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  Subjects -> NUTRITION AND DIETETICS (Total: 201 journals)
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Canadian Journal of Dietetic Practice and Research
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.419
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 17  
 
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ISSN (Print) 1486-3847 - ISSN (Online) 2292-9592
Published by Dietitians of Canada Homepage  [1 journal]
  • Recognizing the value and positive impact of Registered Dietitians

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      Pages: 51 - 51
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Dietetic Practice and Research, Volume 83, Issue 2, Page 51-51, June 2022.

      Citation: Canadian Journal of Dietetic Practice and Research
      PubDate: 2022-06-07T09:32:46Z
      DOI: 10.3148/cjdpr-2022-018
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 2 (2022)
       
  • Sixty Percent of Foods Advertised in Grocery Store Flyers are Not In-line
           with Canada’s Food Guide

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      Authors: Natalie A. Laframboise, Jamie A. Seabrook, June I. Matthews, Paula D. N. Dworatzek
      Pages: 52 - 58
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Dietetic Practice and Research, Volume 83, Issue 2, Page 52-58, June 2022.
      Purpose: To evaluate foods advertised in discount and premium grocery flyers for their alignment with Canada’s 2007 Food Guide (CFG) and assess if alignment differed by food category, season, page location, and price.Methods: Weekly flyers (n = 192) were collected from discount and premium grocery chains from each of 4 seasons. Health Canada’s Surveillance Tool was used to assess food items as in-line or not in-line with CFG.Results: Of 35 576 food items, 39.7% were in-line with CFG. There were no differences in proportions of foods not in-line in discount versus premium flyers (60.9% and 60.0%, respectively). Other Foods and Meat & Alternatives were advertised most (28.0% and 26.3%, respectively; P 
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Dietetic Practice and Research
      PubDate: 2022-01-11T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.3148/cjdpr-2021-035
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 2 (2022)
       
  • Examining Elementary School Children’s Knowledge about Food and
           Nutrition in Southwestern Ontario, Canada

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      Authors: Paige Colley, Jamie A. Seabrook, Sarah J. Woodruff, Jason Gilliland
      Pages: 59 - 67
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Dietetic Practice and Research, Volume 83, Issue 2, Page 59-67, June 2022.
      Purpose: Knowledge is fundamental to helping children make nutritional choices that support lifelong healthy behaviours. This study (i) investigates elementary school children’s knowledge about food and nutrition and (ii) identifies sociodemographic factors influencing children’s reported knowledge.Methods: In 2017–2019, a survey was administered to 2443 students (grades 5–8) at 60 schools across southwestern Ontario, Canada, and a parent survey was used to validate self-reported sociodemographics. Multiple regression was used to analyse children’s knowledge scores and related sociodemographic factors. A total knowledge score was calculated by summing correct responses derived from 46 individual questions in the student survey.Results: Mean total knowledge score was 29.2 out of a possible 46 points (63.5% correct). Students demonstrated some knowledge and awareness of strategies to encourage fruit and vegetable consumption, healthy food selection, nutrition, and food preparation skills, although knowledge of food guide recommendations and locally sourced produce were limited. Female sex, family income, and rurality were associated with higher knowledge scores.Conclusions: Results provide insight regarding strengths and gaps in elementary-school children’s food and nutrition knowledge. Poor performance of students on specific food guide-related questions suggests that the general guidance of the 2019 Canada’s Food Guide might be better understood by children and adolescents.
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Dietetic Practice and Research
      PubDate: 2022-01-11T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.3148/cjdpr-2021-037
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 2 (2022)
       
  • Exploring Barriers to Food Security Among Immigrants: A Critical Role for
           Public Health Nutrition

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      Authors: Clare E. Ramsahoi, Sasha S. Sonny, Jennifer M. Monk
      Pages: 68 - 74
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Dietetic Practice and Research, Volume 83, Issue 2, Page 68-74, June 2022.
      Upon moving to a new country and new food environment, 2 important public health issues may be experienced by immigrants as they adapt to their new country of residence, namely a higher prevalence of food insecurity and/or a decline in overall health over time postimmigration. Therefore, improving the food environment experienced by new migrants may be an effective strategy to reduce long-term health complications and improve well-being postimmigration. The aim of this paper is to discuss the potential barriers experienced by new immigrants in the access, availability, and utilization of familiar culturally appropriate foods and the subsequent impact on their food security status. Culturally appropriate foods are foods commonly consumed as part of cultural food traditions and are often staples within the diet; however, limited availability of and/or access to these foods can reduce food security. By understanding the barriers to food security and challenges that may be faced by immigrants and refugees, dietitians will be better equipped to assist these individuals in accessing culturally familiar foods and improve quality of life. In this capacity, dietitians can play a critical public health nutrition role by serving as a conduit for new immigrants to access community resources and navigate a new food environment.
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Dietetic Practice and Research
      PubDate: 2022-01-11T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.3148/cjdpr-2021-032
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 2 (2022)
       
  • Towards a Standardized Definition of Medical Nutrition Therapy and
           Regulatory Reform in Canada

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      Authors: Justine R Keathley, Amélie Arbour, Marie-Claude Vohl
      Pages: 75 - 80
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Dietetic Practice and Research, Volume 83, Issue 2, Page 75-80, June 2022.
      Various definitions have been proposed to describe Medical Nutrition Therapy (MNT). Broadly, MNT encompasses the provision of nutrition information and advice aimed to prevent, treat, and/or manage health conditions. In Canada, the provision of such information and advice is unregulated, thus allowing anyone to provide MNT services regardless of their education and training. This inevitably poses risks of harm such as the provision of unsafe and/or ineffective nutrition advice as well as delayed evidence-based treatment. Canadian research has further demonstrated that the general public is unable to properly differentiate between regulated, evidence-based nutrition providers (registered dietitians) and those who are unregulated. Therefore, the public is at risk. To reduce nutrition misinformation and ultimately improve the health and well-being of the public, the objective of this paper is, first, to propose a standardized definition of MNT for use across Canada and, second, to propose province- and territory-specific legislative amendments for the regulation of MNT throughout the country. We also present an opposing perspective to the proposed viewpoint. Ultimately, health care regulation across the country requires an overhaul before we expect that nutrition information and advice communicated to the public may be consistently evidence based.
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Dietetic Practice and Research
      PubDate: 2022-01-11T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.3148/cjdpr-2021-033
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 2 (2022)
       
  • What Practice Issues Over 25 Years Most Interest Registered
           Dietitians' Survey and Interview Results

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      Authors: Paula Brauer, Jacqueline Bull, Katelyn Nieuwhof, Aleah J. Kirsh, Linda Dietrich, Janis Randall Simpson, Marlene Wyatt
      Pages: 81 - 85
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Dietetic Practice and Research, Volume 83, Issue 2, Page 81-85, June 2022.
      Dietetics has changed substantially; a mixed-methods project was undertaken to: (i) gauge interest in the profession history since 1993, (ii) identify preferred format(s), (iii) identify possible topics, and (iv) identify possible key informants. An online bilingual survey was conducted in 2018, with follow-up phone interviews among interested respondents. Survey content was organised as 12 major topics. Respondents were invited via a Dietitians of Canada (DC) newsletter, Facebook groups, and at the DC national conference. Survey data, including respondent-generated topics of interest and interview content, were descriptively analyzed. The online survey garnered 360 responses; 332 (92%) completed more than 10% of the survey and were interested in history. Detailed responses were analyzed (296 English; 36 French); 51 were interviewed. An online timeline was the most preferred format (79%). Review of the rise in technology and obesity, aging, supermarket registered dietitians (RDs), the local/organic movement, Practice-based Evidence in Nutrition (PEN), the changes in training models and scope of practice, public awareness of the profession, and advocacy and unique career paths were of most interest (≥ 50% of respondents). These results confirm interest in the recent history of the profession among RDs and provide guidance on preferred format and topics for further work.
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Dietetic Practice and Research
      PubDate: 2022-01-11T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.3148/cjdpr-2021-034
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 2 (2022)
       
  • Teaching a Man to Fish: An Evaluation of a Chronic Disease Management
           Men’s Cooking Class

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      Authors: Chrissa Karagiannis, Allison Cammer, Emily Andreiuk, Nicole Caron, Michele Sheikh, Rochelle Anthony, Karen Davis
      Pages: 86 - 90
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Dietetic Practice and Research, Volume 83, Issue 2, Page 86-90, June 2022.
      There is limited data on the effects of cooking classes on male participants. The LiveWell Chronic Disease Management program’s Men’s Cooking Class (MCC) aims to help participants gain skills and confidence with food to manage chronic diseases more independently and improve their health. This paper evaluates whether, and how, the program is effective in achieving its goals.A qualitative process was used to collect data from past program participants. Data collection included telephone interviews conducted with a sample of 27 past MCC attendees and a focus group held with a subsample of seven participants. Thematic analysis was performed on collected data.Five major themes emerged, including (i) practical and applicable content, (ii) kinesthetic teaching and learning, (iii) catering to the interests of participants, (iv) tailoring to the demographic, and (v) enjoyment and engagement. Findings indicate the current LiveWell MCC program is effective in meeting its goals. The themes identified are aspects of the program that contribute to this effectiveness.The thematic findings indicate areas in which to continuously adapt and monitor the effectiveness of this program and serve as recommendations for other programming. Further research on the long-term impact of MCC for self-management of chronic disease is needed.
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Dietetic Practice and Research
      PubDate: 2022-01-11T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.3148/cjdpr-2021-038
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 2 (2022)
       
  • Patient-Reported Outcome and Experience Measures Administered by
           Dietitians in the Outpatient Setting: Systematic Review

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      Authors: Kelly Lambert, Jordan Stanford
      Pages: 91 - 101
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Dietetic Practice and Research, Volume 83, Issue 2, Page 91-101, June 2022.
      Understanding how patients perceive their health and the experience with the dietitian is fundamental to providing patient-centred care. The types of patient reported measures (PRMs) used by outpatient dietitians is unclear. Guidance about use of PRMs for dietitians is also lacking. The aim of this systematic review was to synthesise evidence regarding the use of PRMs by dietitians in the outpatient setting and evaluate the methodological quality of studies evaluating the psychometric properties of PRMs. Eight databases were searched systematically for studies of dietitians working in the outpatient setting and administering a PRM. Forty-four studies were evaluated and described 58 different PRMs. These included direct nutrition related (n = 12 studies), clinical (n = 21 studies), and health-related quality of life PRMs (n = 24 studies); 1 study documented use of a patient-reported experience measure. A large range of PRMs are used by outpatient dietitians. Of the most common PRMs, the majority are administered in similar populations to the original validation study. Dietitians should use a combination of 3 PRMs: a generic health-related quality of life tool, an experience measure, and at least 1 clinical or direct nutrition-related measure. This will enable dietitians to fully capture the impact of their care on patients.
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Dietetic Practice and Research
      PubDate: 2022-01-11T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.3148/cjdpr-2021-036
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 2 (2022)
       
  • Impact of the COVID-19-induced shift to online dietetics training on PDEP
           competency acquisition and mental health

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      Authors: Kelsey Van, David M. Beauchamp, Hiba Rachid, Marina Mansour, Brooklyne Buckley, Debora Choi, Alexia Prescod, Jennifer M. Monk
      Pages: 1 - 3
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Dietetic Practice and Research, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: A pilot study to investigate the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic and shift to online learning and practicum training on dietetics students’ perceptions of Partnership for Dietetic Education and Practice (PDEP) competency acquisition and mental health.Methods: Dietetics students (n = 19) at the University of Guelph (2020–2021) were invited to complete an anonymous online survey to assess self-reported online dietetics practicum training experiences including (i) benefits and challenges, (ii) PDEP competency acquisition, and (iii) impact on mental health.Results: The benefits of online dietetics training included schedule flexibility (42.1%), reduced commute time (31.6%), and acquiring virtual counselling experience (21.1%). Reported challenges were insufficient communication with preceptors (36.8%), increased project workload (57.9%), and technology (15.8%). In online practicum placements, 52.6% of dietetics students reported adequately acquiring all PDEP competencies, with Nutrition Care identified as the most challenging to obtain (63.2%). A negative impact on mental health and increased levels of stress/anxiety were reported in 94.7% of trainees. Notably, 63.2% of students favoured continuation of online dietetics training through a hybrid or entirely online format.Conclusion: Online dietetics training has the potential to complement the traditional in-person model; however, further adaptation is required to optimize PDEP competency acquisition and students’ mental health.
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Dietetic Practice and Research
      PubDate: 2022-05-03T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.3148/cjdpr-2022-002
       
  • Benefits of a Standardized Enteral Feeding Protocol on the Nutrition and
           Health Outcomes of Very Low Birth Weight Preterm Infants

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      Authors: Rhea D’Costa, Sandra Fucile, Brittany Dickson, Alessia Gallipoli, Kimberly E Dow
      Pages: 1 - 4
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Dietetic Practice and Research, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: To compare nutrition and health outcomes before and after implementing a standardized enteral feeding protocol on nutrition and health outcomes in very low birth weight preterm infants.Methods: A retrospective chart review was performed evaluating preterm infants, born less than 34 weeks gestation and weighing less than 1500 g, before and after the implementation of a standardized enteral feeding protocol. Outcomes included weaning of parenteral nutrition, initiation and advancement of enteral feeds, initiation of human-milk fortifier (HMF), change in weight z-score and neonatal morbidities.Results: Fifty-six infants (30 in pre-group, 26 in post-group) met the inclusion criteria. Infants in the standardized enteral feeding protocol group started enteral feeds earlier (p = 0.039) and received full HMF fortification at lower weights (p = 0.033) than those in the pre-group. Fewer days on continuous positive airway pressure (p = 0.021) and lower rates of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (p = 0.018) were also observed in the post-group. Weaning of parenteral nutrition and weight z-score were not significantly different between groups. There were no differences in other morbidities.Conclusion: Study results suggest that adopting a standardized enteral feeding protocol may promote early initiation of enteral feeds and fortification.
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Dietetic Practice and Research
      PubDate: 2022-05-03T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.3148/cjdpr-2022-003
       
  • Using Nutrition Knowledge and Diet Quality Questionnaires as Screening
           Tools to Identify Female Collegiate Athletes in Need of Dietitian Referral
           

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      Authors: Jensen Skinner, Kaila A. Vento, Carol S. Johnston, Floris C. Wardenaar
      Pages: 1 - 6
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Dietetic Practice and Research, Ahead of Print.
      The purpose of this study was to evaluate nutrition knowledge and diet quality in collegiate athletes to determine if referral to a sports registered dietitian (RD) is warranted. This cross-sectional study analyzed four sections of the Nutrition for Sport Knowledge Questionnaire and the Rapid Eating Assessment for Patients Questionnaire, both validated in athletic populations. The relationship between nutrition knowledge and diet quality was evaluated. Significance was set at P ≤ 0.05. One hundred and twenty athletes reported a median nutrition score of 52 (45–61), and a dietary quality score of 53 (46–58), with a weak, positive association between both (r = 0.28 (95% CI: 0.11–0.44), P 
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Dietetic Practice and Research
      PubDate: 2022-05-03T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.3148/cjdpr-2022-004
       
  • “It Literally Can Save Lives”: How Challenging Structural Inequities
           in Sexual Orientation and Gender Priorities Can Create Change in the
           Canadian Dietetic Profession

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      Authors: Nicholas Hickens, Duygu Gunaydin, Drew Burchell, Phillip Joy
      Pages: 1 - 8
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Dietetic Practice and Research, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: Our aim was to explore Canadian dietitians’ knowledge, beliefs, and values relating to the nutritional care of Two-Spirit, lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans, and other queer groups (2SLGBTQ+).Methods: The research was qualitative and used a poststructural theoretical lens. Interviews were conducted with 16 Canadian dietitians. Data were analyzed using thematic analysis.Results: Three themes were noted: (i) moving away from the binary; (ii) systemic discrimination and 2SLGBTQ+ experiences; and (iii) professional organizations and advocacy. The participants discussed structural, professional, and cultural barriers that affect the nutrition and health experiences of sexual and gender diverse groups.Conclusion: Dietetic institutions and regulatory bodies must provide sexual and gender diversity resources and engage in activities that acknowledge the lives and nutritional concerns of sexual and gender diverse people. Such advocacy is a means to provide more inclusive and equitable care. Key recommendations for structural changes within the profession include using an intersectional lens and a critical dietetic approach to nutritional care.
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Dietetic Practice and Research
      PubDate: 2022-05-03T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.3148/cjdpr-2022-005
       
  • Dietetic Students’ Perceptions of Learning Professional Competencies
           with Four Simulations Throughout a Semester

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      Authors: Mylène Rosa, Isabelle Giroux
      Pages: 1 - 5
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Dietetic Practice and Research, Ahead of Print.
      In nursing and medicine, taking part in simulation activities has been shown to be beneficial for students’ learning; however, little has been documented in dietetics. This study aimed to document the perceived effect of 4 simulations on development of professional competencies by dietetic students. A mixed-method convergent approach was used with pre- and post-questionnaires, interviews, and a focus group discussion to look at dietetic students’ perceptions of learning as part of a Nutrition Assessment course. Nonparametric tests for questionnaires and theme analysis for transcripts were used to examine data. After analysis, data were compared and merged for interpretation. Results showed that participants perceived a significant increase in comprehension of various competencies with simulations. In interviews and a focus group, a participant subgroup (n = 7) perceived an enriched understanding of some dietetic competencies compared with pre-simulations. Simulations seemed to have transformed classroom concepts to a more practical understanding of dietetic practice. More studies are needed to identify if these results could be replicated in different settings. Simulations had a positive effect on students’ perception of competencies development and may be an andragogical tool of choice to support preparing future dietitians for entry to practice.
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Dietetic Practice and Research
      PubDate: 2022-05-03T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.3148/cjdpr-2022-006
       
  • Adopting Sustainable Menu Practices in Healthcare Institutions: Perceived
           Barriers and Facilitators

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      Authors: Béatrice Dagenais, Annie Marquez, Josée Lavoie, Beth Hunter, Geneviève Mercille
      Pages: 1 - 8
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Dietetic Practice and Research, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: The healthcare sector is an important area for sustainable food initiatives, given its inherent mission to heal and its substantial impact on the food system. Foodservice managers can take part in these initiatives by using sustainable menu practices (SMPs). This study aimed to explore managerial perceptions of barriers and facilitators to adopting SMPs in Québec healthcare institutions.Methods: Seventeen foodservice managers were recruited through purposeful sampling to participate in a qualitative semi-structured interview. The Diffusion of Innovations theory was used to assess the main determinants of the diffusion of an innovation (SMPs) through a complex social system (healthcare organization).Results: Participants reported more barriers than facilitators. Lack of support at many levels was recognized as a major hindrance to SMP adoption, as were shortfalls in political directives. Increased collaboration between all food system actors and better communication in healthcare were perceived as needed for increased SMP adoption.Conclusions: This research contributes to an in-depth understanding of managerial experiences in SMP adoption in various regional and healthcare settings. Findings suggest the need for support and strategies that would remove important barriers for foodservice managers and contributed to the development of a guide to support foodservice managers in implementing SMPs.
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Dietetic Practice and Research
      PubDate: 2022-05-03T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.3148/cjdpr-2022-007
       
  • Mapping the Roles of Nutrition and Dietetics Professionals in Sustainable
           Food Systems and Exploring Opportunities for Strategic Collaboration

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      Authors: Lindsay Goodridge, Liesel Carlsson, Edith G. Callaghan
      Pages: 1 - 5
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Dietetic Practice and Research, Ahead of Print.
      Current food systems drive environmental damage, social injustices, and undermine health, and these challenges are complex and seemingly intractable. Collaboration is required to transition to more sustainable food systems (SFS). Registered Dietitians and Nutritionists (RDs) are an under-leveraged and well-positioned group to contribute to addressing food systems challenges because of their locations in the system and their existing skillsets. Drawing on research with dietitians, this perspective paper presents both a theoretical proposal as well as collective expertise in supporting sustainable development of the global food system. It highlights where RDs work in food systems with the aim to reveal multiple points of entry where RDs can and do contribute to SFS across food systems, approaches to apply, as well as opportunities for collaboration within and beyond the profession. Educational and societal barriers exist that prevent systematic RD engagement; however, examples of established work provide models to follow.
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Dietetic Practice and Research
      PubDate: 2022-05-03T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.3148/cjdpr-2022-008
       
  • Comparison of diet quality tools to assess nutritional adequacy for adults
           living with kidney disease

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      Authors: Kelly Picard, Peter A. Senior, Ashley Wilmott, Kailash Jindal, Caroline Richard, Diana R. Mager
      Pages: 1 - 6
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Dietetic Practice and Research, Ahead of Print.
      There is no specific diet quality tool recommended for adults living with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Identifying how diet quality tools assess nutritional adequacy and correlate with potassium and phosphorus (nutrients of interest in CKD) is warranted. Our aim was to compare Mediterranean Diet Scores (MDS), Healthy Eating Index (HEI), and Healthy Food Diversity (HFD) to determine their correlation with nutrient intake in adults living with diabetes and CKD. Using data from a longitudinal study of 50 participants with diabetes and CKD, diet quality was assessed at baseline and 1 or more times at annual visits up to 5 years (complete diet records n = 178). Diet quality was investigated for correlation with nutrient intake. Compared with HEI and HFD, MDS was poorly correlated with nutrient intake (all r values 
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Dietetic Practice and Research
      PubDate: 2022-05-03T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.3148/cjdpr-2022-009
       
  • Creating “Plates” to Evaluate Canadians’ Dietary Intake in Relation
           to the 2019 Canada’s Food Guide

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      Authors: Rachel Prowse, Natalie Doan, Anne Philipneri, Justin Thielman, Salma Hack, Dan W. Harrington, Mahsa Jessri
      Pages: 1 - 8
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Dietetic Practice and Research, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: Explore Canadians’ dietary intake in relation to the 2019 Canada’s Food Guide (CFG) Plate using novel volume-based food analyses, by age and meal occasion.Methods: Foods reported in 24-hour recalls by 20,456 Canadians in the 2015 Canadian Community Health Survey – Nutrition were classified as: Vegetables and Fruits, Whole Grain Foods, Protein Foods, Non-Whole Grain Foods or Other Foods (high in fat, sugar, sodium). Food volumes were used to calculate percent contributions of each grouping to total intake, stratified by age (1–6; 7–12; 13–17; 18–64; 65+years) and meal (breakfast, lunch, supper, snack), applying sample survey weights and bootstrapping.Results: By volume, the Canadian population diet included: 29% Vegetables and Fruits, 22% Protein Foods, 7% Whole Grains, 24% Non-Whole Grain Foods, and 18% Other Foods. Intakes of Protein Foods (1–6 years) and Other Foods (7–12; 13–17 years) were higher in children than adults by volume, relative to total intake. Whole Grains intake was highest at breakfast. Other Foods intake was highest at snack.Conclusions: The volume-based population diet of Canadians reported on a single day includes a substantial proportion of non-recommended foods. There are opportunities to design interventions that target specific foods, ages, and meals to align intake with recommendations.
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Dietetic Practice and Research
      PubDate: 2022-05-03T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.3148/cjdpr-2022-010
       
  • Food Environment and Youth Intake May Influence Uptake of Gluten-Free Food
           Guide Recommendations in Celiac Disease

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      Authors: Samantha Cyrkot, Dominica Gidrewicz, Sven Anders, Margaret Marcon, Justine M. Turner, Diana R. Mager
      Pages: 1 - 7
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Dietetic Practice and Research, Ahead of Print.
      A gluten-free (GF) food guide for children and youth (4–18 years) living with celiac disease (CD) has been developed and extensively evaluated by stakeholders, including registered dietitians. A case study analysis was conducted on data from 16 households of youth with CD to examine how factors related to parental food literacy, the home food environment, and food purchasing patterns may influence food guide uptake by Canadian youth with CD and their families. Households were of higher socioeconomic status, parents had good food literacy, and the home food availability of fruits, vegetables and GF grains was diverse. However, households also had a diverse supply of convenience foods and snack options. Youth reported consuming a larger proportion of these foods (>35% dietary intake) and had suboptimal diet quality. Dietary intake of fruits and vegetables were below GF plate model recommendations by over 30%. Despite limited economical barriers, good parental food literacy, and diverse food availability, meeting fruit and vegetable recommendations based on the pediatric GF food guide remains a major challenge. Findings inform that effective strategies and healthy public policies to support the uptake of GF food guide recommendations are needed to improve the health outcomes of youth with CD.
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Dietetic Practice and Research
      PubDate: 2022-05-03T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.3148/cjdpr-2022-011
       
  • Cheese Intake is Inversely Associated with LDL Cholesterol in Young
           Children

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      Authors: Justin Sheremeta, David W.L. MA, Jess Haines, Alison M. Duncan, Gerarda Darlington, Genevieve Newton, Andrea C. Buchholz
      Pages: 1 - 4
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Dietetic Practice and Research, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: To determine if intake (servings/day) of total dairy and/or dairy subtypes (milk, cheese, and yogurt) were associated with biomarkers related to dyslipidemia, insulin sensitivity and inflammation in a sample of cardio-metabolically healthy young children from the Guelph Family Health Study at the University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, Canada.Methods: Baseline data from 42 children (aged 2.0–6.2 years) from 33 families who provided a dietary assessment and a fasted blood sample were included in this cross-sectional analysis. Linear and logistic regressions using generalized estimating equations were used for analysis and models were adjusted for age, gender, and household income.Results: In total, 42 children (3.74 ± 1.23 years old; mean (± SD)) consumed median (25th percentile, 75th percentile) servings/day of 1.70 (1.16, 2.81) for total dairy, 0.74 (0.50, 1.70) for milk, 0.63 (0.00, 1.16) for cheese, and 0.00 (0.00, 0.38) for yogurt. Cheese intake was significantly inversely associated with LDL cholesterol (−0.16 (95% CI: −0.29, −0.03) mmol/L per serving; P = 0.02)). No other associations between dairy intake and biomarkers were significant.Conclusions: Cheese intake was inversely associated with LDL cholesterol in this preliminary study of cardio-metabolically healthy young children, thereby warranting further research on dairy intake and cardiometabolic risk factors.
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Dietetic Practice and Research
      PubDate: 2022-05-03T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.3148/cjdpr-2022-012
       
  • Comprehensive Nutrition Interventions in First Nation-Operated Schools in
           Canada

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      Authors: Christina Gillies, Rosanne Blanchet, Rebecca Gokiert, Anna Farmer, Noreen D. Willows
      Pages: 1 - 5
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Dietetic Practice and Research, Ahead of Print.
      Comprehensive school-based nutrition interventions offer a promising strategy to support healthy eating for First Nations children. A targeted strategic review was performed to identify nutrition interventions in 514 First Nation-operated schools across Canada through their websites. Directed content analysis was used to describe if interventions used 1 or more of the 4 components of the Comprehensive School Health (CSH) framework. Sixty schools had interventions. Nearly all (n = 56, 93%) schools offered breakfast, snack, and (or) lunch programs (social and physical environment). About one-third provided opportunities for students to learn about traditional healthy Indigenous foods and food procurement methods (n = 18, 30%) (teaching and learning) or facilitated connections between the school and students’ families or the community (n = 16, 27%) (partnerships and services). Few schools (n = 10, 17%) had a nutrition policy outlining permitted foods (school policy). Less than 1% (n = 3) of interventions included all 4 CSH components. Results suggest that most First Nation-operated schools provide children with food, but few have nutrition interventions that include multiple CSH components. First Nation-operated schools may require additional financial and (or) logistical support to implement comprehensive school-based nutrition interventions, which have greater potential to support long-term health outcomes for children than single approaches.
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Dietetic Practice and Research
      PubDate: 2022-01-11T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.3148/cjdpr-2021-039
       
  • Identifiable Dietary Patterns of Pregnant Women: A Canadian Sample

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      Authors: Lydia Tegwyn Mosher, Jamie A. Seabrook, Jasna Twynstra
      Pages: 1 - 8
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Dietetic Practice and Research, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: To estimate the percentage of a sample of pregnant women in Canada following a vegetarian, vegan, low-carbohydrate, gluten-free, Mediterranean, or well-balanced diet, before and during pregnancy and to explore if pregnant women received and were satisfied with nutrition information received from health care providers (HCPs).Methods: Participants were conveniently sampled through Facebook and Twitter. An online survey collected data on sociodemographic characteristics, maternal diet, and whether women received and were satisfied with nutrition information from their HCPs. The McNemar test assessed changes in the proportion of diets followed before and during pregnancy.Results: Of 226 women, most followed a well-balanced diet before (76.9%) and during (72.9%) pregnancy (p = 0.26). Vegetarian, gluten-free, vegan, and low-carbohydrate diets were the least followed diets before and during pregnancy (vegetarian: 7.6% vs 5.3%; gluten-free: 4.9% vs 4.0%; vegan: 2.7% vs 2.2%; low-carbohydrate:4.0% vs 0.4%). Overall, the number of women following restrictive diets before pregnancy was significantly reduced throughout pregnancy (19.1% vs 12.0%, p 
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Dietetic Practice and Research
      PubDate: 2022-01-11T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.3148/cjdpr-2021-040
       
 
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