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  Subjects -> NUTRITION AND DIETETICS (Total: 201 journals)
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International Journal of Food Safety, Nutrition and Public Health
Number of Followers: 20  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1479-3911 - ISSN (Online) 1479-392X
Published by Inderscience Publishers Homepage  [451 journals]
  • A perspective on the potential health risks from PCBs and heavy metals
           contamination of M. merluccius from Mediterranean Sea

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      Authors: Sara Spognardi, Ilenia Bravo, Riccardo Rea, Lucio Cappelli, Patrizia Papetti
      Pages: 85 - 103
      Abstract: In this study, we determined the concentration of six marker PCBS congeners and four trace elements, all having a maximum tolerable level of intake set by EU regulation, in samples of European hake taken from the Mediterranean Sea. The results showed that the contaminant levels were below the recommended international limits in all samples, although with higher PCBs concentrations in samples from Ligurian and Adriatic Sea. The relationships between the contaminants and the sampling sites were investigated using analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey's HSD post-hoc tests. Statistical analysis revealed significant interactions especially between the PCBs, the sum of PCBs and the sites. To evaluate the potential health risk from consumption, we calculated the estimated daily intake (EDI) for adults, finding that total health risk index (HRI) value was low (< 1) in the case of chronic consumptions, despite the non-negligible mercury concentration.
      Keywords: bioaccumulation; polychlorinated biphenyls; PCBs; heavy metals; European hake; Merluccius merluccius; Mediterranean Sea
      Citation: International Journal of Food Safety, Nutrition and Public Health, Vol. 6, No. 2 (2021) pp. 85 - 103
      PubDate: 2021-03-03T23:20:50-05:00
      DOI: 10.1504/IJFSNPH.2021.113404
      Issue No: Vol. 6, No. 2 (2021)
       
  • Safety of cooked foods in home and street vended conditions beyond two
           hours: relevance of 'safe storage temperature' message from
           WHO's five keys for safe food in India

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      Authors: Alekhya Sabbithi, Naveen Kumar Ramachandrappa, SubbaRao M. Gavaravarapu, N. Balakrishna, Sudershan Rao Vemula
      Pages: 104 - 119
      Abstract: The present study examined the differences in microbial growth of foods prepared in household and street vended conditions. Three commonly consumed foods (rice, dhal, meat) were prepared in household (HH) condition and similar food samples collected from street vendors for microbial analysis (USFDA-BAM protocol) at every 2 hrs up to 8 hrs. TBC in cooked rice appeared after 6 hrs (log 0.45 ± 0.36 cfu/g) and 2 hrs of storage (log 0.95 ± 0.94 cfu/g) from HH foods and street foods respectively. Meat samples had log 1.28 ± 1.48 cfu/g at 8 hrs and log 1.17 ± 1.35 at 4 hrs in HH and street foods respectively. <i>Bacillus cereus</i> and <i>Salmonella</i> spp. were identified in street-vended dhal samples after 4 hrs. There is a need for better understanding on shelf life of cooked foods in HH conditions and street foods.
      Keywords: microbial growth; households; rice; dhal; meat; street foods; storage; cooked foods; India
      Citation: International Journal of Food Safety, Nutrition and Public Health, Vol. 6, No. 2 (2021) pp. 104 - 119
      PubDate: 2021-03-03T23:20:50-05:00
      DOI: 10.1504/IJFSNPH.2021.113403
      Issue No: Vol. 6, No. 2 (2021)
       
  • Nutritional management in polycystic ovary syndrome: challenges and
           opportunities

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      Authors: Caroline Hmedeh, Ghina Ghazeeri, Ihab Tewfik
      Pages: 120 - 130
      Abstract: PCOS is one of the most common endocrine diseases affecting women of reproductive age. There is a high prevalence among diseased females. The proper diet for PCOS thus targets these two characteristics of the disorder and through their management and the other symptoms of PCOS including hirsutism, acne and infertility are targeted. Saturated fats consumption should be reduced the unsaturated fat intake must be balanced with the carbohydrate and protein intake. Carbohydrate intake should not be abundant in the diet and the protein intake should not exceed 20% of the total macronutrient calorie intake. A healthy lifestyle must be followed which includes at least 30 minutes of exercise, five times a week. A properly managed diet combined with a balanced lifestyle addresses insulin resistance, cardiovascular health and metabolism, all of which target PCOS symptoms and alleviate them.
      Keywords: polycystic ovary syndrome; PCOS; fats; carbohydrates; proteins; insulin resistance; diabetes; hirtsuism; infertility; glycaemia; glycemic index; physical activity; lifestyle; diet 3
      Citation: International Journal of Food Safety, Nutrition and Public Health, Vol. 6, No. 2 (2021) pp. 120 - 130
      PubDate: 2021-03-03T23:20:50-05:00
      DOI: 10.1504/IJFSNPH.2021.113389
      Issue No: Vol. 6, No. 2 (2021)
       
  • Urban vegetable farming in Ghana: assessing the health risks from
           objective and subjective lenses

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      Authors: Abdul Wahid Arimiyaw, Kabila Abass, Felix Asante
      Pages: 131 - 145
      Abstract: Urban vegetable farming remains a potential public health threat in many underdeveloped countries where wastewater is predominantly used. This paper assesses health risks associated with the use of contaminated water for vegetable farming from an objective and farmers' subjective lenses. Samples of water and vegetables taken from vegetable farming communities in Kumasi were tested for microbial contamination using the most probable number (MPN) method. Besides, health risk perceptions of farmers were assessed using thematic analytical framework. Results show high contamination levels of <i>total coliform</i>, <i>Escherichia coli</i> and <i>Enterococci aerogenes</i> bacteria in both water and vegetable samples, far above the World Health Organisation standards and the benchmark set by the International Commission on Microbiological Specifications for Food. While objective laboratory results show that both the irrigation water and the vegetables produced pose public health risks, farmers generally assessed these as safe. Strict supervision, enforcement of relevant by-laws and continuous public education by metropolitan, municipal and district assemblies are key in ensuring healthy vegetable production for the consuming public.
      Keywords: urban vegetable; vegetable farming; wastewater irrigation; microbial contamination; health risks; risk assessment; risk perceptions; thematic analytical framework; most probable number; MPN; qualitative; urban Kumasi; urban Ghana
      Citation: International Journal of Food Safety, Nutrition and Public Health, Vol. 6, No. 2 (2021) pp. 131 - 145
      PubDate: 2021-03-03T23:20:50-05:00
      DOI: 10.1504/IJFSNPH.2021.113407
      Issue No: Vol. 6, No. 2 (2021)
       
  • Identification of inexpensive natural biopreservatives for food processing
           applications

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      Authors: Sayed Golam Mohiuddin, Md Masudur Rahman, Shoeb Ahmed
      Pages: 146 - 157
      Abstract: Over the years several physical and chemical preservation techniques have been adopted to deal with food spoilage, however, some of them are not suitable for consumption and pose severe health concerns. This calls for an immediate pursuit towards preservation approaches which are strongly effective in terms of antimicrobial, antifungal, mycotoxins inhibition. The use of natural antimicrobial compounds especially extracted from plants are of growing interest due to their non-hazardous properties. This study is designed to identify effective natural bio-preservatives from plant extracts. Among some natural plant extracts tested, cinnamon and clove essential oil (EO) were found to be most effective. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) for bacteria for both cinnamon and clove was found to be 0.2% (v/v). These were also tested for antifungal properties, where unlike clove EO, cinnamon EO was found to be very good antifungal agent. The results suggest that cinnamon and clove EO have strong antibacterial and moderate antifungal activity and may be used as biopreservatives for raw and slightly processed food.
      Keywords: antimicrobial agents; food safety; essential oils; minimum inhibitory concentration; MIC
      Citation: International Journal of Food Safety, Nutrition and Public Health, Vol. 6, No. 2 (2021) pp. 146 - 157
      PubDate: 2021-03-03T23:20:50-05:00
      DOI: 10.1504/IJFSNPH.2021.113406
      Issue No: Vol. 6, No. 2 (2021)
       
  • Determination of formaldehyde in fresh seafood under different washing and
           cooking conditions

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      Authors: Pattama Senthong, Tule Sirikitputtisak, Sivasit Wittayasilp
      Pages: 158 - 166
      Abstract: This study assessed the concentrations of formaldehyde in seafood from domestic markets in Thailand. The four fish species sampled were mackerel, skipjack, threadfin bream, and mullet, along with one prawn and one squid species. Formaldehyde concentrations after alternative preparation conditions were considered. This included the number of rinse cycles: one or two; and alternative cooking methods: boiled and fried. The results indicated that skipjack and threadfin bream had the highest and lowest formaldehyde concentrations, respectively. Rinsing seafood with water once or twice was found to reduce formaldehyde concentrations by 16% or 26%, respectively. Cooking by boiling or frying reduced formaldehyde concentrations by 42% or 41%, respectively. In all cases of preparation and cooking observed, the formaldehyde concentration remained below the permissible level set by the Department of Medical Sciences (5 mg/kg).
      Keywords: formaldehyde; formalin; seafood; fish; prawn; squid; washing; cooking; frying; boiling
      Citation: International Journal of Food Safety, Nutrition and Public Health, Vol. 6, No. 2 (2021) pp. 158 - 166
      PubDate: 2021-03-03T23:20:50-05:00
      DOI: 10.1504/IJFSNPH.2021.113405
      Issue No: Vol. 6, No. 2 (2021)
       
 
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