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  Subjects -> NUTRITION AND DIETETICS (Total: 201 journals)
Showing 1 - 64 of 64 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acta Portuguesa de Nutrição     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Digestive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Advances in Eating Disorders : Theory, Research and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Advances in Food and Nutrition Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 59)
Advances in Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 55)
African Journal of Biomedical Research     Open Access  
African Journal of Food, Agriculture, Nutrition and Development     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Aktuelle Ernährungsmedizin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
American Journal of Botany     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
American Journal of Clinical Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 157)
American Journal of Food and Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 46)
American Journal of Food Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Amerta Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Amino Acids     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 52)
Annual Review of Food Science and Technology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Annual Review of Nutrition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 39)
Appetite     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Arab Journal of Nutrition and Exercise     Open Access  
Archive of Food and Nutritional Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Archivos Latinoamericanos de Nutrición     Open Access  
Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Asian Journal of Clinical Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Bangladesh Journal of Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Bioactive Carbohydrates and Dietary Fibre     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
BMC Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
BMJ Nutrition, Prevention & Health     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
British Journal Of Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 91)
Cahiers de Nutrition et de Diététique     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Canadian Food Studies / La Revue canadienne des études sur l'alimentation     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Canadian Journal of Dietetic Practice and Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Case Reports in Clinical Nutrition     Open Access  
Childhood Obesity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Clinical Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 89)
Clinical Nutrition ESPEN     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Clinical Nutrition Experimental     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Clinical Nutrition Insight     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Clinical Nutrition Open Science     Open Access  
Clinical Obesity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Comparative Exercise Physiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Current Developments in Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Current Nutrition & Food Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Current Nutrition Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Current Opinion in Clinical Nutrition & Metabolic Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Current Research in Nutrition and Food Science     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
DEMETRA : Alimentação, Nutrição & Saúde     Open Access  
Diabetes, Metabolic Syndrome and Obesity     Open Access   (Followers: 46)
Eating and Weight Disorders - Studies on Anorexia, Bulimia and Obesity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Ecology of Food and Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Egyptian Journal of Obesity, Diabetes and Endocrinology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Endocrinología, Diabetes y Nutrición     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Endocrinología, Diabetes y Nutrición (English Edition)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Ernährung & Medizin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
European Journal of Clinical Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 74)
European Journal of Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
European Journal of Nutrition & Food Safety     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Food & Nutrition Research     Open Access   (Followers: 34)
Food and Environmental Virology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Food and Foodways: Explorations in the History and Culture of     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Food and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Food and Nutrition Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Food and Waterborne Parasitology     Open Access  
Food Digestion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Food Frontiers     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Food Hydrocolloids for Health     Open Access  
Food Quality and Safety     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Food Science & Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 59)
Food, Culture and Society: An International Journal of Multidisciplinary Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Frontiers in Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Frontiers in Sustainable Food Systems     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Functional Foods in Health and Disease     Open Access  
Gazi Sağlık Bilimleri Dergisi     Open Access  
Genes & Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Hacettepe University Faculty of Health Sciences Journal     Open Access  
Human Nutrition & Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian Journal of Nutrition and Dietetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Indonesian Food and Nutrition Progress     Open Access  
International Journal for Vitamin and Nutrition Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity     Open Access   (Followers: 30)
International Journal of Child Health and Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Eating Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
International Journal of Food Safety, Nutrition and Public Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
International Journal of Food Science and Nutrition Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Food Sciences and Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
International Journal of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, Transplant and Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Nutrition and Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 23)
International Journal of Nutrition, Pharmacology, Neurological Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Obesity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 90)
International Journal of Sport Nutrition & Exercise Metabolism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 82)
Journal of Advanced Nutrition and Human Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Agriculture, Food Systems, and Community Development     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Dietary Supplements     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Eating Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Ethnic Foods     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Food & Nutritional Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Food and Nutrition Research     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Food Chemistry and Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Food Science and Nutrition Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Health, Population and Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50)
Journal of Hunger & Environmental Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Medical Nutrition and Nutraceuticals     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Medicinal Herbs and Ethnomedicine     Open Access  
Journal of Muscle Foods     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Nutraceuticals and Herbal Medicine     Open Access  
Journal of Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
Journal of Nutrition & Intermediary Metabolism     Open Access  
Journal of Nutrition and Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Nutrition in Gerontology and Geriatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Nutrition, Health and Aging     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Journal of Nutritional & Environmental Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Nutritional Disorders & Therapy     Open Access  
Journal of Nutritional Ecology and Food Research     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Nutritional Science     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Obesity     Open Access   (Followers: 24)
Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition (JPGN)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 52)
Journal of Pharmacy and Nutrition Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Renal Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal of Renal Nutrition and Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Sensory Studies     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Spices and Aromatic Crops     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 60)
Journal of the American College of Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of the Australasian College of Nutritional and Environmental Medicine     Full-text available via subscription  
Jurnal Gizi dan Dietetik Indonesia : Indonesian Journal of Nutrition and Dietetics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Jurnal Gizi Indonesia / The Indonesian Journal of Nutrition     Open Access  
Jurnal Gizi Klinik Indonesia     Open Access  
Jurnal Penelitian Gizi dan Makanan     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Jurnal Riset Kesehatan     Open Access  
La Ciencia al Servicio de la Salud y Nutrición     Open Access  
Lifestyle Genomics     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Lifestyle Journal     Open Access  
Maternal & Child Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Médecine & Nutrition     Full-text available via subscription  
Media Gizi Indonesia     Open Access  
Metabolism and Nutrition in Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Molecular Nutrition & Food Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
NFS Journal     Open Access  
Nigerian Food Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Nigerian Journal of Nutritional Sciences     Full-text available via subscription  
npj Science of Food     Open Access  
Nutrición Hospitalaria     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Nutrients     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Nutrire     Hybrid Journal  
Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Nutrition & Dietetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Nutrition & Food Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Nutrition & Diabetes     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
Nutrition & Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Nutrition - Science en évolution     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Nutrition and Cancer     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Nutrition and Dietary Supplements     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Nutrition and Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Nutrition and Metabolic Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Nutrition Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Nutrition Bytes     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Nutrition in Clinical Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
Nutrition Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Nutrition Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Nutrition Research Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Nutrition Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
Nutrition Today     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Nutritional Neuroscience : An International Journal on Nutrition, Diet and Nervous System     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Obesity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 56)
Obesity Facts     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Obesity Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Oil Crop Science     Open Access  
Open Food Science Journal     Open Access  
Open Nutrition Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Open Obesity Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Pakistan Journal of Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Pediatric Obesity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Perspectivas en Nutrición Humana     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
PharmaNutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Plant Foods for Human Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Plant Production Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Proceedings of the Nutrition Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Progress in Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Public Health Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
RBNE - Revista Brasileira de Nutrição Esportiva     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
RBONE - Revista Brasileira de Obesidade, Nutrição e Emagrecimento     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Chilena de Nutricion     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Revista Española de Nutrición Humana y Dietética     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Revista Mexicana de Trastornos Alimentarios     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Salud Pública y Nutrición     Open Access  
Segurança Alimentar e Nutricional     Open Access  
South African Journal of Clinical Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
The Australian Coeliac     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Topics in Clinical Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
UNICIÊNCIAS     Open Access  
Universal Journal of Food and Nutrition Science     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
World Food Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)

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Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Advances in Nutrition
Journal Prestige (SJR): 2.196
Citation Impact (citeScore): 5
Number of Followers: 55  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 2161-8313 - ISSN (Online) 2156-5376
Published by Oxford University Press Homepage  [419 journals]
  • What Can We Expect from an Umbrella Review'

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Gianfredi V; Nucci D, Amerio A, et al.
      Pages: 684 - 685
      Abstract: Dear Editor:
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Apr 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/advances/nmab150
      Issue No: Vol. 13, No. 2 (2022)
       
  • Reply to V Gianfredi et al

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Marx W; Veronese N, Kelly J, et al.
      Pages: 685 - 686
      Abstract: Dear Editor:
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Apr 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/advances/nmab151
      Issue No: Vol. 13, No. 2 (2022)
       
  • Weighing Evidence of the Role of Saturated and Unsaturated Fats and Human
           Health

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      Authors: Belury M; Ros E, Kris-Etherton P.
      Pages: 686 - 688
      Abstract: Dear Editor:
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Apr 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/advances/nmab160
      Issue No: Vol. 13, No. 2 (2022)
       
  • The Dietary Guidelines Are Correct: Saturated Fat Should Be Limited and
           

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      Authors: Moore J.
      Pages: 688 - 690
      Abstract: In “Perspective: The Saturated Fat–Unsaturated Oil Dilemma: Relations of Dietary Fatty Acids and Serum Cholesterol, Atherosclerosis, Inflammation, Cancer, and All-Cause Mortality” (1) the author concludes “dietary saturated fats seem to be less harmful than the proposed alternative.” This conclusion appears to stem from 1) an inaccurate portrayal of what the proposed alternatives are, 2) inference from animal models and mechanistic studies instead of evidence from human trials, and 3) an inaccurate assessment of the totality of the evidence.
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Apr 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/advances/nmab159
      Issue No: Vol. 13, No. 2 (2022)
       
  • Reply to MA Belury et al. and J Moore

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      Authors: Lawrence G.
      Pages: 690 - 692
      Abstract: Dear Editor:
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Apr 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/advances/nmab161
      Issue No: Vol. 13, No. 2 (2022)
       
  • The Effects of Cardiometabolic Risk Factors on Dietary Behavior

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      Authors: Coskun A; Oz B.
      Pages: 692 - 692
      Abstract: Dear Editor:
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Apr 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/advances/nmac004
      Issue No: Vol. 13, No. 2 (2022)
       
  • Reply to A Coskun and B Oz

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      Authors: Bhat S; Coyle D, Trieu K, et al.
      Pages: 692 - 693
      Abstract: Dear Editor:
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Apr 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/advances/nmac005
      Issue No: Vol. 13, No. 2 (2022)
       
  • Letter to the Editor on the “Effects of Microbiota-driven Therapy on
           Circulating Indoxyl Sulfate and p-Cresyl Sulfate in Patients with Chronic
           Kidney Disease: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized
           Controlled Trials”

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Ruszkowski J; Dębska-Ślizień A.
      Pages: 693 - 695
      Abstract: Dear Editor:
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Apr 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/advances/nmac010
      Issue No: Vol. 13, No. 2 (2022)
       
  • A New Chapter for the American Society for Nutrition's Journal Portfolio

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      Authors: Coates P; Allen L, Belury M, et al.
      Pages: 696 - 697
      Abstract: Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation10.13039/100000865Wellcome Trust10.13039/100010269NIH10.13039/100000002USDA10.13039/100000199USAID10.13039/100000200NICHD10.13039/100009633NIDDK10.13039/100000062Egg Nutrition Center10.13039/100009319
      PubDate: Thu, 10 Feb 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/advances/nmab125
      Issue No: Vol. 13, No. 2 (2022)
       
  • Perspective: Striking a Balance between Planetary and Human Health—Is
           There a Path Forward'

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      Authors: Moreno L; Meyer R, Donovan S, et al.
      Pages: 355 - 375
      Abstract: ABSTRACTThe global adoption of predominantly plant-based, sustainable, healthy diets will help reduce the risk of obesity- and malnutrition-related noncommunicable diseases while protecting the future health of our planet. This review examines the benefits and limitations of different types of plant-based diets in terms of health and nutrition, affordability and accessibility, cultural (ethical and religious) acceptability, and the environment (i.e., the 4 pillars underlying sustainable healthy diets). Results suggest that, without professional supervision, traditional plant-based diets (vegan, vegetarian, and pescatarian diets) can increase the risk of nutritional deficiencies among infants, children/adolescents, women, pregnant/lactating women, and the elderly. In contrast, flexitarian diets and territorial diversified diets (TDDs; e.g., Mediterranean and New Nordic diets) that include large quantities of plant-sourced foods, low amounts of red meat, and moderate amounts of poultry, fish, eggs, and dairy can meet the energy and nutrition needs of different populations without the need for dietary education or supplementation. Compared with vegan, vegetarian, and pescatarian diets, more diverse flexitarian diets and TDDs are associated with reduced volumes of food waste and may be more acceptable and easier to maintain for people who previously followed Western diets. Although flexitarian diets and TDDs have a greater impact on the environment than vegan, vegetarian, and pescatarian diets, the negative effects are considerably reduced compared with Western diets, especially if diets include locally sourced seasonal foods. Further studies are required to define more precisely optimal sustainable healthy diets for different populations and to ensure that diets are affordable and accessible to people in all countries.
      PubDate: Sat, 27 Nov 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/advances/nmab139
      Issue No: Vol. 13, No. 2 (2021)
       
  • Perspective: Estrogen and the Risk of Cognitive Decline: A Missing
           Choline(rgic) Link'

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      Authors: Bortz J; Klatt K, Wallace T.
      Pages: 376 - 387
      Abstract: ABSTRACTFactors that influence the risk of neurocognitive decline and Alzheimer's disease (AD) may provide insight into therapies for both disease treatment and prevention. Although age is the most striking risk factor for AD, it is notable that the prevalence of AD is higher in women, representing two-thirds of cases. To explore potential underlying biological underpinnings of this observation, the intent of this article is to explore the interplay between cognitive aging and sex hormones, the cholinergic system, and novel hypotheses related to the essential nutrient choline. Mechanistic evidence points toward estrogen's neuroprotective effects being strongly dependent on its interactions with the cholinergic system, a modulator of attentional functioning, learning, and memory. Estrogen has been shown to attenuate anticholinergic-induced impairments in verbal memory and normalize patterns of frontal and occipital cortex activation, resulting in a more “young adult” phenotype. However, similar to estrogen replacement's effect in cardiovascular diseases, its putative protective effects may be restricted to early postmenopausal women only, a finding supportive of the “critical window hypothesis.” Estrogen's impact on the cholinergic system may act both locally in the brain but also through peripheral tissues. Estrogen is critical for inducing endogenous choline synthesis via the phosphatidylethanolamine N-methyltransferase (PEMT) gene–mediated pathway of phosphatidylcholine (PC) synthesis. PEMT is dramatically induced in response to estrogen, producing not only a PC molecule and source of choline for the brain but also a key source of the long-chain ω-3 fatty acid, DHA. Herein, we highlight novel hypotheses related to hormone replacement therapy and nutrient metabolism aimed at directing future preclinical and clinical investigation.
      PubDate: Sat, 27 Nov 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/advances/nmab145
      Issue No: Vol. 13, No. 2 (2021)
       
  • Impact of Nationwide Lockdowns Resulting from the First Wave of the
           COVID-19 Pandemic on Food Intake, Eating Behaviors, and Diet Quality: A
           Systematic Review

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      Authors: Mignogna C; Costanzo S, Ghulam A, et al.
      Pages: 388 - 423
      Abstract: ABSTRACTThe lockdowns resulting from the first wave of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic impacted deeply on all life activities, including diet. We performed a systematic review to investigate changes in food intake, eating behaviors, and diet quality during lockdown as compared with before the lockdown. A literature search was performed using 3 electronic databases from inception until 13 June 2021. Observational studies evaluating changes in general populations during the COVID-19 pandemic lockdown were eligible. Of 1963 studies retrieved from the search strategy, 95 met inclusion criteria (85 in adults, 10 in children/adolescents), and the majority were of high quality (72.6%). Most of the studies were web-based surveys using convenience sampling, mainly focused on variations in the consumption of foods and eating behaviors during lockdown, whereas only 15 studies analyzed diet quality through dietary indices. On the basis of the definition of a healthful diet as reflected by a traditional Mediterranean diet, an increase in recommended foods such as fruit and vegetables, legumes, cereals, and olive oil was observed, although a sharp decrease in fish intake and an increase in dairy products were documented. Accordingly, a reduction in foods that should be eaten less frequently was reported—namely, red and processed meat. However, a higher consumption of unhealthy foods (e.g., snacks and sweets) was also observed. Results indicated improved diet quality in Europe, especially among Mediterranean countries, with the exception of France, while a switch to poor nutrient patterns was observed in Colombia and Saudi Arabia. Analyses of eating behaviors suggest an increase in food intake, number of daily meals, and snacking. In conclusion, changes in intake of major food groups, apart from fish intake, were in line with the definition of a traditional Mediterranean diet, indicating a consistent moderate improvement in dietary habits worldwide. This review protocol was registered at https://www.crd.york.ac.uk/prospero/ as CRD42020225292.
      PubDate: Thu, 30 Dec 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/advances/nmab130
      Issue No: Vol. 13, No. 2 (2021)
       
  • The Role of Immunomodulatory Nutrients in Alleviating Complications
           Related to SARS-CoV-2: A Scoping Review

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      Authors: Jandaghi P; Hosseini Z, Chilibeck P, et al.
      Pages: 424 - 438
      Abstract: ABSTRACTThe recent coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has warranted the need to investigate potential therapies or prophylaxis against this infectious respiratory disease. There is emerging evidence about the potential role of nutrients on COVID-19 in addition to using medications such as hydroxychloroquine and azithromycin. This scoping review aims to explore the literature evaluating the effect of immunomodulatory nutrients on the outcomes including hospitalization, intensive care unit admission, oxygen requirement, and mortality in COVID-19 patients. A literature search of databases including Medline, EMBASE, CINAHL, Web of Science, Cochrane, Scopus, and PubMed, as well as hand-searching in Google Scholar (up to 10 February 2021) was conducted. All human studies with different study designs and without limitation on publication year were included except for non-English-language and review articles. Overall, out of 4412 studies, 19 met our inclusion criteria. Four studies examined the impact of supplementation with vitamin C, 4 studies – zinc, 8 studies – vitamin D, and 3 studies investigated the combination of 2 (zinc and vitamin C) or 3 (vitamin D, vitamin B-12, and magnesium) nutrients. Although limited data exist, available evidence demonstrated that supplementation with immune-supportive micronutrients such as vitamins D and C and zinc may modulate immunity and alleviate the severity and risk of infection. The effectiveness of vitamin C, vitamin D, and zinc on COVID-19 was different based on baseline nutrient status, the duration and dosage of nutrient therapy, time of administration, and severity of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) disease. This review indicated that supplementation with high-dose vitamin C, vitamin D, and zinc may alleviate the complications caused by COVID-19, including inflammatory markers, oxygen therapy, length of hospitalization, and mortality; however, studies were mixed regarding these effects. Further randomized clinical trials are necessary to identify the most effective nutrients and the safe dosage to combat SARS-CoV-2.
      PubDate: Tue, 21 Dec 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/advances/nmab128
      Issue No: Vol. 13, No. 2 (2021)
       
  • Dairy Product Consumption and Cardiovascular Health: A Systematic Review
           and Meta-analysis of Prospective Cohort Studies

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      Authors: Chen Z; Ahmed M, Ha V, et al.
      Pages: 439 - 454
      Abstract: ABSTRACTThe association between dairy product consumption and cardiovascular health remains highly debated. We quantitatively synthesized prospective cohort evidence on the associations between dairy consumption and risk of hypertension (HTN), coronary heart disease (CHD), and stroke.We systematically searched PubMed, Embase, and Web of Science through August 1, 2020, to retrieve prospective cohort studies that reported on dairy consumption and risk of HTN, CHD, or stroke. We used random-effects models to calculate the pooled RR and 95% CI for the highest compared with the lowest category of intake and for a 1-serving/d increase in consumption. We rated the quality of evidence using NutriGrade.Fifty-five studies were included. Total dairy consumption was associated with a lower risk of HTN (RR for highest compared with lowest level of intake: 0.91, 95% CI: 0.86, 0.95, I2 = 73.5%; RR for 1-serving/d increase: 0.96, 95% CI: 0.94, 0.97, I2 = 66.5%), CHD (highest compared with lowest level of intake: 0.96, 95% CI: 0.92, 1.00, I2 = 46.6%; 1-serving/d increase: 0.98, 95% CI: 0.95, 1.00, I2 = 56.7%), and stroke (highest compared with lowest level of intake: 0.90, 95% CI: 0.85, 0.96, I2 = 60.8%; 1-serving/d increase: 0.96, 95% CI: 0.93, 0.99, I2 = 74.7%). Despite moderate to considerable heterogeneity, these associations remained consistent across multiple subgroups. Evidence on the relation between total dairy and risk of HTN and CHD was of moderate quality and of low quality for stroke. Low-fat dairy consumption was associated with lower risk of HTN and stroke and high-fat dairy with a lower risk of stroke. Milk, cheese, or yogurt consumption showed inconsistent associations with the cardiovascular outcomes in high compared with low intake and dose–response meta-analyses.Total dairy consumption was associated with a modestly lower risk of hypertension, CHD, and stroke. Moderate to considerable heterogeneity was observed in the estimates, and the overall quality of the evidence was low to moderate.
      PubDate: Wed, 22 Sep 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/advances/nmab118
      Issue No: Vol. 13, No. 2 (2021)
       
  • The Effects of Soy Products on Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Patients
           with Type 2 Diabetes: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Clinical
           Trials

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      Authors: Asbaghi O; Ashtary-Larky D, Mousa A, et al.
      Pages: 455 - 473
      Abstract: ABSTRACTPrevious studies have suggested that soy products may be beneficial for cardiometabolic health, but current evidence regarding their effects in type 2 diabetes (T2D) remains unclear. The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to determine the impact of soy product consumption on cardiovascular risk factors in patients with T2D. PubMed, Scopus, Embase, and the Cochrane library were systematically searched from inception to March 2021 using relevant keywords. All randomized controlled trials (RCTs) investigating the effects of soy product consumption on cardiovascular risk factors in patients with T2D were included. Meta-analysis was performed using random-effects models and subgroup analysis was performed to explore variations by dose and baseline risk profile. A total of 22 trials with 867 participants were included in this meta-analysis. Soy product consumption led to a significant reduction in serum concentrations of triglycerides (TGs) [weighted mean difference (WMD): –24.73 mg/dL; 95% CI: –37.49, –11.97], total cholesterol (WMD: –9.84 mg/dL; 95% CI: –15.07, –4.61), LDL cholesterol (WMD: –6.94 mg/dL; 95% CI: –11.71, –2.17), and C-reactive protein (WMD: –1.27 mg/L; 95% CI: –2.39, –0.16). In contrast, soy products had no effect on HDL cholesterol, fasting blood sugar (FBS), fasting insulin, glycated hemoglobin, HOMA-IR, systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure, or BMI (all P ≥ 0.05). In subgroup analyses, there was a significant reduction in FBS after soy consumption in patients with elevated baseline FBS (>126 mg/dL) and in those who received higher doses of soy intake (>30 g/d). Moreover, soy products decreased SBP in patients with baseline hypertension (>135 mm Hg). Our meta-analysis suggests that soy product consumption may improve cardiovascular parameters in patients with T2D, particularly in individuals with poor baseline risk profiles. However, larger studies with longer durations and improved methodological quality are needed before firm conclusions can be reached.
      PubDate: Mon, 08 Nov 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/advances/nmab121
      Issue No: Vol. 13, No. 2 (2021)
       
  • Dietary Sphingomyelin Metabolism and Roles in Gut Health and Cognitive
           Development

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      Authors: Jiang C; Cheong L, Zhang X, et al.
      Pages: 474 - 491
      Abstract: ABSTRACTSphingomyelin (SM) is a widely occurring sphingolipid that is a major plasma membrane constituent. Milk and dairy products are rich SM sources, and human milk has high SM content. Numerous studies have evaluated the roles of SM in maintaining cell membrane structure and cellular signal transduction. There has been a growing interest in exploring the role of dietary SM, especially from human milk, in imparting health benefits. This review focuses on recent publications regarding SM content in several dietary sources and dietary SM metabolism. SM digestion and absorption are slow and incomplete and mainly occur in the middle sections of the small intestine. This review also evaluates the effect of dietary SM on gut health and cognitive development. Studies indicate that SM may promote gut health by reducing intestinal cholesterol absorption in adults. However, there has been a lack of data supporting clinical trials. An association between milk SM and neural development is evident before childhood. Hence, additional studies and well-designed randomized controlled trials that incorporate dietary SM evaluation, SM metabolism, and its long-term functions on infants and children are required.
      PubDate: Sat, 23 Oct 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/advances/nmab117
      Issue No: Vol. 13, No. 2 (2021)
       
  • The Prebiotic Potential of Inulin-Type Fructans: A Systematic Review

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      Authors: Hughes R; Alvarado D, Swanson K, et al.
      Pages: 492 - 529
      Abstract: ABSTRACTInulin-type fructans (ITF), including short-chain fructooligosaccharides (scFOS), oligofructose, and inulin, are commonly used fibers that are widely regarded as prebiotic for their ability to be selectively utilized by the intestinal microbiota to confer a health benefit. However, to our knowledge the literature thus far lacks a thorough discussion of the evidence from human clinical trials for the prebiotic effect of ITF, including beneficial effects on intestinal microbiota composition and intestinal and extraintestinal processes (e.g., glucose homeostasis, lipids, mineral absorption and bone health, appetite and satiety, inflammation and immune function, and body composition). Additionally, there has been a lack of discussion regarding aspects such as the effect of ITF chain length on its intestinal and extraintestinal effects. The overall objective of this systematic review was to summarize the prebiotic potential of ITF based on the results of human clinical trials in healthy adult populations. Evidence from studies included in the current review suggest that ITF have a prebiotic effect on the intestinal microbiota, promoting the abundances of Bifidobacterium, Lactobacillus, and Faecalibacterium prausnitzii. Beneficial health effects reported following ITF intake include improved intestinal barrier function, improved laxation, increased insulin sensitivity, decreased triglycerides and an improved lipid profile, increased absorption of calcium and magnesium, and increased satiety. Although there is some evidence for differing effects of ITF based on chain length, the lack of direct comparisons and detailed descriptions of physicochemical properties limits the ability to draw conclusions from human clinical studies. Future research should focus on elucidating the mechanisms by which the intestinal microbiota mediates or modifies the effects of ITF on human health and the contribution of individual factors such as age and metabolic health to the movement toward personalization of prebiotic applications.
      PubDate: Wed, 27 Oct 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/advances/nmab119
      Issue No: Vol. 13, No. 2 (2021)
       
  • Vitamin B-12 and the Gastrointestinal Microbiome: A Systematic Review

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      Authors: Guetterman H; Huey S, Knight R, et al.
      Pages: 530 - 558
      Abstract: ABSTRACTVitamin B-12 deficiency is a major public health problem affecting individuals across the lifespan, with known hematological, neurological, and obstetric consequences. Emerging evidence suggests that vitamin B-12 may have an important role in other aspects of human health, including the composition and function of the gastrointestinal (gut) microbiome. Vitamin B-12 is synthesized and utilized by bacteria in the human gut microbiome and is required for over a dozen enzymes in bacteria, compared to only 2 in humans. However, the impact of vitamin B-12 on the gut microbiome has not been established. This systematic review was conducted to examine the evidence that links vitamin B-12 and the gut microbiome. A structured search strategy was used to identify in vitro, animal, and human studies that assessed vitamin B-12 status, dietary intake, or supplementation, and the gut microbiome using culture-independent techniques. A total of 22 studies (3 in vitro, 8 animal, 11 human observational studies) were included. Nineteen studies reported that vitamin B-12 intake, status, or supplementation was associated with gut microbiome outcomes, including beta-diversity, alpha-diversity, relative abundance of bacteria, functional capacity, or short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) production. Evidence suggests that vitamin B-12 may be associated with changes in bacterial abundance. While results from in vitro studies suggest that vitamin B-12 may increase alpha-diversity and shift gut microbiome composition (beta-diversity), findings from animal studies and observational human studies were heterogeneous. Based on evidence from in vitro and animal studies, microbiome outcomes may differ by cobalamin form and co-intervention. To date, few prospective observational studies and no randomized trials have been conducted to examine the effects of vitamin B-12 on the human gut microbiome. The impact of vitamin B-12 on the gut microbiome needs to be elucidated to inform screening and public health interventions.
      PubDate: Fri, 17 Dec 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/advances/nmab123
      Issue No: Vol. 13, No. 2 (2021)
       
  • Impact of Dietary Carbohydrate Restriction versus Energy Restriction on
           Exogenous Carbohydrate Oxidation during Aerobic Exercise

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      Authors: Small S; Margolis L.
      Pages: 559 - 567
      Abstract: ABSTRACTIndividuals with high physical activity levels, such as athletes and military personnel, are likely to experience periods of low muscle glycogen content. Reductions in glycogen stores are associated with impaired physical performance. Lower glycogen stores in these populations are likely due to sustained aerobic exercise coupled with suboptimal carbohydrate or energy intake. Consuming exogenous carbohydrate during aerobic exercise may be an effective intervention to sustain physical performance during periods of low glycogen. However, research is limited in the area of carbohydrate recommendations to fuel performance during periods of suboptimal carbohydrate and energy intake. Additionally, the studies that have investigated the effects of low glycogen stores on exogenous carbohydrate oxidation have yielded conflicting results. Discrepancies between studies may be the result of glycogen stores being lowered by restricting carbohydrate or restricting energy intake. This narrative review discusses the influence of low glycogen status, resulting from carbohydrate restriction versus energy restriction, on exogenous carbohydrate oxidation and examines the potential mechanism resulting in divergent responses in exogenous carbohydrate oxidation. Results from this review indicate that rates of exogenous carbohydrate oxidation can be maintained when glycogen content is lower following carbohydrate restrictions but may be reduced following energy restriction. Reductions in exogenous carbohydrate oxidation following energy restriction appear to result from lower insulin sensitivity and glucose uptake. Exogenous carbohydrate may thus be an effective intervention to sustain performance following short-term energy-adequate carbohydrate restriction but may not be an effective ergogenic aid when glycogen stores are low due to energy restriction.
      PubDate: Fri, 12 Nov 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/advances/nmab124
      Issue No: Vol. 13, No. 2 (2021)
       
  • The Effect of Maternal Vitamin D Supplementation on Vitamin D Status of
           Exclusively Breastfeeding Mothers and Their Nursing Infants: A Systematic
           Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Clinical Trials

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      Authors: Kazemain E; Ansari S, Davoodi S, et al.
      Pages: 568 - 585
      Abstract: ABSTRACTThe optimal vitamin D supplementation plan during lactation is unclear. We investigated the effect of maternal vitamin D supplementation on mother-infant dyads' vitamin D status during lactation. All controlled trials that compared vitamin D supplements to placebo or low doses of vitamin D in breastfeeding mothers were included. Pooled effect size and the associated 95% CI for each outcome were estimated using random-effects models. A 1-stage random-effect dose-response model was used to estimate the dose-response relation across different vitamin D dosages and serum 25-hydroxy vitamin D [25(OH)D] concentrations. We identified 19 clinical trials with 27 separate comparison groups (n = 3337 breastfeeding mothers). Maternal vitamin D supplement dosages were associated with circulating 25(OH)D concentrations in breastfeeding women in a nonlinear fashion. Supplementation with 1000 IU of vitamin D/d increased serum 25(OH)D concentrations by 7.8 ng/mL, whereas there was a lower increase in concentrations at vitamin D doses of >2000 IU/d (3.07 and 2.05 ng/mL increases between 2000–3000 and 3000–4000 IU/d, respectively). A linear relation was observed between maternal vitamin D supplementation dosage and the infants’ circulating 25(OH)D concentrations. Each additional 1000 IU of maternal vitamin D intake was accompanied by a 2.7 ng/mL increase in serum 25(OH)D concentration in their nursing infants. The subgroup analysis showed that maternal vitamin D supplementation was accompanied by a statistically significant increase in infants’ 25(OH)D concentration in the trials with a duration of >20 wk, vitamin D supplementation >1000 IU/d, East Indian participants, maternal BMI <25 kg/m2, and studies with an overall low risk of bias. Long-term maternal supplementation with vitamin D at a high dose (>6000 IU/d) effectively corrected vitamin D deficiency in both mothers and infants. Nevertheless, infants with 25(OH)D concentrations over 20 ng/mL may require a relatively low maternal dose to maintain vitamin D sufficiency.
      PubDate: Thu, 28 Oct 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/advances/nmab126
      Issue No: Vol. 13, No. 2 (2021)
       
  • Effect of Antioxidants on Sperm Quality Parameters in Subfertile Men: A
           Systematic Review and Network Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled
           Trials

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      Authors: Su L; Qu H, Cao Y, et al.
      Pages: 586 - 594
      Abstract: ABSTRACTAntioxidant supplementation has been identified as an important intervention for subfertile men. However, the effectiveness of different antioxidants in improving sperm quality remains unclear. In this study, a network meta-analysis (NMA) was designed to evaluate the effects of different antioxidants on sperm quality parameters in subfertile men. Published randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of antioxidants in subfertile men were searched in the PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane Library databases from inception to 31 January, 2021. Eight antioxidants (folic acid, zinc, vitamin E, carnitine, selenium, coenzyme q10 [CoQ10], N-acetylcysteine, and vitamin C) and a placebo (control) were included in our study. A Bayesian NMA with random effects was performed for each outcome (sperm concentration, sperm motility, and sperm morphology); the surface under the cumulative ranking curves (SUCRAs) for the effectiveness of each intervention was applied to identify the optimal intervention. Eighteen studies with 1790 subfertile men were included in the study. CoQ10 elicited a significant increase in sperm concentration (mean difference [MD] = 5.95; 95% CI: 0.05, 10.79) compared with the placebo; it achieved the highest rank in efficacy among all the antioxidants (SUCRA: 79.4%). With regard to sperm motility, carnitine (MD = 12.43; 95% CI: 4.07, 20.26) and CoQ10 (MD = 7.33; 95% CI: 0.35, 14.17) showed significant beneficial effects compared with the placebo; the efficacy of carnitine was the highest among all the antioxidants (SUCRA: 88.7%). With regard to sperm morphology, the efficacy of vitamin C tended to be the highest (SUCRA: 93.6%), although it did not show a significant beneficial effect (MD = 7.73; 95% CI: –0.94, 16.33) compared with the placebo. Overall, for subfertile men, CoQ10 and carnitine interventions showed better effectiveness in increasing sperm concentration and sperm motility, respectively.
      PubDate: Tue, 30 Nov 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/advances/nmab127
      Issue No: Vol. 13, No. 2 (2021)
       
  • Improving the Dietary Intake of Health Care Workers through Workplace
           Dietary Interventions: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

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      Authors: Panchbhaya A; Baldwin C, Gibson R.
      Pages: 595 - 620
      Abstract: ABSTRACTThe workplace has been identified as a potential location for dietary intervention delivery due to the amount of time spent and the meals eaten in this setting. It is recommended that interventions are tailored to specific occupational groups, and to date, there is limited synthesis of the evidence relating to health care workers. This review characterizes and evaluates the effectiveness of dietary interventions in health care workers to aid the design and implementation of interventions. The MEDLINE database was searched to September 2020. The reference list of an umbrella review was hand-searched for additional titles against inclusion criteria. The search included 1) population, 2) intervention, and 3) work environment. Studies were assessed for risk of bias. Harvest plots and forest plots were created to display study quality, direction, and size of effect of selected primary (energy, fruit and vegetable, and fat intake) and secondary outcomes (weight, BMI, blood pressure, and serum cholesterol concentrations). Thirty-nine articles assessing 34 interventions were eligible for inclusion. Intervention types most commonly used were environmental, educational, educational plus behavioral, and behavioral. Due to the heterogeneity in study design and intervention type, results were largely inconclusive. For dietary outcomes, interventions produced small–moderate favorable changes in fruit, vegetable, and fat intake. Decreased fat intake was mainly observed in environmental interventions and increases in fruit and vegetable intake were observed when an educational and/or behavioral component was present. Interventions producing weight loss were mostly nonrandomized trials involving education and physical activity. Total and LDL cholesterol decreased in interventions involving physical activity. Meta-analyses revealed significant decreases in energy intake, weight, blood pressure, total cholesterol, and LDL cholesterol in nonrandomized trials where data were available. Much more research is needed into strategies to promote diet quality improvement in health care workers. A protocol for this review is registered at PROSPERO (CRD42021234906).
      PubDate: Tue, 30 Nov 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/advances/nmab120
      Issue No: Vol. 13, No. 2 (2021)
       
  • Microsimulation Modeling in Food Policy: A Scoping Review of
           Methodological Aspects

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      Authors: Mertens E; Genbrugge E, Ocira J, et al.
      Pages: 621 - 632
      Abstract: ABSTRACTFood policies for the prevention and management of diet-related noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) have been increasingly relying on microsimulation models (MSMs) to assess effectiveness. Given the increased uptake of MSMs, this review aims to provide an overview of the characteristics of MSMs that link diets with NCDs. A comprehensive review was conducted in PubMed and Web of Knowledge. Inclusion criteria were: 1) findings from an MSM; 2) diets, foods, or nutrients as the main exposure of interest; and 3) NCDs, such as overweight/obesity, type 2 diabetes, coronary heart disease, stroke, or cancer, as the disease outcome for impact assessment. This review included information from 33 studies using MSM in analyzing diet and diverse food policies on NCDs. Hereby, most models employed stochastic, discrete-time, dynamic microsimulation techniques to calculate anticipated (cost-)effectiveness of strategies based on food pricing, food reformulation, or dietary (lifestyle) interventions. Currently available models differ in the methodology used for quantifying the effect of the dietary changes on disease, and in the method for modeling the disease incidence and mortality. However, all studies provided evidence that the models were sufficiently capturing the close-to-reality situation by justifying their choice of model parameters and validating externally their modeled disease incidence and mortality with observed or predicted event data. With the increasing use of various MSMs, between-model comparisons, facilitated by open access models and good reporting practices, would be important for judging a model's accuracy, leading to continued improvement in the methodologies for developing and applying MSMs and, subsequently, a better understanding of the results by policymakers.
      PubDate: Mon, 25 Oct 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/advances/nmab129
      Issue No: Vol. 13, No. 2 (2021)
       
  • Potential Biomarkers, Risk Factors, and Their Associations with
           IgE-Mediated Food Allergy in Early Life: A Narrative Review

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      Authors: Childs C; Munblit D, Ulfman L, et al.
      Pages: 633 - 651
      Abstract: ABSTRACTFood allergy (FA) affects the quality of life of millions of people worldwide and presents a significant psychological and financial burden for both national and international public health. In the past few decades, the prevalence of allergic disease has been on the rise worldwide. Identified risk factors for FA include family history, mode of delivery, variations in infant feeding practices, prior diagnosis of other atopic diseases such as eczema, and social economic status. Identifying reliable biomarkers that predict the risk of developing FA in early life would be valuable in both preventing morbidity and mortality and by making current interventions available at the earliest opportunity. There is also the potential to identify new therapeutic targets. This narrative review provides details on the genetic, epigenetic, dietary, and microbiome influences upon the development of FA and synthesizes the currently available data indicating potential biomarkers. Whereas there is a large body of research evidence available within each field of potential risk factors, there is a very limited number of studies that span multiple methodological fields, for example, including immunology, microbiome, genetic/epigenetic factors, and dietary assessment. We recommend that further collaborative research with detailed cohort phenotyping is required to identify biomarkers, and whether these vary between at-risk populations and the wider population. The low incidence of oral food challenge–confirmed FA in the general population, and the complexities of designing nutritional intervention studies will provide challenges for researchers to address in generating high-quality, reliable, and reproducible research findings.
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Oct 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/advances/nmab122
      Issue No: Vol. 13, No. 2 (2021)
       
  • Dietary Interventions in Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

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      Authors: Pickel L; Iliuta I, Scholey J, et al.
      Pages: 652 - 666
      Abstract: ABSTRACTAutosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is characterized by the progressive growth of renal cysts, leading to the loss of functional nephrons. Recommendations for individuals with ADPKD to maintain a healthy diet and lifestyle are largely similar to those for the general population. However, recent evidence from preclinical models suggests that more tightly specified dietary regimens, including caloric restriction, intermittent fasting, and ketogenic diets, hold promise to slow disease progression, and the results of ongoing human clinical trials are eagerly awaited. These dietary interventions directly influence nutrient signaling and substrate availability in the cystic kidney, while also conferring systemic metabolic benefits. The present review focuses on the importance of local and systemic metabolism in ADPKD and summarizes current evidence for dietary interventions to slow disease progression and improve quality of life.
      PubDate: Wed, 10 Nov 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/advances/nmab131
      Issue No: Vol. 13, No. 2 (2021)
       
  • Current Evidence and Directions for Intermittent Fasting During Cancer
           Chemotherapy

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      Authors: Gabel K; Cares K, Varady K, et al.
      Pages: 667 - 680
      Abstract: ABSTRACTAlmost 40% of the adult population in the USA will be diagnosed with cancer in their lifetime. Diet is a modifiable factor which is known to affect cancer risk and recurrence. Yet, little is known about how diet influences cancer treatment outcomes. Intermittent fasting, characterized by periods of abstaining from foods and beverages alternated with periods of ad libitum intake, when adopted in the context of chemotherapy, has shown promise in preclinical models resulting in decreased vomiting, diarrhea, visible discomfort, and improved insulin sensitivity and efficacy of chemotherapeutic treatment. Although intermittent fasting during receipt of chemotherapy has been well-established in preclinical models, limited numbers of human studies are now being reported. This review aims to survey the current data examining the effect of intermittent fasting on chemotherapy efficacy, patient treatment outcomes, patient centered outcomes, and circulating biomarkers associated with cancer. Available data show that periodic fasting, a form of intermittent fasting, may hold potential to improve the effectiveness of chemotherapy, decrease treatment-related side effects and cancer-promoting factors such as insulin, while ameliorating treatment-related decreases in quality of life and daily functioning. Larger controlled periodic fasting trials, including exploration of alternate forms of intermittent fasting, are needed to better elucidate the effect of intermittent fasting on treatment and patient outcomes during chemotherapy.
      PubDate: Thu, 11 Nov 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/advances/nmab132
      Issue No: Vol. 13, No. 2 (2021)
       
  • Nutrition Information Brief—Copper

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      Authors: Burkhead J; Collins J.
      Pages: 681 - 683
      Abstract: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases10.13039/100000062R01 DK074867R01 DK109717Office of Dietary Supplements10.13039/100000063R15 DK114747P20GM103395-7525
      PubDate: Thu, 23 Dec 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/advances/nmab157
      Issue No: Vol. 13, No. 2 (2021)
       
 
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