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  Subjects -> NUTRITION AND DIETETICS (Total: 201 journals)
Showing 1 - 64 of 64 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acta Portuguesa de Nutrição     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Digestive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Advances in Eating Disorders : Theory, Research and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Advances in Food and Nutrition Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 59)
Advances in Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 55)
African Journal of Biomedical Research     Open Access  
African Journal of Food, Agriculture, Nutrition and Development     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Aktuelle Ernährungsmedizin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
American Journal of Botany     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
American Journal of Clinical Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 157)
American Journal of Food and Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 46)
American Journal of Food Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Amerta Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Amino Acids     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 52)
Annual Review of Food Science and Technology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Annual Review of Nutrition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 39)
Appetite     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Arab Journal of Nutrition and Exercise     Open Access  
Archive of Food and Nutritional Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Archivos Latinoamericanos de Nutrición     Open Access  
Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Asian Journal of Clinical Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Bangladesh Journal of Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Bioactive Carbohydrates and Dietary Fibre     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
BMC Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
BMJ Nutrition, Prevention & Health     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
British Journal Of Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 91)
Cahiers de Nutrition et de Diététique     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Canadian Food Studies / La Revue canadienne des études sur l'alimentation     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Canadian Journal of Dietetic Practice and Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Case Reports in Clinical Nutrition     Open Access  
Childhood Obesity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Clinical Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 89)
Clinical Nutrition ESPEN     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Clinical Nutrition Experimental     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Clinical Nutrition Insight     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Clinical Nutrition Open Science     Open Access  
Clinical Obesity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Comparative Exercise Physiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Current Developments in Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Current Nutrition & Food Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Current Nutrition Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Current Opinion in Clinical Nutrition & Metabolic Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Current Research in Nutrition and Food Science     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
DEMETRA : Alimentação, Nutrição & Saúde     Open Access  
Diabetes, Metabolic Syndrome and Obesity     Open Access   (Followers: 46)
Eating and Weight Disorders - Studies on Anorexia, Bulimia and Obesity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Ecology of Food and Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Egyptian Journal of Obesity, Diabetes and Endocrinology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Endocrinología, Diabetes y Nutrición     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Endocrinología, Diabetes y Nutrición (English Edition)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Ernährung & Medizin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
European Journal of Clinical Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 74)
European Journal of Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
European Journal of Nutrition & Food Safety     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Food & Nutrition Research     Open Access   (Followers: 34)
Food and Environmental Virology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Food and Foodways: Explorations in the History and Culture of     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Food and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Food and Nutrition Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Food and Waterborne Parasitology     Open Access  
Food Digestion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Food Frontiers     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Food Hydrocolloids for Health     Open Access  
Food Quality and Safety     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Food Science & Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 59)
Food, Culture and Society: An International Journal of Multidisciplinary Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Frontiers in Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Frontiers in Sustainable Food Systems     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Functional Foods in Health and Disease     Open Access  
Gazi Sağlık Bilimleri Dergisi     Open Access  
Genes & Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Hacettepe University Faculty of Health Sciences Journal     Open Access  
Human Nutrition & Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian Journal of Nutrition and Dietetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Indonesian Food and Nutrition Progress     Open Access  
International Journal for Vitamin and Nutrition Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity     Open Access   (Followers: 30)
International Journal of Child Health and Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Eating Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
International Journal of Food Safety, Nutrition and Public Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
International Journal of Food Science and Nutrition Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Food Sciences and Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
International Journal of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, Transplant and Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Nutrition and Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 23)
International Journal of Nutrition, Pharmacology, Neurological Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Obesity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 90)
International Journal of Sport Nutrition & Exercise Metabolism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 82)
Journal of Advanced Nutrition and Human Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Agriculture, Food Systems, and Community Development     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Dietary Supplements     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Eating Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Ethnic Foods     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Food & Nutritional Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Food and Nutrition Research     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Food Chemistry and Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Food Science and Nutrition Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Health, Population and Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50)
Journal of Hunger & Environmental Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Medical Nutrition and Nutraceuticals     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Medicinal Herbs and Ethnomedicine     Open Access  
Journal of Muscle Foods     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Nutraceuticals and Herbal Medicine     Open Access  
Journal of Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
Journal of Nutrition & Intermediary Metabolism     Open Access  
Journal of Nutrition and Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Nutrition in Gerontology and Geriatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Nutrition, Health and Aging     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Journal of Nutritional & Environmental Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Nutritional Disorders & Therapy     Open Access  
Journal of Nutritional Ecology and Food Research     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Nutritional Science     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Obesity     Open Access   (Followers: 24)
Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition (JPGN)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 52)
Journal of Pharmacy and Nutrition Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Renal Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal of Renal Nutrition and Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Sensory Studies     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Spices and Aromatic Crops     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 60)
Journal of the American College of Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of the Australasian College of Nutritional and Environmental Medicine     Full-text available via subscription  
Jurnal Gizi dan Dietetik Indonesia : Indonesian Journal of Nutrition and Dietetics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Jurnal Gizi Indonesia / The Indonesian Journal of Nutrition     Open Access  
Jurnal Gizi Klinik Indonesia     Open Access  
Jurnal Penelitian Gizi dan Makanan     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Jurnal Riset Kesehatan     Open Access  
La Ciencia al Servicio de la Salud y Nutrición     Open Access  
Lifestyle Genomics     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Lifestyle Journal     Open Access  
Maternal & Child Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Médecine & Nutrition     Full-text available via subscription  
Media Gizi Indonesia     Open Access  
Metabolism and Nutrition in Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Molecular Nutrition & Food Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
NFS Journal     Open Access  
Nigerian Food Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Nigerian Journal of Nutritional Sciences     Full-text available via subscription  
npj Science of Food     Open Access  
Nutrición Hospitalaria     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Nutrients     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Nutrire     Hybrid Journal  
Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Nutrition & Dietetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Nutrition & Food Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Nutrition & Diabetes     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
Nutrition & Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Nutrition - Science en évolution     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Nutrition and Cancer     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Nutrition and Dietary Supplements     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Nutrition and Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Nutrition and Metabolic Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Nutrition Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Nutrition Bytes     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Nutrition in Clinical Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
Nutrition Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Nutrition Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Nutrition Research Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Nutrition Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
Nutrition Today     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Nutritional Neuroscience : An International Journal on Nutrition, Diet and Nervous System     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Obesity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 56)
Obesity Facts     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Obesity Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Oil Crop Science     Open Access  
Open Food Science Journal     Open Access  
Open Nutrition Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Open Obesity Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Pakistan Journal of Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Pediatric Obesity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Perspectivas en Nutrición Humana     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
PharmaNutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Plant Foods for Human Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Plant Production Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Proceedings of the Nutrition Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Progress in Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Public Health Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
RBNE - Revista Brasileira de Nutrição Esportiva     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
RBONE - Revista Brasileira de Obesidade, Nutrição e Emagrecimento     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Chilena de Nutricion     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Revista Española de Nutrición Humana y Dietética     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Revista Mexicana de Trastornos Alimentarios     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Salud Pública y Nutrición     Open Access  
Segurança Alimentar e Nutricional     Open Access  
South African Journal of Clinical Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
The Australian Coeliac     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Topics in Clinical Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
UNICIÊNCIAS     Open Access  
Universal Journal of Food and Nutrition Science     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
World Food Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)

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Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Journal of Nutrition, Health and Aging
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.249
Citation Impact (citeScore): 3
Number of Followers: 30  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1279-7707 - ISSN (Online) 1760-4788
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2469 journals]
  • A Giant in Geriatrics: A Tribute to Professor John Edward Morley

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      PubDate: 2022-05-14
       
  • Accuracy of SARC-F, SARC-CalF, and Ishii Test in Assessing Severe
           Sarcopenia in Older Adults in Nursing Homes

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      Abstract: Objectives We aimed to assess the comparative accuracy of using SARC-F, as well as the SARC-F in tandem with calf circumference (SARC-CalF) and Ishii test, to screen severe sarcopenia in older adults residing in nursing homes. Method In this cross-sectional study, the AWGS2019 criteria were used as diagnostic standards. We adopted an “exclusion” screening test, focusing on sensitivity and the negative predictive value (NPV) combined with AUC, to assess the accuracy of the screening tools. Results We studied 199 people aged 60 and older, of whom 67 (33.7%) had severe sarcopenia, including 40 males (41.2%) and 27 females (26.5%). Among all participants, the sensitivities and NPV of SARC-F, SARC-CalF, and Ishii test were 85.1%/0.88, 68.7%/0.82, and 89.6%/0.94, respectively. For males, the SARC-F, SARC-CalF, and Ishii test sensitivities and NPV were 77.5%/0.78, 47.5%/0.7, and 85%/0.88, respectively. Among females, the SARC-F, SARC-CalF, and Ishii test sensitivities and NPV were 74.1%/0.9, 81.5%/0.92, 96.3%/0.99, respectively. There were no statistical differences between the AUCs of SARC-F or SARC-CalF for all participants or for the male or female groups; however, in terms of the AUC, the Ishii test was superior compared with the other two screening methods. Conclusion The Ishii test is more suitable for screening severe sarcopenia in older adults in nursing homes compared to SARC-F and SARC-CalF, and 130 points are recommended as the cut-off value of the Ishii test for screening severe sarcopenia.
      PubDate: 2022-05-14
       
  • Circulating Levels of Apelin, GDF-15 and Sarcopenia: Lack of Association
           in the MAPT Study

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      Abstract: Objectives Apelin and GDF-15 have been proposed as biomarkers of age-related sarcopenia but evidence in human models is scarce. This study aimed to explore the associations between blood apelin and GDF-15 with sarcopenia incidence and the evolution of sarcopenia components over two years in older adults >70 years. Design Secondary longitudinal analysis of the Multidomain Alzheimer Preventive Trial. Participants Older adults (>70 years) attending primary care centers in France and Monaco. Setting. Community. Measurements Serum Apelin (pg/mL) and plasma GDF-15 (pg/mL) were measured. Outcomes included sarcopenia defined by the European Working Group on Sarcopenia in Older People (EWGSOP) and its determinants (appendicular lean mass [ALM] evaluated through a Dual-energy X-ray Absorptiometry (DXA) scan, handgrip strength (HGS) and the 4-meter gait speed) measured over 2 years. Linear mixed models and logistic regression were used to explore the longitudinal associations. Results We included 168 subjects from MAPT (median age=76y, IQR=73–79; 78% women). Serum apelin was not significantly associated with sarcopenia incidence (OR=1.001;95%CI=1.000,1.001;p-value>0.05 in full-adjusted models) nor with ALM (β=−5.8E-05;95%CI=−1.0E-04,2.12E-04;p>0.05), HGS (β=−1.1E-04;95%CI=−5.0E-04,2.8E-04;p>0.05), and GS (β=−5.1E-06;95%CI=−1.0E-05,2.0E-05;p>0.05) in fully adjusted models. Similarly, plasma GDF-15 was not associated with both the incidence of sarcopenia (OR=1.001,95%CI=1.000,1.002,p>0.05) and the evolution of its determinants ([ALM, β=2.1E-05;95%CI=−2.6E-04,3.03E-04;p>0.05], HGS [β=−5.9E-04;95%CI=−1.26E-03,8.1E-05; p>0.05] nor GS [β=−2.6E-06;95%CI=−3.0E-05, 2.3E-05;p>0.05]) in fully adjusted models. Conclusions Blood apelin and GDF-15 were not associated with sarcopenia incidence or with the evolution of sarcopenia components over a 2-year follow-up in community-dwelling older adults. Well-powered longitudinal studies are needed to confirm or refute our findings.
      PubDate: 2022-05-14
       
  • Relationship between Coffee Consumption and Osteoporosis Risk Determined
           by the ESR1 Polymorphism rs2982573

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      Abstract: Background The development of osteoporosis is partly explained by interactions between genetic and lifestyle or environmental factors. Objectives In the current study, we determined the relationship between coffee consumption and the risk of osteoporosis among individuals with ESR1 rs2982573 in Taiwan. Design, Participants and Setting In this population-based cross-sectional study, we used genetic, demographic, and lifestyle data from participants recruited in Taiwan Biobank (TWB) between 2016 and 2019. We used multiple logistic regression analyses to determine the relationship between osteoporosis and variant rs2982573 genotypes (TT, TC, and CC). Main Outcome The primary outcome was osteoporosis. Results Individuals with osteoporosis (n = 515) were older than those without the disease (mean age ±SE (year); 61.324±0.361 versus 53.068 ±0.130, p<0.001). There was no significant association between rs2982573 and osteoporosis (OR, 0.904; 95% CI, 0.706–1.157; p=0.422 for TC+CC when compared with the TT genotype). Coffee consumption was associated with a lower risk of osteoporosis (OR, 0.737; 95% CI, 0.592–0.918; p=0.006). The p-value for interaction between rs2982573 and coffee consumption was 0.0393. In our subgroup analyses, the adjusted ORs (95% CI) were 0.635 (0.410–0.985) in coffee drinking TC+CC individuals and 1.095 (0.809–1.482) in non-coffee drinking TC+CC individuals, respectively when compared with their TT genotype counterparts. Conclusion According to our study, participants in the TWB with the TC+CC genotype of ESR1 rs2982573 who consumed at least three cups of coffee per week were less likely to have osteoporosis.
      PubDate: 2022-05-14
       
  • Evaluation of the Accuracy of Six Simple Screening Tools for Sarcopenia in
           Schizophrenic Patients

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      Abstract: Objectives Our objective was to evaluate if SARC-F, SARC-CalF, SARC-F-EBM, calf circumference (CC), mid-upper-arm circumference (MUAC) and Ishii test can be used to accurately screen for sarcopenia in schizophrenic patients. Method We enrolled schizophrenic patients aged 50 or older, who were regularly taking antipsychotic medications, at two mental health centres. Bioimpedance-based muscle-mass was analysed with an InBody 770 instrument, while muscle strength was measured with a digital grip-strength dynamometer. The physical performance of the patients was gauged from their gait speed over 6 m. Standard AWGS2019 diagnostic criteria were used, and the accuracies of the six screening methods were indicated by the sensitivity, negative predictive value (NPV), and area under receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). Results A total of 339 stable schizophrenic patients were enrolled. The overall prevalence of sarcopenia was 53.1%, and the prevalence was 55.6% and 47.66%, respectively, for males and females. The prevalence of sarcopenia obesity in the total population was 16.22%, and that of males and females was 18.97% and 10.28%, respectively. The SARC-F, SARC-CalF, SARC-F-EBM, CC, MUAC and Ishii test sensitivity/NPV in screening for sarcopenia were 41.86%/0.52, 79.07%/0.7, 28.68%/0.51, 78.3%/0.71, 76.74%/0.7, 89.92%/0.84, respectively, in males and 45.1%/0.59, 94.12%/0.91, 54.9%/0.7, 92.16%/60.91, 74.51%/0.77, 96.08%/0.94, respectively, in females. In males, the AUCs of the SARC-F, SARC-CalF, SARC-F-EBM, CC, MUAC and Ishii test were 0.601 (95%CI, 0.528–0.673), 0.754 (95%CI,0.69–0.817), 0.657 (95%CI,0.588–0.727), 0.8 (95%CI, 0.744–0.856), 0.781 (95%CI, 0.721–0.84) and 0.88 (95%CI, 0.837–0.922), respectively, and in females, they were 0.587(95%CI,0.479–0.696), 0.794 (95%CI,0.709–0.878), 0.799 (95%CI,0.71–0.888), 0.893 (95%CI, 0.833–0.953), 0.843 (95%CI, 0.772–0.915) and 0.855 (95%CI, 0.784–0.926), respectively. Conclusion The prevalence of sarcopenia in schizophrenic patients is high. Clinical doctors should screen for sarcopenia in schizophrenic patients and provide timely interventions to reduce the occurrence of adverse events. The above six tools can be used as screening tools, and the Ishii test is the most suitable for screening.
      PubDate: 2022-05-14
       
  • Screening — An Important Starting Point for Effective Loneliness
           Interventions among Older Adults

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      PubDate: 2022-05-12
       
  • Validation of the ALONE Scale: A Clinical Measure of Loneliness

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      Abstract: Objectives This study aimed to examine the validity and reliability of a rapid, clinically administrable loneliness screening tool for older adults called the ALONE scale. Design This was a cross-sectional study. Setting Participants were recruited from either ambulatory clinics or a nursing home. Participants Participants were 65 years of age or older and had SLUMS scores of 14 or greater. Measurements Construct validity of the 5-item ALONE scale was examined through correlation with the previously validated UCLA-20 Loneliness Questionnaire. Divergent validity for discriminating between loneliness and depression was examined through correlation with the PHQ-8 items. Test-retest reliability was assessed by correlation between baseline ALONE scores and those from re-administration in 2–3 weeks. Results Among ambulatory clinic participants (n=199), the ALONE scale showed strong correlation with the UCLA-20 (r=0.81, p < 0.001). Similar correlation coefficients were seen among demographic subgroups: White Americans (n=123) (r=0.81, p < 0.001), Black Americans (n=66) (r=0.79, p < 0.001), adults ≥ 75 years (n=74) (r=0.86, p < 0.001). Among nursing home patients (n=22), the ALONE scale showed fair correlation with the UCLA-20 (r=0.74, p < 0.001). Test-retest of the ALONE scale showed a strong correlation (r=0.89, p < 0.001). ROC curve analysis determined ALONE scale scores of 8 and greater as optimal for severe loneliness screening. Conclusion This study shows that the ALONE scale has strong validity in assessing older adults for severe loneliness. The brief, comprehensible nature of the ALONE scale reduces adoption burden making it optimal for use in clinical settings.
      PubDate: 2022-05-12
       
  • Association of Daily Physical Activity with Disability in
           Community-Dwelling Older Adults With/Without Chronic Kidney Disease

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      Abstract: Objectives Physical activity is recommended for disability prevention in the older adult population; however, the level of physical activity required for older adults with chronic kidney disease (CKD) remains unknown. This study aimed to examine the associations between daily physical activity and disability incidence in older adults with and without CKD to determine relevant daily physical activity levels. Design Prospective observational study. Setting and Participants 3,786 community-dwelling older adults aged ≥65 years. Measurements Mean daily times spent in light- (LPA) and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) were measured using triaxial accelerometers. CKD was defined by a creatinine estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) <60 mL/min/1.73 m2. Disability incidence was identified as long-term care insurance certification during a 60-month follow-up period. Associations between physical activity and disability incidence were examined using Cox proportional hazard models stratified by the CKD status. Non-linear and linear associations were tested using the restricted cubic spline. Results A total of 1,054 individuals were identified to have CKD. Disability incidence was higher in the CKD group than in the non-CKD group. The adjusted cox proportional hazard models indicated that a 10-minute increase in MVPA time was associated with lower disability incidence in the non-CKD group (hazard ratio [HR], 0.838; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.764–0.918) and the CKD group (HR, 0.859; 95% CI: 0.766–0.960). Linear associations were observed in MVPA for the non-CKD and CKD groups. Conclusion Increasing MVPA was associated with lower disability incidence in older adults with and without CKD. These findings can help devise disability prevention strategies for older CKD patients.
      PubDate: 2022-05-05
       
  • Decreased Diversity of Gut Microbiota Is Associated with Decreased Muscle
           Mass and Function in Older Adults Residing in a Nursing Home

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      PubDate: 2022-05-04
       
  • Biomarkers of Age-Related Frailty and Frailty Related to Diseases: An
           Exploratory, Cross-Sectional Analysis from the MAPT Study

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      Abstract: Background Frailty may in most cases result from two main causes: the aging process (age-related frailty) and diseases (evolving chronic conditions or acute medical illnesses — disease-related frailty). The biological determinants characterizing these two main causes of frailty may be different. Objectives The aim of this study is to compare the biological and neuroimaging profile of people without frailty, those with age-related frailty, and subjects with disease-related frailty in community-dwelling older adults. Material and Methods We performed a secondary, cross-sectional analysis from the Multidomain Alzheimer Preventive Trial (MAPT). We included 1199 subjects without frailty throughout the 5-year follow-up, 82 subjects with incident age-related frailty, and 53 with incident disease-related frailty. Available blood biomarkers involved nutritional (eg, vitamin D, omega-3 fatty acids), inflammatory-related (IL-6, TNFR1, GDF15), neurodegenerative (eg, beta-amyloid, neurofilament light chain) and neuroimaging markers (MRI, Amyloid-PET). Results Although not statistically significant, the results of the unadjusted model showed increasing gradients for inflammatory markers (GDF15, TNFR1) and decreasing gradients for nutritional and neuroimaging markers (omega 3 index, hippocampal volume) from age-related frailty participants to individuals with disease-related frailty. Considering the linear models we observed higher GDF15 values in disease-related frailty group compared to age-related frailty individuals [β = 242.8 (49.5, 436.2)]. We did not find any significant difference between subjects without frailty and those with age-related frailty. Subjects with disease-related frailty compared to subjects without frailty had lower values of DHA [β = −2.42 (−4.76, −0.08)], Omega 3 Index [β = −0.50 (−0.95, −0.06)] and hippocampal volume [β = −0.22 (−0.42,−0.02)]. They also had higher values of GDF15 [β = 246.1 (88.9, 403.4)] and TNFR1 [β = 157.5 (7.8, 307.2)]. Conclusion Age-related frailty and disease-related frailty may represent different degrees of frailty severity on a biological level. Further research is needed to identify biomarkers potentially able to distinguish these classifications of frailty.
      PubDate: 2022-05-04
       
  • Associations between Hair Mineral Concentrations and Skeletal Muscle Mass
           in Korean Adults

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      Abstract: Objectives Muscle health plays an important role in maintaining function and independence in the elderly, and some nutrients provide protection against the age-related decline of muscle strength and function. Minerals are important nutrients that may contribute to the prevention and treatment of sarcopenia, but they have not been well-studied. This study investigated whether hair mineral concentrations differ between subjects with low muscle mass (LMM) and subjects with normal muscle mass. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting And Participants A total of 232 adults ≥ 20 years of age who visited the Health Promotion Center of the University Hospital in Gyeonggi-do, Republic of Korea. Measurements The data from 232 subjects were analyzed and divided into LMM and normal groups based on the appendicular skeletal muscle mass index (ASMI) (LMM was defined as ASMI < 7.0 kg/m2 in men and < 5.7 kg/m2 in women). Skeletal muscle mass was estimated using a multi-frequency bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) device with a body composition analyzer. Results Overall mean age of participants was 50.4±11.6 years (29.7% women). Subjects with LMM showed significantly lower triglyceride levels, greater high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels, and lower body mass index (BMI), compared with subjects who had normal muscle mass. No significant differences in hair mineral concentrations were observed between subjects with LMM and subjects with normal muscle mass, with the exception of copper. Hair copper concentrations were significantly greater in subjects with LMM than in subjects with normal muscle mass after adjustment for covariates and factors (65.7±14.2 vs 33.1±4.3 µg/g, P = 0.035). Conclusion These results suggest that hair mineral status may play a role in the development of LMM. Therefore, further studies with larger numbers of subjects are required to identify the effects of mineral imbalances, their relationships with sarcopenia, and the differences between subjects with LMM and subjects with normal muscle mass.
      PubDate: 2022-05-02
       
  • A Combined Assessment Method of Phase Angle and Skeletal Muscle Index to
           Better Predict Functional Recovery after Acute Stroke

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      Abstract: Objectives We aimed to investigate whether combination assessment of phase angle (PhA) and skeletal muscle index (SMI), was a possible predictor of physical function at discharge from the hospital in patients with acute stroke. Research Methods & Procedures In this retrospective cohort study that was conducted from May 2020 and July 2021, we determined PhA and SMI using bioimpedance analysis (BIA) in patients with acute stroke. Patients were classified as normal, low PhA + SMI group, pre-sarcopenia (low SMI only), and dynapenia (low PhA only) using cut-off points (men: SMI < 7.0 kg/m2, PhA < 4.05 degrees; women: SMI < 5.7 kg/m2, PhA < 3.55 degrees). The main outcome was physical function based on functional independence measure motor (FIM-motor) score at discharge. Multiple regression analysis was used to determine the association between low PhA + SMI and FIM-motor score. Results We included 244 patients (161 men; mean age, 73.9 years). low PhA + SMI was found in 21 (8.6%) patients. Multiple regression analysis showed that low PhA + SMI was independently associated with the FIM-motor score at discharge (β= −0.099, 95%CI: −0.193,−0.005, p = 0.039). The PhA cutoff values for determining good functional results using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were 5.36 for men (sensitivity = 0.769, specificity = 0.586, area under the curve [AUC] = 0.682), and 3.85 for women (sensitivity = It was 0.881, specificity = 0.481, AUC). Further, pearson correlation coefficient showed that PhA was significantly related to FIM-motor score in patients with mild or moderately severe stroke (mild: r = 0.472, p < 0.001; moderate: r = 0.524, p < 0.001). Conclusions Combination of low PhA and SMI values at baseline, was an independent predictor of physical function at discharge in patients with acute stroke. The findings highlighted the importance of measuring PhA and SMI using BIA in patients with acute stroke.
      PubDate: 2022-05-01
       
  • Truncal Fat and Frailty Are Important Predictors of Cognitive Performance
           among Aging Adults with Obesity

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      Abstract: Objectives To explore associations among cognition, frailty, and obesity in older adults. Design Descriptive, secondary analysis of baseline data from two related lifestyle intervention trials. Setting Clinical study open to civilian population through the Center for Translational Research on Inflammatory Diseases at the Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Houston, TX. Participants One hundred eight community-dwelling adults with obesity, aged 65 or older, recruited consecutively from two lifestyle intervention trials. Measurements Cognition was assessed using Composite Age-Adjusted Scale Score from the National Institutes of Health Toolbox COGNITION BATTERY: Obesity was assessed by body mass index (BMI) and also by truncal fat mas via dual energy x-ray absorptiometry. Frailty was assessed using the Physical Performance Test. Results A significant linear regression model for cognition revealed frailty as the strongest predictor, followed by sex, and then truncal fat (R2=0.340, p<0.001). Conclusion Cognition among community-dwelling older adults with obese BMI may worsen with greater truncal fat mass. Frailty appears to be an important predictor of cognitive performance in this population.
      PubDate: 2022-05-01
       
  • The Medium-Term Changes in Health-Related Behaviours among Spanish Older
           People Lifestyles during Covid-19 Lockdown

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      Abstract: Objectives The aim was to evaluate general changes and investigate the association between diet quality, physical activity (PA), and sedentary time (ST) during COVID-19 lockdown and the subsequent 7-month changes in health-related behaviours and lifestyles in older people. Participants 1092 participants (67–97y) from two Spanish cohorts were included. Design Telephone-based questionaries were used to evaluate health-related behaviours and lifestyle. Multinomial logistic regression analyses with diet quality, PA, and ST during lockdown as predictors for health-related behaviours changes post-lockdown were applied. Results Diet quality, PA, and ST significantly improved post-lockdown, while physical component score of the SF-12 worsened. Participants with a low diet quality during lockdown had higher worsening of post-lockdown ST and anxiety; whereas those with high diet quality showed less likelihood of remaining abstainers, worsening weight, and improving PA. Lower ST was associated with a higher likelihood of remaining abstainers, and worsening weight and improving social contact; nevertheless, higher ST was linked to improvement in sleep quality. Lower PA was more likely to decrease alcohol consumption, while higher PA showed the opposite. However, PA was more likely to be associated to remain abstainers. Conclusions Despite improvements in lifestyle after lockdown, it had health consequences for older people. Particularly, lower ST during lockdown seemed to provide the most medium-term remarkable lifestyle improvements.
      PubDate: 2022-05-01
       
  • Cutoff Points for Grip Strength in Screening for Sarcopenia in
           Community-Dwelling Older-Adults: A Systematic Review

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      Abstract: Background Currently, different cutoff points for handgrip strength (HGS) have been used to estimate the prevalence of sarcopenia. In addition, the variability of equipment and protocols for this assessment can significantly influence the early detection of this important public health problem. Thus, this review aims to identify the different cutoff points for HGS adopted for older men and women in screening for sarcopenia. Objectives this review aims to identify the different cutoff points for HGS adopted for older men and women in screening for sarcopenia. Methods: In accordance with the PRISMA 2020 recommendations, which included published studies from the last 10 years, from 6 databases, in 3 different languages. Results 19.730 references were identified, of which 62 were included for the review. All references analyzed used algorithms and definitions of sarcopenia already known in the literature. Of the studies found, 16 chose to develop cutoff values for HGS based on their own population. The variation in cutoff points was evident when compared between gender and regions of the world. Conclusion It has become evident that there is a variability of normative values for HGS in sarcopenia screening. In addition, this systematic review shows the difference in the cutoff points used between the consensuses and those developed for each population.
      PubDate: 2022-04-30
       
  • The Association between Number of Teeth and Cognitive Frailty in Older
           Adults: A Cross-Sectional Study

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      Abstract: Objectives This study aimed to explore the association between number of teeth and cognitive frailty in American older adults. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting Community. Participants The participants were 1,531 community-dwelling older adults aged 60 or older from the NHANES database. Methods Frailty was assessed using a 49-item frailty index, with a cut-off value for frailty of more than 0.21. Cognitive dysfunction was evaluated by the Digit-Symbol Coding Test (DSCT), with the cut-off being below the lowest interquartile range (scores ≤37). Cognitive frailty was defined as participants who suffered from both frailty and cognitive dysfunction. Oral health indicators included number of teeth and other factors, such as the presence of gum disease, daily use of dental floss, daily use of mouthwash and self-rated oral health. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to explore the relationship between number of teeth and cognitive frailty. Results The mean age of the total sample was 69.67 (SD=6.60) years, and 52.71% (n=807) were female. Our study suggests there was a negative association between number of teeth and cognitive frailty (OR =0.98,95%CI:0.96–0.99, P=0.044) after controlling for potential confounding factors. In addition, older adults with 20 or more teeth had lower odds of being cognitively frail (OR=0.66,95%CI:0.44–0.99, P=0.046) than individuals who had less than 20 teeth. Conclusion This study suggests that older adults who have more teeth are associated with a lower risk of cognitive frailty. This finding highlights the importance of maintaining as many teeth as possible throughout life and into old age. Cohort studies will be required in the future to determine this relationship.
      PubDate: 2022-04-26
       
  • Difference between “Physical Fitness Age” Based on Physical Function
           and Chronological Age Is Associated with Obesity, Hyperglycemia,
           Depressive Symptoms, and Low Serum Albumin

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      Abstract: Objectives This study aimed to (1) develop the physical fitness age, which is the biological age based on physical function, (2) evaluate the validity of the physical fitness age for the assessment of sarcopenia, and (3) examine the factors associated with the difference between physical fitness age and chronological age. Design Cross-sectional study Setting and Participants Community-dwelling older adults and outpatients. Measurements A formula for calculating the physical fitness age was created based on the usual walking speed, handgrip strength, one-leg standing time, and chronological age of 4,076 older adults from the pooled data of community-dwelling and outpatients using the principal component analysis. For the validation of the physical fitness age, we also used pooled data from community-dwelling older adults (n = 1929) and outpatients (n = 473). Sarcopenia was diagnosed according to the Asian Working Group for Sarcopenia 2019 consensus. The association of D-age (the difference between physical and chronological ages) with cardiovascular risk factors, renal function, and cardiac function was examined. Results The receiver operating characteristic analysis, with sarcopenia as the outcome, showed that the area under the curve (AUC) of physical fitness age was greater than that of chronological age (AUC 0.87 and 0.77, respectively, p < 0.001). Binomial logistic regression analysis revealed that the D-age was significantly associated with sarcopenia after adjustment for covariates (odds ratio 1.22, 95% confidence interval 1.19–1.26; p <0.001). In multivariate linear regression analysis with D-age as the dependent variable, D-age was independently associated with a history of diabetes mellitus (or hemoglobin A1c as a continuous variable), obesity, depression, and low serum albumin level. D-age was also correlated with estimated glomerular filtration rate derived from serum cystatin C, brain natriuretic peptide, and ankle-brachial index, reflecting some organ function and arteriosclerosis. Conclusions Compared to chronological age, physical fitness age calculated from handgrip strength, one-leg standing time, and usual walking speed was a better scale for sarcopenia. D-age, which could be a simple indicator of physical function, was associated with modifiable factors, such as poor glycemic control, obesity, depressive symptoms, and malnutrition.
      PubDate: 2022-04-25
       
  • The Relationship between Dietary Copper intake and Telomere Length in
           Hypertension

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      Abstract: Background More indications proved that diet might be involved in the telomere length, a marker of biological aging and chronic diseases. Copper is widely viewed as one of the essential elements in the diet. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the relationship between telomere length and dietary copper intake in hypertension and provide a basis for guiding dietary copper intake in patients with hypertension. Methods The data was collected from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) in 1999–2000 and 2001–2002. The relevance between telomere length and dietary copper intake in hypertension is assessed using a multivariable linear regression model. Results We gathered 1,867 participants with hypertension with assessed telomere length and dietary copper intake. We found that one unit increasing log-transformed dietary copper intake in hypertension was significantly associated with longer telomere length base pair (bp) (β = 112.20, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 5.48, 218.92), after controlling for covariates, including age, sex, ethnicity, body mass index (BMI), physical activity, and taking medication for hypertension. For the age group, we found that one unit increasing log-transformed dietary copper in hypertension was associated with longer telomere length (β = 237.95, 95% CI: 114.39, 361.51) in the age group >45 years. The grouping was based on whether the participants take medication for hypertension. We found that one unit increasing log-transformed dietary copper in hypertension was associated with longer telomere length (β = 116.47, 95% CI: 0.72, 232.21) in the group that takes medication for hypertension. Conclusions This study demonstrates that dietary copper intake was associated with longer telomere length in patients with hypertension, which provides evidence for guiding dietary copper intake in patients with hypertension. However, further studies are needed to evaluate the effect of copper supplementation on telomere length in patients with hypertension in well-designed random control studies and prospective studies.
      PubDate: 2022-04-25
       
  • Association between Malnutrition Severity and Swallowing Function in
           Convalescent Rehabilitation Wards: A Multi-Center Cohort Study in
           Malnourished Patients with Sarcopenic Dysphagia

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      Abstract: Objectives To evaluate the characteristics of sarcopenic dysphagia (SD) and the prognosis of swallowing function in convalescent rehabilitation hospital patients; and to investigate the association between malnutrition severity and SD. Design A prospective, multi-center, cohort study. Setting We extracted registry data from the Japanese Sarcopenic Dysphagia Database, focusing on patients admitted to convalescent rehabilitation hospitals. Participants A total of 207 participants were recruited and stratified according to the presence or absence of SD. Next, the participants were divided into groups based on nutrition status using the Global Leadership Initiative on Malnutrition criteria normal nutrition, moderate malnutrition, and severe malnutrition. We also compared the outcomes between patients with SD (SD group) and those without SD (no-SD group) according to malnutrition status. Measurements The Food Intake LEVEL Scale (FILS) score was the outcome measure. Higher scores on the FILS indicate better swallowing function. We compared the patient characteristics between the SD and non-SD groups among all patients and then according to the severity of malnutrition. Results A total of 207 patients were recruited. 11 were diagnosed with normal nutrition, 72 with moderate malnutrition, and 124 with severe malnutrition. There were 128 participants with SD and 79 participants without SD; the prevalence of SD was 61.8%. Hip fracture was the most common disease among the SD patients (34.4%). The median time to the end of follow-up was 73.5 days for the SD group and 84.0 days for the no-SD group. There was no significant difference in the FILS score between the SD and no-SD groups, but the increase in the FILS score was significantly lower in the SD group than the no-SD group among patients with severe malnutrition after adjusting for confounding factors (age, sex, FILS at admission, BMI, cognitive functional independence measure, and care level before onset) (β = −0.206, p = 0.011, 95% confidence interval = −0.723, −0.098). Conclusion Orthopedic diseases are the most common type of disease among SD patients in convalescent rehabilitation hospitals. Swallowing dysfunction was particularly severe in malnourished patients with SD. This result suggests the importance of the definition of SD for malnourished patients. We should practice nutritional management as soon as possible in severely malnourished patients diagnosed with SD.
      PubDate: 2022-04-20
       
  • COVID-19 Prevalence in UNIVI Group Nursing Homes and Multilevel Geriatric
           Hospitals: Epidemiological Study of Immunological Status with Rapid
           Serological Tests for Diagnostic Guidance and Follow Up

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      Abstract: Background/Objectives To date, data are lacking on the proportion of residents, and employees who have actually been exposed to SARS-Cov-2 in nursing homes and geriatric healthcare institutions, as well as the evolution of their serological status and the recurrence of Covid-19. The primary objective was to determine the prevalence of COVID-19 using NG Biotech rapid serological tests among caregivers and residents. The secondary objectives were to determine: prevalence according to RT PCR tests or clinical diagnosis; the risk factors (autonomy, arterial hypertension, diabetes mellitus) and clinical presentation (e.g. respiratory, abdominal or cutaneous symptoms, asthenia, fever) among residents; the risk factors (age, sex, profession, family situation) among caregivers; the evolution of the serological status at 1, 3 and 6 months using NG Biotech rapid serological tests; the symptomatic recurrence of Covid 19 at 1, 3 and 6 months. Design Multicentric prospective observational. Setting Study location: 27 nursing homes and 3 multilevel geriatric hospitals belonging to the UNIVI Group in France. Participants 1334 professionals: 692 among multilevel geriatric hospitals (mean age: 43.6+/−11.8; 441 (82.4%) female) and 642 among nursing homes (mean age: 43.5+/−12.4; 685 (85.9%) female), and 1145 residents (mean age: 89+/−7.5; 898 (78.7%) female). Measurements Prevalence using NG Biotech rapid serological tests, medical diagnosis, RT-PCR tests. Risk factors among residents using the medical file and among caregivers using questionnaires. Clinical presentation in residents using the medical file. Results The prevalence using NG Biotech rapid serological test in residents was 14.4 % (168 of 1142 available diagnostics), the global prevalence (positive RT-PCR or positive serological test) was 22.7% (203 of 895 available diagnostics). The prevalence using NG Biotech rapid serological test in professionals was 12.8% (164 of 1315 available diagnostics), the global prevalence (positive RT-PCR test or positive serological test) was 23.8% (222 of 933 available diagnostics). The risk factors among residents were: living in an Alzheimer unit, and being a contact case. Being independent for activities of daily living was protective. The risk factor among caregivers was being a contact case. Another risk factor was the job; nurse assistants, nurses, and physicians were the most exposed. Residents had atypical clinical presentations including frequent geriatric syndromes (falls, delirium). 68.3% (71 of 104) of the initially positive residents still had a positive rapid serological test at 1 month follow up and 74 % (54 of 73) at 3 months follow up. 77.9% (88 of 113) of the initially positive employees still had a positive rapid serological test at 1 month follow up. Symptomatic reinfection was exceptional in caregivers or in residents during follow up. Conclusion COVID 19 prevalence among caregivers and residents in nursing homes and geriatric health Institutions is underestimated when using only one method for diagnosis. Geriatric syndromes such as falls and delirium in residents should trigger further investigations on a COVID-19 cause. Immunity was persistent in ¾ of caregivers and residents during the 3 months follow up. The high prevalence of COVID 19 in geriatric institutions pleads in favor of the French vaccination policy, initially targeting as a priority the most vulnerable and dependent people, followed by staff members in healthcare institutions and nursing homes. More studies on the persistence of immunity and the perspective of Covid 19 mutations will help determine the long-term vaccine booster policy.
      PubDate: 2022-04-20
       
 
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