A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z  

  Subjects -> NUTRITION AND DIETETICS (Total: 201 journals)
We no longer collect new content from this publisher because the publisher has forbidden systematic access to its RSS feeds.
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Public Health Nutrition
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.122
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 30  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1368-9800 - ISSN (Online) 1475-2727
Published by Cambridge University Press Homepage  [353 journals]
  • PHN volume 25 issue 8 Cover and Front matter

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Pages: 1 - 3
      PubDate: 2022-07-25
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980022001458
       
  • PHN volume 25 issue 8 Cover and Back matter

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Pages: 1 - 1
      PubDate: 2022-07-25
      DOI: 10.1017/S136898002200146X
       
  • Evaluation and prioritisation of actions on food environments to address
           the double burden of malnutrition in Senegal: perspectives from a national
           expert panel

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Manga; Julien Soliba, Diouf, Adama, Vandevijvere, Stefanie, Diagne, Maty, Kwadjode, Komlan, Dossou, Nicole, Thiam, El Hadji Momar, Ndiaye, Ndeye Fatou, Moubarac, Jean-Claude
      Pages: 2043 - 2055
      Abstract: Objective:To evaluate the extent of implementation of public policies aimed at creating healthy eating environments in Senegal compared to international best practice and identity priority actions to address the double burden of malnutrition.Design:The Healthy Food Environment Policy Index (Food-EPI) was used by a local expert panel to assess the level of implementation of forty-three good practice policy and infrastructure support indicators against international best practices using a Likert scale and identify priority actions to address the double burden of malnutrition in Senegal.Setting:Senegal, West Africa.Participants:A national group of independent experts from academia, civil society, non-governmental organisations and United Nations bodies (n =15) and a group of government experts from various ministries (n =16) participated in the study.Results:Implementation of most indicators aimed at creating healthy eating environments were rated as ‘low’ compared to best practice (31 on 43, or 72 %). The Gwet AC2 inter-rater reliability was good at 0·75 (95 % CI 0·70, 0·80). In a prioritisation workshop, experts identified forty-five actions, prioritising ten as relatively most feasible and important and relatively most effective to reduce the double burden of malnutrition in Senegal (e.g. develop and implement regional school menus based on local products (expand to fourteen regions) and measure the extent of the promotion of unhealthy foods to children).Conclusions:Significant efforts remain to be made by Senegal to improve food environments. This project allowed to establish an agenda of priority actions for the government to transform food environments in Senegal to tackle the double burden of malnutrition.
      PubDate: 2022-03-24
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980022000702
       
  • Development and validation of the Chinese version non-nutritive sweetener
           FFQ with urinary biomarker in children and adolescents

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Chu; Ying-Yueh, Chen, Yue-Hwa, Hsieh, Rong-Hong, Hsia, Shih-Min, Wu, Hung-Tsung, Chen, Yang-Ching
      Pages: 2056 - 2063
      Abstract: Objective:The purpose of the current study was to develop a validated FFQ to evaluate the intake of non-nutritive sweeteners (NNS) in child and adolescent Asian populations.Design:Intensive and overall market research was performed to create the applicable NNS-FFQ with thirteen food categories and 305 items. Six intense sweeteners, including acesulfame potassium, aspartame, sucralose, glycyrrhizin, steviol glycosides and sorbitol, were investigated. The validity and reproducibility of the NNS-FFQ were evaluated. The validity was further assessed by examining the consistency of reported NNS intake compared with urinary biomarkers using Cohen’s κ analysis.Settings:This work was considered to be relevant in Asian societies.Participants:One hundred and two children and adolescents recruited from several clinics were invited to participate in the current study.Results:High content validity indices and high content validity ratio levels were revealed for each sweetener and food category. Reproducibility among subjects was satisfactory. Significant moderate correlations between estimated steviol glycoside/sucralose consumption and sensitive urinary biomarker levels were demonstrated (κ values were 0·59 and 0·45 for steviol glycosides and sucralose, respectively), indicating that the NNS-FFQ can be used to assess an individual’s NNS intake. The dietary intense sweetener consumption pattern evaluated in this measurement was similar to those observed in other Asian countries but differed from those observed in Western populations with respect to types and amounts of NNS.Conclusions:This validated NNS-FFQ can be an applicable and useful tool to evaluate NNS intake in future epidemiological and clinical studies.
      PubDate: 2022-04-13
      DOI: 10.1017/S136898002200088X
       
  • Social determinants of obesity in American Indian and Alaska Native
           peoples aged ≥ 50 years

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Goins; R Turner, Conway, Cheryl, Reid, Margaret, Jiang, Luohua, Chang, Jenny, Huyser, Kimberly R, Brega, Angela G, Steiner, John F, Fyfe-Johnson, Amber L, Johnson-Jennings, Michelle, Hiratsuka, Vanessa, Manson, Spero M, O’Connell, Joan
      Pages: 2064 - 2073
      Abstract: Objective:American Indian and Alaska Native peoples (AI/AN) have a disproportionately high rate of obesity, but little is known about the social determinants of obesity among older AI/AN. Thus, our study assessed social determinants of obesity in AI/AN aged ≥ 50 years.Design:We conducted a cross-sectional analysis using multivariate generalised linear mixed models to identify social determinants associated with the risk of being classified as obese (BMI ≥ 30·0 kg/m2). Analyses were conducted for the total study population and stratified by median county poverty level.Setting:Indian Health Service (IHS) data for AI/AN who used IHS services in FY2013.Participants:Totally, 27 696 AI/AN aged ≥ 50 years without diabetes.Results:Mean BMI was 29·8 ± 6·6 with 43 % classified as obese. Women were more likely to be obese than men, and younger ages were associated with higher obesity risk. While having Medicaid coverage was associated with lower odds of obesity, private health insurance was associated with higher odds. Living in areas with lower rates of educational attainment and longer drive times to primary care services were associated with higher odds of obesity. Those who lived in a county where a larger percentage of people had low access to a grocery store were significantly less likely to be obese.Conclusions:Our findings contribute to the understanding of social determinants of obesity among older AI/AN and highlight the need to investigate AI/AN obesity, including longitudinal studies with a life course perspective to further examine social determinants of obesity in older AI/AN.
      PubDate: 2022-04-22
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980022000945
       
  • Multilevel exploration of individual- and community-level factors
           contributing to overweight and obesity among reproductive-aged women: a
           pooled analysis of Bangladesh Demographic and Health Survey, 2004–2018

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Ahammed; Benojir, Sarder, Md. Alamgir, Kundu, Subarna, Keramat, Syed Afroz, Alam, Khorshed
      Pages: 2074 - 2083
      Abstract: Objectives:Overweight and obesity have been related to a variety of adverse health outcomes. Understanding the overweight and obesity epidemic in Bangladesh, particularly among reproductive-aged women, is critical for monitoring and designing effective control measures. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of overweight and obesity in reproductive-aged women and to identify the risk factors of overweight and obesity.Design:A total of 70 651 women were obtained from the five most recent and successive Bangladesh Demographic and Health Surveys (BDHS). The multilevel logistic regression model was used to explore the individual- and community-level factors of overweight and obesity.Setting:Five most recent nationally representative household surveys across all regions.Participants:Reproductive-aged (15–49 years) non-pregnant women.Results:Approximately 35·2 % (95 % CI: 34·9–35·6 %) of women were either overweight or obese in Bangladesh. At the individual- and community-level, higher age (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) = 5·79, 95 % CI: 5·28–6·34), secondary or higher education (aOR = 1·69 [1·60–1·78]), relatively wealthiest households (aOR = 4·41 [4·10–4·74]), electronic media access (aOR = 1·32 [1·26–1·37]) and community high literacy (aOR = 1·10 [1·04–1·15]) of women were significantly positively associated with being overweight or obese. Whereas, rural residents (aOR = 0·79 [0·76–0·82]) from larger-sized households (aOR = 0·80 [0·73–0·87]) and have high community employment (aOR = 0·92 [0·88–0·97]) were negatively associated with the probability of being overweight or obese.Conclusion:Individual- and community-level factors influenced the overweight and obesity of Bangladeshi reproductive-aged women. Interventions and a comprehensive public health plan aimed at identifying and addressing the growing burden of overweight and obesity should be a top focus.
      PubDate: 2022-05-16
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980022001124
       
  • Values and preferences influencing willingness to change red and processed
           meat consumption in response to evidence-based information: a mixed
           methods study

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Prokop-Dorner; Anna, Piłat-Kobla, Aleksandra, Zając, Joanna, Luśtyk, Michalina, Valli, Claudia, Łapczuk, Aneta, Brzyska, Monika, Johnston, Bradley, Zera, Dena, Guyatt, Gordon, Alonso-Coello, Pablo, Bala, Malgorzata M
      Pages: 2084 - 2098
      Abstract: Objectives:The aim of the study is (1) to assess the extent to which omnivores are willing to stop or reduce their consumption of red and processed meat in response to evidence-based information regarding the possible reduction of cancer mortality and incidence achieved by dietary modification; (2) to identify socio-demographic categories associated with higher willingness to change meat consumption and (3) to understand the motives facilitating and hindering such a change.Design:During an initial computer-assisted web interview, respondents were presented with scenarios containing the estimates of the absolute risk reduction in overall cancer incidence and mortality tailored to their declared level of red and processed meat consumption. Respondents were asked whether they would stop or reduce their average meat consumption based on the information provided. Their dietary choices were assessed at 6-month follow-up. Additionally, we conducted semi-structured interviews to better understand the rationale for dietary practices and the perception of health information.Participants:The study was conducted among students and staff of three universities in Krakow, Poland.Results:Most of the 513 respondents were unwilling to change their consumption habits. We found gender to be a significant predictor of the willingness. Finally, we identified four themes reflecting key motives that determined meat consumption preferences: the importance of taste and texture, health consciousness, the habitual nature of cooking and persistence of omnivorous habits.Conclusions:When faced with health information about the uncertain reduction in the risk of cancer mortality and incidence, the vast majority of study participants were unwilling to introduce changes in their consumption habits.
      PubDate: 2022-04-08
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980022000866
       
  • Evaluating an integrated nutrition and mathematics curriculum: primary
           school teachers’ and students’ experiences

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Follong; Berit M, Prieto-Rodriguez, Elena, Miller, Andrew, Collins, Clare E, Bucher, Tamara
      Pages: 2099 - 2110
      Abstract: Objective:To present the process evaluation of a curricular Cross-curricular Unit on Portion Size (CUPS) program that integrates nutrition and mathematics, describing teacher and student perspectives on the intervention.Design:Semi-structured interviews and focus groups were conducted following the implementation of the CUPS program during a pilot randomised controlled trial designed to evaluate efficacy for improved portion size estimation. Lessons involved experiential learning using food models and mathematics cubes and focussed on portion size, food groups, volume and capacity. Data were collected immediately post-intervention and analysed using an inductive thematic approach.Setting:Primary schools in Newcastle, Australia.Participants:Year 3 and/or 4 teachers (n 3) and their students (n 15).Results:Teachers believed the programme supported the learning of nutrition concepts, with the majority of students enjoying the lessons, cubes and food models. Teachers indicated most students were engaged and became more aware of healthy eating and serve size recommendation. Although teachers enjoyed and valued the lessons, they suggested that the integration of volume and capacity should be further improved in order to address the time barrier for teaching nutrition.Conclusion:The process evaluation reports on challenges and successes of implementing an integrative nutrition programme. This teaching approach could be useful and successful when aligned with teacher’ and student’ needs. Based on participant feedback, lessons could be refined to enhance integration of mathematics content and to support student learning.
      PubDate: 2022-03-22
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980022000386
       
  • Family child care home providers’ self-reported nutrition and physical
           activity practices, self-efficacy, barriers and knowledge: baseline
           findings from happy healthy homes

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Sisson; Susan B, Eckart, Erin, Williams, Bethany D, Patel, Sarah M, Kracht, Chelsea L, Davis, Holly A, Ward, Dianne S, Hildebrand, Deana, Stoner, Julie A, Stinner, Emily, Kerr, Kelly E, Salvatore, Alicia
      Pages: 2111 - 2124
      Abstract: Objective:Describe nutrition and physical activity practices, nutrition self-efficacy and barriers and food programme knowledge within Family Child Care Homes (FCCH) and differences by staffing.Design:Baseline, cross-sectional analyses of the Happy Healthy Homes randomised trial (NCT03560050).Setting:FCCH in Oklahoma, USA.Participants:FCCH providers (n 49, 100 % women, 30·6 % Non-Hispanic Black, 2·0 % Hispanic, 4·1 % American Indian/Alaska Native, 51·0 % Non-Hispanic white, 44·2 ± 14·2 years of age. 53·1 % had additional staff) self-reported nutrition and physical activity practices and policies, nutrition self-efficacy and barriers and food programme knowledge. Differences between providers with and without additional staff were adjusted for multiple comparisons (P < 0·01).Results:The prevalence of meeting all nutrition and physical activity best practices ranged from 0·0–43·8 % to 4·1–16·7 %, respectively. Average nutrition and physical activity scores were 3·2 ± 0·3 and 3·0 ± 0·5 (max 4·0), respectively. Sum nutrition and physical activity scores were 137·5 ± 12·6 (max 172·0) and 48·4 ± 7·5 (max 64·0), respectively. Providers reported high nutrition self-efficacy and few barriers. The majority of providers (73·9–84·7 %) felt that they could meet food programme best practices; however, knowledge of food programme best practices was lower than anticipated (median 63–67 % accuracy). More providers with additional staff had higher self-efficacy in family-style meal service than did those who did not (P = 0·006).Conclusions:Providers had high self-efficacy in meeting nutrition best practices and reported few barriers. While providers were successfully meeting some individual best practices, few met all. Few differences were observed between FCCH providers with and without additional staff. FCCH providers need additional nutrition training on implementation of best practices.
      PubDate: 2022-02-07
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980022000337
       
  • Parental work hours and household income as determinants of unhealthy food
           and beverage intake in young Australian children

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Mauch; Chelsea E, Wycherley, Thomas P, Bell, Lucinda K, Laws, Rachel A, Byrne, Rebecca, Golley, Rebecca K
      Pages: 2125 - 2136
      Abstract: Objective:This study examined parental work hours and household income as determinants of discretionary (energy-dense, nutrient-poor) food and beverage intake in young children, including differences by eating occasion.Design:Secondary analysis of cross-sectional data. Three hierarchical regression models were conducted with percentage of energy from discretionary food and beverages across the day, at main meals and at snack times being the outcomes. Dietary intake was assessed by 1 × 24-h recall and 1–2 × 24-h food record(s). Both maternal and paternal work hours were included, along with total household income. Covariates included household, parent and child factors.Setting:Data from the NOURISH/South Australian Infants Dietary Intake studies were collected between 2008 and 2013.Participants:Participants included 526 mother–child dyads (median (interquartile range) child age 1·99 (1·96, 2·03) years). Forty-one percentage of mothers did not work while 57 % of fathers worked 35–40 h/week. Most (85 %) households had an income of ≥$50 k AUD/year.Results:Household income was consistently inversely associated with discretionary energy intake (β = –0·12 to –0·15). Maternal part-time employment (21–35 h/week) predicted child consumption of discretionary energy at main meals (β = 0·10, P = 0·04). Paternal unemployment predicted a lower proportion of discretionary energy at snacks (β = -0·09, P = 0·047).Conclusions:This work suggests that household income should be addressed as a key opportunity-related barrier to healthy food provision in families of young children. Strategies to reduce the time burden of healthy main meal provision may be required in families where mothers juggle longer part-time working hours with caregiving and domestic duties. The need to consider the role of fathers and other parents/caregivers in shaping children’s intake was also highlighted.
      PubDate: 2022-02-09
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980022000349
       
  • ‘You know what, I’m in the trend as well’: understanding the
           interplay between digital and real-life social influences on the food and
           activity choices of young adults

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Leu; Jodie, Tay, Zoey, van Dam, Rob M, Müller-Riemenschneider, Falk, Lean, Michael EJ, Nikolaou, Charoula Konstantia, Rebello, Salome A
      Pages: 2137 - 2155
      Abstract: Objective:To understand young adults’ perceptions of online and real-life social influences on their food and activity choices.Design:A qualitative study involving 7 focus groups. Thematic analysis using both deductive and inductive techniques were performed.Setting:A polytechnic and a university in Singapore.Participants:A total of 46 full-time students, 19–24 years of age.Results:Participants revealed that social media meets multiple needs, contributing to its ubiquitous use and facilitating content spread between social networks. Food-related content shared on social media were mostly commercial posts, marketing foods and eateries showcasing price promotions, emphasising sensory properties of foods or creating narratives that activated trends. Subsequently, real-life social activities frequently revolve around marketed foods that were not necessarily healthy. In contrast, physical activity posts were rarely being followed up in real life. Portrayals describing a toxic gym culture could contribute to negative perceptions of peers’ physical activity posts and a disinclination towards sharing such posts. Participants expressed that close, supportive social networks in real life strongly influenced initiating and maintaining healthy lifestyles. However, in a society that highly values academic achievements, participants prioritised studying and socialising over healthy eating and physical activity.Conclusions:Overall, our findings reveal that virtual and real-life social influences have complex interactions affecting Asian young adults’ behavioural choices and should be considered when designing interventions for this group. Regulations related to the digital marketing of unhealthy food, and improving the availability, accessibility and affordability of healthier food options, particularly in the foodservice sector, would be of value to consider.
      PubDate: 2022-02-21
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980022000398
       
  • Understanding children’s perspectives of the influences on their
           dietary behaviours

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Chan; Mei Jun, Tay, Gabrielle Wann Nii, Kembhavi, Gayatri, Lim, Jubilee, Rebello, Salome A, Ng, Hazyl, Lin, Congren, Wang, May C, Müller-Riemenschneider, Falk, Chong, Mary Foong-Fong
      Pages: 2156 - 2166
      Abstract: Objective:This study aimed to examine the intrapersonal, interpersonal, environmental and macrosystem influences on dietary behaviours among primary school children in Singapore.Design:A qualitative interpretive approach was used in this study. Focus group discussions guided by the socio-ecological model (sem), of which transcripts were analysed deductively using the sem and inductively using thematic analysis to identify themes at each sem level.Setting:Two co-educational public primary schools in Singapore.Participants:A total of 48 children (n 26 girls) took part in the semi-structured focus group discussions. Their mean age was 10·8 years (sd = 0·9, range 9–12 years), and the majority of the children were Chinese (n 36), along with some Indians (n 8) and Malays (n 4).Results:Children’s knowledge of healthy eating did not necessarily translate into healthy dietary practices and concern for health was a low priority. Instead, food and taste preferences were pivotal influences in their food choices. Parents had a large influence on children with regards to their accessibility to food, their attitudes and values towards food. Parental food restriction led to some children eating in secrecy. Peer influence was not frequently reported by children. Competitions in school incentivised children to consume fruits and vegetables, but reinforcements from teachers were inconsistent. The proximity of fast-food chains in the neighbourhood provided children easy access to less healthy foods. Health advertisements on social media rather than posters worked better in drawing children’s attention.Conclusions:Findings highlighted important factors that should be considered in future nutrition interventions targeting children.
      PubDate: 2022-02-21
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980022000404
       
  • Association between dietary patterns and stroke in patients with type 2
           diabetes mellitus in China: a propensity score-matched analysis

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: He; Chenlu, Wang, Wei, Chen, Qian, Shen, Ziyuan, Pan, Enchun, Sun, Zhongming, Lou, Peian, Zhang, Xunbao
      Pages: 2188 - 2196
      Abstract: Objective:This study aimed to examine the impact of different dietary patterns on stroke outcomes among type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients in China.Design:Participants were enrolled by a stratified random cluster sampling method in the study. After collecting dietary data using a quantified FFQ, latent class analysis was used to identify dietary patterns, and propensity score matching was used to reduce confounding effects between different dietary patterns. Binary logistic regression and conditional logistic regression were used to analyse the relationship between dietary patterns and stroke in patients with T2DM.Setting:A cross-sectional survey available from December 2013 to January 2014.Participants:A total of 13 731 Chinese residents aged 18 years or over.Results:Two dietary patterns were identified: 61·2 % of T2DM patients were categorised in the high-fat dietary pattern while 38·8 % of patients were characterised by the balanced dietary pattern. Compared with the high-fat dietary pattern, the balanced dietary pattern was associated with reduced stroke risk (OR = 0·63, 95 %CI 0·52, 0·76, P < 0·001) after adjusting for confounding factors. The protective effect of the balanced model did not differ significantly (interaction P> 0·05).Conclusions:This study provides sufficient evidence to support the dietary intervention strategies to prevent stroke effectively. Maintaining a balanced dietary pattern, especially with moderate consumption of foods rich in quality protein and fresh vegetables in T2DM patients, might decrease the risk of stroke in China.
      PubDate: 2022-03-31
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980022000763
       
  • Online breast-feeding support groups as a community asset in Lebanon after
           Beirut explosion

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Ramadan; Nabiha, Bonmatí-Tomas, Anna, Juvinyà-Canal, Dolors, Ghaddar, Ali
      Pages: 2254 - 2264
      Abstract: Objective:Breast-feeding rates are unsatisfactory in Lebanon. Social media groups could play an important role in promoting breast-feeding in normal conditions and post crisis. The aim of this study is to identify breast-feeding challenges, facilitators and assets and to describe how community assets via social media could build community resilience to pandemic’s and disaster’s effects.Design:A two-phase qualitative content analysis was performed on posts and comments collected from a Facebook breast-feeding support group. Data were categorised into themes, categories and subcategories.Setting:Posts and comments retrieved from a Facebook breast-feeding support group in Lebanon during the month of August 2020.Participants:Group members: mothers who breastfed, breast-feeding mothers and group admins that are lactation consultants.Results:In phase one, breast-feeding ‘Challenges’ identified were lack of support from peers and family, lack of supportive policies, lack of knowledge and maternal stress related to political instability, COVID-19 and economic crisis. ‘Assets and facilitators’ included community support and donations. In phase two, analysis revealed how assets were being used on social media platform to build community resilience post crisis, through access to social support in challenging times, community engagement, material resources and transformative potential.Conclusion:Challenges faced during breast-feeding were diminished due to the support and assets received on a Facebook breast-feeding support group, and social media has been shown to be an important community asset implicated in empowering women to breastfeed and to build community resilience in moments of crisis.
      PubDate: 2022-01-31
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980022000295
       
  • Investigating group-based classes (‘weaning workshops’) to support
           complementary infant feeding in Irish primary care settings: a
           cross-sectional survey

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Flannery; Caragh, Shea, Caroline, O’Brien, Yvonne, O’Halloran, Joanne, Matvienko-Sikar, Karen, Kelly, Colette, Toomey, Elaine
      Pages: 2265 - 2276
      Abstract: Objective:This study aims to (1) investigate current practice regarding ‘weaning workshops’ to support complementary infant feeding delivered within Irish primary care, (2) explore the experiences and opinions of community dietitians regarding optimal content and modes of delivery of weaning workshops and (3) identify the key factors to be considered in the development and implementation of weaning workshops delivered within primary care.Design:Cross-sectional survey.Setting:Irish primary care.Participants:Forty-seven community-based dietitians.Results:Sixteen dietitians reported that workshops were run in their area with variable frequency, with ten reporting that workshops were never run in their area. Participants reported that mostly mothers of medium socio-economic status (SES) attended weaning workshops when infants were aged between 4 and 7 months, and that feedback from workshop attendees was predominantly positive. Dietitians identified that key factors to be considered in future development and delivery of weaning workshops are (1) workshop characteristics such as content, timing and venue, (2) organisational characteristics such as availability of resources and multidisciplinary involvement and (3) attendee characteristics such as SES.Conclusions:This study highlights substantial variability regarding provision of weaning workshops in Ireland, and a lack of standardisation regarding the provider, content and frequency of workshops where workshops are being delivered. The study also provides unique insights into the experiences and opinions of primary care community dietitians regarding the development and delivery of weaning workshops in terms of optimal content and delivery options. These perspectives will make a valuable contribution given the dearth of evidence in this area internationally.
      PubDate: 2022-03-09
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980022000477
       
  • Participation in cost-offset community-supported agriculture by low-income
           households in the USA is associated with community characteristics and
           operational practices

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Hanson; Karla L, Xu, Lynn, Marshall, Grace A, Sitaker, Marilyn, Jilcott Pitts, Stephanie B, Kolodinsky, Jane, Bennett, April, Carriker, Salem, Smith, Diane, Ammerman, Alice S, Seguin-Fowler, Rebecca A
      Pages: 2277 - 2287
      Abstract: Objective:Subsidised or cost-offset community-supported agriculture (CO-CSA) connects farms directly to low-income households and can improve fruit and vegetable intake. This analysis identifies factors associated with participation in CO-CSA.Design:Farm Fresh Foods for Healthy Kids (F3HK) provided a half-price, summer CO-CSA plus healthy eating classes to low-income households with children. Community characteristics (population, socio-demographics and health statistics) and CO-CSA operational practices (share sizes, pick up sites, payment options and produce selection) are described and associations with participation levels are examined.Setting:Ten communities in New York (NY), North Carolina (NC), Vermont and Washington states in USA.Participants:Caregiver–child dyads enrolled in spring 2016 or 2017.Results:Residents of micropolitan communities had more education and less poverty than in small towns. The one rural location (NC2) had the fewest college graduates (10 %) and most poverty (23 %) and poor health statistics. Most F3HK participants were white, except in NC where 45·2 % were African American. CO-CSA participation varied significantly across communities from 33 % (NC2) to 89 % (NY1) of weeks picked up. Most CO-CSA farms offered multiple share sizes (69·2 %) and participation was higher than when not offered (76·8 % v. 57·7 % of weeks); whereas 53·8 % offered a community pick up location, and participation in these communities was lower than elsewhere (64·7 % v. 78·2 % of weeks).Conclusion:CO-CSA programmes should consider offering a choice of share sizes and innovate to address potential barriers such as rural location and limited education and income among residents. Future research is needed to better understand barriers to participation, particularly among participants utilising community pick up locations.
      PubDate: 2022-04-13
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980022000908
       
  • Disclosure of funding sources and conflicts of interest in evidence
           underpinning vitamin D and calcium recommendations in bone health
           guidelines

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Baram; Liora, Dai, Zhaoli, McDonald, Sally, Bero, Lisa A
      Pages: 2288 - 2295
      Abstract: Objective:The present study aims to examine the relationship between study funding sources, author conflicts of interest (COI) and conclusions in studies supporting vitamin D and Ca intake cited in bone health guideline recommendations.Design:Cross-sectionalSetting:Forty-seven global bone health guidelines with vitamin D and/or Ca recommendations for adults aged 40 years and above.Participants:The evidence cited to support the recommendations was extracted by two independent reviewers and classified by type of recommendation, article characteristics, study design, types of funding sources and conflict of interest (COI) disclosure and direction of study conclusions.Results:Of 156 articles cited to support the bone health recommendations, 120 (77 %) disclosed a funding source, and 43 (28 %) declared that at least one author had a COI. Compared with articles with non-commercial or no funding source, those funded by commercial sponsors tended to have a study conclusion favourable towards vitamin D/Ca (relative risk (95 % CI): 1·32 (0·94, 1·87), P = 0·16), but the association was not statistically significant (Fisher’s exact test). Compared to those with a COI disclosure statement, articles with missing or unclear COI disclosure were more likely to have favourable conclusions (1·56 (1·05, 2·31), P = 0·017) (Fisher’s exact test).Conclusion:In the evidence underpinning a sample of global bone health guidelines, COI disclosure was low and studies with missing or unclear COI disclosures were more likely to have favourable study conclusions than those with disclosures, suggesting a need for greater transparency of COI in bone health guidelines.
      PubDate: 2022-01-24
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980022000246
       
  • Applying and comparing various nutrient profiling models against the
           packaged food supply in South Africa

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Frank; Tamryn, Ng, Shu Wen, Miles, Donna R, Swart, Elizabeth C
      Pages: 2296 - 2307
      Abstract: Objective:This study aimed to apply the newly developed Chile Adjusted Model (CAM) nutrient profiling model (NPM) to the food supply in South Africa (SA) and compare its performance against existing NPM as an indication of suitability for use to underpin food policies targeted at discouraging consumption of products high in nutrients associated with poor health.Design:Cross-sectional analysis of the SA-packaged food supply comparing the CAM to three other NPM: SA Health and Nutrition Claims (SA HNC), Chilean Warning Octagon (CWO) 2019, and Pan-American Health Organisation (PAHO) NPM.Setting:The SA-packaged food supply based on products stocked by supermarkets in Cape Town, SA.Participants:Packaged foods and beverages (n 6474) available in 2018 were analysed.Results:Forty-nine per cent of products contained excessive amounts of nutrients of concern (considered non-compliant) according to the criteria of all four models. Only 10·9 % of products were not excessive in any nutrients of concern (considered compliant) according to all NPM evaluated. The CAM had an overall non-compliance level of 73·2 % and was comparable to the CWO 2019 for foods (71·2 % and 71·1 %, respectively). The CAM was the strictest NPM for beverages (80·4 %) due to the criteria of non-sugar sweeteners and free sugars. The SA HNC was the most lenient with non-compliance at 52·9 %. This was largely due to the inclusion of nutrients to encourage, which is a criterion for this NPM.Conclusion:For the purpose of discouraging products high in nutrients associated with poor health in SA, the CAM is a suitable NPM.
      PubDate: 2022-02-16
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980022000374
       
  • Caregivers’ provision of sweetened fruit-flavoured drinks to young
           children: importance of perceived product attributes and differences by
           socio-demographic and behavioural characteristics

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Choi; Yoon Y, Jensen, Melissa L, Fleming-Milici, Frances, Harris, Jennifer L
      Pages: 2308 - 2316
      Abstract: Objective:Drinks containing added sugar and/or non-nutritive sweeteners are not recommended for children under 6 years. Yet, most young children consume these products. The current study examined factors associated with caregivers’ provision of sweetened drinks to their young child.Design:Caregivers reported frequency of providing sweetened fruit-flavoured drinks (fruit drinks and flavoured water) and unsweetened juices (100 % juice and juice/water blends) to their 1- to 5-year-old child in the past month and perceived importance of product attributes (healthfulness, product claims and other characteristics), other drinks provided, reading the nutrition facts panel and socio-demographic characteristics. A partial proportional odds model measured the relationship between these factors and frequency of providing sweetened fruit-flavoured drinks.Setting:Online cross-sectional survey.Participants:U.S. caregivers (n 1763) with a young child (ages 1–5).Results:The majority (74 %) of caregivers provided sweetened fruit-flavoured drinks to their child in the past month; 26 % provided them daily. Provision frequency was positively associated with some drink attributes, including perceived healthfulness, vitamin C claims and box/pouch packaging; child requests and serving other sweetened drinks and juice/water blends. Provision frequency was negatively associated with perceived importance of ‘no/less sugar’ and ‘all natural’ claims. Reading nutrition facts panels, serving water to their child and child’s age were not significant.Conclusion:Misunderstanding of product healthfulness and other marketing attributes contribute to frequent provision of sweetened drinks to young children. Public health efforts to address common misperceptions, including counter marketing, may raise awareness among caregivers about the harms of providing sweetened drinks to young children.
      PubDate: 2022-04-20
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980022000751
       
  • Effect of multiple micronutrient supplements v. iron and folic acid
           supplements on neonatal mortality: a reanalysis by iron dose

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Gomes; Filomena, Agustina, Rina, Black, Robert E, Christian, Parul, Dewey, Kathryn G, Kraemer, Klaus, Shankar, Anuraj H, Smith, Emily, Tumilowicz, Alison, Bourassa, Megan W
      Pages: 2317 - 2321
      Abstract: Objective:Antenatal multiple micronutrient supplements (MMS) are a cost-effective intervention to reduce adverse pregnancy and birth outcomes. However, the current WHO recommendation on the use of antenatal MMS is conditional, partly due to concerns about the effect on neonatal mortality in a subgroup of studies comparing MMS with iron and folic acid (IFA) supplements containing 60 mg of Fe. We aimed to assess the effect of MMS v. IFA on neonatal mortality stratified by Fe dose in each supplement.Methods:We updated the neonatal mortality analysis of the 2020 WHO guidelines using the generic inverse variance method and applied the random effects model to calculate the effect estimates of MMS v. IFA on neonatal mortality in subgroups of trials (n 13) providing the same or different amounts of Fe, that is, MMS with 60 mg of Fe v. IFA with 60 mg of Fe; MMS with 30 mg of Fe v. IFA with 30 mg of Fe; MMS with 30 mg of Fe v. IFA with 60 mg of Fe; and MMS with 20 mg of Fe v. IFA with 60 mg of Fe.Results:There were no statistically significant differences in neonatal mortality between MMS and IFA within any of the subgroups of trials. Analysis of MMS with 30 mg v. IFA with 60 mg of Fe (7 trials, 14 114 participants), yielded a non-significant risk ratio of 1·12 (95 % CI 0·83 to 1·50).Conclusion:Neonatal mortality did not differ between MMS and IFA regardless of Fe dose in either supplement.
      PubDate: 2022-04-25
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980022001008
       
  • Do diets with higher carbon footprints increase the risk of mortality'
           A population-based simulation study using self-selected diets from the USA
           

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Pollock; Benjamin D, Willits-Smith, Amelia M, Heller, Martin C, Bazzano, Lydia A, Rose, Donald
      Pages: 2322 - 2328
      Abstract: Objective:Are diets with a greater environmental impact less healthy' This is a key question for nutrition policy, but previous research does not provide a clear answer. To address this, our objective here was to test whether American diets with the highest carbon footprints predicted greater population-level mortality from diet-related chronic disease than those with the lowest.Design:Baseline dietary recall data were combined with a database of greenhouse gases emitted in the production of foods to estimate a carbon footprint for each diet. Diets were ranked on their carbon footprints and those in the highest and lowest quintiles were studied here. Preventable Risk Integrated Model (PRIME), an epidemiological modelling software, was used to assess CVD and cancer mortality for a simulated dietary change from the highest to the lowest impact diets. The diet–mortality relationships used by PRIME came from published meta-analyses of randomised controlled trials and prospective cohort studies.Setting:USA.Participants:Baseline diets came from adults (n 12 865) in the nationally representative 2005–2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.Results:A simulated change at the population level from the highest to the lowest carbon footprint diets resulted in 23 739 (95 % CI 20 349, 27 065) fewer annual deaths from CVD and cancer. This represents a 1·83 % (95 % CI 1·57 %, 2·08 %) decrease in total deaths. About 95 % of deaths averted were from CVD.Conclusions:Diets with the highest carbon footprints were associated with a greater risk of mortality than the lowest, suggesting that dietary guidance could incorporate sustainability information to reinforce health messaging.
      PubDate: 2022-03-31
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980022000830
       
  • Food insecurity among active duty soldiers and their families during the
           coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Rabbitt; Matthew P, Beymer, Matthew R, Reagan, Joanna J, Jarvis, Brantley P, Watkins, Eren Y
      Pages: 2329 - 2336
      Abstract: Objective:We examined the determinants of food insecurity among active duty Army households that transitioned into food insecurity during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic.Design:We compared Army households that recently transitioned into marginal food insecurity with those households that remained highly food secure (n 2832) to better understand how these households differ in their resilience to food insecurity during economic downturns using data from a military installation in the USA in 2020.Setting:A US military installation in the USA.Participants:Active duty US Army soldiers.Results:Prior to the pandemic, the prevalence of marginal food insecurity among Army households was similar to that reported for households in the general population. Marginal food insecurity among Army households increased over 1·5-fold – from 19 % to 33 % – with the onset of the pandemic. Relative to Army households with consistently high food security, the Army households that transitioned into marginal food insecurity after the onset of the pandemic were more likely to report concerns about financial insecurity and the job security of their family members.Conclusions:Army households, like their civilian counterparts, are vulnerable to food insecurity because of instability in their income during periods of economic uncertainty. Periods of economic uncertainty are more common for Army households because of the frequent relocations associated with military service which could lead to predictable periodic spikes in their food insecurity.
      PubDate: 2022-01-24
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980022000192
       
  • Shining a light on marginal food insecurity in an understudied population

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Liese; Angela D
      Pages: 2337 - 2338
      PubDate: 2022-05-12
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980022001094
       
  • Individual and contextual factors associated with under- and
           over-nutrition among school-aged children and adolescents in two Nigerian
           states: a multi-level analysis

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Adeomi; Adeleye Abiodun, Fatusi, Adesegun, Klipstein-Grobusch, Kerstin
      Pages: 2339 - 2351
      Abstract: Objective:This study aimed to identify individual and contextual factors that are associated with under- and over-nutrition among school-aged children and adolescents in two Nigerian states.Design:Community-based cross-sectional study.Setting:The study was carried out in rural and urban communities of Osun and Gombe States in Nigeria.Participants:A total of 1200 school-aged children and adolescents.Results:Multi-level analysis showed that the full models accounted for about 82 % and 39 % of the odds of thinness or overweight/obese across the communities, respectively. Household size (adjusted OR (aOR) 1·10; P = 0·001; 95 % CI (1·04, 1·16)) increased the odds, while the upper wealth index (aOR 0·43; P = 0·016; 95 % CI (0·22, 0·86)) decreased the odds of thinness. Age (aOR 0·86; P < 0·001; 95 % CI (1·26, 8·70)), exclusive breastfeeding (aOR 0·46; P = 0·010; 95 % CI (0·25, 0·83)), physical activity (aOR 0·55; P = 0·001; 95 % CI (0·39, 0·78)) and the upper wealth index (aOR 0·47; P = 0·018; 95 % CI (0·25, 0·88)) were inversely related with overweight/obesity, while residing in Osun State (aOR 3·32; P = 0·015; 95 % CI (1·26, 1·70)), female gender (aOR 1·73; P = 0·015; 95 % CI (1·11, 2·69)) and screen time> 2 h/d (aOR 2·33; P = 0·005; 95 % CI (1·29, 4·19)) were positively associated with overweight/obesity.Conclusions:The study shows that selected community and individual-level factors are strongly associated with thinness and overweight/obesity among school-aged children and adolescents.
      PubDate: 2022-01-24
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980022000258
       
  • Individual and contextual factors associated with under- and
           over-nutrition among school-aged children and adolescents in two Nigerian
           states: a multi-level analysis – CORRIGENDUM

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Adeomi; Adeleye Abiodun, Fatusi, Adesegun, Klipstein-Grobusch, Kerstin
      Pages: 2352 - 2352
      PubDate: 2022-05-16
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980022001082
       
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


Your IP address: 44.200.171.74
 
Home (Search)
API
About JournalTOCs
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-