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  Subjects -> NUTRITION AND DIETETICS (Total: 201 journals)
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Nutrition Reviews
Journal Prestige (SJR): 2.499
Citation Impact (citeScore): 6
Number of Followers: 36  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0029-6643 - ISSN (Online) 1753-4887
Published by Oxford University Press Homepage  [419 journals]
  • The association between dietary patterns and the novel inflammatory
           markers platelet-activating factor and lipoprotein-associated
           phospholipase A2: a systematic review

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      Authors: English C; Mayr H, Lohning A, et al.
      Pages: 1371 - 1391
      Abstract: AbstractContextAtherosclerosis is a disease of chronic inflammation. Recent research has identified 2 novel inflammatory biomarkers: platelet-activating factor (PAF) and lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2). Diet has been proposed as a mediator of inflammation, but to date, the focus for these novel biomarkers has been on individual foods and nutrients rather than overall dietary patterns.ObjectiveTo systematically review the literature on the association between dietary patterns and PAF and Lp-PLA2.Data SourcesThe PubMed, Embase, CINAHL, and Cochrane CENTRAL literature databases were searched.Data AnalysisStudy quality was evaluated using the Quality Criteria Checklist. Sixteen studies (n = 4 observational and n = 12 interventional) were included and assessed for associations between dietary patterns and PAF and Lp-PLA2.ConclusionStudy quality varied from neutral (n = 10) to positive (n = 6). Mediterranean, heart healthy, and vegetarian dietary patterns were associated with improved levels of PAF and Lp-PLA2. Conversely, Western dietary patterns were less favorable. A range of well-established, healthier dietary patterns may lower inflammation and the risk of atherosclerosis. More well-designed studies are needed to confirm these findings and identify other dietary patterns that improve inflammation.
      PubDate: Thu, 05 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/nutrit/nuab051
      Issue No: Vol. 80, No. 6 (2022)
       
  • Nutritional screening tool for critically ill children: a systematic
           review

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      Authors: Ventura J; Silveira T, Bechard L, et al.
      Pages: 1392 - 1418
      Abstract: AbstractContextNutritional screening tools (NSTs) are used to identify patients who are at risk of nutritional status (NS) deterioration and associated clinical outcomes. Several NSTs have been developed for hospitalized children; however, none of these were specifically developed for Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) patients.ObjectiveA systematic review of studies describing the development, application, and validation of NSTs in hospitalized children was conducted to critically appraise their role in PICU patients.Data SourcesPubMed, Embase, Web of Science, Scopus, SciELO, LILACS, and Google Scholar were searched from inception to December 11, 2020.Data ExtractionThe review included 103 studies that applied NSTs at hospital admission. The NST characteristics collected included the aims, clinical setting, variables, and outcomes. The suitability of the NSTs in PICU patients was assessed based on a list of variables deemed relevant for this population.Data AnalysisFrom 19 NSTs identified, 13 aimed to predict NS deterioration. Five NSTs were applied in PICU patients, but none was validated for this population. NSTs did not include clinical, NS, laboratory, or dietary variables that were deemed relevant for the PICU population.ConclusionNone of the available NSTs were found to be suitable for critically ill children, so a new NST should be developed for this population. AQ6Systematic Review RegistrationPROSPERO registration no. CRD42020167898.
      PubDate: Wed, 04 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/nutrit/nuab075
      Issue No: Vol. 80, No. 6 (2022)
       
  • Technology-based nutrition interventions using the Mediterranean diet: a
           systematic review

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      Authors: Benajiba N; Dodge E, Khaled M, et al.
      Pages: 1419 - 1433
      Abstract: AbstractContextOver the past 2 decades, overweight and obesity rates have increased exponentially, along with related comorbidities including type 2 diabetes, hypertension, cardiovascular disease, and some cancers. The Mediterranean Diet (MDiet) has been suggested as a potential way to mitigate the health burdens related to overweight and obesity.ObjectiveFor this review, the literature on MDiet-focused digital interventions was examined to determine efficacy, best practices, and potential limitations.Data SourcesThe search was conducted across 15 databases for relevant publications published through April 2020 in English, French, Spanish, Arabic, or Italian.Data ExtractionPreferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines were followed using a combination of keywords and phrases and evaluated independently for relevance, merit, and inclusion and exclusion criteria.Data AnalysisThe systematic literature review resulted in 15 articles that met the search criteria. Ten interventions were delivered online, and 5 were delivered via smartphone using an app. The majority of online MDiet-focused interventions were effective, particularly when modeled after evidence-based and best-practice online nutrition education interventions. Such interventions also are effective for promoting positive health behaviors and health outcomes, such as increased physical activity, increased levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and a lower total high-density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio.ConclusionTechnology-based interventions to educate and promote adherence to the MDiet are successful in helping individuals achieve the stated outcomes. More research is needed to determine the efficacy of MDiet interventions delivered via smartphone apps.
      PubDate: Wed, 04 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/nutrit/nuab076
      Issue No: Vol. 80, No. 6 (2022)
       
  • Nutrition as a modifiable factor in the onset and progression of pulmonary
           function impairment in COPD: a systematic review

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      Authors: van Iersel L; Beijers R, Gosker H, et al.
      Pages: 1434 - 1444
      Abstract: ContextChronic obstructive lung disease (COPD) is a progressive lung disease characterized by persistent airflow limitation. An increasing amount of evidence suggests an effect of dietary quality on the risk of COPD in the general population and pulmonary function decline in patients with COPD.ObjectiveThe association of dietary intake and nutrient status with COPD risk and onset, as well as pulmonary function decline (change in forced expiratory volume in 1 second, forced vital capacity, or the ratio of the former to the latter) in patients with COPD was investigated in this systematic review.Data SourcesThe PubMed database was searched by combining terms of pulmonary function or COPD with diet, nutrient status, or nutritional supplementation.Data ExtractionOriginal studies and systematic reviews and meta-analyses were included. Articles obtained were independently screened for relevance on the bases of title and abstract by 2 researchers. Eventually, 89 articles were included in the analysis.ResultsThe unhealthy Western-style diet is associated with an increased risk of COPD and an accelerated decline of pulmonary function. Intake of fruit, vegetables, dietary fibers, vitamins C and E, polyphenols, and β-carotene were individually associated with lower COPD risk, whereas consumption of processed meat was associated with higher COPD risk. Data on the effect of dietary quality on pulmonary function decline in patients with COPD are limited and inconsistent. Strong evidence for beneficial effects on pulmonary function decline was found only for vitamin D supplementation.ConclusionConsidering the increasing burden of COPD, more attention should be given to dietary quality as a modifiable factor in disease development and progression in patients with COPD.Systematic Review RegistrationPROSPERO registration no. CRD42021240183.
      PubDate: Wed, 04 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/nutrit/nuab077
      Issue No: Vol. 80, No. 6 (2022)
       
  • Fish intake, n-3 fatty acid body status, and risk of cognitive decline: a
           systematic review and a dose–response meta-analysis of observational and
           experimental studies

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      Authors: Kosti R; Kasdagli M, Kyrozis A, et al.
      Pages: 1445 - 1458
      Abstract: AbstractContextRandomized controlled trials (RCTs) testing supplementation with eicosapentaenoic (EPA) and docosahexaenoic (DHA) fatty acids have failed to provide evidence supporting a suggested inverse association between fish intake and dementia risk.ObjectiveDose–response analyses were conducted to evaluate associations between fish intake, all-cause dementia or Alzheimer’s Disease (AD), and the effect of EPA/DHA supplementation on cognitive performance.Data SourcesPubMed, Scopus and Web of Science databases were searched for original research evaluating either associations between fish intake and dementia or AD, or the impact of EPA and/or DHA supplementation on the risk of cognitive decline.Data ExtractionData were collected on study characteristics and methods; number of cases/deaths (for observational studies); categories of exposure; model covariates; risk estimates from the most-adjusted model; type and dosage of supplementation (from RCTs); fatty acid levels in blood; and differences in cognition test results before and after supplementation. Risk of bias was assessed through the ROBINS-E and RoB2.0 tools for observational and experimental studies, respectively.Data AnalysisWeighted mixed-effects models were applied, allowing for the inclusion of studies with 2 levels of exposure. Based on findings with low/moderate risk of bias, fish intake of up to 2 portions (250 g) per week was associated with a 10% reduction (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.79, 1.02, Ν = 5) in all-cause dementia and a 30% reduction (95% CI: 0.54, 0.89, Ν = 3) in AD risk. Changes in EPA and DHA body status had a positive impact on participants’ executive functions, but not on their overall cognitive performance.ConclusionThe protection offered by fish intake against cognitive decline levels off at intakes higher than 2 portions/week and likely relates to the impact of EPA and DHA on the individual’s executive functions, although there remain questions about the mechanisms linking the short- and long-term effects.Systematic Review RegistrationPROSPERO registration no. CRD42019139528.
      PubDate: Wed, 04 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/nutrit/nuab078
      Issue No: Vol. 80, No. 6 (2022)
       
  • The association between later eating rhythm and adiposity in children and
           adolescents: a systematic review and meta-analysis

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      Authors: Zou M; Northstone K, Perry R, et al.
      Pages: 1459 - 1479
      Abstract: AbstractContextChildhood adiposity, an important predictor of adult chronic disease, has been rising dramatically. Later eating rhythm, termed night eating, is increasing in adults but rarely studied in younger ages.ObjectiveThe objective of this study was to review the association between later eating rhythm and adiposity in children and adolescents. The aspects of later eating being considered included: energy intake (for evening main meal, evening snack, whole evening period, and around bedtime); timing (any food eaten at later timing); and meal frequency in the evening/night (evening main meal skipping, evening snack consumption).Data SourcesFive databases (the Cochrane Library, CINAHL, Embase, MEDLINE (via OVID), and Web of Science) were searched for eligible articles published prior to and including August 2020.Data ExtractionData extraction and quality assessment were conducted by 2 reviewers independently.Data AnalysisForty-seven studies were included, all of which were observational. Meta-analysis showed positive associations between both higher energy intake around bedtime (odds ratio [OR] 1.19, 95% CI 1.06, 1.33) and evening main meal skipping (OR 1.30, 95% CI 1.14, 1.48), and adiposity. There was evidence to suggest that consuming evening snacks reduced adiposity, but it was very weak (OR 0.80, 95% CI 0.62, 1.05). No association was seen between eating later and adiposity (OR 1.04, 95% CI 0.68, 1.61). In the narrative analysis, approximately half of the studies suggested that there was no association between later eating rhythm and adiposity, either as a whole or within exposure subsets.ConclusionThe magnitude of the relationship between later eating rhythm and adiposity is very small, and may vary depending on which aspects of later eating rhythm are under consideration; however, the evidence for this conclusion is of very low certainty . Further research with a more consistent definition of “later timing”, and longitudinal studies in different populations, may lead to different conclusions.Systematic Review RegistrationPROSPERO registration no. CRD42019134187.
      PubDate: Wed, 04 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/nutrit/nuab079
      Issue No: Vol. 80, No. 6 (2022)
       
  • How cost-effective is nutrition care delivered in primary healthcare
           settings' A systematic review of trial-based economic evaluations

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      Authors: Barnes K; Szewczyk Z, Kelly J, et al.
      Pages: 1480 - 1496
      Abstract: AbstractContextNutrition care is an effective lifestyle intervention for the treatment and prevention of many noncommunicable diseases. Primary care is a high-value setting in which to provide nutrition care.ObjectiveThe objective of this review was to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of nutrition care interventions provided in primary care settings.Data SourcesMedline, Embase, the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, EconLit, and the National Health Service Economic Evaluation Database (NHS EED) were searched from inception to May 2021.Data ExtractionData extraction was guided by the Consolidated Health Economic Evaluation Reporting Standards (CHEERS) reporting guidelines. Randomized trials of nutrition interventions in primary care settings were included in the analysis if incremental cost-effectiveness ratios were reported. The main outcome variable incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) and reported interpretations were used to categorize interventions by the cost-effectiveness plane quadrant.ResultsOf 6837 articles identified, 10 were included (representing 9 studies). Eight of the 9 included studies found nutrition care in primary care settings to be more costly and more effective than usual care. High study heterogeneity limited further conclusions.ConclusionNutrition care in primary care settings is effective, though it requires investment; it should, therefore, be considered in primary care planning. Further studies are needed to evaluate the long-term cost-effectiveness of providing nutrition care in primary care settings.Systematic review registrationPROSPERO registration no. CRD42020201146.
      PubDate: Wed, 04 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/nutrit/nuab082
      Issue No: Vol. 80, No. 6 (2022)
       
  • The impact of collagen protein ingestion on musculoskeletal connective
           tissue remodeling: a narrative review

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      Authors: Holwerda A; van Loon L.
      Pages: 1497 - 1514
      Abstract: AbstractCollagen is the central structural component of extracellular connective tissue, which provides elastic qualities to tissues. For skeletal muscle, extracellular connective tissue transmits contractile force to the tendons and bones. Connective tissue proteins are in a constant state of remodeling and have been shown to express a high level of plasticity. Dietary-protein ingestion increases muscle protein synthesis rates. High-quality, rapidly digestible proteins are generally considered the preferred protein source to maximally stimulate myofibrillar (contractile) protein synthesis rates. In contrast, recent evidence demonstrates that protein ingestion does not increase muscle connective tissue protein synthesis. The absence of an increase in muscle connective tissue protein synthesis after protein ingestion may be explained by insufficient provision of glycine and/or proline. Dietary collagen contains large amounts of glycine and proline and, therefore, has been proposed to provide the precursors required to facilitate connective tissue protein synthesis. This literature review provides a comprehensive evaluation of the current knowledge on the proposed benefits of dietary collagen consumption to stimulate connective tissue remodeling to improve health and functional performance.
      PubDate: Wed, 04 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/nutrit/nuab083
      Issue No: Vol. 80, No. 6 (2022)
       
  • The health benefits of anthocyanins: an umbrella review of systematic
           reviews and meta-analyses of observational studies and controlled
           clinical trials

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      Authors: Sandoval-Ramírez B; Catalán Ú, Llauradó E, et al.
      Pages: 1515 - 1530
      Abstract: AbstractAnthocyanins (ACNs) are phenolic compounds present in foods and have undefined health benefits. The present umbrella review aimed to analyze the effects of ACNs on multiple aspects of human health (from systematic reviews and meta-analyses [SRMs] of randomized controlled trials [RCTs]), and the associations of ACNs with the risk of various diseases (from SRMs of observational studies [OSs]). Following the PRISMA methodology, the PubMed, SCOPUS, and Cochrane databases were searched up to November 1, 2020 for OS-SRMs and RCT-SRMs that examined the effects of ACNs on health. The risk of bias of RCT-SRMs was assessed using the AMSTAR 2, and that of OS-SRMs was assessed using the Joanna Briggs Institute methodology. Based on 5 OS-SRMs (57 studies and 2 134 336 participants), ACNs of various sources were significantly associated with a reduction in the risks of hypertension and type 2 diabetes mellitus. According to 8 RCT-SRMs (139 interventions and >4984 participants), ACNs improved plasmatic lipids, glucose metabolism, and endothelial function, without affecting blood pressure. No associations between ACNs and breast or gastric cancer risks were found. ACN intake opens new pathways for the management of glucose metabolism, the plasmatic lipid profile, and the improvement of endothelial function in humans.
      PubDate: Wed, 04 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/nutrit/nuab086
      Issue No: Vol. 80, No. 6 (2022)
       
  • Theoretical and practical approaches for dietary behavior change in urban
           socioeconomically disadvantaged adolescents: a systematic review

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      Authors: Bel-Serrat S; Greene E, Mullee A, et al.
      Pages: 1531 - 1557
      Abstract: AbstractContextThere is limited evidence on strategies used to promote dietary behavior changes in socioeconomically disadvantaged urban adolescents and on their effectiveness.ObjectiveA synthesis of nutrition interventions used in this group of adolescents is provided in this systematic review.Data SourcesFive electronic databases (PubMed, Web of Science, CINAHL, PsycINFO, and ERIC) were searched until November 2020 to identify relevant studies.Data ExtractionForty-six manuscripts (n = 38 intervention studies) met the inclusion criteria. Quality was assessed with the Effective Public Health Practice Project Quality Assessment Tool. A qualitative synthesis summarizing data on study characteristics was conducted.Data AnalysisStudies were classified by intervention type as those focusing on hedonic determinants of dietary intake (n = 1), environmental changes to promote a specific dietary intake (n = 3), cognitive determinants (n = 29), and multicomponent strategies (n = 13). The social cognitive theory was the most applied theoretical framework, either alone or combined with other frameworks. Most of the intervention studies targeted multiple dietary outcomes, and success was not always reported for each.ConclusionsDespite the heterogeneity of the studies and lack of combination of dietary outcomes into dietary scores or patterns to evaluate changes on the individuals’ whole diets, long-term, theory-driven interventions targeting a single dietary factor seem promising in obtaining sustainable dietary behavior changes.Systematic Review RegistrationPROSPERO registration no. CRD42020188219.
      PubDate: Wed, 04 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/nutrit/nuab120
      Issue No: Vol. 80, No. 6 (2022)
       
  • Are systematic reviews addressing nutrition for cancer prevention
           trustworthy' A systematic survey of quality and risk of bias

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      Authors: Zajac J; Storman D, Swierz M, et al.
      Pages: 1558 - 1567
      Abstract: AbstractContextThe last 30 years have yielded a vast number of systematic reviews and/or meta-analyses addressing the link between nutrition and cancer risk.ObjectiveThe aim of this survey was to assess overall quality and potential for risk of bias in systematic reviews and meta-analyses (SRMAs) that examined the role of nutrition in cancer prevention.Data SourcesMEDLINE, Embase, and the Cochrane Library databases were searched (last search performed November 2018). Study SelectionStudies identified as SRMAs that investigated a nutritional or dietary intervention or exposure for cancer prevention in the general population or in people at risk of cancer and in which primary studies had a comparison group were eligible for inclusion. Screening, data extraction, and quality assessment were conducted independently by 2 reviewers.Data ExtractionAltogether, 101 studies were randomly selected for analysis. The methodological quality and risk of bias were evaluated using the AMSTAR-2 and ROBIS tools, respectively.ResultsMost SRMAs included observational studies. Less than 10% of SRMAs reported a study protocol, and only 51% of SRMAs assessed the risk of bias in primary studies. Most studies conducted subgroup analyses, but only a few reported tests of interaction or specified subgroups of interest a priori. Overall, according to AMSTAR-2, only 1% of SRMAs were of high quality, while 97% were of critically low quality. Only 3% had a low risk of bias, according to ROBIS.ConclusionsThis systematic survey revealed substantial limitations with respect to quality and risk of bias of SRMAs. SRMAs examining nutrition and cancer prevention cannot be considered trustworthy, and results should be interpreted with caution. Peer reviewers as well as users of SRMAs should be advised to use the AMSTAR-2 and/or ROBIS instruments to help to determine the overall quality and risk of bias of SRMAs.Systematic Review RegistrationPROSPERO registration number CRD42019121116.
      PubDate: Wed, 04 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/nutrit/nuab093
      Issue No: Vol. 80, No. 6 (2022)
       
  • Effects of nutrition and gestational alcohol consumption on fetal growth
           and development

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      Authors: Naik V; Lee J, Wu G, et al.
      Pages: 1568 - 1579
      Abstract: AbstractFetal alcohol exposure can lead to a range of developmental disorders, including impaired fetal growth and development of multiple organ systems. These disorders are grouped under the term fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASDs). Adequate nutrition and a conducive intrauterine environment are essential for healthy fetal development. Nutrient deficiencies resulting from inadequate maternal nutrient ingestion may be compounded by alcohol-induced altered nutrient metabolism, placental clearance, and malabsorption. Alcohol-induced alteration of the intrauterine environment is the main source of developmental deficits and nutritional insufficiencies can worsen the effects on fetal development. In this review, we discuss studies examining the collective and interactive effects of nutrition (specifically iron, selenium, vitamin A, thiamine, zinc, folate, vitamin B12, choline, and amino acids) relative to gestational alcohol consumption and its effects on fetal growth and development. We also summarize scientific reports that tested potential benefits of micronutrient supplementation in animal models of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders and in humans. In summary, the deleterious effects of alcohol exposure in relation to nutrient homeostasis further validate that avoidance of alcohol consumption during pregnancy is the most effective way to mitigate the teratogenic effects of alcohol.
      PubDate: Wed, 04 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/nutrit/nuab119
      Issue No: Vol. 80, No. 6 (2022)
       
  • Blenderized formulations in home enteral nutrition: a narrative review
           about challenges in nutritional security and food safety

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      Authors: Santos D; Ataide C, Mota da Costa N, et al.
      Pages: 1580 - 1598
      Abstract: AbstractBlenderized formulations (BFs) are prepared by homogenization of food that is normally used in oral nutrition. BFs are mainly used in home enteral nutrition (HEN), although their use has also been reported by hospitals when commercial enteral formulas are not available. HEN is applied when the patient has been discharged from the hospital. This nutritional therapy promotes the patient's reintegration into the family nucleus and promotes humanized care, and decreases treatment costs. However, the patient should continue to receive health and nutritional care, ranging from periodic nutritional re-evaluation to adaptation of the dietary plan. HEN provides the patient a greater contact with the family, whereas BFs promote the adaptation of the diet with food, respecting the food diversity and culture, lower cost, and easier access to food. Disadvantages of BFs include more time spent by the professional to calculate the dietary plan, greater difficulty in adjusting daily needs, and less microbiological and chemical stability. In this review, the nutritional, food security, and safety aspects of BF used in HEN are discussed. Technological quality aspects that are essential knowledge in the preparation of the patient's dietary plan also are presented.
      PubDate: Wed, 04 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/nutrit/nuab121
      Issue No: Vol. 80, No. 6 (2022)
       
  • Retail food outlets and metabolic syndrome: a systematic review of
           longitudinal studies

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      Authors: de Albuquerque F; Pessoa M, De Santis Filgueiras M, et al.
      Pages: 1599 - 1618
      Abstract: AbstractContextThe community food environment covers the type, quantity, density, location, and access to retail food outlets, and its influence on eating behavior, obesity, and metabolic syndrome has been investigated.ObjectiveTo evaluate the evidence on longitudinal associations between objectively measured retail food outlets and metabolic syndrome components in children, adolescents, and adults.Data extractionThis systematic review followed the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines. Study quality and risk of bias were assessed with the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale.Data sourcesThe Scopus, Embase, Web of Science, Scielo, PubMed, MEDLINE, and Lilacs databases were searched without any restriction on publication dates.Data analysisOf the 18 longitudinal studies included, significant associations were reported in 9 between retail food outlets and metabolic syndrome components in adults (6 positive associations, 2 negative, and 1 both positive and negative), and in 3 studies of children and adolescents (2 negative associations and 1 both positive and negative). Six studies with adults found no association.ConclusionLimited evidence was found for longitudinal associations between retail food outlets and metabolic syndrome components. In future studies, researchers should consider the use of standardized retail food outlet measurements and accurate analysis to better understand the influence of the community food environment on metabolic syndrome.Systematic Review RegistrationPROSPERO registration no: CRD42020177137.
      PubDate: Wed, 04 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/nutrit/nuab111
      Issue No: Vol. 80, No. 6 (2022)
       
  • Effects of Bifidobacterium animalis subspecies lactis supplementation on
           gastrointestinal symptoms: systematic review with meta-analysis

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      Authors: Araújo M; Vogado C, Mendes M, et al.
      Pages: 1619 - 1633
      Abstract: AbstractContextThe effects of probiotics on gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms have been increasingly investigated, particularly that of Bifidobacterium animalis. Clinical trials so far have shown differing evidence regarding these effects in healthy adults.ObjectiveTo synthesize the published evidence on the effects of B. animalis subspecies lactis on GI symptoms (GIS) in healthy adults.Data SourceA search of the Medline, Embase, Lilacs, Scopus, Web of Science, ProQuest, and Google Scholar databases was conducted for reports on randomized controlled trials published up to October 2021.Data ExtractionPopulation characteristics and data on colonic transit time (CTT), stool consistency, defecation frequency, abdominal pain, bloating, flatulence, volunteer compliance, and adverse events were extracted. A random-effects model was used to estimate the effect of probiotic treatment on these variables.Data SynthesisIn total, 1551 studies were identified, of which 14 were included in the qualitative synthesis and 13 in the meta-analysis. Overall, probiotic supplementation increased defecation frequency (standardized mean difference [SMD], 0.26; 95%CI, 0.13–0.39). Subgroup analysis revealed a decrease in CTT (SMD, −0.34; 95%CI, −0.62 to −0.07) in short-term treatment (≤14 d) and an improvement in stool consistency (SMD, 0.76; 95%CI, 0.44–1.08) in individuals without GIS. No improvement in abdominal pain and bloating was found.ConclusionsB. animalis subspecies lactis supplementation may increase defecation frequency and, in short-term treatment, may reduce CTT in healthy adults and improve stool consistency in individuals without GIS. More high-quality randomized controlled trials are needed to develop a clinical protocol for the use of this strain to improve these symptoms.Systematic Review RegistrationPROSPERO registration no. CRD42020154060.
      PubDate: Wed, 04 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/nutrit/nuab109
      Issue No: Vol. 80, No. 6 (2022)
       
  • Efficacy and tolerability of the ketogenic diet and its variations for
           preventing migraine in adolescents and adults: a systematic review

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      Authors: Caminha M; Moreira A, Matheus F, et al.
      Pages: 1634 - 1647
      Abstract: AbstractContextMigraine is a headache of variable intensity that is associated with focal and systemic symptoms. A ketogenic diet (KD), a very-low-carbohydrate diet with a proportional increase in fat, causes brain metabolic alterations, which could be beneficial for some neurologic conditions.ObjectiveA systematic review was conducted to assess the efficacy and tolerability of KD in preventing migraine in adolescents and adults.Data sourcesThe Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses standard was used to review articles found in the PubMed, EMBASE, Scopus, Web of Science, LILACS, LIVIVO, Science Direct, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials databases. The Google Scholar, DOAJ, ProQuest, and OpenGrey databases were included.Data ExtractionThe population, intervention, comparison, outcome, and study design strategy included assessing the quality of the evidence using Grading of Recommendations Assessment Development and Evaluation and the risk of bias after applying the JBI critical appraisal tools.Data AnalysisMost of the 10 selected studies reported that KD reduced the number and severity of migraine attacks in patients, with few reported adverse effects. The evidence on the effectiveness of the KD is low, so whether the final effect is due to the treatment remains inconclusive.ConclusionsThis study represents an initial effort to systematize information on the efficacy and tolerability of KD and its variations in the prevention of migraine.Systematic Review RegistrationPROSPERO registration no. CRD42020186253
      PubDate: Wed, 04 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/nutrit/nuab080
      Issue No: Vol. 80, No. 6 (2022)
       
  • Grains – a major source of sustainable protein for health

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      Authors: Poutanen K; Kårlund A, Gómez-Gallego C, et al.
      Pages: 1648 - 1663
      Abstract: AbstractCereal grains are the main dietary source of energy, carbohydrates, and plant proteins world-wide. Currently, only 41% of grains are used for human consumption, and up to 35% are used for animal feed. Cereals have been overlooked as a source of environmentally sustainable and healthy plant proteins and could play a major role in transitioning towards a more sustainable food system for healthy diets. Cereal plant proteins are of good nutritional quality, but lysine is often the limiting amino acid. When consumed as whole grains, cereals provide health-protecting components such as dietary fiber and phytochemicals. Shifting grain use from feed to traditional foods and conceptually new foods and ingredients could improve protein security and alleviate climate change. Rapid development of new grain-based food ingredients and use of grains in new food contexts, such as dairy replacements and meat analogues, could accelerate the transition. This review discusses recent developments and outlines future perspectives for cereal grain use.
      PubDate: Wed, 04 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/nutrit/nuab084
      Issue No: Vol. 80, No. 6 (2022)
       
  • Effectiveness of nutrition interventions on improving diet quality and
           nutrition knowledge in military populations: a systematic review

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      Authors: Kullen C; Mitchell L, O’Connor H, et al.
      Pages: 1664 - 1693
      Abstract: AbstractContextOptimizing nutrition in military groups through improved diet quality and nutrition knowledge is key in supporting the high physical and cognitive demands.ObjectiveThe objective of this investigation was to systematically review the effectiveness of nutrition interventions among military personnel in improving diet quality and/or nutrition knowledge.Data SourcesMedline, Embase, CINAHL, and Scopus were searched from the earliest records to May 2020.Data ExtractionData were extracted by 2 reviewers. The primary outcomes were diet quality and/or nutrition knowledge.Data AnalysisTwenty studies were included. The main intervention approaches identified were nutrition education of individuals (i.e., education-based studies; EB) (n = 12), and manipulation of the food service environment (i.e., dining facility studies; DFACs) (n = 8). The most common strategies were face-to-face lectures (n = 8) for EB, and healthier menus (n = 7) and education of catering staff (n = 6) for DFAC interventions. Most studies (18/20) demonstrated favorable within-group effects; however, dietary changes were inconsistent. Five of 10 studies using a comparator group demonstrated positive between-group differences.ConclusionAlthough potential exists for improving diet quality and nutrition knowledge in military populations, the heterogeneity of the studies to date limits conclusions on the most efficacious strategies.
      PubDate: Wed, 04 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/nutrit/nuab087
      Issue No: Vol. 80, No. 6 (2022)
       
  • Obesity and oral health in Mexican children and adolescents: systematic
           review and meta-analysis

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      Authors: Aceves-Martins M; Godina-Flores N, Gutierrez-Gómez Y, et al.
      Pages: 1694 - 1710
      Abstract: AbstractContextA relationship between obesity and poor oral health has been reported.ObjectiveTo investigate the association between overweight/obesity and oral health in Mexican children and adolescents.Data SourcesA literature search was conducted of 13 databases and 1 search engine for articles published from 1995 onward.Data AnalysisA total of 18 publications were included. Evidence was inconclusive and varied according to sociodemographic factors or outcome measuring tools. The Decayed, Missing, and Filled Teeth and Filled Teeth Surfaces indices and the decayed extracted filled teeth index outcomes were included in a random effects model meta-analysis. Pooled estimates showed no statistically significant oral health differences (measured via the decayed extracted filled teeth or the Decayed, Missing, and Filled Teeth Surfaces indexes) among body mass index (BMI) categories. However, pooled estimates of 6 studies showed that children with higher BMI had worse oral health in permanent teeth (measured via the Decayed Missing Filled Teeth Index) than children with lower BMI (overall mean difference, –0.42; 95%CI, –0.74, –0.11).ConclusionWhether there is an association between poor oral health and high BMI is inconclusive; however, both co-exist among Mexican children. Therefore, health promotion and prevention efforts should address common risk factors and broader risk social determinants shared between noncommunicable diseases.
      PubDate: Thu, 05 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/nutrit/nuab088
      Issue No: Vol. 80, No. 6 (2022)
       
  • A systematic review of supermarket automated electronic sales data for
           population dietary surveillance

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      Authors: Jenneson V; Pontin F, Greenwood D, et al.
      Pages: 1711 - 1722
      Abstract: AbstractContextMost dietary assessment methods are limited by self-report biases, how long they take for participants to complete, and cost of time for dietitians to extract content. Electronically recorded, supermarket-obtained transactions are an objective measure of food purchases, with reduced bias and improved timeliness and scale.ObjectiveThe use, breadth, context, and utility of electronic purchase records for dietary research is assessed and discussed in this systematic review.Data sourcesFour electronic databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, Global Health) were searched. Included studies used electronically recorded supermarket transactions to investigate the diet of healthy, free-living adults.Data extractionSearches identified 3422 articles, of which 145 full texts were retrieved and 72 met inclusion criteria. Study quality was assessed using the National Institutes of Health Quality Assessment Tool for Observational Cohort and Cross-Sectional Studies.Data analysisPurchase records were used in observational studies, policy evaluations, and experimental designs. Nutrition outcomes included dietary patterns, nutrients, and food category sales. Transactions were linked to nutrient data from retailers, commercial data sources, and national food composition databases.ConclusionElectronic sales data have the potential to transform dietary assessment and worldwide understanding of dietary behavior. Validation studies are warranted to understand limits to agreement and extrapolation to individual-level diets.Systematic Review RegistrationPROSPERO registration no. CRD42018103470
      PubDate: Thu, 05 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/nutrit/nuab089
      Issue No: Vol. 80, No. 6 (2022)
       
  • A systematic review and meta-analysis of the effects of Hibiscus
           sabdariffa on blood pressure and cardiometabolic markers

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      Authors: Ellis L; Zulfiqar S, Holmes M, et al.
      Pages: 1723 - 1737
      Abstract: AbstractContextHibiscus sabdariffa (hibiscus) has been proposed to affect cardiovascular risk factors.ObjectiveTo review the evidence for the effectiveness of hibiscus in modulating cardiovascular disease risk markers, compared with pharmacologic, nutritional, or placebo treatments.Data SourcesA systematic search of the Web of Science, Cochrane, Ovid (MEDLINE, Embase, AMED), and Scopus databases identified reports published up to June 2021 on randomized controlled trials using hibiscus as an intervention for lipid profiles, blood pressure (BP), and fasting plasma glucose levels in adult populations.Data ExtractionSeventeen chronic trials were included. Quantitative data were examined using a random effects meta-analysis and meta-regression with trial sequential analysis to account for type I and type II errors.Data AnalysisHibiscus exerted stronger effects on systolic BP (−7.10 mmHg [95%CI, −13.00, −1.20]; I2 = 95%; P = 0.02) than placebo, with the magnitude of reduction greatest in those with elevated BP at baseline. Hibiscus induced reductions to BP similar to that resulting from medication (systolic BP reduction, 2.13 mmHg [95%CI, −2.81, 7.06], I2 = 91%, P = 0.40; diastolic BP reduction, 1.10 mmHg [95%CI, −1.55, 3.74], I2 = 91%, P = 0.42). Hibiscus also significantly lowered levels of low-density lipoprotein compared with other teas and placebo (−6.76 mg/dL [95%CI, −13.45, −0.07]; I2 = 64%; P = 0.05).ConclusionsRegular consumption of hibiscus could confer reduced cardiovascular disease risk. More studies are warranted to establish an effective dose response and treatment duration.Systematic Review RegistrationPROSPERO registration no. CRD42020167295
      PubDate: Thu, 05 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/nutrit/nuab104
      Issue No: Vol. 80, No. 6 (2022)
       
  • Fruit and Vegetable Dietary Patterns and Mental Health in Women: A
           Systematic Review

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      Authors: Guzek D; Gła¸bska D, Groele B, et al.
      Pages: 1357 - 1370
      Abstract: ContextMental health may be influenced by some dietary patterns. Among common elements of beneficial patterns is high fruit and vegetable intake. However, no systematic review has been conducted to date, to our knowledge, that has assessed the influence of fruit and vegetable dietary patterns on a broad spectrum of mental health.ObjectiveWe conducted a systematic review, using the PRISMA guidelines, of the observational studies analyzing the association between the dietary pattern of fruit and vegetables and the broad aspects of mental health in adult women.Data sourcesThe databases PubMed and Web of Science were searched, and additional manual search for observational peer-reviewed studies was conducted for studies published until June 2019.Data extractionA total of 5911 studies were extracted and verified based on title and abstract for the inclusion criteria. All procedures were conducted independently by 2 researchers. The final number of included studies was 30. The review was structured around the type of observed outcome.Data analysisThe included studies had defined habitual intake associated with dietary patterns with the intake of specific fruit and/or vegetables, and/or fruit or vegetable products (eg, juices), as well as any aspect of the broad spectrum of general mental health. The Newcastle–Ottawa Scale was used to assess bias. The observed association was not stated in all the included studies; some of them revealed a reverse relationship, but only for the vegetarian/vegan diet. A vegetarian diet may be characterized by high consumption of fruits and vegetables, but it sometimes may not be properly balanced, due to excluded products. This may be the reason of observed situation.ConclusionsA general positive influence was observed for the dietary patterns characterized by high consumption of fruit and vegetables and of fruit or vegetable products by women.Systematic review registrationPROSPERO registration no. CRD42019138148.
      PubDate: Wed, 26 May 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/nutrit/nuab007
      Issue No: Vol. 80, No. 6 (2021)
       
 
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