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  Subjects -> NUTRITION AND DIETETICS (Total: 201 journals)
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Public Health Nutrition
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.122
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 30  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1368-9800 - ISSN (Online) 1475-2727
Published by Cambridge University Press Homepage  [353 journals]
  • PHN volume 25 issue 10 Cover and Front matter

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      Pages: 1 - 3
      PubDate: 2022-09-14
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980022001781
       
  • PHN volume 25 issue 10 Cover and Back matter

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      Pages: 1 - 1
      PubDate: 2022-09-14
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980022001793
       
  • Barriers and enablers to menu planning guideline implementation in
           Australian childcare centres and the role of government support services

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      Authors: Elford; Audrey, Spence, Alison, Wakem, Amy, Campbell, Karen J, Love, Penelope
      Pages: 2661 - 2670
      Abstract: Objective:To explore government support service access, perceived barriers/enablers to menu planning and menu compliance in long day care (LDC) centres in Victoria, Australia, where the Victorian Government-funded Healthy Eating Advisory Service (HEAS) is available to provide free LDC menu planning support.Design:This is a cross-sectional study design. Data were collected from online surveys with the option of uploading 2 weeks of menus and recipes. Menu compliance was scored for quantity, quality and variety. Barriers/enablers to menu planning guideline implementation were determined using the Theoretical Domains Framework (TDF). Independent t tests, one-way ANOVA and chi-square tests assessed relationships between characteristics, barriers/enablers and menu scores.Setting:Eighty-nine LDC centres that prepare food onsite.Participants:LDC staff responsible for menu planning (n 89) and menus from eighteen centres.Results:Fifty-five per cent of centres had accessed HEAS. Of eighteen provided menus, only one menu was compliant with menu planning guidelines. HEAS access was associated with higher average scores in four of seven TDF domains, namely knowledge/awareness, skills/role, reinforcement/influence and optimism/intent. There were no correlations between menu score and barriers/enablers; however, menu quality scores were higher for those accessing HEAS.Conclusions:Childcare-specific government support services may be an important public health nutrition strategy and may improve menu planning guideline implementation as well as menu quality; however, this does not necessarily translate into menu compliance. Research should confirm these findings in larger studies to ascertain uptake of these services. Public health efforts should focus on exploring barriers and enablers to uptake of government support services to increase reach and acceptability.
      PubDate: 2022-06-01
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980022001343
       
  • Differences in energy and nutrient content of menu items served by large
           chain restaurants in the USA and the UK in 2018

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      Authors: Huang; Yuru, Burgoine, Thomas, Theis, Dolly RZ, Adams, Jean
      Pages: 2671 - 2679
      Abstract: Objective:To quantify the sector-wide energy and nutritional differences of both adult and children’s restaurant menu items in the UK and the USA in 2018.Design:Cross-sectional study.Setting:Energy and nutritional information provided on restaurant websites.Participants:Menu items (n 40 902) served by forty-two large UK chains and ninety-six large USA chains.Results:Mean absolute energy, fat and saturated fat values were higher in USA menu items. For example, the mean adjusted per-item differences of adult menu items between the USA and the UK were 45·6 kcal for energy and 3·2 g for fat. Comparable figures for children’s menu items were 43·7 kcal and 4 g. Compared with UK menu items, USA adult menu items also had higher sugar content (3·2 g, 95 % CI (0·5, 6)), and children’s menu items had higher Na content (181·1 mg, 95 % CI (108·4, 253·7)). Overall, 96·8 % of UK and 95·8 % of USA menu items exceeded recommended levels for at least one of Na, fat, saturated fat or sugars.Conclusions:Menu items served by large chain restaurants had higher mean absolute levels of energy, fat and saturated fat in the USA compared with the UK. UK adult menu items were also lower in sugars compared with the USA ones and children’s items lower in Na. As more than 95 % of all items were considered to have high levels of at least one nutrient of public health concern in the USA and the UK, improvements in restaurant menu items are needed in both countries.
      PubDate: 2022-06-01
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980022001379
       
  • Regulation of baby food marketing in Thailand: a NetCode analysis

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      Authors: Cetthakrikul; Nisachol, Kelly, Matthew, Banwell, Cathy, Baker, Phillip, Smith, Julie
      Pages: 2680 - 2692
      Abstract: Objective:To report on the prevalence of different types of breast-milk substitutes (BMS) marketing and the compliance of such marketing with the ‘Control of Marketing of Infant and Young Child Food Act 2017’ (The Act) and the ‘International Code of Marketing of Breast-milk Substitutes (WHO Code)’ in Thailand.Design:Cross-sectional quantitative study, guided by the WHO/UNICEF NetCode Periodic Assessment Protocol.Setting:Health facilities and retail outlets in Bangkok, Thai media.Participants:Mothers of 0–2-year-old children, health professionals, promotions at retail outlets and health facilities, product labels, marketing on television and the internet.Results:Marketing to mothers was highly prevalent, mostly from electronic or digital media, while BMS companies provided items to health professionals to distribute to mothers. Promotional materials in health facilities displayed company brands or logos. At retail outlets, most promotions were price-related. Approximately two-fifths of labels contained nutrition or health claims. Television marketing was growing-up-milk (GUM) advertisements, while internet promotions were varied from price-related materials to product reviews. Most instances of non-compliant BMS marketing with the Act were advertisements to mothers, and most were infant formula. Most non-compliant BMS marketing with the WHO Code was mainly concerned GUM, which are not covered by the Act and appeared in the media.Conclusions:BMS marketing does not fully comply with the Act or the WHO Code. The Thai government should conduct regular monitoring and enforcement activities, educate health professionals, and strengthen the Act’s provisions on the media and GUM to fully align with the WHO Code.
      PubDate: 2022-06-23
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980022001446
       
  • The contribution of breastfeeding to a healthy, secure and sustainable
           food system for infants and young children: monitoring mothers’ milk
           production in the food surveillance system of Norway

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      Authors: Smith; Julie P, Lande, Britt, Johansson, Lars, Baker, Phillip, Bærug, Anne
      Pages: 2693 - 2701
      Abstract: Objective:The mother–child breastfeeding dyad is a powerful force for achieving healthy, secure and sustainable food systems. However, food system reports exclude breastfeeding and mother’s milk. To help correct this omission and give breastfeeding women greater visibility in food systems dialogue and action, we illustrate how to estimate mother’s milk production and incorporate this into food surveillance systems, drawing on the pioneering experience of Norway to show the potential value of such analysis.Design:The estimates use data on the proportion of children who are breastfed at each month of age (0–24 months), annual number of live births and assumptions on daily human milk intake at each month. New indicators for temporal and cross-country comparisons are considered.Setting:It is assumed that a breastfeeding mother on average produces 306 l of milk during 24 months of lactation.Participants:The annual number of live births is from Statistics Norway. Data for any breastfeeding at each month of age, between 0 and 24 months, are from official surveys in 1993, 1998–1999, 2006–2007, 2013 and 2018–2019.Results:Estimated total milk production by Norwegian mothers increased from 8·2 to 10·1 million l per year between 1993 and 2018–2019. Annual per capita production increased from 69 to 91 l per child aged 0–24 months.Conclusions:This study shows it is feasible and useful to include human milk production in food surveillance systems as an indicator of infant and young child food security and dietary quality. It also demonstrates significant potential for greater milk production.
      PubDate: 2022-07-04
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980022001495
       
  • Cross-cultural adaptation and validation of a questionnaire on eating
           habits and physical activity of university students in confinement due to
           coronavirus disease

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      Authors: Cofre; Sebastian, Perez, Victoria, Giuras, Nicole, Pino, Jose L, Diaz, Claudio, Arguello, Graciela
      Pages: 2702 - 2708
      Abstract: Objective:The purpose of the current study was to cross-culturally adapt and validate an online questionnaire to assess eating habits and physical activity of university students under confinement due to coronavirus disease (COVID-19).Design:Generation of a cross-sectional online survey to university students conducted during confinement due to COVID-19. The study was divided into two phases.Settings:Students, Chile.Participants:Phase 1 considered the process of translation and back translation, expert panel, cultural adaptation and the generation of a pilot to validate a preliminary format of the questionnaire. In Phase 2, information from the instrument was collected from two hundred and sixty-eight university students, ages 16 to 30 years old, with a mean age of 21·6 (3·3) The major proportion of participants were female (82 %).Results:The adapted questionnaire was statistically validated in three dimensions: (A) eating habits and behaviours during quarantine, (B) perception of risk and (C) physical activity changes during the quarantine. The reliability of Cronbach’s α for dimensions A, B and C was 0·59, 0·85 and 0·97, respectively. The complete questionnaire obtained 0·61 in internal consistency and 0·61 (0·58–0·67) ICC reliability. A statistically significant positive correlation matrix was observed.Conclusions:This questionnaire is a practical tool to obtain accurate information about the relation of COVID-19 confinement on people’s eating habits and physical activity. Therefore, it could contribute to establishing appropriate strategies to prevent negative effects on people’s health.
      PubDate: 2022-03-31
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980022000805
       
  • Validation of an instrument to assess food diversity in women of
           childbearing age in Medellín, Colombia

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      Authors: Correa Guzmán; Nathalia, Calvo Betancur, Víctor Daniel, Sepúlveda Herrera, Diana María, Cárdenas Sánchez, Diana Liseth, Manjarrés Correa, Luz Mariela
      Pages: 2709 - 2719
      Abstract: Objective:To validate a Food Diversity Questionnaire (CDA, for its name in Spanish) that identifies the prevalence of the risk of deficiency in the intake of eleven micronutrients.Design:The CDA paper form, an online application for data entry and handling, was designed and compared with the 24-h recall (24HR) as a reference method. All data were processed in Personal Computer Software for Intake Distribution Estimation (PC-SIDE) v1 software. A descriptive analysis and comparisons between prevalence, concordance and reproducibility analyses were performed.Setting:Medellín, Colombia.Participants:Women of childbearing age between 19 and 50 years (n 186) who worked for the Buen Comienzo programme in 2019.Results:When comparing the adjusted 24HR technique and the CDA, there was no significant difference in population-level data at risk of deficiency in any micronutrient intake. However, based on individual-level data of the best linear unbiased predictor, the concordance analyses were weak, and although agreements were high according to the diagnostic performance tests, a good ability to detect deficiency was only observed in a few nutrients: vitamin A 100·0 %, Ca 98·7 %, Fe 92·8 %, folates 91·6 %, and pyridoxine 81·8 %.Conclusions:The CDA validated in this study is useful and faster at evaluating population-level data at risk of deficiency in the intake of Ca, Fe, Zn, thiamine, riboflavin, niacin, pyridoxine, folates, vitamin B12, vitamin C and vitamin A. Based on individual-level data, a good ability to detect deficiencies was observed in the intake of vitamin A, Ca, Fe, folates and pyridoxine.
      PubDate: 2022-04-08
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980022000854
       
  • Nutrient profiles of commercially produced complementary foods available
           in Cambodia, Indonesia and the Philippines

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      Authors: Bassetti; Eleonora, Zehner, Elizabeth, Mayhew, Susannah H, Nasser, Nadine, Mulder, Anzélle, Badham, Jane, Sweet, Lara, Crossley, Rachel, Pries, Alissa M
      Pages: 2720 - 2730
      Abstract: Objective:To assess the nutritional suitability of commercially produced complementary foods (CPCF) marketed in three South-East Asian contexts.Design:Based on label information declared on the products, nutrient composition and content of CPCF were assessed against the WHO Europe nutrient profile model (NPM). The proportion of CPCF that would require a ‘high sugar’ warning was also determined.Setting:Khsach Kandal district, Cambodia; Bandung City, Indonesia; and National Capital Region, Philippines.Participants:CPCF products purchased in Cambodia (n 68) and Philippines (n 211) in 2020, and Indonesia (n 211) in 2017.Results:Only 4·4 % of products in Cambodia, 10·0 % of products in Indonesia and 37·0 % of products in the Philippines fully complied with relevant WHO Europe NPM nutrient composition requirements. Sixteen per cent of CPCF in Cambodia, 27·0 % in Indonesia and 58·8 % in the Philippines contained total sugar content levels that would require a ‘high sugar’ warning.Conclusions:Most of the analysed CPCF were not nutritionally suitable to be promoted for older infants and young children based on their nutrient profiles, with many containing high levels of sugar and sodium. Therefore, it is crucial to introduce new policies, regulations and standards to limit the promotion of inappropriate CPCF in the South-East Asia region.
      PubDate: 2022-07-04
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980022001483
       
  • Relative validity of a short screener to assess diet quality in patients
           with severe obesity before and after bariatric surgery

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      Authors: Heusschen; Laura, Berendsen, Agnes AM, Balvers, Michiel GJ, Deden, Laura N, de Vries, Jeanne HM, Hazebroek, Eric J
      Pages: 2731 - 2741
      Abstract: Objective:To determine the relative validity and reproducibility of the Eetscore FFQ, a short screener for assessing diet quality, in patients with (severe) obesity before and after bariatric surgery (BS).Design:The Eetscore FFQ was evaluated against 3-d food records (3d-FR) before (T0) and 6 months after BS (T6) by comparing index scores of the Dutch Healthy Diet index 2015 (DHD2015-index). Relative validity was assessed using paired t tests, Kendall’s tau-b correlation coefficients (τb), cross-classification by tertiles, weighted kappa values (kw) and Bland–Altman plots. Reproducibility of the Eetscore FFQ was assessed using intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC).Setting:Regional hospital, the Netherlands.Participants:Hundred and forty participants with obesity who were scheduled for BS.Results:At T0, mean total DHD2015-index score derived from the Eetscore FFQ was 10·2 points higher than the food record-derived score (P < 0·001) and showed an acceptable correlation (τb = 0·42, 95 % CI: 0·27, 0·55). There was a fair agreement with a correct classification of 50 % (kw = 0·37, 95 % CI: 0·25, 0·49). Correlation coefficients of the individual DHD components varied from 0·01–0·54. Similar results were observed at T6 (τb = 0·31, 95 % CI: 0·12, 0·48, correct classification of 43·7 %; kw = 0·25, 95 % CI: 0·11, 0·40). Reproducibility of the Eetscore FFQ was good (ICC = 0·78, 95 % CI: 0·69, 0·84).Conclusion:The Eetscore FFQ showed to be acceptably correlated with the DHD2015-index derived from 3d-FR, but absolute agreement was poor. Considering the need for dietary assessment methods that reduce the burden for patients, practitioners and researchers, the Eetscore FFQ can be used for ranking according to diet quality and for monitoring changes over time.
      PubDate: 2022-07-04
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980022001501
       
  • The psychosocial antecedents of the adherence to the Mediterranean diet

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      Authors: Carfora; Valentina, Morandi, Maria, Jelić, Anđela, Catellani, Patrizia
      Pages: 2742 - 2757
      Abstract: Objective:Most previous research on the antecedents of healthy food choice has not investigated the links between these antecedents and has focused on specific food choice rather than on an overall diet. In the present study, we tested the plausibility of an integrated theoretical model aiming to explain the role of different psychosocial factors in increasing the intention to adhere to the Mediterranean Diet (MeDiet).Design:An online survey measured participants’ attitude and perceived behavioural control (i.e. rational antecedents), subjective norm (i.e. social antecedent), positive and negative anticipated emotions (i.e. emotional antecedents), food choice health and mood motives (i.e. motivational antecedents), past adherence to the MeDiet (i.e. behavioural antecedent), and intention to adhere to the MeDiet.Setting:Italy.Participants:1940 adults: 1086 females; 854 males; mean age = 35·65; sd = 14·75; age range = 18–84.Results:Structural Equation Modelling (sem) analyses confirmed the plausibility of the proposed model. Perceived behavioural control was the strongest rational antecedent of intention, followed by the emotional (i.e. anticipated emotions) and the social (i.e. subjective norm) antecedents. Mediation analysis showed that motivational antecedents had only an indirect impact on intention via emotional antecedents. Finally, multigroup sem analysis highlighted that past adherence to the MeDiet moderated the hypothesised paths among all the study variables.Conclusions:The above findings advance our comprehension of which antecedents public communication might leverage to promote an increase in the adherence to the MeDiet.
      PubDate: 2022-04-13
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980022000878
       
  • Can food parenting practices explain the association between parental
           education and children’s food intake' The Feel4Diabetes-study

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      Authors: Flores-Barrantes; Paloma, Mavrogianni, Christina, Iglesia, Iris, Mahmood, Lubna, Willems, Ruben, Cardon, Greet, De Vylder, Flore, Liatis, Stavros, Makrilakis, Konstantinos, Martinez, Remberto, Schwarz, Peter, Rurik, Imre, Antal, Emese, Iotova, Violeta, Tsochev, Kaloyan, Chakarova, Nevena, Kivelä, Jemina, Wikström, Katja, Manios, Yannis, Moreno, Luis A
      Pages: 2758 - 2771
      Abstract: Objective:This study aimed to investigate the mediating role of food parenting practices (FPP), including home availability of different types of foods and drinks, parental modelling of fruit intake, permissiveness and the use of food as a reward in the relationship between parental education and dietary intake in European children.Design:Single mediation analyses were conducted to explore whether FPP explain associations between parents’ educational level and children’s dietary intake measured by a parent-reported FFQ.Setting:Six European countries.Participants:Parent–child dyads (n 6705, 50·7 % girls, 88·8 % mothers) from the Feel4Diabetes-study.Results:Children aged 8·15 ± 0·96 years were included. Parental education was associated with children’s higher intake of water, fruits and vegetables and lower intake of sugar-rich foods and savoury snacks. All FPP explained the associations between parental education and dietary intake to a greater or lesser extent. Specifically, home availability of soft drinks explained 59·3 % of the association between parental education and sugar-rich food intake. Home availability of fruits and vegetables was the strongest mediators in the association between parental education and fruit and vegetable consumption (77·3 % and 51·5 %, respectively). Regarding savoury snacks, home availability of salty snacks and soft drinks was the strongest mediators (27·6 % and 20·8 %, respectively).Conclusions:FPP mediate the associations between parental education and children’s dietary intake. This study highlights the importance of addressing FPP in future interventions targeting low-educated populations.
      PubDate: 2022-04-13
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980022000891
       
  • Perceptions of tap water associated with low-income Michigan mothers’
           and young children’s beverage intake

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      Authors: Bauer; Katherine W, Weeks, Heidi M, Clayson, Michelle, Needham, Belinda
      Pages: 2772 - 2781
      Abstract: Objective:To quantify perceptions of tap water among low-income mothers with young children residing in Michigan and examine associations between perceptions of tap water, mothers’ and young children’s beverage intake, and mothers’ infant feeding practices.Design:Cross-sectional study.Setting:Online survey.Participants:Medicaid-insured individuals who had given birth at a large Midwestern US hospital between fall 2016 and fall 2020 were invited by email to complete a survey in winter 2020 (N 3881); 15·6 % (N 606) completed eligibility screening, 550 (90·8 %) were eligible to participate, and 500 (90·9 %) provided valid survey data regarding perceptions of tap water, self and child beverage intake, and infant feeding practices.Results:Two-thirds (66·2 %) of mothers reported that their home tap water was safe to drink without a filter, while 21·6 % were unsure about the safety of their home tap water. Mothers’ perceptions of their home tap water were associated with their own tap and bottled water intake and their young children’s tap water and bottled water intake. Mothers with more negative perceptions of tap water in general, independent of their perceptions about their home tap water, consumed more bottled water and sugar-sweetened beverages, and their young children drank bottled water and fruit drinks more frequently. Few associations were observed between mothers’ perceptions of tap water and infant feeding practices.Conclusions:Uncertainty about tap water safety and negative perceptions of tap water are common among low-income Michigan mothers. These beliefs may contribute to less healthful and more costly beverage intake among mothers and their young children.
      PubDate: 2022-05-16
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980022001136
       
  • Dietary changes based on food purchase patterns following a type 2
           diabetes diagnosis

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      Authors: Edenbrandt; Anna Kristina, Ewers, Bettina, Storgaard, Heidi, Smed, Sinne
      Pages: 2782 - 2793
      Abstract: Objective:The study explores whether type 2 diabetes (T2D) diagnosis affects food consumption patterns in line with the dietary recommendations provided to individuals in relation to a diagnosis.Design:Based on detailed food purchase data, we explore which dietary changes are most common following a T2D diagnosis. Changes are investigated for several energy-adjusted nutrients and food groups and overall adherence to dietary guidelines.Setting:We use data on diagnosis of T2D and hospitalisation in relation to T2D for a sample of adult Danes registered in the official patient register. This is combined with detailed scanner data on food purchases, which are used as a proxy for dietary intake.Participants:We included 274 individuals in Denmark who are diagnosed during their participation in a consumer panel where they report their food purchases and 16 395 individuals who are not diagnosed.Results:Results suggest some changes in dietary composition following diagnosis, as measured by a Healthy Eating Index and for specific food groups and nutrients, although the long-term effects are limited. Socio-economic characteristics are poor predictors of dietary changes following diagnosis. Change in diet following diagnosis vary with the pre-diagnosis consumption patterns, where individuals with relatively unhealthy overall diets prior to diagnosis improve overall healthiness more compared to individuals with relatively healthy diets prior to diagnosis.Conclusions:Adherence to dietary advice is low, on average, but there is large variation in behavioural change between the diagnosed individuals. Our results stress the difficulty for diagnosed individuals to shift dietary habits, particularly in the long term.
      PubDate: 2022-06-17
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980022001409
       
  • The role of child diets in the association between pre-pregnancy diets and
           childhood behavioural problems: a mediation analysis

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      Authors: Gete; Dereje G, Waller, Michael, Mishra, Gita D
      Pages: 2876 - 2885
      Abstract: Objective:To quantify the mediating role of childhood diets in the relationship between maternal diets prior to pregnancy and childhood behavioural disorders.Design:The Healthy Eating Index score was constructed using a semi-quantitative and validated 101-item FFQ. We assessed childhood behavioural disorders using the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire. Three dietary patterns were identified using principal component analysis to explore childhood dietary patterns (high fats and sugar; prudent diets; and diary). A causal inference framework for mediation analysis was used to quantify the mediating role of childhood diets in the association between pre-pregnancy diets and the risk of offspring behavioural problems.Setting:This is a national representative population-based survey which covers all Australian citizens and permanent residents in Australia.Participants:We included 1448 mother–child pairs from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women’s Health and its sub-study mothers and their children’s health.Results:We found a 20 % of the total effect of the poor adherence to pre-pregnancy diet quality on the risk of offspring behavioural problems was mediated through childhood high consumptions of fats and sugar. No clear mediating effect through prudent and diary childhood diets was observed.Conclusion:This study suggests that childhood high fats and sugar consumption may contribute to the total effects of the pre-pregnancy diets on the risk of childhood behavioural problems.
      PubDate: 2022-06-20
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980022001410
       
  • Remittances and food security in Bangladesh: an empirical country-level
           analysis

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      Authors: Szabo; Sylvia, Ahmed, Sayem, Wiśniowski, Arkadiusz, Pramanik, Malay, Islam, Rashadul, Zaman, Ferdousi, Kuwornu, John KM
      Pages: 2886 - 2896
      Abstract: Objective:To examine the association between remittances and food security in Bangladesh, controlling for other key factors.Design:The secondary data analysis was performed on the most recent (2016) nationally representative Household Income and Expenditure Survey. We used logistic regression models to measure the association between food security of the household and remittances received. The household food security was measured based on expenditure on food items and the energy intake of the household members. The key explanatory variables included the receipt of remittances by the household and household-level socio-economic characteristics.Setting:Bangladesh.Participants:Totally, 45 977 households across seven divisions of Bangladesh.Results:Findings suggested that remittances have a significant positive effect on food security. Further, the households with female heads were significantly more likely to be food insecure. The wealth status and geographical locations were significantly associated with food security status in Bangladesh.Conclusions:The findings highlight the importance of considering remittance as one of the key factors, while stakeholders implement nutritional interventions in Bangladesh and other low-income settings. Future research should consider this as an important determinant while further examining food security in such settings.
      PubDate: 2022-05-26
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980022001252
       
  • Feasibility of the automatic ingestion monitor (AIM-2) for infant feeding
           assessment: a pilot study among breast-feeding mothers from Ghana

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      Authors: Cerminaro; Caroline, Sazonov, Edward, McCrory, Megan A, Steiner-Asiedu, Matilda, Bhaskar, Viprav, Gallo, Sina, Laing, Emma, Jia, Wenyan, Sun, Mingui, Baranowski, Tom, Frost, Gary, Lo, Benny, Anderson, Alex Kojo
      Pages: 2897 - 2907
      Abstract: Objective:Passive, wearable sensors can be used to obtain objective information in infant feeding, but their use has not been tested. Our objective was to compare assessment of infant feeding (frequency, duration and cues) by self-report and that of the Automatic Ingestion Monitor-2 (AIM-2).Design:A cross-sectional pilot study was conducted in Ghana. Mothers wore the AIM-2 on eyeglasses for 1 d during waking hours to assess infant feeding using images automatically captured by the device every 15 s. Feasibility was assessed using compliance with wearing the device. Infant feeding practices collected by the AIM-2 images were annotated by a trained evaluator and compared with maternal self-report via interviewer-administered questionnaire.Setting:Rural and urban communities in Ghana.Participants:Participants were thirty eight (eighteen rural and twenty urban) breast-feeding mothers of infants (child age ≤7 months).Results:Twenty-five mothers reported exclusive breast-feeding, which was common among those < 30 years of age (n 15, 60 %) and those residing in urban communities (n 14, 70 %). Compliance with wearing the AIM-2 was high (83 % of wake-time), suggesting low user burden. Maternal report differed from the AIM-2 data, such that mothers reported higher mean breast-feeding frequency (eleven v. eight times, P = 0·041) and duration (18·5 v. 10 min, P = 0·007) during waking hours.Conclusion:The AIM-2 was a feasible tool for the assessment of infant feeding among mothers in Ghana as a passive, objective method and identified overestimation of self-reported breast-feeding frequency and duration. Future studies using the AIM-2 are warranted to determine validity on a larger scale.
      PubDate: 2022-05-26
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980022001264
       
  • What are the mechanisms and contexts by which care groups achieve social
           and behavioural change in low- and middle-income countries' Group
           motivation findings from a realist synthesis

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      Authors: Pieterse; Pieternella, Walsh, Aisling, Chirwa, Ellen, Matthews, Anne
      Pages: 2908 - 2919
      Abstract: Objective:Infant and under-five mortality rates in low- and middle-income countries (LMIC) can be reduced by encouraging behaviours such as sleeping under insecticide-treated bed nets, exclusive breast-feeding for the first 6 months, regular handwashing, etc. Community-based volunteer or peer-to-peer mechanisms are cost-effective ways of promoting these lifesaving practices. However, the sustainability and reach of community-based behaviour change promotion remains a challenge. Our inquiry focuses on the utilisation, by non-governmental organisations (NGO), of Care Groups, a peer-to-peer behaviour change intervention. We asked: What are the mechanisms and contexts by which Care Groups achieve social and behavioural change in nutrition, health and other sectors'Design:Realist synthesis reviewing forty-two texts that contained empirical evidence about Care Group interventions.Setting:LMIC.Participants:We held consultations with a research reference group, which included Care Group and nutrition experts, and Care Group – implementing NGO staff in Malawi.Results:Different types of motivation drive the establishment and the sustainability of peer group interventions. A certain amount of motivation was derived from the resources provided by the NGO establishing the Care Groups. Subsequently, both volunteers and neighbourhood group members were motivated by the group dynamics and mutual support, as well as support from the wider community. Finally, volunteers and group members alike became self-motivated by their experience of being involved in group activities.Conclusions:When designing and implementing community-based behaviour change interventions, awareness of the multi-directional nature of the motivating drivers that are experienced by peer- or community group members is important, to optimise these groups’ reach and sustainability.
      PubDate: 2022-06-01
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980022001367
       
  • Group-based nutrition interventions to promote healthy eating and mobility
           in community-dwelling older adults: a systematic review

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      Authors: Teggart; Kylie, Ganann, Rebecca, Sihota, Davneet, Moore, Caroline, Keller, Heather, Senson, Christine, Phillips, Stuart M, Neil-Sztramko, Sarah E
      Pages: 2920 - 2951
      Abstract: Objective:To identify the efficacy of group-based nutrition interventions to increase healthy eating, reduce nutrition risk, improve nutritional status and improve physical mobility among community-dwelling older adults.Design:Systematic review. Electronic databases MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE, PsycINFO and Sociological s were searched on July 15, 2020 for studies published in English since January 2010. Study selection, critical appraisal (using the Joanna Briggs Institute’s tools) and data extraction were performed in duplicate by two independent reviewers.Setting:Nutrition interventions delivered to groups in community-based settings were eligible. Studies delivered in acute or long-term care settings were excluded.Participants:Community-dwelling older adults aged 55+ years. Studies targeting specific disease populations or promoting weight loss were excluded.Results:Thirty-one experimental and quasi-experimental studies with generally unclear to high risk of bias were included. Interventions included nutrition education with behaviour change techniques (BCT) (e.g. goal setting, interactive cooking demonstrations) (n 21), didactic nutrition education (n 4), interactive nutrition education (n 2), food access (n 2) and nutrition education with BCT and food access (n 2). Group-based nutrition education with BCT demonstrated the most promise in improving food and fluid intake, nutritional status and healthy eating knowledge compared with baseline or control. The impact on mobility outcomes was unclear.Conclusions:Group-based nutrition education with BCT demonstrated the most promise for improving healthy eating among community-dwelling older adults. Our findings should be interpreted with caution related to generally low certainty, unclear to high risk of bias and high heterogeneity across interventions and outcomes. Higher quality research in group-based nutrition education for older adults is needed.
      PubDate: 2022-05-16
      DOI: 10.1017/S136898002200115X
       
  • Strategies to improve enrollment in The Special Supplemental Nutrition
           Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC): examining high coverage
           states and leveraging successful COVID-19 pandemic adjustments

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      Authors: Kuhn; Amanda G, Ganacias, Karen G, Rethy, Janine A
      Pages: 2952 - 2956
      Abstract: The Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) is an essential program in the USA providing food benefits and nutritional and breast-feeding support to low-income pregnant or postpartum women, infants and children at nutritional risk. Despite similarities amongst federal regulations shared across WIC programs at the state level, important differences in the operations, policies and technologies between states exist. Nationally, nearly half of women, infants and children who were eligible to receive WIC benefits in 2018 were not participating in the program. In this paper, we evaluate common practices exhibited by states with the highest and lowest WIC coverage rates to identify strategies that may improve enrollment and retention rates in regions with low WIC coverage rates. We use WIC as a case study for identifying strategies that can be broadly applied to improve utilisation of similar food assistance programs globally, particularly those benefiting low-income women and children. The four strategies discussed here include utilising data to check adjunctive eligibility and reach eligible non-participants, increasing public awareness of WIC through outreach and referral efforts, implementing a centralised smartphone app and linking personal electronic benefits and streamlining the use of technologies for online applications, participant portals and remote communication. In most states, the COVID-19 pandemic and the federal waivers issued in response have offered the opportunity to promptly implement some of these strategies, particularly with regard to remote communication capabilities. With proper resources and implementation, these strategies can improve utilisation of WIC and similar programs globally.
      PubDate: 2022-07-22
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980022001471
       
  • Exploring young Australians’ understanding of sustainable and healthy
           diets: a qualitative study

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      Authors: Ronto; Rimante, Saberi, Golsa, Carins, Julia, Papier, Keren, Fox, Elizabeth
      Pages: 2957 - 2969
      Abstract: Objective:This qualitative study aimed to explore young Australians’ perspectives, motivators and current practices in achieving a sustainable and healthy diet.Design:Semi-structured online interviews were conducted with young Australians. Interviews were audio-recorded using the online Zoom platform, transcribed and analysed using a deductive analysis method by applying the Theoretical Domains Framework and inductive thematic data analysis.Setting:Young Australians recruited via social media platforms, noticeboard announcements and flyers.Subjects:Twenty-two Australians aged 18 to 25 years.Results:The majority of participants were aware of some aspects of a sustainable and healthy diet and indicated the need to reduce meat intake, increase intake of plant-based foods, reduce food wastage and packaging and reduce food miles. Young adults were motivated to adopt more sustainable dietary practices but reported that individual and environmental factors such as low food literacy, limited food preparation and cooking skills, lack of availability and accessibility of environmentally friendly food options and costs associated with sustainable and healthy diets hindered their ability to do so.Conclusions:Given the barriers faced by many of our participants, there is a need for interventions aimed at improving food literacy and food preparation and cooking skills as well as those that create food environments that make it easy to select sustainable and healthy diets. Future research is needed for longitudinal larger scale quantitative studies to confirm our qualitative findings. In addition, the development and evaluation of individual and micro-environmental-based interventions promote sustainable and healthy diets more comprehensively.
      PubDate: 2022-07-07
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980022001513
       
 
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