age. Future studies are needed to confirm and extend these findings. Level of Evidence Level 1, Systematic Review.
      PubDate: 2022-11-18
       
  • The influence of front-of-pack nutritional labels on eating and purchasing
           behaviors: a narrative review of the literature

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      Abstract: Background Front-of-Pack Nutritional Labels are considered a useful tool to help consumers orient themselves in their food choices and direct their behavior toward a healthier diet. FOPNL development and use are part of a framework that includes cognitive, biological, hedonic and cultural aspects, able to affect consumers' eating and purchasing behavior. Aim Given the complexity of the matter, the aim of this narrative review is to analyze the combination of different factors that drive food choices and eating behaviors and to highlight some aspects that are not fully studied. Methods The authors conducted the research using a top-down approach at first, followed by a bottom-up approach; starting with general considerations about the purchasing process, gradually narrowing the discussion to a specific sub-population, and finally extending the discussion back to more general reasonings about the direction to adopt in future, or at least to evaluate, for effective communication. Results Biases and attitudes toward food products were found to regularly interfere with buying behavior patterns, making it impossible to standardize an average consumer. This reflects in current research, increasing the complexity of the topic. All determinants influencing food choices are often assessed individually rather than in a synergistic and multidimensional context, while the purchasing scenario is characterized by multiple stimuli to which the consumer is subjected. FOPNLs’ impact on perceived healthiness has been studied in different conditions, but some population subgroups have not been sufficiently represented. In particular, the effect of FOPNLs on consumers suffering from eating disorders is understudied and needs further attention. Furthermore, some approaches can be compared to “negative nutrition” or “loss-framed communication”, putting nutrients out of context, emphasizing losses more than gains and risking promoting negative feelings in consumers. Conclusion Due to the heterogeneity of studies, evidence on what works best in driving people to adopt lasting lifestyle changes is still mixed. Science communicators and policymakers should consider the possibility that a multi-component approach incorporating nutrition information and education may be a key strategy to promote consumers’ self-consciousness and to support them in their cognitive efforts toward a healthy and sustainable diet. Level of evidence Level V, narrative review.
      PubDate: 2022-11-11
       
  • Anorexia nervosa as a disorder of the subcortical–cortical
           interoceptive-self

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      Abstract: Purpose Anorexia nervosa (AN) is characterized by a diminished capacity in perceiving the physiological correlates of interoceptive sensations, namely bodily self-consciousness. Given the neural division of self-processing into interoceptive-, exteroceptive- and mental-self, we hypothesize neural deficits in the interoceptive-processing regions in AN. Methods To prove this, we reviewed resting state (rs), task and rest-task studies in AN literature. Results Neuronal data demonstrate the following in AN: (i) decreased rs-functional connectivity (rsFC) of subcortical–cortical midline structures (SCMS); (ii) reduced rsFC between medial (default-mode network/DMN and salience network/SN) and lateral (executive-control network/ECN) cortical regions; (iii) decreased rsFC in mainly the regions of the interoceptive-self; (iv) altered activity with overall increased activity in response to sensory/body image stimuli, especially in the regions of the interoceptive-self; (v) lack of a clear task-related distinction between own’s and others’ body image. Conclusion These data may indicate that rs-hypoconnectivity between SCMS, as neural correlate of a reduced intero-exteroceptive integration resulting in self-objectification, might be linked to overall increased activity in interoceptive regions during sensory/body image stimuli in AN, engendering an “anxious bodily self.” Level of evidence I: Systematic review.
      PubDate: 2022-11-10
       
  • Psychometric properties of the Italian body shape questionnaire: an
           investigation of its reliability, factorial, concurrent, and criterion
           validity

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      Abstract: Purpose This study was set up to investigate the reliability, factorial, concurrent, and criterion validity of the Italian version of the 34-item Body Shape Questionnaire (BSQ) and its shorter versions. Methods The study included 231 patients diagnosed with an eating disorder and 58 putatively healthy people (comparison sample). The Italian BSQ-34 was administered to participants together with the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale and the Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale. Information on body mass index, caloric intake at baseline, and the number of episodes of self-vomiting per week was also acquired. Results Cronbach’s alpha of BSQ-34 was 0.971 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.965–0.976) in patients and 0.960 (0.944–0.974) in controls. Test–retest stability in patients (n = 69), measured with intraclass correlation coefficient, was 0.987 (0.983–0.991). Confirmatory factor analysis of the single-factor model yielded acceptable fit for all versions of the BSQ. On all BSQ versions, patients scored higher than controls with a large effect size when calculated as Cliff’s delta. BMI and mean caloric intake at baseline had a stronger association with BSQ-34 than levels of anxiety and depression. The analysis with the receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve showed that the BSQ-34 distinguished patients with an eating disorder from controls with good accuracy (Area Under the Curve = 86.5; 95% CI 82.2–90.7). Conclusion The Italian version of the BSQ possesses good psychometric properties, in both the long and the shortened versions, and it can be applied to measure body dissatisfaction for both clinical and research purposes. Level of evidence Level III, Evidence obtained from well-designed cohort or case–control analytic studies.
      PubDate: 2022-11-09
       
  • Relationships between body image and mental health in white, cisgender
           college students

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      Abstract: Purpose Previous studies have suggested that drive for leanness (DL) may be less maladaptive than drive for thinness (DT) or drive for muscularity (DM). However, no studies have examined whether there might be gender differences in the relationships between these three drives and mental health variables. The purpose of this study was twofold. First, we wanted to examine DL in the context of mental health and to see if it is less maladaptive than DT and DM. Second, we wanted to examine gender differences in the relationships between body dissatisfaction (DT, DM, DL) and mental health in a sample of college students. Methods A sample of 988 White, heterosexual, cisgender college students (76.8% female) completed an omnibus survey measuring body image (DL, DT, DM) and mental health (generalized anxiety, social physique anxiety, self-esteem) variables. Regression analyses evaluated associations between these drives and mental health variables. Results DT predicted all three mental health outcomes in both men and women. DM predicted generalized and social physique anxiety in women but only generalized anxiety in men. DL predicted social physique anxiety only in women. Conclusion Because we found gender differences in body image and relationships between body image and mental health, future studies should take gender into account when exploring body image and related variables. Level of Evidence V Cross-sectional descriptive study.
      PubDate: 2022-11-07
       
  • Pseudo Bartter Syndrome in anorexia nervosa

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      Abstract: Introduction Anorexia nervosa is a psychiatric disorder with various non-psychiatric manifestations that arise from the self-imposed malnourishment and possible purging behaviors. These medical manifestations or complications may mimic non psychiatric disorders and difficult the diagnosis of an eating disorder. Case report We report the case of a patient with a binge-eating/purging subtype of anorexia nervosa, whose purges consisted in diuretic abuse. She kept her purges secret and during more than 1 year she was admitted several times in the emergency room for, sometimes life-threatening, hypokalemia. Furthermore, she consulted practitioners from different specialties and was hospitalized in a nephrology service to investigate chronic hypokalemia and other metabolic and hydroelectrolytic disturbances. A Bartter Syndrome was suspected, and she underwent genetic testing. Eventually she started psychiatric follow up and was admitted as an inpatient under the care of a specialized eating disorders unit. Conclusion This patient presented a series of metabolic disturbances secondary to the diuretic abuse, that mimicked the manifestations of hereditary tubulopathies like Bartter Syndrome. Coincidentally it was found that the patient had a mutation in a gene linked to Bartter Syndrome, that wasn’t enough to justify this diagnosis. So, a Pseudo Bartter Syndrome secondary to the diuretic abuse was evident. The focus on medical manifestations delayed the recognition of the anorexia nervosa and the associated diuretic abuse as the main cause of the electrolyte and metabolic disturbances. This case emphasizes the importance of being familiarized with the non-psychiatric manifestations of eating disorders, so they may be rapidly recognized and managed. Level of evidence Level V, Case Report.
      PubDate: 2022-11-07
       
  • Avoidant-restrictive food intake disorder in a male patient with Goldenhar
           syndrome

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      Abstract: Background Goldenhar syndrome (GS) is a rare congenital condition characterized by the underdevelopment of structures deriving from the first and second branchial arches. Clinical phenotype might encompass extra-craniofacial abnormalities, and patients may experience neuropsychiatric disorders with a higher prevalence than healthy controls. To the best of our knowledge, an association between GS and Feeding and Eating Disorders (FED) has never been reported in the literature. Case report A 15-year-old boy with GS was referred to our outpatient clinic due to severe underweight (BMI of 12.7 kg/m2) and food intake disorder with avoidant restrictive features. After a diagnosis of avoidant-restrictive food intake disorder (ARFID) was made, an inpatient multidisciplinary intervention and outpatient follow-up program were provided, which resulted in the improvement of the boy’s weight and FED psychopathology. Conclusions The current report describes the first case of a young male with GS and ARFID. We suggest that ARFID may present itself as part of the spectrum of neuropsychiatric disorders associated with the syndrome; since traumatic experiences and gastrointestinal discomfort play a pivotal role in the development of ARFID among children, attention should be paid to those affected by GS that involves crucial structures in the swallowing process. Further literature evidence will help portray the complex relationship between ARFID and GS more precisely. Level of evidence Level V, case report.
      PubDate: 2022-10-30
       
  • Validation of the Italian version of the Power of Food Scale in the adult
           population

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      Abstract: Purpose The Power of Food Scale (PFS) is designed to measure the personal susceptibility to highly processed and palatable foods. The purpose of this study was to validate the Italian version of PFS (PFS-It) in the adult population. Methods Data were obtained from 536 Italian adults aged between 18 and 86 years. The PFS-It and the Binge Eating Scale (BES) were administered to all participants. Results The factorial structure of the PFS-It was investigated using a CFA that returned excellent fit indices. The Cronbach’s alpha coefficients for the PFS-It total score and for its subscales (Food Available, Food Present, and Food Tasted), as well as for the BES total score, revealed good to moderate reliability. Finally, PFS-It was positively and significantly correlated with BES. Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the first study to propose the norms and psychometric characteristics of the Power of Food Scale in an Italian population. The results show that PFS-it is a valid and reliable instrument for the measurement of Hedonic Hunger in an adult Italian population. Level of evidence Level V, cross-sectional descriptive study.
      PubDate: 2022-10-28
       
  • Cardiopulmonary exercise testing for patients with anorexia nervosa: a
           case–control study

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      Abstract: Purpose Patients with anorexia nervosa (AN) require appropriate nutrient therapy and physical activity management. Eating disorder treatment guidelines do not include safe, evidence-based intensity criteria for exercise. This study used cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPX) to evaluate the exercise tolerance of patients with AN. Methods CPX was performed with 14 female patients with AN admitted to a specialized eating disorder unit between 2015 and 2019. Their anaerobic threshold (AT) was determined by assessing their exercise tolerance using CPX and compared with 14 healthy controls (HC). The metabolic equivalents (AT-METS) were compared when AT was reached. We examined factors related to AT (AN-AT) in the AN group, including age, body mass index (BMI), previous lowest weight, minimum BMI, past duration of BMI < 15, exercise history, and ΔHR (heart rate at the AT—resting heart rate). Results The AT of the AN group (BMI: 15.7 [Mean] ± 1.8 standard deviation [SD]) was significantly lower than that of the HC group (BMI: 19.7 ± 1.8) (AN: 10.0 ± 1.8 vs. HC: 15.2 ± 3.0 ml/kg/min, P < 0.001). AT-METS was also significantly lower in the AN group than in the HC group (AN: 2.9 ± 0.52 vs. HC: 4.4 ± 0.91, P < 0.001). AN-AT was highly influenced by ΔHR. Conclusions This study showed that AT and AT-METS were lower in patients with AN than in HC. Patients with AN should be prescribed light-intensity aerobic exercise, and the current findings may help develop future physical management guidelines for patients with AN. Level of evidence III: Evidence obtained from case–control analytic studies.
      PubDate: 2022-10-22
       
  • Validation of a new screening questionnaire for disordered eating
           behaviors in men

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      Abstract: Purpose The aim of this study was to develop an instrument to identify disordered eating behaviors (DEB) in college men (hereafter, DEBM-Q). Methods A two-stage project consisting of a diagnostic scale construction (n1 = 9 for interviews, n2 = 9 for cognitive laboratory) and a validation study with a cross-sectional sample (N = 570) was carried out. Both semi-structured interviews and a cognitive laboratory with nine participants were conducted to obtain DEBM-Q items. DEBM-Q was applied to 570 freshmen male in Mexico City. Psychometric characteristics and internal consistency (Cronbach’s alpha) were analyzed. An item-total correlation value greater than 0.30 was determined, and factor loads greater than 0.40 were considered valid. Exploratory factor analysis (EFA, n1 = 297) and confirmatory factor analysis (CFA, n2 = 273) were performed. Results Two fixed factors explaining 55.08% of the total variance were extracted. Factor 1, “Drive for Thinness” (8 items), explained 30.84% of the variance, whereas factor 2, “Drive for Muscularity” (8 items), explained 24.23% of the variance. Cronbach’s alpha for the whole questionnaire was 0.84. DEBM-Q was correlated with the Dutch Food Restriction Scale (RS) (r = 0.52, p < 0.001), Eating Disorder Examination-Questionnaire (EDE-Q) (r = 0.46, p < 0.001), Emotional Eating Scale (EES) (r = 0.18, p < 0.001), and Negative Affect Subscale (PANAS-X) (r = 0.11, p < 0.005). Conclusion DEBM-Q is a valid and practical short screening tool (16 items) allowing early identification of disordered eating in young men, thereby facilitating clinical management. Level of evidence Level V: Opinions of authorities, based on descriptive studies, narrative reviews, clinical experience, or reports of expert committees.
      PubDate: 2022-10-22
       
  • A proof-of-concept study for the use of a computerised avatar to embody
           the eating disorder voice in anorexia nervosa

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      Abstract: Purpose This study assessed (1) the experience of the eating disorder voice in people with anorexia nervosa or in remission, and (2) the feasibility of creating and interacting with a computerised representation (i.e., avatar) of this voice. Methods Twenty-one individuals with anorexia nervosa and 18 individuals who were in remission participated in the study. They reported on the characteristics of their eating disorder voice and created a personalised avatar (a visual and auditory representation of the eating disorder voice), using a computerised software. Participants assessed closeness of match between the voice and the avatar, perceived distress and acceptability of re-exposure to the avatar. Results Patients felt less powerful than their eating disorder voice and unable to disregard the voice's commands. The experience of the voice was associated with negative, as well as some positive emotions, reflecting the prototypical ambivalence towards the illness. Individuals in remission had an opposite pattern of responses. They attributed only negative emotions to the voice, felt more powerful than the voice, and able to disregard its commands. Overall participants reported that there was a good match between the voice and the sound of the avatar. Patients expressed willingness to repeat exposure to the avatar. Conclusion Individuals with anorexia can create personalised digital avatars representing the eating disorder voice and are willing to engage therapeutically with the avatar. The next step is to test the feasibility of repeated exposure to the avatar to address the power and distress associated with the eating disorder voice. Level of evidence Level III.
      PubDate: 2022-10-22
       
  • No elevated levels of orthorexic eating behavior in a sample of adults
           with allergies and food intolerances

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      Abstract: Purpose To compare orthorexic eating behavior in a sample of adults with and without self-reported allergies and food intolerances. Methods N = 52 individuals with and n = 102 individuals without self-reported allergies and food intolerances (80% with medical diagnosis; in total 74.6% female, 23.7% male; age: M = 28.13, SD = 11.96 years) completed an online survey with the Düsseldorf Orthorexia Scale and answered several questions regarding their allergies/intolerances. Results The groups did not differ in their orthorexic eating behavior. In the sample of individuals with allergies/intolerances, orthorexic eating behavior correlated with the perceived severity of the allergic symptoms and the number of consequences that the allergies had for eating behavior. Conclusions In line with previous findings, orthorexic eating behavior does not seem to be elevated in individuals with allergies/intolerances. However, focusing on a healthy diet despite adverse food reactions and experiencing a number of allergy-related consequences for one’s eating behavior might be associated with orthorexic eating behavior. Level of evidence III, case–control analytic study.
      PubDate: 2022-10-21
       
  • Informing care through lived experiences: perspectives of consumers and
           carers regarding dietetic care for eating disorders in Australia

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      Abstract: Purpose Dietitians are important members of eating disorder treatment teams. Previous research indicates little is known about the experience of receiving nutrition care for eating disorders. This study aimed to explore the perspectives of consumers and carers regarding the care received from primary care dietitians for eating disorders. Methods This study qualitatively explored the perceptions of individuals aged ≥ 15 years, who (i) identified as having an eating disorder or (ii) had cared for someone with an eating disorder, and had received care from a dietitian in a primary care setting. Thematic analysis was used to identify themes from interview transcripts. Synthesized member checking was utilized to assess whether the identified themes resonated with participants’ experiences. Twenty-four individuals (21 consumers, 3 carers) participated in a semi-structured interview. Seventeen participants completed member checking and all supported the identified themes and subthemes. Results Three themes emerged inductively from the data: (1) valuing a person-centered approach to dietetic care; (2) the therapeutic alliance is central to engaging in dietetic care; and (3) sharing the complex journey. Conclusions This study advances the understanding of the aspects of dietetic care perceived as most helpful by consumers and carers. These insights highlight the importance of person-centeredness, empathy, trust and collaboration within eating disorder care. The findings can be used by dietitians and health professionals to inform practice. Further research is needed to understand how dietitians can be supported to provide optimal nutrition care to people and families impacted by eating disorders. Level of evidence V. Qualitative study.
      PubDate: 2022-10-21
       
  • Connecting a health-focused self-concept with orthorexia nervosa symptoms
           via fear of losing control over eating unhealthy food and disgust for
           unhealthy food

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      Abstract: Purpose Orthorexia nervosa (ON) involves a maladaptive preoccupation with healthy eating through strict dietary rules that negatively affect physical and mental health. Recent evidence suggests that ON symptoms may stem, in part, from having a health-focused self-concept (i.e., overvaluing the importance of health for self-definition and self-worth). Herein, fear of losing control over eating unhealthy foods and disgust for unhealthy foods were examined as potential mediators of the association between health-focused self-concept and ON symptoms. Methods The parallel mediation model was tested using a community sample of people who believe they are currently following a healthy eating diet plan and/or believe they are leading a healthy eating lifestyle (N = 442). Participants were recruited from Amazon’s Mechanical Turk and completed a questionnaire battery that included the Health-Focused Self-Concept Scale, questionnaires assessing fear of losing control over eating unhealthy food and disgust with unhealthy food, and the Orthorexia Nervosa Inventory. Results As expected, a health-focused self-concept was indirectly and positively associated with ON symptoms via fear and disgust. Conclusion The findings conceptually replicate and extend prior research on anorexia nervosa supporting the transdiagnostic utility of a focused self-concept, fear of losing control, and disgust across eating disorders. Level of evidence Level V, cross-sectional descriptive study.
      PubDate: 2022-10-20
       
  • Exploring the contributions of affective constructs and interoceptive
           awareness to feeling fat

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      Abstract: Purpose Feeling fat, a subjective feeling of being overweight that does not always correspond to actual body weight, is commonly reported in patients with an eating disorder. Research suggests that feeling fat relates to deficits in interoceptive awareness, the perception and integration of signals related to body states. Relatedly, recent work has linked feeling fat to affective constructs, such as depressive symptoms and guilt. The current study explores the unique relationships between feeling fat, self-reported, and objective IA, guilt, alexithymia, and depressive symptoms. Method Female undergraduates (N = 128) completed the 11th item of the Eating Disorder Examination Questionnaire, the Toronto Alexithymia Scale, the Guilt subscale of the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule, and the Beck Depression Inventory-II. Participants also completed two IA measures: a heartbeat perception task and the Multidimensional Assessment of Interoceptive Awareness. Results All collected measures explained 56% of the variability in feeling fat. Depressive symptoms, self-reported IA, and BMI accounted for significant variability in feeling fat. Relative weights analyses revealed that depressive symptoms accounted for the most variability in feeling fat (19%). This finding remained significant after controlling for BMI, which also accounted for significant variability in feeling fat (25%). Conclusions Our results replicate previous findings that depressive symptoms relate significantly to feeling fat and extend this work by incorporating the role of interoceptive awareness, guilt, and alexithymia. Endorsement of feeling fat during an intake assessment may alert clinicians to assess for depressive symptoms, and focusing on depressive symptoms in treatment may improve feeling fat. Level of evidence Level I Evidence obtained from an experimental study.
      PubDate: 2022-10-19
       
  • Care utilization in eating disorders: for whom are multiple episodes of
           care more likely'

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      Abstract: Purpose The current study aimed to determine baseline clinical features among adults receiving varied levels of care for transdiagnostic eating disorders (N = 5206, 89.9% female, mean age 29 years old) that may be associated with increased care utilization. Methods We used negative binomial regression models to evaluate associations among eating disorder diagnoses, other psychiatric features (e.g., lifetime history of comorbid disorders), and the number of episodes of care for treatment of the eating disorder. Results Having a diagnosis of binge eating disorder (p < .001) or avoidant restrictive food intake disorder (p = .04) were associated with lower odds of readmissions. A lifetime diagnosis of major depressive disorder (p < .001) or self-injury (p < .001) was each associated with significantly higher odds of readmissions. Conclusions Care utilization may differ according to eating disorder diagnosis, with a likelihood of increased readmission for those with a history of mood disorder or self-injury. Identification of individuals with greater vulnerability for eating disorder care utilization holds potential in aiding treatment and discharge planning, and development. Level of evidence Level III: evidence obtained from well-designed cohort or case–control analytic studies.
      PubDate: 2022-10-19
       
  • Emotion recognition, alexithymia, empathy, and emotion regulation in women
           with anorexia nervosa

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      Abstract: Purpose Anorexia nervosa (AN) is associated with challenges in recognizing, understanding, and interpreting one’s own and other’s emotional states, feelings, and thoughts. It is unknown whether difficulties in emotion processing occur independently of common comorbid symptoms of AN and predict acute eating disorder characteristics. We aimed to examine emotion recognition, alexithymia, emotion regulation, and empathy in individuals with AN and to assess whether these predict eating disorder symptoms independently from comorbid symptoms. Methods Participants included 42 women with AN and 40 healthy control (HC) women between 18–30 years. Basic and complex emotion recognition was assessed with face photos and video clips. Alexithymia, empathy, emotion regulation, and comorbid symptoms (anxiety, depressive, and obsessive–compulsive symptoms and ASD traits) were assessed with self-assessment questionnaires. Results Participants with AN exhibited difficulties in basic and complex emotion recognition, as well as increased alexithymia, decreased empathy, and challenges in emotion regulation when compared to HCs. After controlling for comorbid symptoms, differences remained only in complex emotion recognition. Challenges in emotion recognition were associated with lower body mass index, and increased alexithymia was associated with increased eating disorder symptoms. Increased challenges in emotion regulation were associated with a shorter duration of illness, higher body mass index, and increased eating disorder symptoms. Conclusions Participants with AN displayed widespread deficit in emotion processing, but only challenges in complex emotion recognition occurred independently from comorbid symptoms. Deficits in emotion processing may contribute to the illness severity and thus could be an important treatment target. Level of Evidence Level III, case-control analytic study.
      PubDate: 2022-10-18
       
  • Estimating and validating the structure of feeding behavior networks

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      Abstract: Purpose Network analysis has been widely used in psychometrics over the past decade, yet it is unknown that whether this methodology could be applied in the field of child health assessment such as caregivers’ feeding behavior and child eating behavior. Our study leveraged network psychometrics method to estimating and examining the network structure of Chinese Preschoolers’ Caregivers’ Feeding Behavior Scale (CPCFBS), and compared the applicability of network methods in the feeding behavior scale. Methods The CPCFBS was previously applied in a sample of 768 preschoolers’ caregivers, used to estimate the structure of feeding behavior networks. Network structure was estimated with Gaussian Graphical Model. Dimensionality was detected using Exploratory Graph Analysis (EGA). The network structural consistency was tested using EGA bootstrap. The network structure was compared with the original structure using model fit indices and reliability. Results A seven-dimensional EGA network was explored after rearranging four items and deleting one item with unstable structural consistency. The absolute fit and relative fit of EGA structure were better than the original structure. The EGA structure had nearly same values of the reliability with the original structure. Conclusion Our study presented a novel perspective for feeding behavior analytical strategies, and demonstrated that network analysis was applicable and superior in exploring the structure of feeding behavior scales. Level of evidence Level V, cross-sectional descriptive study.
      PubDate: 2022-10-16
       
  • Gray matter volume and functional connectivity underlying binge eating in
           healthy children

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      Abstract: Purpose As a maladaptive disordered eating behavior, binge eating (BE) onset has been reported in children as young as eight years old and is linked with a range of negative psychological consequences. However, previous neuroimaging research of BE has mainly focused on adults in clinical conditions, and little is known about the potential neurostructural and neurofunctional bases of BE in healthy children. Methods In this study, we examined these issues in 76 primary school students (mean age = 9.86 years) using voxel-based morphometry and resting-state functional connectivity (rsFC) approaches. Results After controlling for age, sex, and total intracranial volume/head motion, we observed that higher levels of BE were correlated with greater gray matter volumes (GMV) in the left fusiform and right insula and weaker rsFC between the right insula and following three regions: right orbital frontal cortex, left cingulate gyrus, and left superior frontal gyrus. No significant associations were observed between BE and regional white matter volume. Significant sex differences were found only in the relationship between BE and GMV in the left fusiform. Furthermore, the GMV- and rsFC-based predictive models (a machine-learning method) achieved significant correlations between the actual and predicted BE values, demonstrating the robustness of our findings. Conclusion The present study provides novel evidence for the brain structural and functional substrates of children’s BE, and further reveals that the weakened communication between core regions associated with negative affectivity, reward responsivity, and executive function is strongly related to dysregulated eating. Level of evidence Level V, descriptive study.
      PubDate: 2022-10-12
       
 
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