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  Subjects -> NUTRITION AND DIETETICS (Total: 201 journals)
Showing 1 - 64 of 64 Journals sorted by number of followers
American Journal of Clinical Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 176)
British Journal Of Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 94)
International Journal of Obesity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 92)
Clinical Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 91)
International Journal of Sport Nutrition & Exercise Metabolism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 87)
European Journal of Clinical Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 74)
Advances in Food and Nutrition Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 62)
Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 61)
Food Science & Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 59)
Obesity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 58)
Advances in Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 55)
Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 52)
Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition (JPGN)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 52)
Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51)
Diabetes, Metabolic Syndrome and Obesity     Open Access   (Followers: 49)
American Journal of Food and Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 46)
Nutrition in Clinical Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
Journal of Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
Annual Review of Nutrition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 39)
Nutrition Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
European Journal of Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Food & Nutrition Research     Open Access   (Followers: 34)
Journal of Nutrition, Health and Aging     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity     Open Access   (Followers: 31)
Public Health Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Nutrition & Dietetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Journal of Renal Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Current Opinion in Clinical Nutrition & Metabolic Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Obesity Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Appetite     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Current Nutrition & Food Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Journal of Obesity     Open Access   (Followers: 24)
Eating and Weight Disorders - Studies on Anorexia, Bulimia and Obesity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
International Journal of Nutrition and Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 23)
Childhood Obesity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Nutrition Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Clinical Nutrition ESPEN     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
International Journal of Eating Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Advances in Eating Disorders : Theory, Research and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Comparative Exercise Physiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
International Journal of Food Safety, Nutrition and Public Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Nutrition & Diabetes     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Topics in Clinical Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
African Journal of Food, Agriculture, Nutrition and Development     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
American Journal of Botany     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Canadian Journal of Dietetic Practice and Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Clinical Obesity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Journal of Nutrition and Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Nutrition & Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Advanced Nutrition and Human Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Nutrition in Gerontology and Geriatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Nutrition and Dietary Supplements     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Eating Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Nutrition Today     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Maternal & Child Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
BMC Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Nutrition and Cancer     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Clinical Nutrition Insight     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Health, Population and Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Food, Culture and Society: An International Journal of Multidisciplinary Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Annual Review of Food Science and Technology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Nutrition Research Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Nutrients     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Advances in Digestive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Food and Foodways: Explorations in the History and Culture of     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Asian Journal of Clinical Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Nutrition Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
International Journal of Food Sciences and Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Frontiers in Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Ecology of Food and Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Dietary Supplements     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Nutrition Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
International Journal for Vitamin and Nutrition Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Pediatric Obesity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Food and Nutrition Research     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
BMJ Nutrition, Prevention & Health     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
American Journal of Food Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Nutritional Neuroscience : An International Journal on Nutrition, Diet and Nervous System     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Obesity Facts     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Current Nutrition Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Amino Acids     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Nutrition & Food Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Proceedings of the Nutrition Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Nutrition and Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Hunger & Environmental Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of the American College of Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Food and Nutrition Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Food Chemistry and Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Current Research in Nutrition and Food Science     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Food Science and Nutrition Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Current Developments in Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Molecular Nutrition & Food Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Child Health and Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Pharmacy and Nutrition Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Bangladesh Journal of Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Plant Foods for Human Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
South African Journal of Clinical Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Nutrition Bytes     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Nutrition - Science en évolution     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Food Digestion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Genes & Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Metabolism and Nutrition in Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Universal Journal of Food and Nutrition Science     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Nutrition, Pharmacology, Neurological Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Medical Nutrition and Nutraceuticals     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Agriculture, Food Systems, and Community Development     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Frontiers in Sustainable Food Systems     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
PharmaNutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
World Food Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Revista Española de Nutrición Humana y Dietética     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Nutrición Hospitalaria     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Nutrition and Metabolic Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Ernährung & Medizin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Aktuelle Ernährungsmedizin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, Transplant and Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Renal Nutrition and Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Food Quality and Safety     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Endocrinología, Diabetes y Nutrición (English Edition)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Bioactive Carbohydrates and Dietary Fibre     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Perspectivas en Nutrición Humana     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Oil Crop Science     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Nigerian Food Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Open Nutrition Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Revista Chilena de Nutricion     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Pakistan Journal of Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Progress in Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Lifestyle Genomics     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Nutritional & Environmental Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Acta Portuguesa de Nutrição     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Nutritional Science     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Food Frontiers     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Food and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Plant Production Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Human Nutrition & Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Jurnal Gizi dan Dietetik Indonesia : Indonesian Journal of Nutrition and Dietetics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Archive of Food and Nutritional Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Spices and Aromatic Crops     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
European Journal of Nutrition & Food Safety     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Case Reports in Clinical Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Open Obesity Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Amerta Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Food Science and Nutrition Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Endocrinología, Diabetes y Nutrición     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Canadian Food Studies / La Revue canadienne des études sur l'alimentation     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Mexicana de Trastornos Alimentarios     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cahiers de Nutrition et de Diététique     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
The Australian Coeliac     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Jurnal Penelitian Gizi dan Makanan     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
RBONE - Revista Brasileira de Obesidade, Nutrição e Emagrecimento     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
RBNE - Revista Brasileira de Nutrição Esportiva     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian Journal of Nutrition and Dietetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Food and Environmental Virology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Ethnic Foods     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Food & Nutritional Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian Journal of Obesity, Diabetes and Endocrinology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Clinical Nutrition Experimental     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Clinical Nutrition Open Science     Open Access  
Food Hydrocolloids for Health     Open Access  
npj Science of Food     Open Access  
Functional Foods in Health and Disease     Open Access  
Journal of Nutraceuticals and Herbal Medicine     Open Access  
Arab Journal of Nutrition and Exercise     Open Access  
Nutrire     Hybrid Journal  
UNICIÊNCIAS     Open Access  
Lifestyle Journal     Open Access  
Archivos Latinoamericanos de Nutrición     Open Access  
Revista Salud Pública y Nutrición     Open Access  
Open Food Science Journal     Open Access  
Segurança Alimentar e Nutricional     Open Access  
Indonesian Food and Nutrition Progress     Open Access  
Journal of Medicinal Herbs and Ethnomedicine     Open Access  
La Ciencia al Servicio de la Salud y Nutrición     Open Access  
Jurnal Riset Kesehatan     Open Access  
Jurnal Gizi Indonesia / The Indonesian Journal of Nutrition     Open Access  
Hacettepe University Faculty of Health Sciences Journal     Open Access  
Gazi Sağlık Bilimleri Dergisi     Open Access  
Media Gizi Indonesia     Open Access  
Jurnal Gizi Klinik Indonesia     Open Access  
NFS Journal     Open Access  
Journal of Nutrition & Intermediary Metabolism     Open Access  
Food and Waterborne Parasitology     Open Access  
Journal of Nutritional Ecology and Food Research     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Nutritional Disorders & Therapy     Open Access  
DEMETRA : Alimentação, Nutrição & Saúde     Open Access  
Nigerian Journal of Nutritional Sciences     Full-text available via subscription  
African Journal of Biomedical Research     Open Access  
Journal of the Australasian College of Nutritional and Environmental Medicine     Full-text available via subscription  
Médecine & Nutrition     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Sensory Studies     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Muscle Foods     Hybrid Journal  

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Similar Journals
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Canadian Journal of Dietetic Practice and Research
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.419
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 17  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 1486-3847 - ISSN (Online) 2292-9592
Published by Dietitians of Canada Homepage  [1 journal]
  • The future of dietetics starts with education (research)!

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Pages: 103 - 103
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Dietetic Practice and Research, Volume 83, Issue 3, Page 103-103, September 2022.

      Citation: Canadian Journal of Dietetic Practice and Research
      PubDate: 2022-09-01T04:12:51Z
      DOI: 10.3148/cjdpr-2022-032
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Identifiable Dietary Patterns of Pregnant Women: A Canadian Sample

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      Authors: Lydia Tegwyn Mosher, Jamie A. Seabrook, Jasna Twynstra
      Pages: 104 - 111
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Dietetic Practice and Research, Volume 83, Issue 3, Page 104-111, September 2022.
      Purpose: To estimate the percentage of a sample of pregnant women in Canada following a vegetarian, vegan, low-carbohydrate, gluten-free, Mediterranean, or well-balanced diet, before and during pregnancy and to explore if pregnant women received and were satisfied with nutrition information received from health care providers (HCPs).Methods: Participants were conveniently sampled through Facebook and Twitter. An online survey collected data on sociodemographic characteristics, maternal diet, and whether women received and were satisfied with nutrition information from their HCPs. The McNemar test assessed changes in the proportion of diets followed before and during pregnancy.Results: Of 226 women, most followed a well-balanced diet before (76.9%) and during (72.9%) pregnancy (p = 0.26). Vegetarian, gluten-free, vegan, and low-carbohydrate diets were the least followed diets before and during pregnancy (vegetarian: 7.6% vs 5.3%; gluten-free: 4.9% vs 4.0%; vegan: 2.7% vs 2.2%; low-carbohydrate:4.0% vs 0.4%). Overall, the number of women following restrictive diets before pregnancy was significantly reduced throughout pregnancy (19.1% vs 12.0%, p 
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Dietetic Practice and Research
      PubDate: 2022-01-11T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.3148/cjdpr-2021-040
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • “It Literally Can Save Lives”: How Challenging Structural Inequities
           in Sexual Orientation and Gender Priorities Can Create Change in the
           Canadian Dietetic Profession

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      Authors: Nicholas Hickens, Duygu Gunaydin, Drew Burchell, Phillip Joy
      Pages: 112 - 119
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Dietetic Practice and Research, Volume 83, Issue 3, Page 112-119, September 2022.
      Purpose: Our aim was to explore Canadian dietitians’ knowledge, beliefs, and values relating to the nutritional care of Two-Spirit, lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans, and other queer groups (2SLGBTQ+).Methods: The research was qualitative and used a poststructural theoretical lens. Interviews were conducted with 16 Canadian dietitians. Data were analyzed using thematic analysis.Results: Three themes were noted: (i) moving away from the binary; (ii) systemic discrimination and 2SLGBTQ+ experiences; and (iii) professional organizations and advocacy. The participants discussed structural, professional, and cultural barriers that affect the nutrition and health experiences of sexual and gender diverse groups.Conclusion: Dietetic institutions and regulatory bodies must provide sexual and gender diversity resources and engage in activities that acknowledge the lives and nutritional concerns of sexual and gender diverse people. Such advocacy is a means to provide more inclusive and equitable care. Key recommendations for structural changes within the profession include using an intersectional lens and a critical dietetic approach to nutritional care.
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Dietetic Practice and Research
      PubDate: 2022-05-03T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.3148/cjdpr-2022-005
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Adopting Sustainable Menu Practices in Healthcare Institutions: Perceived
           Barriers and Facilitators

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      Authors: Béatrice Dagenais, Annie Marquez, Josée Lavoie, Beth Hunter, Geneviève Mercille
      Pages: 120 - 127
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Dietetic Practice and Research, Volume 83, Issue 3, Page 120-127, September 2022.
      Purpose: The healthcare sector is an important area for sustainable food initiatives, given its inherent mission to heal and its substantial impact on the food system. Foodservice managers can take part in these initiatives by using sustainable menu practices (SMPs). This study aimed to explore managerial perceptions of barriers and facilitators to adopting SMPs in Québec healthcare institutions.Methods: Seventeen foodservice managers were recruited through purposeful sampling to participate in a qualitative semi-structured interview. The Diffusion of Innovations theory was used to assess the main determinants of the diffusion of an innovation (SMPs) through a complex social system (healthcare organization).Results: Participants reported more barriers than facilitators. Lack of support at many levels was recognized as a major hindrance to SMP adoption, as were shortfalls in political directives. Increased collaboration between all food system actors and better communication in healthcare were perceived as needed for increased SMP adoption.Conclusions: This research contributes to an in-depth understanding of managerial experiences in SMP adoption in various regional and healthcare settings. Findings suggest the need for support and strategies that would remove important barriers for foodservice managers and contributed to the development of a guide to support foodservice managers in implementing SMPs.
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Dietetic Practice and Research
      PubDate: 2022-05-03T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.3148/cjdpr-2022-007
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Comprehensive Nutrition Interventions in First Nation-Operated Schools in
           Canada

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      Authors: Christina Gillies, Rosanne Blanchet, Rebecca Gokiert, Anna Farmer, Noreen D. Willows
      Pages: 128 - 132
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Dietetic Practice and Research, Volume 83, Issue 3, Page 128-132, September 2022.
      Comprehensive school-based nutrition interventions offer a promising strategy to support healthy eating for First Nations children. A targeted strategic review was performed to identify nutrition interventions in 514 First Nation-operated schools across Canada through their websites. Directed content analysis was used to describe if interventions used 1 or more of the 4 components of the Comprehensive School Health (CSH) framework. Sixty schools had interventions. Nearly all (n = 56, 93%) schools offered breakfast, snack, and (or) lunch programs (social and physical environment). About one-third provided opportunities for students to learn about traditional healthy Indigenous foods and food procurement methods (n = 18, 30%) (teaching and learning) or facilitated connections between the school and students’ families or the community (n = 16, 27%) (partnerships and services). Few schools (n = 10, 17%) had a nutrition policy outlining permitted foods (school policy). Less than 1% (n = 3) of interventions included all 4 CSH components. Results suggest that most First Nation-operated schools provide children with food, but few have nutrition interventions that include multiple CSH components. First Nation-operated schools may require additional financial and (or) logistical support to implement comprehensive school-based nutrition interventions, which have greater potential to support long-term health outcomes for children than single approaches.
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Dietetic Practice and Research
      PubDate: 2022-01-11T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.3148/cjdpr-2021-039
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Using Nutrition Knowledge and Diet Quality Questionnaires as Screening
           Tools to Identify Female Collegiate Athletes in Need of Dietitian Referral
           

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      Authors: Jensen Skinner, Kaila A. Vento, Carol S. Johnston, Floris C. Wardenaar
      Pages: 133 - 138
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Dietetic Practice and Research, Volume 83, Issue 3, Page 133-138, September 2022.
      The purpose of this study was to evaluate nutrition knowledge and diet quality in collegiate athletes to determine if referral to a sports registered dietitian (RD) is warranted. This cross-sectional study analyzed four sections of the Nutrition for Sport Knowledge Questionnaire and the Rapid Eating Assessment for Patients Questionnaire, both validated in athletic populations. The relationship between nutrition knowledge and diet quality was evaluated. Significance was set at P ≤ 0.05. One hundred and twenty athletes reported a median nutrition score of 52 (45–61), and a dietary quality score of 53 (46–58), with a weak, positive association between both (r = 0.28 (95% CI: 0.11–0.44), P 
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Dietetic Practice and Research
      PubDate: 2022-05-03T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.3148/cjdpr-2022-004
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Dietetic Students’ Perceptions of Learning Professional Competencies
           with Four Simulations Throughout a Semester

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      Authors: Mylène Rosa, Isabelle Giroux
      Pages: 139 - 143
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Dietetic Practice and Research, Volume 83, Issue 3, Page 139-143, September 2022.
      In nursing and medicine, taking part in simulation activities has been shown to be beneficial for students’ learning; however, little has been documented in dietetics. This study aimed to document the perceived effect of 4 simulations on development of professional competencies by dietetic students. A mixed-method convergent approach was used with pre- and post-questionnaires, interviews, and a focus group discussion to look at dietetic students’ perceptions of learning as part of a Nutrition Assessment course. Nonparametric tests for questionnaires and theme analysis for transcripts were used to examine data. After analysis, data were compared and merged for interpretation. Results showed that participants perceived a significant increase in comprehension of various competencies with simulations. In interviews and a focus group, a participant subgroup (n = 7) perceived an enriched understanding of some dietetic competencies compared with pre-simulations. Simulations seemed to have transformed classroom concepts to a more practical understanding of dietetic practice. More studies are needed to identify if these results could be replicated in different settings. Simulations had a positive effect on students’ perception of competencies development and may be an andragogical tool of choice to support preparing future dietitians for entry to practice.
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Dietetic Practice and Research
      PubDate: 2022-05-03T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.3148/cjdpr-2022-006
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Impact of the COVID-19-induced shift to online dietetics training on PDEP
           competency acquisition and mental health

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      Authors: Kelsey Van, David M. Beauchamp, Hiba Rachid, Marina Mansour, Brooklyne Buckley, Debora Choi, Alexia Prescod, Jennifer M. Monk
      Pages: 144 - 146
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Dietetic Practice and Research, Volume 83, Issue 3, Page 144-146, September 2022.
      Purpose: A pilot study to investigate the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic and shift to online learning and practicum training on dietetics students’ perceptions of Partnership for Dietetic Education and Practice (PDEP) competency acquisition and mental health.Methods: Dietetics students (n = 19) at the University of Guelph (2020–2021) were invited to complete an anonymous online survey to assess self-reported online dietetics practicum training experiences including (i) benefits and challenges, (ii) PDEP competency acquisition, and (iii) impact on mental health.Results: The benefits of online dietetics training included schedule flexibility (42.1%), reduced commute time (31.6%), and acquiring virtual counselling experience (21.1%). Reported challenges were insufficient communication with preceptors (36.8%), increased project workload (57.9%), and technology (15.8%). In online practicum placements, 52.6% of dietetics students reported adequately acquiring all PDEP competencies, with Nutrition Care identified as the most challenging to obtain (63.2%). A negative impact on mental health and increased levels of stress/anxiety were reported in 94.7% of trainees. Notably, 63.2% of students favoured continuation of online dietetics training through a hybrid or entirely online format.Conclusion: Online dietetics training has the potential to complement the traditional in-person model; however, further adaptation is required to optimize PDEP competency acquisition and students’ mental health.
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Dietetic Practice and Research
      PubDate: 2022-05-03T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.3148/cjdpr-2022-002
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Benefits of a Standardized Enteral Feeding Protocol on the Nutrition and
           Health Outcomes of Very Low Birth Weight Preterm Infants

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      Authors: Rhea D’Costa, Sandra Fucile, Brittany Dickson, Alessia Gallipoli, Kimberly E Dow
      Pages: 147 - 150
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Dietetic Practice and Research, Volume 83, Issue 3, Page 147-150, September 2022.
      Purpose: To compare nutrition and health outcomes before and after implementing a standardized enteral feeding protocol on nutrition and health outcomes in very low birth weight preterm infants.Methods: A retrospective chart review was performed evaluating preterm infants, born less than 34 weeks gestation and weighing less than 1500 g, before and after the implementation of a standardized enteral feeding protocol. Outcomes included weaning of parenteral nutrition, initiation and advancement of enteral feeds, initiation of human-milk fortifier (HMF), change in weight z-score and neonatal morbidities.Results: Fifty-six infants (30 in pre-group, 26 in post-group) met the inclusion criteria. Infants in the standardized enteral feeding protocol group started enteral feeds earlier (p = 0.039) and received full HMF fortification at lower weights (p = 0.033) than those in the pre-group. Fewer days on continuous positive airway pressure (p = 0.021) and lower rates of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (p = 0.018) were also observed in the post-group. Weaning of parenteral nutrition and weight z-score were not significantly different between groups. There were no differences in other morbidities.Conclusion: Study results suggest that adopting a standardized enteral feeding protocol may promote early initiation of enteral feeds and fortification.
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Dietetic Practice and Research
      PubDate: 2022-05-03T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.3148/cjdpr-2022-003
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Predictors of Tri-council Funding Among Nutrition Researchers in Canada

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      Authors: Natalie D. Riediger, Maria Kisselgoff, Maureen Cooper, Kelsey Mann, Hannah Derksen, Maria Gaddi, Patti Glazer
      Pages: 1 - 8
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Dietetic Practice and Research, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: Barriers in research for women and dietitians have been documented. We sought to describe tri-council funding awarded within the nutrition discipline according to institution type, academic rank, gender, dietitian status, and primary research methods used.Methods: Using an online search methodology, faculty members with research appointments were identified from nutrition departments offering accredited dietetic programs and/or at Canada’s collective of research-intensive universities known as U15. All data regarding faculty members, their institutions, and funding were collected through publicly available websites and Scopus. Tri-council funding associated with the nominated principal investigator, from a 5-year period, 2013–2014 to 2017–2018, was extracted. Binary logistic regression was used to test for predictors of receiving any tri-council operating funds within the 5-year period.Results: Faculty members (n = 237) from 21 institutions were identified for inclusion. Those from U15 institutions, at the full professor rank, nondietitians, men, and those who engaged in primarily quantitative research methods (vs. qualitative or mixed-methods) were significantly more likely to hold any tri-council funding during the eligible period. Dietitians (n = 76) were significantly less likely to hold tri-council funding, independent of institution, rank, gender, and primary research methods utilized.Conclusions: The apparent under-funding of academic dietitians from federal tri-council sources requires exploration.
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Dietetic Practice and Research
      PubDate: 2022-08-28T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.3148/cjdpr-2022-020
       
  • Body Satisfaction and Associated Predictors Among Baby Boomer Women in
           Rural and Urban Manitoba

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      Authors: Nikki Hawrylyshen, Christina Lengyel
      Pages: 1 - 8
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Dietetic Practice and Research, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: This study examines body satisfaction, weight attitudes, dieting behaviours, and aging concerns of baby boomer women (BBW; born 1946–1965) from rural and urban Manitoba.Methods: Primary data collection occurred November 2015, and 1083 participants completed the Body Image and Food Choice Survey. Four strata of BBW were represented to examine differences between older and younger BBW and location of residence. Multinomial logistic regression models were fit to determine predictors of weight and appearance satisfaction. Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were considered significant at p ≤ 0.05.Results: Fifty-three percent of participants were satisfied with their appearance, whereas only 34% were satisfied with their weight. Ninety-one percent desired to lose weight (29.9 ± 29.3 lbs). Aging anxiety was evident for 46% of participants and associated with appearance satisfaction (χ2 = 27.46, df = 4, p 
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Dietetic Practice and Research
      PubDate: 2022-08-25T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.3148/cjdpr-2022-013
       
  • Perceptions and Experiences of Nutrition Interventions in Individuals with
           Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) and their Caregivers

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      Authors: Leland Guillemin, Jessica Hofstede, Teigan Anderson, Hailey Walkeden, Kerri Schellenberg, Ester Kang, Dayna Berry, Stephanie Lefebvre, Jessica RL Lieffers
      Pages: 1 - 5
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Dietetic Practice and Research, Ahead of Print.
      Nutrition concerns are prevalent in individuals with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS). Despite the prevalence of nutrition concerns, few data are available on perceptions and experiences of nutrition interventions in individuals with ALS and their caregivers; this study aimed to collect this information. An online survey was developed and hosted on Survey Monkey®. Individuals with ALS and their caregivers from Saskatchewan, Canada, were invited to complete the survey through email to attendees of the ALS Clinic (Saskatoon, Canada), and via the ALS Society of Saskatchewan Facebook page in February–March, 2021. Quantitative data were analyzed using descriptive statistics. Twelve eligible respondents completed the survey (n = 10 individuals with ALS; n = 2 caregivers). The present study found nutrition was important to respondents and there was interest in trying diets and supplements for ALS management; of note, many respondents were interested in exploring the ketogenic diet. Six (50%) respondents had weight loss concerns. All respondents would recommend consulting with a dietitian upon being diagnosed with ALS. Many respondents reported a predefined negative perception of tube feeding. The results of this study suggest that increasing the accessibility of dietitians could positively impact ALS-related care. The findings also provide guidance for dietitians to enhance nutrition care for individuals with ALS.
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Dietetic Practice and Research
      PubDate: 2022-08-25T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.3148/cjdpr-2022-014
       
  • Family Feeding Practices of Parents on Prince Edward Island: A Focus on
           Responsive Feeding

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      Authors: Katrina A. Nagge, Sarah Finch, Melissa D. Rossiter
      Pages: 1 - 5
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Dietetic Practice and Research, Ahead of Print.
      The home environment and parental influence are strong predictors of eating behaviours in young children and can influence healthy development. The objective of this study was to describe the feeding practices of a sample of families on Prince Edward Island. Eleven parent participants were recruited, one-on-one interviews were held, and a thematic analysis was conducted. Conversations with parents revealed that the family feeding environment is influenced by a multitude of factors that change daily and need to be navigated based on the age of the child. Parents saw family meals as time together and an opportunity to model healthy eating behaviours; however, they faced several challenges at mealtimes, including perceived picky eating. Parents recognized their children’s hunger and satiety cues, although they respected satiety signals more often if children ate what they perceived as a lot of food. Many parents used food as a reward to encourage their children to eat more but recognized that it could lead to the development of undesirable habits. Despite the complex factors that influence feeding, dietitians can work with families to foster a responsive feeding environment by encouraging family meals, recognizing and respecting hunger and satiety cues, and understanding typical changes in eating behaviours as children age.
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Dietetic Practice and Research
      PubDate: 2022-08-25T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.3148/cjdpr-2022-015
       
  • Dietitian Involvement Improves Consumption of Oral Nutrition Supplements
           in Hospitalized Patients

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      Authors: Osman Mohamed Elfadil, Saketh R. Velapati, Lisa D. Miller, Michael F. Huiras, Evan A. Stoecker, Morgan Warner, Laura Vanderveer, Ashley Adkins, Christopher Chargo, Katherine Kueny, Molly S. Bailey, Ryan T. Hurt, Manpreet S. Mundi
      Pages: 1 - 5
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Dietetic Practice and Research, Ahead of Print.
      Hospitalized patients are at an increased risk of malnutrition due to multiple factors including, but not limited to, acute and chronic diseases especially those affecting gastrointestinal tract, surgery, appetite, and frequent nil per os while undergoing diagnostic workup. Because of this, guidelines suggest the use of oral nutritional supplements (ONS) in hospitalized patients to reduce the risk of malnutrition and its complications. The current report aims to highlights key findings from a cross-sectional survey of 99 hospitalized patients who were at risk for or diagnosed with malnutrition and prescribed ONS. Data regarding ONS prescriber information as well as number ordered and consumed were collected. Of the 2.4 ± 1.5 supplements ordered per person each day, only 1.3 ± 1.1 were consumed, and there was 48% wastage of prescribed ONS. However, dietitian involvement was associated with significant reduction in wastage. Given the need and benefit, it is imperative for the nutrition community to further explore best practices to improve ONS consumption.
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Dietetic Practice and Research
      PubDate: 2022-08-25T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.3148/cjdpr-2022-016
       
  • Comparison of Responsive Feeding Practices in Child Care and Home
           Environments in Nova Scotia

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      Authors: Jessie-Lee D. Mcisaac, Brenna Richard, Joan Turner, Melissa D. Rossiter
      Pages: 1 - 7
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Dietetic Practice and Research, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: The values, beliefs and practices between the family home and child care environment can play a role in shaping a responsive food environment for young children, but few studies have explored the differences across these settings. The purpose of this study was to compare responsive feeding practices in child care and home environments through the framework of the 2019 Canada Food Guide healthy eating recommendations.Methods: Nova Scotia families and child care providers completed an online survey on responsive feeding. Independent-samples t-tests explored the differences between family and child care respondents on variables related to the 2019 Canada’s Food Guide, including: food variety, mindfulness, eating with others, cooking more often, and enjoyment of food. A directed content analysis was used to code the open-ended qualitative questions.Results: Family respondents (n = 603) were more likely to report offering a variety of foods, repeated exposures to new foods, and asking children about fullness. Child care respondents (n = 253) were more likely to sit with children during meals and less likely to encourage children to finish their food.Conclusions: The results identify potential points of intervention, including the importance of increasing communication to ensure mutually supportive messages and environments for healthy eating.
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Dietetic Practice and Research
      PubDate: 2022-08-25T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.3148/cjdpr-2022-017
       
  • Awareness of Canada’s Food Guide Among Canadian Youth

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      Authors: Adèle Corkum, Lana Vanderlee, Christine M. White, David Hammond
      Pages: 1 - 5
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Dietetic Practice and Research, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: Canada’s Food Guide (CFG) contains recommendations for healthy eating for Canadians. The objective was to examine the awareness of and learning about CFG by Canadian youth.Methods: Cross-sectional online surveys were conducted with 3,674 youth aged 10–17 years in Canada in November/December 2019. Logistic binary regression models examined awareness of CFG, learning about CFG in school, and learning about healthy eating in schools in the past 12 months.Results: Most participants reported hearing of CFG (84.5%), learning about CFG in school (86.6%), and learning about healthy eating in school (65.4%) in the past 12 months. Awareness of CFG was higher among females (OR: 1.61; 95% CI: 1.32–1.96), older youth (1.70; 1.39–2.07), and those in Atlantic Canada (OR: 1.77; 95% CI: 1.10, 2.84). Significantly fewer East/Southeast Asian, South Asian, Latino, and Middle Eastern participants reported hearing of CFG compared to white participants (p 
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Dietetic Practice and Research
      PubDate: 2022-08-25T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.3148/cjdpr-2022-019
       
  • Facteurs influençant l’apport alimentaire en rations des soldats
           canadiens dans l’Arctique : un sondage national

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      Authors: Florence V. Lavergne, Raphaëlle Laroche-Nantel, Denis Prud’Homme, Isabelle Giroux
      Pages: 1 - 4
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Dietetic Practice and Research, Ahead of Print.
      Objectif. Documenter la perception des soldats des Forces armées canadiennes (FAC) quant aux facteurs influençant leur apport alimentaire en rations de combat durant leur travail en Arctique.Méthodes. Un questionnaire bilingue électronique a été envoyé nationalement à des soldats s’étant entraînés dans l’Arctique entre 2015 et 2018. Il comportait 6 questions ouvertes et 33 fermées sur les facteurs influençant l’apport alimentaire et l’acceptabilité des rations.Résultats. Parmi les 54 questionnaires remplis (taux de réponse : 31 %), 6 étaient incomplets et ont été exclus. L’échantillon final était composé de 48 militaires de neuf provinces ayant en moyenne 12,1 ± 6,8 années d’expérience dans les FAC. Les facteurs ayant le plus d’effets négatifs sur l’apport alimentaire étaient la température des aliments, le fait de manger en se déplaçant, l’horaire des exercices et activités, ainsi que l’équipement nécessaire à la préparation et à la consommation. Les participants ont déclaré avoir consommé entre 61 et 71 % des rations. Ils ont noté qu’un temps considérable était nécessaire pour préparer les rations puisqu’elles étaient congelées. Soixante-cinq pour cent des soldats ont rapporté une perte de poids durant leur travail dans l’Arctique.Conclusions. Une multitude de facteurs a influencé l’apport et les pratiques alimentaires des soldats. Ces résultats guideront les recherches futures et aideront à la prise de décisions concernant de possibles changements aux rations en Arctique.
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Dietetic Practice and Research
      PubDate: 2022-08-25T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.3148/cjdpr-2022-021
       
  • Impact of COVID-19 School-Related Policies in Ontario on Parents’
           School Lunch Packing Habits

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      Authors: Alanna Shwed, Brianne O’Rourke, Brenda Bruner, Kristen Ferguson
      Pages: 1 - 7
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Dietetic Practice and Research, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: COVID-19 has disrupted the daily routines of many Canadian families. In Ontario, provincially mandated public health measures have resulted in significant changes to school policies, including those related to food. The impact of COVID-19 related school food policies on parental lunch packing habits is unknown; therefore, this study investigated how school-related COVID-19 policies have impacted parental school lunch packing habits.Methods: Parents (N = 287) of school-aged children were recruited from parent-specific Facebook groups across Ontario, Canada, to complete an online survey regarding lunch packing habits. This survey was developed based on findings from a previously conducted scoping review. Open-ended survey responses were inductively analyzed.Results: Three over-arching themes were constructed: (1) Food Programs and COVID-19; (2) Schedule Changes; and (3) School Policy Changes. Parents explained that the cancellation or modification of food programs at schools, changes to the length of time children are given to eat at school, and removal of access to microwaves, garbage cans, and teacher assistance during lunch have forced parents to change their lunch packing habits.Conclusion: Findings from this study demonstrate a need for better support to help ease the burden parents experience when packing their child’s school lunch, during an already extremely stressful time.
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Dietetic Practice and Research
      PubDate: 2022-08-25T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.3148/cjdpr-2022-022
       
  • Breakfast Quality of Preschool-aged Canadian Children

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      Authors: Erin K. Smith, Rebecca Lewis, Andrea C. Buchholz, Jess Haines, David W. L. Ma, Alison M. Duncan
      Pages: 1 - 4
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Dietetic Practice and Research, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: To investigate the breakfast quality of preschool-aged children through a comparison of their energy and nutrient intakes at breakfast to published benchmarks for a balanced breakfast.Methods: Dietary data were collected for 163 children aged 3–5 years enrolled in the Guelph Family Health Study using one parent-reported online 24-hour recall and analyzed for energy and nutrient intakes. Breakfast quality was assessed by tallying the frequency of participants whose nutrient and energy intakes at their breakfast meal met the recommendations for a balanced breakfast established by the International Breakfast Research Initiative (IRBI).Results: Almost all participants (98%) consumed breakfast, and most participants (82.5%) met the energy IRBI recommendation. However, the majority of participants did not meet the IRBI recommendations for breakfast intakes of most macronutrients and micronutrients. In particular, fewer than 25% of participants met the IRBI recommendations for breakfast intakes of dietary fibre, niacin, folate, vitamin C, calcium, potassium and zinc.Conclusions: Almost all preschool-aged children in this study consumed breakfast, but the nutritional quality of their breakfast did not meet recommendations for most nutrients. These results can inform nutrition education and intervention programs for children that aim to improve the nutritional quality of breakfast.
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Dietetic Practice and Research
      PubDate: 2022-08-25T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.3148/cjdpr-2022-023
       
  • Mapping the Roles of Nutrition and Dietetics Professionals in Sustainable
           Food Systems and Exploring Opportunities for Strategic Collaboration

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      Authors: Lindsay Goodridge, Liesel Carlsson, Edith G. Callaghan
      Pages: 1 - 5
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Dietetic Practice and Research, Ahead of Print.
      Current food systems drive environmental damage, social injustices, and undermine health, and these challenges are complex and seemingly intractable. Collaboration is required to transition to more sustainable food systems (SFS). Registered Dietitians and Nutritionists (RDs) are an under-leveraged and well-positioned group to contribute to addressing food systems challenges because of their locations in the system and their existing skillsets. Drawing on research with dietitians, this perspective paper presents both a theoretical proposal as well as collective expertise in supporting sustainable development of the global food system. It highlights where RDs work in food systems with the aim to reveal multiple points of entry where RDs can and do contribute to SFS across food systems, approaches to apply, as well as opportunities for collaboration within and beyond the profession. Educational and societal barriers exist that prevent systematic RD engagement; however, examples of established work provide models to follow.
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Dietetic Practice and Research
      PubDate: 2022-05-03T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.3148/cjdpr-2022-008
       
  • Comparison of diet quality tools to assess nutritional adequacy for adults
           living with kidney disease

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      Authors: Kelly Picard, Peter A. Senior, Ashley Wilmott, Kailash Jindal, Caroline Richard, Diana R. Mager
      Pages: 1 - 6
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Dietetic Practice and Research, Ahead of Print.
      There is no specific diet quality tool recommended for adults living with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Identifying how diet quality tools assess nutritional adequacy and correlate with potassium and phosphorus (nutrients of interest in CKD) is warranted. Our aim was to compare Mediterranean Diet Scores (MDS), Healthy Eating Index (HEI), and Healthy Food Diversity (HFD) to determine their correlation with nutrient intake in adults living with diabetes and CKD. Using data from a longitudinal study of 50 participants with diabetes and CKD, diet quality was assessed at baseline and 1 or more times at annual visits up to 5 years (complete diet records n = 178). Diet quality was investigated for correlation with nutrient intake. Compared with HEI and HFD, MDS was poorly correlated with nutrient intake (all r values 
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Dietetic Practice and Research
      PubDate: 2022-05-03T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.3148/cjdpr-2022-009
       
  • Creating “Plates” to Evaluate Canadians’ Dietary Intake in Relation
           to the 2019 Canada’s Food Guide

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      Authors: Rachel Prowse, Natalie Doan, Anne Philipneri, Justin Thielman, Salma Hack, Dan W. Harrington, Mahsa Jessri
      Pages: 1 - 8
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Dietetic Practice and Research, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: Explore Canadians’ dietary intake in relation to the 2019 Canada’s Food Guide (CFG) Plate using novel volume-based food analyses, by age and meal occasion.Methods: Foods reported in 24-hour recalls by 20,456 Canadians in the 2015 Canadian Community Health Survey – Nutrition were classified as: Vegetables and Fruits, Whole Grain Foods, Protein Foods, Non-Whole Grain Foods or Other Foods (high in fat, sugar, sodium). Food volumes were used to calculate percent contributions of each grouping to total intake, stratified by age (1–6; 7–12; 13–17; 18–64; 65+years) and meal (breakfast, lunch, supper, snack), applying sample survey weights and bootstrapping.Results: By volume, the Canadian population diet included: 29% Vegetables and Fruits, 22% Protein Foods, 7% Whole Grains, 24% Non-Whole Grain Foods, and 18% Other Foods. Intakes of Protein Foods (1–6 years) and Other Foods (7–12; 13–17 years) were higher in children than adults by volume, relative to total intake. Whole Grains intake was highest at breakfast. Other Foods intake was highest at snack.Conclusions: The volume-based population diet of Canadians reported on a single day includes a substantial proportion of non-recommended foods. There are opportunities to design interventions that target specific foods, ages, and meals to align intake with recommendations.
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Dietetic Practice and Research
      PubDate: 2022-05-03T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.3148/cjdpr-2022-010
       
  • Food Environment and Youth Intake May Influence Uptake of Gluten-Free Food
           Guide Recommendations in Celiac Disease

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      Authors: Samantha Cyrkot, Dominica Gidrewicz, Sven Anders, Margaret Marcon, Justine M. Turner, Diana R. Mager
      Pages: 1 - 7
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Dietetic Practice and Research, Ahead of Print.
      A gluten-free (GF) food guide for children and youth (4–18 years) living with celiac disease (CD) has been developed and extensively evaluated by stakeholders, including registered dietitians. A case study analysis was conducted on data from 16 households of youth with CD to examine how factors related to parental food literacy, the home food environment, and food purchasing patterns may influence food guide uptake by Canadian youth with CD and their families. Households were of higher socioeconomic status, parents had good food literacy, and the home food availability of fruits, vegetables and GF grains was diverse. However, households also had a diverse supply of convenience foods and snack options. Youth reported consuming a larger proportion of these foods (>35% dietary intake) and had suboptimal diet quality. Dietary intake of fruits and vegetables were below GF plate model recommendations by over 30%. Despite limited economical barriers, good parental food literacy, and diverse food availability, meeting fruit and vegetable recommendations based on the pediatric GF food guide remains a major challenge. Findings inform that effective strategies and healthy public policies to support the uptake of GF food guide recommendations are needed to improve the health outcomes of youth with CD.
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Dietetic Practice and Research
      PubDate: 2022-05-03T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.3148/cjdpr-2022-011
       
  • Cheese Intake is Inversely Associated with LDL Cholesterol in Young
           Children

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      Authors: Justin Sheremeta, David W.L. MA, Jess Haines, Alison M. Duncan, Gerarda Darlington, Genevieve Newton, Andrea C. Buchholz
      Pages: 1 - 4
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Dietetic Practice and Research, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: To determine if intake (servings/day) of total dairy and/or dairy subtypes (milk, cheese, and yogurt) were associated with biomarkers related to dyslipidemia, insulin sensitivity and inflammation in a sample of cardio-metabolically healthy young children from the Guelph Family Health Study at the University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, Canada.Methods: Baseline data from 42 children (aged 2.0–6.2 years) from 33 families who provided a dietary assessment and a fasted blood sample were included in this cross-sectional analysis. Linear and logistic regressions using generalized estimating equations were used for analysis and models were adjusted for age, gender, and household income.Results: In total, 42 children (3.74 ± 1.23 years old; mean (± SD)) consumed median (25th percentile, 75th percentile) servings/day of 1.70 (1.16, 2.81) for total dairy, 0.74 (0.50, 1.70) for milk, 0.63 (0.00, 1.16) for cheese, and 0.00 (0.00, 0.38) for yogurt. Cheese intake was significantly inversely associated with LDL cholesterol (−0.16 (95% CI: −0.29, −0.03) mmol/L per serving; P = 0.02)). No other associations between dairy intake and biomarkers were significant.Conclusions: Cheese intake was inversely associated with LDL cholesterol in this preliminary study of cardio-metabolically healthy young children, thereby warranting further research on dairy intake and cardiometabolic risk factors.
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Dietetic Practice and Research
      PubDate: 2022-05-03T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.3148/cjdpr-2022-012
       
 
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