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  Subjects -> NUTRITION AND DIETETICS (Total: 201 journals)
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Current Nutrition Reports
Number of Followers: 8  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Online) 2161-3311
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2467 journals]
  • Berries in Microbiome-Mediated Gastrointestinal, Metabolic, and Immune
           Health

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      Abstract: Purpose of Review Current research has shown that berry-derived polymeric substrates that resist human digestion (dietary fibers and polyphenols) are extensively metabolized in the gastrointestinal tract dominated by microbiota. This review assesses current epidemiological, experimental, and clinical evidence of how berry (strawberry, blueberry, raspberry, blackberry, cranberry, black currant, and grapes) phytochemicals interact with the microbiome and shape health or metabolic risk factor outcomes. Recent Findings There is a growing evidence that the compositional differences among complex carbohydrate fractions and classes of polyphenols define reversible shifts in microbial populations and human metabolome to promote gastrointestinal health. Interventions to prevent gastrointestinal inflammation and improve metabolic outcomes may be achieved with selection of berries that provide distinct polysaccharide substrates for selective multiplication of beneficial microbiota or oligomeric decoys for binding and elimination of the pathogens, as well as phenolic substrates that hold potential to modulate gastrointestinal mucins, reduce luminal oxygen, and release small phenolic metabolites signatures capable of ameliorating inflammatory and metabolic perturbations. Summary These mechanisms may explain many of the differences in microbiota and host gastrointestinal responses associated with increased consumption of berries, and highlight potential opportunities to intentionally shift gut microbiome profiles or to modulate risk factors associated with better nutrition and health outcomes.
      PubDate: 2023-02-04
       
  • The Role of Cow’s Milk Consumption in Breast Cancer Initiation and
           Progression

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      Abstract: Purpose of Review This review evaluates cow milk’s impact on breast carcinogenesis by linking recent epidemiological evidence and new insights into the molecular signaling of milk and its constituents in breast cancer (BCa) pathogenesis. Recent Findings Recent prospective cohort studies support the association between cow’s milk consumption and the risk of estrogen receptor-α-positive (ER+) BCa. Milk is a complex biological fluid that increases systemic insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), insulin and estrogen signaling, and interacting hormonal promoters of BCa. Further potential oncogenic components of commercial milk include exosomal microRNAs (miR-148a-3p, miR-21-5p), bovine meat and milk factors, aflatoxin M1, bisphenol A, pesticides, and micro- and nanoplastics. Individuals with BRCA1 loss-of-function mutations and FTO and IGF1 gain-of-function polymorphisms enhancing IGF-1/mTORC1 signaling may be at increased risk for milk-induced ER+ BCa. Summary Recent prospective epidemiological and pathobiochemical studies identify commercial milk consumption as a critical risk factor of ER+ BCa. Large meta-analyses gathering individuals of different ethnic origins with milk derived from dairy cows of varying genetic backgrounds and diverse feeding procedures as well as missing data on thermal processing of milk (pasteurization versus ultra-heat treatment) make multi-national meta-analyses unsuitable for BCa risk estimations in susceptible populations. Future studies are required that consider all vulnerable periods of breast carcinogenesis to cow’s milk exposure, beginning during the perinatal period and puberty, since these are the most critical periods of mammary gland morphogenesis. Notwithstanding the need for better studies including detailed information on milk processing and vulnerable periods of human breast carcinogenesis, the available evidence suggests that dietary guidelines on milk consumption may have to be reconsidered.
      PubDate: 2023-02-02
       
  • The Effect on Inflammation of Adherence to the Mediterranean Diet in
           Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

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      Abstract: Purpose of Review Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), which is common in women of reproductive age worldwide, is a syndrome that reduces the lifelong quality of life and poses a significant risk for various diseases. PCOS is a combination of symptoms of hyperandrogenism, oligo-anovulation, and polycystic ovarian morphology (PCOM). In PCOS, which is characterized by chronic low-grade inflammation, some inflammatory cytokines are increased. This review aimed to explain possible mechanisms of inflammation in PCOS and the effects of Mediterranean diet components on reducing this inflammation. Recent Findings Although the exact mechanisms of inflammation in PCOS are not yet fully known, it is stated that it is mediated by obesity, insulin resistance, and high androgen concentration. This inflammatory state negatively impacts the risk of future health problems and the quality of life of PCOS. Therefore, strategies to reduce inflammation are thought to be important. Dietary adjustments have important effects in reducing this inflammation and preventing disease. At this point, the Mediterranean diet, which has been proven to have a protective effect against many diseases, draws attention. Among the components of the Mediterranean diet, especially omega-3, antioxidants and dietary fiber may contribute to the reduction of inflammation through different mechanisms. Summary PCOS is characterized by chronic low-grade inflammation, which increases women’s risk of health problems, both now and in the future. Reducing inflammation is therefore extremely important, and it can be achieved with adherence to the Mediterranean diet. Graphical Inflammation pathways and the effect of the components of the Mediterranean diet in PCOS. AGE, advanced glycation end products; NF-κB, nuclear factor kappa-B. Obesity, insulin resistance, and hyperandrogenism may cause inflammation in PCOS through different mechanisms. Antioxidants, omega-3, and dietary fiber, which are the main components of the Mediterranean diet, may be effective in reducing this inflammation in PCOS. (Created with BioRender.com)
      PubDate: 2023-01-31
       
  • Responses to Hypoxia: How Fructose Metabolism and Hypoxia-Inducible
           Factor-1a Pathways Converge in Health and Disease

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      Abstract: Purpose of Review Oxygen is critical for the high output of energy (adenosine triphosphate) generated by oxidative phosphorylation in the mitochondria, and when oxygen delivery is impaired due to systemic hypoxia, impaired or reduced delivery of red blood cells, or from local ischemia, survival processes are activated. Recent Findings One major mechanism is the activation of hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) that act to reduce oxygen needs by blocking mitochondrial function and stimulating glucose uptake and glycolysis while also stimulating red blood cell production and local angiogenesis. Recently, endogenous fructose production with uric acid generation has also been shown to occur in hypoxic and ischemic tissues where it also appears to drive the same functions, and indeed, there is evidence that many of hypoxia-inducible factors effects may be mediated by the stimulation of fructose production and metabolism. Unfortunately, while being acutely protective, these same systems in overdrive lead to chronic inflammation and disease and may also be involved in the development of metabolic syndrome and related disease. The benefit of SGLT2 inhibitors may act in part by reducing the delivery of glucose with the stimulation of fructose formation, thereby allowing a conversion from the glycolytic metabolism to one involving mitochondrial metabolism. Summary The use of hypoxia-inducible factor stabilizers is expected to aid the treatment of anemia but, in the long-term, could potentially lead to worsening cardiovascular and metabolic outcomes. We suggest more studies are needed on the use of these agents.
      PubDate: 2023-01-28
       
  • Women in Nutrition Science: A Biographical Review

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      Abstract: Purpose of the Review The field of nutrition is in debt to a cadre of women who led the field through its formative years. This review highlights the contributions of these women that are gleaned through analysis of biographical articles published in The Journal of Nutrition. Recent Findings Forces emerged during the development of nutrition science, such as departments of home economics and the majority-female field of dietetics, that suggest women might be well represented in biographical articles in the field of nutrition. However, just 29 women have been the subject of biographical articles in The Journal of Nutrition representing 14.3% of the 202 biographical articles published to date — a percentage lower than scientific journals overall. Summary This review explores these biographies to identify factors that facilitated and hindered careers and to highlight the manifold scientific contributions of women in nutrition science. This review looks toward the past to provide perspective and inspiration for those working in the field of nutrition today.
      PubDate: 2023-01-25
       
  • Ketogenic Diet as Medical Prescription in Women with Polycystic Ovary
           Syndrome (PCOS)

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      Abstract: Purpose of Review The polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is an endocrine dysfunction associated with a myriad of metabolic disorders and high rate of infertility. In order to aid its management, several lifestyle/dietary interventions have been evaluated. Very low-calorie ketogenic diet (VLCKD) is rapidly showing promising benefits not only in obesity but also in the treatment of other metabolic diseases. The main objective of this review is to assess the scientific evidence in support of this dietary pattern as an effective measure for treating PCOS and the metabolic disorders associated with it. Recent Findings Preliminary data suggested significant improvements in body weight and composition, metabolic profile (glucose, serum insulin, triglycerides, total and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol), and insulin resistance following VLCKD. However, the evidence is still scarce and needs to be more substantiated. Summary Weight reduction in women with PCOS has been shown to improve metabolic derangements and body composition, but there is no consensus on the ideal dietary pattern or macronutrient composition. There is some evidence supporting the possible role of the Mediterranean diet in improving infertility (along with other well-known metabolic benefits) in women with PCOS. Of note, VLCKD might be considered a potential intervention for the short-term treatment of PCOS, but it must be prescribed and carefully guided by professionals.
      PubDate: 2023-01-25
       
  • Grape Seed Components as Protectors of Inflammation, DNA Damage, and
           Cancer

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      Abstract: Purpose of Review Oxidative stress is related to the pathogenesis of several chronic diseases, including inflammatory processes. Free radicals excess increase not only oxidative stress but also genomic instability. Polyphenols are non-enzymatic antioxidants that act as a defense barrier against free radicals and non-radical oxidants. The purpose of this article was to review published articles relating dietary polyphenols contained in grape seed proanthocyanidin extracts with its potential for reversing DNA damage. Recent Findings Proanthocyanidin components exert pleiotropic actions having several biological, biochemical, and significant pharmacological effects and showed the ability to reduce cytotoxicity and genotoxicity. Summary Grape seed proanthocyanidin extracts showed the ability to reduce cytotoxicity and genotoxicity through the comet assay and the micronucleus technique.
      PubDate: 2023-01-24
       
  • Optimal Nutrition in the Older Adult: Beneficial Versus Ineffective
           Supplements

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      Abstract: Purpose of Review Proper nutrition in older adults is essential, as nutritional deficiencies are common in this population. This review aims to summarize the benefits and risks of nutritional supplementation in the older adult population including the efficacy of various supplements, their risks, and common drug interactions with frequently prescribed medications. Recent Findings In recent years, a growing percentage of older adults have been found to take multiple daily nutritional supplements. This population has complex nutritional needs due to the physiology of aging and the presence of comorbidities. However, many primary care providers are unaware of the benefits and drawbacks of nutritional supplementation in the elderly. This review summarizes the current literature to provide more clarity to providers on how to support this population’s nutritional needs. Summary Nutritional supplementation is essential for elderly populations who may not be able to obtain adequate nutrition from dietary sources. Supplements vary widely in efficacy and safety. As such, supplementation should be individualized and guided by a qualified healthcare provider to ensure patients receive effective, beneficial nutrition.
      PubDate: 2023-01-23
       
  • Dietary Intake and Systemic Inflammation: Can We Use Food as Medicine'

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      Abstract: Purpose of Review This review summarizes the current literature regarding the association between diet and systemic inflammation. Recent Findings Data in humans suggests that consumption of plant-based nutrients is associated with a reduction in systemic inflammation, while consumption of red meat and excessive dairy has the opposite effect and may increase risk of acute flares in those that suffer from certain chronic diseases like inflammatory bowel disease or psoriasis and certain cancers. Summary There is a known association between diet and systemic inflammation; thus, we recommend that clinicians discuss plant-based, whole food diets with patients, particularly those that suffer from chronic inflammatory diseases as an adjunct treatment for these conditions. Future research should evaluate whether adherence to these types of diets is sustainable in the long term and how these changes affect important quality of life concerns.
      PubDate: 2023-01-20
       
  • The Effect of Sunlight Exposure on Vitamin D Status in Countries of Low
           and High Latitudes: A Systematic Literature Review

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      Abstract: Purpose of the Review To conduct a systematic review of studies to investigate the association between climate and vitamin D in humans. Recent Findings There is growing interest in the association between the environment and vitamin D, but robust methods to understand this relationship are lacking. Studies focus mainly on seasonality and latitude. Research quantifying sunlight exposure necessary for adequate vitamin D synthesis in people with darker skin color and those people living at low latitudes are scarce, as are studies in urban populations that may have limited opportunity for sunlight exposure. Summary There are gaps regarding values and timing of exposure to UV radiation required for adequate vitamin D synthesis considering skin color, geography, climate, and local irradiation. Nature-based solutions (NbS) that can mitigate climate change will become increasingly important for preventing hypovitaminosis D. For example, tree-shaded spaces might encourage more participation in outside activities and thereby favor vitamin D synthesis by the skin.
      PubDate: 2022-12-16
       
  • The Association Between Nutrition, Obesity, Inflammation, and Endometrial
           Cancer: A Scoping Review

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      Abstract: Purpose of Review Endometrial cancer is the most common gynecological malignancy and represents a notorious threat to women’s health worldwide. Endometrial cancer predominantly affects post-menopausal women; yet the prevalence of this disease has been rising also among pre-menopausal women. Poor nutritional habits, inflammation, and obesity may be associated with endometrial cancer (EC) among both pre-menopausal and post-menopausal women and should be further assessed among a wide spectrum of age groups. Recent Findings This scoping review explores and reports on primary research studies conducted to investigate the impact of nutrition, inflammation, and/or obesity on endometrial cancer risk among both pre-menopausal and post-menopausal women. Using a predefined protocol in compliance with the PRISMA guidelines, a search was conducted on four separate databases including PubMed, Cochrane Library, ProQuest, and Google Scholar to investigate the association between nutrition, inflammation, obesity, and endometrial cancer. A total of 4862 articles were identified. Following a full article analysis, 27 articles met the full inclusion criteria and were included in the current review. Findings from the literature support a role of nutrition, obesity, and inflammation in the development of EC. The studies included in the current review supported that plant-based, Mediterranean, or ketogenic diets are associated with a lower risk of EC while there is no association between glycemic index and EC risk. On the other hand, increased BMI is associated with a higher risk of EC and there is a positive association between obesity-related pro-inflammatory biomarkers and increased risk for EC development. Summary Further research needs to be conducted to gain more insight into the complex interactions between nutrition, obesity, and inflammation and their association with EC development among pre-, peri-, and post- menopausal women with the ultimate goal to improve management and preventive strategies and achieve reduced prevalence of endometrial cancer.
      PubDate: 2022-12-14
       
  • Appraisal of Gene-Environment Interactions in GWAS for Evidence-Based
           Precision Nutrition Implementation

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      Abstract: Purpose of Review This review aims to analyse the currently reported gene-environment (G × E) interactions in genome-wide association studies (GWAS), involving environmental factors such as lifestyle and dietary habits related to metabolic syndrome phenotypes. For this purpose, the present manuscript reviews the available GWAS registered on the GWAS Catalog reporting the interaction between environmental factors and metabolic syndrome traits. Recent Findings Advances in omics-related analytical and computational approaches in recent years have led to a better understanding of the biological processes underlying these G × E interactions. A total of 42 GWAS were analysed, reporting over 300 loci interacting with environmental factors. Alcohol consumption, sleep time, smoking habit and physical activity were the most studied environmental factors with significant G × E interactions. Summary The implementation of more comprehensive GWAS will provide a better understanding of the metabolic processes that determine individual responses to environmental exposures and their association with the development of chronic diseases such as obesity and the metabolic syndrome. This will facilitate the development of precision approaches for better prevention, management and treatment of these diseases.
      PubDate: 2022-12-01
       
  • Diet, Gut Microbiome, and Cognitive Decline

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      Abstract: Purpose of Review An epidemic of age-associated cognitive decline, most commonly ascribed to neurodegenerative conditions such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease, is causing healthcare costs to soar and devastating caregivers. An estimated 6.5 million Americans are living today with Alzheimer’s disease, with 13.8 million cases projected by mid-century. Although genetic mutations are known to cause neurodegeneration, autosomal dominant disease is very rare and most sporadic cases can be attributed, at least in part, to modifiable risk factors. Recent Findings Diet is a potential modifiable risk factor in cognitive decline. Food communicates with the brain through a complex signaling web involving multiple cells, mediators and receptors. Gut-brain communication is modulated by microorganisms including bacteria, archaea, viruses, and unicellular eukaryotes, which together constitute the microbiota. Microbes not only play major roles in the digestion and fermentation of the food, providing nutrients and bioactive metabolites, but also reflect the type and amount of food consumed and food-borne toxic exposures. Food components modify the diversity and abundance of the microbial populations, maintain the integrity of the gut barrier, and regulate the passage of microbes and their metabolites into the blood stream where they modulate the immune system and communicate with body systems including the brain. Summary This paper will focus on selected mechanisms through which interactions between diet and the gut microbiota can modify brain integrity and cognitive function with emphasis on the pathogenesis of the most common dementia, Alzheimer’s disease.
      PubDate: 2022-12-01
       
  • Therapeutic Potential of GLP-2 Analogs in Gastrointestinal Disorders:
           Current Knowledge, Nutritional Aspects, and Future Perspectives

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      Abstract: Purpose of Review Although Glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1 receptor agonists have been used for almost two decades in the treatment of diabetes mellitus type 2 and, lately, in obesity, recent years have seen an increasing interest in the pharmacological agonism of other proglucagon-derived peptides, including GLP-2. Herein, we aimed to review the available evidence on the effects of GLP-2 agonism from animal and clinical studies. Furthermore, we summarize the current clinical applications of GLP-2 agonists among patients with intestinal failure associated with short bowel syndrome (SBS-IF) as well as potential future expansion of their indications to other intestinal disorders. Recent Findings Evidence from preclinical studies has highlighted the cellular trophic and functional beneficial actions of GLP-2 on small intestinal and colonic mucosa. Subsequently, pharmacologic agonism of GLP-2 has gathered interest for the treatment of patients with conditions pertaining to the loss of intestinal anatomical and/or functional integrity to a degree requiring parenteral support, collectively referred to as intestinal failure. GLP-2 analogs positively influence nutrient absorption in animal models and humans, although continued therapy is likely needed for sustained effects. The degradation-resistant GLP-2-analog teduglutide has received approval for the treatment of SBS-IF, in which it may decisively reduce patient dependency on parenteral support and improve quality of life. Another two longer-acting analogs, glepaglutide and apraglutide, are currently undergoing phase III clinical trials. Summary The use of GLP-2 analogs is effective in the management of SBS-IF and may show promise in the treatment of other severe gastrointestinal disorders associated with loss of effective intestinal resorptive surface area.
      PubDate: 2022-12-01
       
  • Maternal Intake of Probiotics to Program Offspring Health

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      Abstract: Purpose of Review Probiotics intake may be considered beneficial by prospective and pregnant mothers, but their effects on offspring development are incompletely understood. The purpose of this review was to examine recent pre-clinical and clinical studies to understand how maternal probiotics exposure affects offspring health outcomes. Recent Findings Effects were investigated in the context of supporting offspring growth, intestinal health, and gut microbiota, preventing allergic diseases, supporting neurodevelopment, and preventing metabolic disorders in pre-clinical and clinical studies. Most human studies focused on infancy outcomes, whereas pre-clinical studies also examined outcomes at adolescence and young adulthood. While still understudied, both pre-clinical and clinical studies propose epigenetic modifications as an underlying mechanism. Optimal timing of intervention remains unclear. Summary Administration of selected probiotics to mothers has programming potential for sustaining life-long health of offspring. Administration protocols, specific windows of susceptibility, and individual-specific responses need to be further studied.
      PubDate: 2022-12-01
       
  • Physical Activity and Breast Cancer Survival–Epidemiologic Evidence and
           Potential Biologic Mechanisms

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      Abstract: Purpose of Review To review the biologic mechanisms that may be operative between physical activity and survival after breast cancer. Recent Findings Physical activity decreases risk of mortality from breast cancer by up to 40%. Several biologic mechanisms have been hypothesized to explain this association. Previous cohort studies and randomized trials have examined the primary mechanisms that appear to be operative, which involve a decrease in sex hormone levels, insulin resistance, and inflammation. The evidence is still inconsistent and several limitations in the existing literature exist. Summary Understanding the biologic mechanisms involved in the association of physical activity and breast cancer survival will provide more precision to physical activity guidelines for cancer survival. To achieve this objective, future research should include direct measurements of physical activity, sedentary behaviour, and health-related fitness to provide a more comprehensive assessment of these factors and their association with biomarkers and survival after breast cancer.
      PubDate: 2022-12-01
       
  • Sustainable Diets and Cancer: a Systematic Review

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      Abstract: Purpose of Review This review aimed to investigate the association of sustainable diets in relation to cancer risk, cancer recurrence, and cancer-specific mortality in adults. Recent Findings More than 500 articles were initially identified. Nine articles were eligible for inclusion, presenting data from 8 prospective cohort studies, conducted in Europe and the USA. The sustainability indicators investigated were greenhouse gas emissions, food biodiversity, land use, exposure to pesticides or organic food consumption, and the EAT-Lancet diet. One study reported a sustainability index that combined multiple sustainability indicators. A modest inverse association between higher adherence to sustainable diets and cancer incidence or cancer mortality was observed in most studies. Summary While sustainable diets may decrease cancer risk or mortality, the reviewed studies were heterogeneous regarding sustainability indicators and cancer outcomes. A common definition of dietary sustainability would facilitate better generalization of future research findings. Also, studies among non-western populations are needed.
      PubDate: 2022-11-21
      DOI: 10.1007/s13668-022-00442-z
       
  • Plant-Based Diets and Cancer Prognosis: a Review of Recent Research

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      Abstract: Purpose of Review Although plant-based diets are recommended for cancer prevention, their role in cancer survival is still uncertain. The purpose of this systematic review is to summarize the association between postdiagnosis plant-based diets and prognosis in cancer survivors. Recent Findings There is indication that higher intake of plant-based foods was associated with improved prognosis in cancer survivors. For colorectal cancer survival, a better prognosis was observed for a high intake of whole grains and fibre. For breast cancer survival, a higher intake of fruit, vegetable and fibre and a moderate intake of soy/isoflavone were associated with beneficial outcomes. A higher vegetable fat intake was related to improved prognosis in prostate cancer survivors. Summary Emerging evidence suggests benefits of postdiagnosis plant-based diets on prognosis in cancer survivors. However, given the high heterogeneity between studies, further research in cancer survivors, considering clinical factors (e.g. treatment, stage) and methodological aspects (e.g. timing of dietary assessment), is needed.
      PubDate: 2022-09-23
      DOI: 10.1007/s13668-022-00440-1
       
  • Dysbiosis in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease: Let Us Talk About
           Vitamin K

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      Abstract: Purpose of Review This narrative review aimed to summarize the current evidence on the connection between dysbiosis and vitamin K deficiency in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). The presence of dysbiosis (perturbations in the composition of the microbiota) has been described in several non-communicable diseases, including chronic kidney disease, and it has been hypothesized that dysbiosis may cause vitamin K deficiency. Patients with CKD present both vitamin K deficiency and gut dysbiosis; however, the relationship between gut dysbiosis and vitamin K deficiency remains to be addressed. Recent Findings Recently, few studies in animals have demonstrated that a dysbiotic environment is associated with low production of vitamin K by the gut microbiota. Summary Vitamin K plays a vital role in blood coagulation as well as in the cardiovascular and bone systems. It serves as a cofactor for γ-glutamyl carboxylases and thus is essential for the post-translational modification and activation of vitamin K-dependent calcification regulators, such as osteocalcin, matrix Gla protein, Gla-rich protein, and proteins C and S. Additionally, vitamin K executes essential antioxidant and anti-inflammatory functions. Dietary intake is the main source of vitamin K; however, it also can be produced by gut microbiota. This review discusses the effects of uremia on the imbalance in gut microbiota, vitamin K-producing bacteria, and vitamin K deficiency in CKD patients, leading to a better understanding and raising hypothesis for future clinical studies.
      PubDate: 2022-09-23
      DOI: 10.1007/s13668-022-00438-9
       
  • Assessing the Cost of Healthy and Unhealthy Diets: A Systematic Review of
           Methods

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      Abstract: Purpose of Review Poor diets are a leading risk factor for chronic disease globally. Research suggests healthy foods are often harder to access, more expensive, and of a lower quality in rural/remote or low-income/high minority areas. Food pricing studies are frequently undertaken to explore food affordability. We aimed to capture and summarise food environment costing methodologies used in both urban and rural settings. Recent Findings Our systematic review of high-income countries between 2006 and 2021 found 100 relevant food pricing studies. Most were conducted in the USA (n = 47) and Australia (n = 24), predominantly in urban areas (n = 74) and cross-sectional in design (n = 76). All described a data collection methodology, with just over half (n = 57) using a named instrument. The main purpose for studies was to monitor food pricing, predominantly using the ‘food basket’, followed by the Nutrition Environment Measures Survey for Stores (NEMS-S). Comparatively, the Healthy Diets Australian Standardised Affordability and Price (ASAP) instrument supplied data on relative affordability to household incomes. Summary Future research would benefit from a universal instrument reflecting geographic and socio-cultural context and collecting longitudinal data to inform and evaluate initiatives targeting food affordability, availability, and accessibility.
      PubDate: 2022-09-09
      DOI: 10.1007/s13668-022-00428-x
       
 
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