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  Subjects -> NUTRITION AND DIETETICS (Total: 201 journals)
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Public Health Nutrition
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.122
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 30  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1368-9800 - ISSN (Online) 1475-2727
Published by Cambridge University Press Homepage  [352 journals]
  • PHN volume 25 issue 12 Cover and Front matter

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      Pages: 1 - 3
      PubDate: 2022-11-14
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980022002397
       
  • PHN volume 25 issue 12 Cover and Back matter

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      Pages: 1 - 1
      PubDate: 2022-11-14
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980022002403
       
  • Consumption of foods with the Keyhole front-of-pack nutrition label:
           potential impact on energy and nutrient intakes of Swedish adolescents

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      Authors: Wanselius; Julia, Larsson, Christel, Berg, Christina, Öhrvik, Veronica, Lindroos, Anna Karin, Lissner, Lauren
      Pages: 3279 - 3290
      Abstract: Objective:The Keyhole is an internationally recognised front-of-pack nutrition label, guiding consumers to healthier food options. It indicates products in accordance with specific criteria for dietary fats, sugars, fibres, salt and wholegrains. The objective of this study was to simulate the potential impact of the Keyhole on adolescents’ energy and nutrient intakes by modelling a shift from reported food intakes to foods meeting the Keyhole criteria.Design:Self-reported dietary intake data were derived from a cross-sectional survey. Multiple replacement scenarios were calculated, where foods meeting the Keyhole criteria replaced reported non-compliant foods with varying proportions of replacement.Setting:Dietary survey ‘Riksmaten Adolescents 2016–2017’ in schools across Sweden.Participants:A nationally representative sample of 3099 adolescents in school years 5, 8 and 11 (55 % girls).Results:Overall, replacement with foods meeting the Keyhole criteria led to more adolescents meeting nutrition recommendations. Largest median intake improvements were seen for wholegrains (+196 %), SFA (-13 %), PUFA (+17 %) and fibres (+15 %). Smallest improvements were seen for free sugars (-3 %) and salt (-2 %), partly explained by the ineligibility of main food sources of free sugars for the Keyhole, and non-inclusion of ready meals that are often high in salt. Most micronutrient intakes were stable or improved. Unintentional effects included decreases in vitamin A, MUFA and energy intakes. Largest potential improvements in fat and fibre sources were observed in the youngest age group.Conclusions:A shift to Keyhole alternatives for everyday foods would improve adolescents’ nutrient intakes, even with smaller exchanges.
      PubDate: 2022-09-30
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980022002178
       
  • Dietary intake and educational outcomes among Australian university
           students: cross-sectional and longitudinal associations

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      Authors: Babaeer; Lena, Stylianou, Michalis, Walker, Jacqueline L, Gomersall, Sjaan R
      Pages: 3291 - 3305
      Abstract: Objective:This study aimed to examine cross-sectional and longitudinal associations between dietary intake and educational outcomes (EO) in Australian first-year university students.Design:This cross-sectional and longitudinal study measured outcomes of interest at three points over 1 year. Measures included self-reported dietary patterns and dietary intake via a three-day estimated food record. Objective EO (corresponding semester grade point average (GPA), overall GPA and graduation status) variables were extracted from academic records. Cross-sectional and longitudinal associations were examined using regression models and generalised estimating equations, respectively.Setting:A large university in Queensland, Australia.Participants:Participants (n 80) were first-year students who had completed high school in the previous year.Results:Some significant associations were found with semester GPA, including: (a) moderate positive associations between serves of vegetables and semester GPA at time point 2 and over time; and (b) a weak negative association between Na intake and semester GPA at time point 2. Although insignificant, meaningful negative associations were found between alcohol consumption and semester GPA at time point 1 and over time. Some significant associations were also found with graduation status, including: (a) a positive association between meeting Australian carbohydrate recommendations and graduation status; and (b) a negative association between Fe intake and graduation status, both at time point 1.Conclusions:Both cross-sectional and longitudinal findings highlight positive associations between vegetable intake and EO and negative associations between alcohol consumption and EO. Further relevant work is needed with larger, more variable samples in demographic, dietary and EO characteristics.
      PubDate: 2022-09-01
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980022001847
       
  • Food security and feeding behaviours in low-income, Latinx families with
           preschool-aged children

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      Authors: Foster; Byron A, Linville, Deanna, Miller-Bedell, Emma Rose, Mahjoub, Hannah
      Pages: 3306 - 3311
      Abstract: Objective:To examine the association between food security and feeding practices in Latinx parents of pre-school-aged children and examine possible effect modification by parental self-efficacy.Design:Cross-sectional assessment using the US Department of Agriculture screener for food insecurity as the exposure and sub-scales of the Comprehensive Feeding Practices Questionnaire as the outcome with the General Self-Efficacy Scale as an effect modifier. Non-parametric descriptive statistics were used to compare groups based on food security status.Setting:Two Latinx communities with low-socioeconomic status in Texas in 2017 and in Oregon in 2018–2019.Participants:Latinx parents of preschool aged children, English and Spanish speaking. Dyads were excluded if they had moderate-severe developmental disabilities, a seizure disorder with a restrictive diet or taking medications known to influence typical growth.Results:Of the 168 families in Oregon, 65 (38 %) reported food insecurity, and 10 (21 %) of the 48 families in Texas reported food insecurity. Food security was associated with greater parental monitoring practices in both the Texas and Oregon samples. We observed no differences in creating a healthy home food environment by food security status in either sample. Parental general self-efficacy showed evidence of effect modification in Oregon - only parents with lower self-efficacy showed a significant association between food security and feeding practices.Conclusions:Latinx parents of preschool children experience high levels of food insecurity, which are associated with maladaptive parental feeding practices. Greater parental general self-efficacy moderates this association and could buffer the effects of food insecurity on children’s health.
      PubDate: 2022-09-05
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980022001884
       
  • Would offering vegetables to children for breakfast increase their total
           daily vegetable intake'

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      Authors: McLeod; Chris J, Haycraft, Emma, Daley, Amanda J
      Pages: 3312 - 3316
      Abstract: The consumption of vegetables is vitally important for children’s health and development. However, in many Westernised countries, most children do not eat sufficient quantities of vegetables and consume many energy-dense and high-sugar foods; a health behaviour associated with the onset of non-communicable diseases. To address this important public health concern, it is necessary to think ‘outside the box’ and consider innovative and pragmatic ways to increase children’s daily vegetable intake. In many countries, caregivers implementing best-practice child feeding methods typically offer children vegetables at lunch, dinner and for snacks. It is unusual for children to be routinely offered vegetables for breakfast, yet there is no nutritional, physiological or medical reason why vegetables should not be eaten at breakfast. Indeed, in some countries, children frequently consume vegetables for breakfast. Increasing children’s exposure to vegetables at breakfast from an early age would allow for the development of a positive association between eating vegetables and breakfast, thus providing another opportunity in the day where vegetables might be regularly consumed by children. In this paper, we propose a rationale for why vegetables should be routinely offered to young children at breakfast time in countries where this may not be the norm. Future research assessing the feasibility and acceptability of such a public health intervention would provide health policy agencies with evidence about a potentially effective and easily implementable approach for increasing children’s vegetable intake, thus improving their overall nutritional status, as well as their heath and development.
      PubDate: 2022-09-12
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980022002002
       
  • The impact of a healthy checkout intervention on fruit and vegetable
           ‘micro-pack’ purchases in New Mexico

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      Authors: Rogus; Stephanie, Guthrie, Joanne, Niculescu, Mihai, Xu, Lina
      Pages: 3317 - 3325
      Abstract: Objective:Produce sold as plastic-wrapped packs of two to four individual items (i.e., produce micro-packs) that are low cost and placed at checkout may appeal to shoppers with budget constraints and provide a second chance to purchase items available elsewhere in the store. This study examined the impact of an intervention that placed produce micro-packs at checkout and promoted them in grocery stores across New Mexico, USA.Design:This quasi-experimental study placed produce micro-packs at checkout end-caps in thirteen stores (group 1), with eight stores serving as controls (group 2) from 1 July 2019 through 31 January 2020 (first phase). The intervention was extended to group 2 stores from 1 February 2020 through 30 June 2020 (second phase). Cashiers were directed to upsell the micro-packs to Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children recipients who had unspent cash value benefits for produce purchases.Setting:Twenty-one grocery stores across New Mexico.Participants:Twenty-one produce items sold as micro-packs in stores from July 2019 through June 2020.Results:A random effects model showed that the daily sales of micro-packs increased by 47 % during each intervention period. Group 2 stores had lower sales than group 1 stores during the first phase of the intervention. Once extended to group 2 stores, sales of micro-packs in those stores increased and sales in group 1 stores continued at the higher level.Conclusions:Placing produce micro-packs at checkout may increase produce sales and support health promotion efforts by public and private stakeholders.
      PubDate: 2022-09-12
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980022002026
       
  • Ultra-processed food consumption and dietary, lifestyle and social
           determinants: a path analysis in Brazilian graduates (CUME project)

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      Authors: Mattar; Jéssica Bevenuto, Domingos, Ana Luiza Gomes, Hermsdorff, Helen Hermana Miranda, Juvanhol, Leidjaira Lopes, de Oliveira, Fernando Luiz Pereira, Pimenta, Adriano Marçal, Bressan, Josefina
      Pages: 3326 - 3334
      Abstract: Objective:To explore the relationship between ultra-processed foods (UPF) consumption and dietary, lifestyle and social determinants using pathway analysis in the baseline of the Cohort of Universities of Minas Gerais (CUME project).Design:Cross-sectional study, in which path analysis was used to estimate direct and indirect effects of dietary practices, sleep, time on the computer and professional status on UPF consumption.Setting:Data were collected in 2016, through an online questionnaire composed of sociodemographic, anthropometric, lifestyle and dietary practices questions, and a FFQ.Participants:Baseline participants from the CUME Project (n 2826), adults who graduated from Universidade Federal de Viçosa or Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Brazil.Results:Being employed (P = 0·024), the time spent on the computer (P = 0·031) and the frequency of fried food intake (P < 0·001) were positively and directly associated with UPF consumption, whereas the sleep duration (P = 0·007) and the number of meals per d (P < 0·001) were negatively and directly associated with UPF consumption. Indirect effects were observed between being employed, mediated by the sleep duration (P = 0·032) and fried food intake (P = 0·005), whereas being a student is mediated by the time on the computer (P = 0·048).Conclusion:The time spent on the computer, sleep duration and fried food consumption showed direct effects on UPF consumption. They also acted as mediators on the relationship between professional status and UPF consumption. Besides, the number of meals eaten each day also was directly associated with UPF consumption.
      PubDate: 2022-09-23
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980022002087
       
  • Perceived facilitators and barriers to healthy dietary behaviour in adults
           with type 2 diabetes mellitus in Kenya: a qualitative study

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      Authors: Mokaya; Moses, Saruni, Eddah, Kyallo, Florence, Vangoitsenhoven, Roman, Matthys, Christophe
      Pages: 3335 - 3343
      Abstract: Objective:This study aimed to explore the facilitators and barriers to healthy dietary behaviour in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in Kenya.Design:A qualitative descriptive design using telephone interviews was applied. An interview guide was developed through a modified theoretical framework.Setting:This study was conducted in selected hospitals in Nakuru County, located in west-central Kenya.Participants:A two-step sampling strategy was used to select hospitals and study participants. Adult participants aged 30 to 85 years, with T2DM from six hospitals were selected based on their ability to openly elaborate on the theme of dietary behaviour.Results:Thirty respondents were interviewed (mean age 62 years; 43·3 % females). The average duration of the interviews was 32:02 min (sd 17·07). The highest-ranking internal facilitators of healthy dietary behaviour were knowledge of healthy food choices, gardening, self-efficacy, food preparation skills and eating at home. External facilitators included inaccurate beliefs and information on food and diet, education by healthcare workers, food availability, proximity to food selling points and family support. Internal barriers included tastes and preferences, health conditions barring intake of certain foods, and random eating of unhealthy foods. External barriers included socio-economic factors, seasonal unavailability of fruits and food safety concerns.Conclusions:Facilitators and barriers to healthy dietary behaviour among Kenyan adults with T2DM are related to food literacy and include selection, preparation and eating. Interventions to enhance healthy dietary behaviour should target context-specific knowledge, skills and self-efficacy.
      PubDate: 2022-10-10
      DOI: 10.1017/S136898002200221X
       
  • Parental food consumption and diet quality and its association with
           children’s food consumption in families at high risk of type 2 diabetes:
           the Feel4Diabetes-study

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      Authors: Mahmood; Lubna, Moreno, Luis A, Flores-Barrantes, Paloma, Mavrogianni, Christina, Schwarz, Peter, Makrilakis, Konstantinos, Liatis, Stavros, Cardon, Greet, Willems, Ruben, Rurik, Imre, Radó, Sándorné, Tankova, Tsvetalina, Iotova, Violeta, Usheva, Natalya, Manios, Yannis, Gonzalez-Gil, Esther M
      Pages: 3344 - 3355
      Abstract: Objective:To examine the parental food consumption and diet quality and its associations with children’s consumption in families at high risk for developing type 2 diabetes mellitus across Europe. Also, to compare food frequency consumption among parents and children from high-risk families to the European Dietary guidelines/recommendations.Design:Cross-sectional study using Feel4diabetes FFQ.Setting:Families completed FFQ and anthropometric measures were obtained. Linear regression analyses were applied to investigate the relations between parental food consumption and diet quality and their children’s food consumption after consideration of potential confounders.Participants:2095 European families (74·6 % mothers, 50·9 % girls). The participants included parent and one child, aged 6–8 years.Results:Parental food consumption was significantly associated with children’s intake from the same food groups among boys and girls. Most parents and children showed under-consumption of healthy foods according to the European Dietary Guidelines. Parental diet quality was positively associated with children’s intake of ‘fruit’ (boys: β = 0·233, P < 0·001; girls: β = 0·134, P < 0·05) and ‘vegetables’ (boys: β = 0·177, P < 0·01; girls: β = 0·234, P < 0·001) and inversely associated with their ‘snacks’ consumption (boys: β = –0·143, P < 0·05; girls: β = –0·186, P < 0·01).Conclusion:The present study suggests an association between parental food consumption and diet quality and children’s food intake. More in-depth studies and lifestyle interventions that include both parents and children are therefore recommended for future research.
      PubDate: 2022-10-11
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980022002245
       
  • Racial/ethnic differences in maternal feeding practices and beliefs at 6
           months postpartum

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      Authors: von Ash; Tayla, Alikhani, Anna, Lebron, Cynthia, Risica, Patricia Markham
      Pages: 3445 - 3454
      Abstract: Objective:To examine racial/ethnic differences in maternal feeding practices and beliefs in a sample of low-income smoke-exposed women.Design:Cross-sectional analysis using data collected during a randomised control trial. Maternal feeding practices and beliefs were assessed using the Infant Feeding Questionnaire (IFQ), which was administered at 6 months postpartum. ANOVA was used to examine differences in IFQ items by race/ethnicity, while multivariable linear regression models were used to examine differences in IFQ factor scores by race/ethnicity adjusting for potential confounders.Setting:Participants were recruited from prenatal clinics.Participants:343 women (39 % non-Hispanic White, 28 % Hispanic/Latina, 13 % Black, and 20 % other).Results:Racial/ethnic minority mothers were more likely than non-Hispanic White mothers to put cereal in their infant’s bottle so that the infant would stay full longer (P = 0·032), state their infant wanted more than just formula or breast milk prior to 4 months (P = 0·019), allow their infant to eat whenever he/she wanted (P = 0·023) and only allow their infant to eat at set times (P < 0·001). Adjusting for potential confounders, racial/ethnic minority mothers had higher scores for factors 1 (concern about infant undereating or becoming underweight), 2 (concern about infant’s hunger), 4 (concern about infant overeating or becoming overweight) and 5 (feeding infant on a schedule), and lower scores for factor 7 (social interaction with the infant during feeding) than White mothers. Racial/ethnic differences were not found for the other two factors.Conclusions:Differences in maternal feeding practices and beliefs across race/ethnicity are present at 6 months postpartum.
      PubDate: 2022-01-14
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980021005073
       
  • Breast-feeding, rapid growth in the first year of life and excess weight
           at the age of 2 years: the 3D Cohort Study

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      Authors: Dubois; Lise, Feng, Cindy, Bédard, Brigitte, Yu, Yamei, Luo, Zhong-Cheng, Marc, Isabelle, Fraser, William D
      Pages: 3455 - 3465
      Abstract: Objective:To assess relationships between breast-feeding, rapid growth in the first year of life and overweight/obesity status at the age of 2 years.Design:As part of an observational, longitudinal study beginning in early pregnancy, multivariable logistic regressions were used to assess associations between breast-feeding duration (total and exclusive) and rapid weight gain (RWG) between birth and 1 year of age, and to determine predictors of overweight/obesity status at the age of 2 years.Setting:Nine hospitals located in the province of Quebec, Canada.Participants:A sample of 1599 term infants who participated in the 3D Cohort Study.Results:Children having RWG in the first year and those having excess weight at the age of 2 years accounted for 28 % and < 10 %, respectively. In multivariable models, children breastfed < 6 months and from 6 months to < 1 year were, respectively, 2·5 times (OR 2·45; 95 % CI 1·76, 3·41) and 1·8 times (OR 1·78; 95 % CI 1·29, 2·45) more likely to show RWG up to 1 year of age compared to children breastfed ≥ 1 year. Children exclusively breastfed < 3 months had significantly greater odds of RWG in the first year (OR 1·94; 95 % CI 1·25, 3·04) compared to children exclusively breastfed for ≥ 6 months. Associations between breast-feeding duration (total or exclusive) and excess weight at the age of 2 years were not detected. RWG in the first year was found to be the main predictor of excess weight at the age of 2 years (OR 6·98; 95 % CI 4·35, 11·47).Conclusions:The potential beneficial effects of breast-feeding on rate of growth in the first year of life suggest that interventions promoting breast-feeding are relevant for obesity prevention early in life.
      PubDate: 2022-01-07
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980022000015
       
  • Serum antioxidant status and mortality from influenza and pneumonia in US
           adults

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      Authors: Kang; Habyeong, Hu, Howard, Park, Sung Kyun
      Pages: 3466 - 3475
      Abstract: Objective:We examined the association between serum antioxidant status and mortality from influenza and pneumonia in US adults.Design:Serum concentrations of antioxidants included vitamin C, vitamin A, vitamin E, sum of α- and β-carotene, β-cryptoxanthin, lutein + zeaxanthin and lycopene. We computed total antioxidant capacity (TAC) as a measure of composite antioxidant status in serum. Survey-weighted Cox proportional hazard models were used to compute hazard ratios (HR) and 95 % CI comparing quartiles of each antioxidant and TAC.Setting:Data from the US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES)-III.Participants:A total of 7428 NHANES-III participants ≥45 years of age.Results:With a weighted-median follow-up of 16·8 years, 154 participants died from influenza/pneumonia. After adjustment for covariates, serum vitamin C, the sum of α- and β-carotene and TAC were nonlinearly associated with influenza/pneumonia mortality, with the statistically significant smallest HR at the third quartile v. the first quartile (HR = 0·38 (95 % CI: 0·19, 0·77), 0·29 (0·16, 0·51) and 0·30 (0·15, 0·59), respectively). HR comparing the fourth v. the first quartiles were weaker and nonsignificant: 0·57 (95 % CI: 0·27, 1·17), 0·70 (0·41, 1·19) and 0·65 (0·31, 1·35), respectively. Serum lycopene had a monotonic association with influenza/pneumonia mortality (HR = 0·43 (95 % CI: 0·23, 0·83) comparing the fourth v. the first quartile, Pfor trend = 0·01).Conclusions:The current study suggests that antioxidant intake as reflected by serum concentrations may reduce mortality risk from influenza or pneumonia in the US general population. These findings warrant further confirmation in other populations with different settings (e.g. a shorter-term association with influenza infection).
      PubDate: 2022-01-10
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980022000027
       
  • Association of Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension diet and
           Mediterranean diet with blood pressure in less-developed ethnic minority
           regions

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      Authors: Dai; Suyao, Xiao, Xiong, Xu, Chuanzhi, Jiao, Yan, Qin, Zixiu, Meng, Jiantong, Zuo, Haojiang, Zeng, Peibin, Tang, Dan, Wu, Xinyu, Nima, Qucuo, Quzong, Deji, Zhao, Xing
      Pages: 3476 - 3486
      Abstract: Objective:We aimed to investigate the associations of Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH)-style diet and Mediterranean-style diet with blood pressure (BP) in less-developed ethnic minority regions (LEMR).Design:Cross-sectional study.Setting:Dietary intakes were assessed by a validated FFQ. Dietary quality was assessed by the DASH-style diet score and the alternative Mediterranean-style diet (aMED) score. The association between dietary quality and BP was evaluated using multivariate linear regression model. We further examined those associations in subgroups of BP level.Participants:A total of 81 433 adults from the China Multi-Ethnic Cohort (CMEC) study were included in this study.Results:In the overall population, compared with the lowest quintile, the highest quintile of DASH-style diet score was negatively associated with systolic BP (SBP) (coefficient –2·78, 95 % CI –3·15, –2·41; Pfor trend < 0·001), while the highest quintile of aMED score had a weaker negative association with SBP (coefficient –1·43, 95 % CI –1·81, –1·05; Pfor trend < 0·001). Both dietary indices also showed a weaker effect on diastolic BP (coefficient for DASH-style diet –1·06, 95 % CI –1·30, –0·82; coefficient for aMED –0·43, 95 % CI –0·68, –0·19). In the subgroup analysis, both dietary indices showed a stronger beneficial effect on SBP in the hypertension group than in either of the other subgroups.Conclusion:Our results indicated that the healthy diet originating from Western developed countries can also have beneficial effects on BP in LEMR. DASH-style diet may be a more appropriate recommendation than aMED as part of a dietary strategy to control BP, especially in hypertensive patients.
      PubDate: 2022-01-14
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980022000106
       
  • Prevalence and factors associated with overweight or obesity among 2- to
           6-year-old children in Hunan, China: a cross-sectional study

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      Authors: Liu; Na, Li, Huixia, Guo, Zhanjun, Chen, Xin, Cheng, Peng, Wang, Bian, Huang, Guangwen, Shen, Minxue, Lin, Qian, Wu, Jing
      Pages: 3487 - 3498
      Abstract: Objective:To compare the prevalence of overweight or obesity (ow/ob) with WHO BMI cut-off points, International Obesity Task Force (IOTF) cut-off points and Chinese BMI criteria and examine its potential factors among preschool children in Hunan Province.Design:A cross-sectional survey including anthropometric measurements and questionnaires about children’s information, caregivers’ socio-demographic characteristics and maternal characteristics. χ2 tests and univariate and multivariate binary logistic regression were performed to evaluate the possible factors of ow/ob.Setting:Hunan, China, from September to October 2019.Participants:In total, 7664 children 2 to 6 years of age.Results:According to Chinese BMI criteria, about 1 in 7–8 children aged 2–6 years had ow/ob in Hunan, China. The overall estimated prevalence of ow/ob among 2- to 6-year-old children was significantly higher when based on the Chinese BMI criteria compared with the WHO BMI cut-off points and IOTF cut-off points. According to Chinese BMI criteria, ow/ob was associated with residing in urban areas, older age, male sex, eating snacking food more frequently, macrosomia delivery, caesarean birth, heavier maternal prepregnancy weight and pre-delivery weight.Conclusion:The prevalence of ow/ob in preschool children in Hunan Province remains high. More ow/ob children could be screened out according to Chinese BMI cut-offs compared with WHO and IOTF BMI criteria. In the future, targeted intervention studies with matched controls will be needed to assess the long-term effects of intervention measures to provide more information for childhood obesity prevention and treatment.
      PubDate: 2022-01-17
      DOI: 10.1017/S136898002200012X
       
  • Characterisation of anaemia amongst school going adolescent girls in rural
           Haryana, India

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      Authors: Gupta; Aakriti, Sachdev, Harshpal Singh, Kapil, Umesh, Prakash, Shyam, Pandey, Ravindra Mohan, Sati, Hem Chandra, Sharma, Lokesh Kumar, Lal, Priti Rishi
      Pages: 3499 - 3508
      Abstract: Objective:High burden of anaemia exists amongst rural adolescent girls in India. The objective of this study was to characterise anaemia in school going adolescent girls in rural Haryana, India.Design:Linear and multiple logistic regression analysis of data collected prior to an intervention trial was conducted. Participants were classified into anaemic (haemoglobin
      PubDate: 2022-01-24
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980022000210
       
  • Coffee and caffeine intake in relation to symptoms of psychological
           disorders among adults

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      Authors: Nouri-Majd; Saeedeh, Salari-Moghaddam, Asma, Hassanzadeh Keshteli, Ammar, Afshar, Hamid, Esmaillzadeh, Ahmad, Adibi, Peyman
      Pages: 3509 - 3519
      Abstract: Objective:Given that there is an inconsistency in the findings related to the relationship between coffee and caffeine consumption and symptoms of psychological disorders, we performed a cross-sectional analysis to examine the association between coffee and caffeine intake and symptoms of psychological disorders among adults.Design:In this cross-sectional study, 3362 participants were included. We assessed the coffee and caffeine intakes using a self-completed FFQ. Symptoms of depression, anxiety and psychological distress were assessed using Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and General Health Questionnaire screening tools.Setting:Fifty different healthcare centres located in the province of Isfahan, Iran.Participants:This study was performed on 3362 Iranian general adults working in healthcare centres.Results:The mean age of participants in this study was 36·2 ± 7·8 years. After controlling for potential confounders, individuals who consumed coffee weekly or more had a significantly lower odds of symptoms of depression (OR 0·67; 95 % CI (0·46, 0·96)) and symptoms of anxiety (OR 0·57; 95 % CI (0·34, 0·95)) compared with those who did not consume coffee. However, no significant association was found between coffee intake and symptoms of psychological distress (OR 0·98; 95 % CI (0·68, 1·42)). No significant relationship was found between caffeine intake and odds of symptoms of depression (OR 0·94; 95 % CI (0·75, 1·16)), symptoms of anxiety (OR 0·90; 95 % CI (0·67, 1·20)) and symptoms of psychological distress (OR 1·13; 95 % CI (0·89, 1·42)).Conclusion:Compared with lack of coffee intake, weekly or more coffee consumption might be correlated with symptoms of depression and anxiety.
      PubDate: 2022-01-31
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980022000271
       
  • Food insecurity and physical functioning in Boston area Puerto Rican older
           adults

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      Authors: Kuehl; Lillian, Lee, Jong Soo, Dinesh, Deepika, Na, Muzi, Tucker, Katherine L, Palacios, Natalia
      Pages: 3520 - 3526
      Abstract: Objective:Prior studies have found evidence of a relationship between food insecurity and functional limitations among older populations in the USA.Design:This is a longitudinal investigation of food security in relation to functional limitations, assessed as Activities of Daily Living (ADL) and Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADL) scores.Setting:The Greater Boston, MA area.Participants:1461 Boston Puerto Rican Health study participants, predominantly (70·5 %) female and aged 57·1 years (sd ± 7·6) at baseline followed for 6·2 (sd ± 0·98) years.Results:In cross-sectional analysis at baseline, participants reporting severe food insecurity had greater functional limitations (higher ADL; β = 2·34; 95 % CI (1·48, 3·19)) and higher IADL (β = 1·17, 95 % CI (0·68, 1·65)) compared with food secure participants. In longitudinal linear mixed models, severely food insecure participants at baseline had greater functional limitations over 5 years, as assessed by ADL (β = 1·74; 95 % CI (0·95, 2·53); P < 0·001) and IADL (β = 0·93, 95 % CI (0·48, 1·38)) compared with food secure participants. However, baseline food security did not significantly alter the 5-year trajectory in ADL (P-interaction between baseline food security and time for ADL and IADL = 0·41 and 0·47, respectively).Conclusions:In this cohort of Boston area Puerto Rican adults, those who are food insecure had consistently higher ADL and IADL scores over time, compared with those who are food secure. Baseline food security did not appear to alter the trajectory in ADL or IADL score.
      PubDate: 2022-08-05
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980022000301
       
  • Socio-economic inequalities in the consumption of fruits and vegetables in
           Peru between 2014 and 2019

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      Authors: Hernández-Vásquez; Akram, Visconti Lopez, Fabriccio J, Vargas-Fernández, Rodrigo
      Pages: 3527 - 3537
      Abstract: Objective:To estimate the prevalence and socio-economic inequalities in adequate consumption of fruits and vegetables in Peru between 2014 and 2019.Design:Analytical cross-sectional study. The outcome variable was adequate consumption of fruits and vegetables, defined as the consumption of five or more servings of fruits and vegetables per d (yes/no). We used concentration curves and Erreygers concentration index to describe socio-economic inequalities and a microeconometric approach to determine the contribution of each variable to inequality.Setting:Peru.Participants:Data from Peruvians aged 18 years or older collected by the Demographic and Family Health Survey.Results:The prevalence of adequate fruit and vegetable consumption did not change between 2014 (10·7 %; 95 % CI (10·0, 11·4)) and 2019 (11 %; 95 % CI (10·4, 11·7)). We found socio-economic inequalities in the adequate consumption of fruits and vegetables, with wealthier individuals having a higher prevalence of adequate consumption compared to poorer individuals in 2014 (19·2 % v. 3·5 %) and 2019 (18·6 % v. 4·7 %). The decomposition analysis found that education, urban areas and being wealthy were the main factors associated with socio-economic inequality in adequate fruit and vegetable consumption, being structural problems of society.Conclusion:Despite the current regulations on healthy eating in Peru, adequate consumption of fruits and vegetables remains low, and there are socio-economic inequalities between the poorest and wealthiest individuals. Our findings suggest that more efforts are needed to increase the intake and assess the disparities in adequate fruit and vegetable consumption.
      PubDate: 2022-09-08
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980022001860
       
  • Exploring the associations between neighbourhood food environment,
           household food insecurity and child weight-related outcomes in
           socio-economically and racially/ethnically diverse families

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      Authors: Agarwal; Sarthak, Fertig, Angela R, Trofholz, Amanda C, Tate, Allan D, Robinson, Jenna, Berge, Jerica M
      Pages: 3538 - 3547
      Abstract: Objective:To examine associations among neighbourhood food environments (NFE), household food insecurity (HFI) and child’s weight-related outcomes in a racially/ethnically diverse sample of US-born and immigrant/refugee families.Design:This cross-sectional, observational study involving individual and geographic-level data used multilevel models to estimate associations between neighbourhood food environment and child outcomes. Interactions between HFI and NFE were employed to determine whether HFI moderated the association between NFE and child outcomes and whether the associations differed for US-born v. immigrant/refugee groups.Setting:The sample resided in 367 census tracts in the Minneapolis/St. Paul, MN metropolitan area, and the data were collected in 2016–2019.Participants:The sample was from the Family Matters study of families (n 1296) with children from six racial/ethnic and immigrant/refugee groups (African American, Latino, Hmong, Native American, Somali/Ethiopian and White).Results:Living in a neighbourhood with low perceived access to affordable fresh fruits and vegetables was found to be associated with lower food security (P < 0·01), poorer child diet quality (P < 0·01) and reduced availability of a variety of fruits (P < 0·01), vegetables (P < 0·05) and whole grains in the home (P < 0·01). Moreover, residing in a food desert was found to be associated with a higher child BMI percentile if the child’s household was food insecure (P < 0·05). No differences in associations were found for immigrant/refugee groups.Conclusions:Poor NFE were associated with worse weight-related outcomes for children; the association with weight was more pronounced among children with HFI. Interventions aiming to improve child weight-related outcomes should consider both NFE and HFI.
      PubDate: 2022-10-10
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980022002130
       
  • Implementation of food education in school environments improves pupils’
           eating patterns and social participation in school dining

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      Authors: Laitinen; Aija L, Antikainen, Amma, Mikkonen, Santtu, Kähkönen, Kaisa, Talvia, Sanna, Varjonen, Silja, Paavola, Saila, Karhunen, Leila, Tilles-Tirkkonen, Tanja
      Pages: 3548 - 3558
      Abstract: Objective:Schools can be an effective arena for food education. The Tasty School is a tailored teacher-driven food education model that provides tools for implementing food education in primary schools. This study aimed to investigate the effects of the Tasty School model on pupils’ eating patterns and experiences. We also aimed to assess the implementation strength of the Tasty School.Design:A quasi-experimental study was conducted during one school year 2019–2020 in fifteen intervention and ten control schools. The intervention schools implemented the Tasty School food education model. The pupils completed web-based baseline and follow-up questionnaires in class during a school day. The principals were interviewed after the intervention. The data were analysed using a mixed-effects model for repeated measures, accounting for the implementation strength and selected standardisation effects.Setting:A total of twenty-five general Finnish primary schools.Participants:1480 pupils from grades 3−6 (age 8–12 years) from five municipalities in Finland.Results:Percentages of pupils eating a balanced school meal increased in schools where food education was actively implemented (P = 0·027). In addition, pupils’ experience of social participation in school dining strengthened in schools where the Tasty School model was implemented (5-point scale mean from 2·41 to 2·61; P = 0·017).Conclusions:Healthy eating patterns can be promoted by the active implementation of food education in primary schools. The Tasty School model offers a promising tool for developing healthy eating patterns and increasing social participation among pupils not only in Finland, but also potentially in other countries as well.
      PubDate: 2022-10-10
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980022002154
       
  • The (scarce and circumscribed) culinary content in food-based dietary
           guidelines around the world: 1991–2021

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      Authors: Oliveira; Mariana Fernandes Brito de, Martins, Carla Adriano, Castro, Inês Rugani Ribeiro de
      Pages: 3559 - 3567
      Abstract: Objective:To evaluate the culinary content of key messages contained in food-based dietary guidelines (FBDG) available at the global online repository of the FAO of the UN.Design:Document analysis was conducted in August 2021 with data extraction of key messages explicitly related to cooking present in FBDG. Data were analysed inductively using thematic analysis.Setting:The FAO’s global repository of FBDG.Participants:Not applicable.Results:Just over half (n 39; 53·4 %) of the seventy-three FBDG analysed included at least one key message about cooking. The Latin American and Caribbean FBDG presented the greatest amount and variety of content about cooking in the key messages, whereas the Near East and North America placed less emphasis on cooking. We identified three themes: (i) healthy food preparation (n 35; 61·4 % of the fifty-seven culinary key messages identified); (ii) food hygiene (n 14; 24·6 %) and (iii) the promotion of culinary practices (n 7; 12·3 %). Albania’s key message covered two themes (food hygiene and healthy food preparation) (n 1; 1·8 %).Conclusion:FBDG are official documents that express recommendations for a healthy diet. As most of these recommendations throughout the world include foods that must be cooked prior to consumption, culinary content should gain more visibility and be presented more broadly in these official documents.
      PubDate: 2022-09-08
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980022001938
       
  • The corporate capture of the nutrition profession in the USA: the case of
           the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics

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      Authors: Carriedo; Angela, Pinsky, Ilana, Crosbie, Eric, Ruskin, Gary, Mialon, Melissa
      Pages: 3568 - 3582
      Abstract: Objective:The involvement of unhealthy commodity corporations in health policy and research has been identified as an important commercial determinant contributing to the rise of non-communicable diseases. In the USA, health professional associations have been subject to corporate influence. This study explores the interactions between corporations and the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (AND), and their implications for the profession in the USA and globally.Design:We conducted an inductive analysis of documents (2014–2020) obtained through freedom of information requests, to assess key AND actors’ dealings with food, pharmaceutical and agribusiness corporations. We also triangulated this information with publicly available data.Setting:The USA.Participants:Not applicable.Results:The AND, AND Foundation (ANDF) and its key leaders have ongoing interactions with corporations. These include AND’s leaders holding key positions in multinational food, pharmaceutical or agribusiness corporations, and AND accepting corporate financial contributions. We found the AND has invested funds in corporations such as Nestlé, PepsiCo and pharmaceutical companies, has discussed internal policies to fit industry needs and has had public positions favouring corporations.Conclusion:The documents reveal a symbiotic relationship between the AND, its Foundation and corporations. Corporations assist the AND and ANDF with financial contributions. AND acts as a pro-industry voice in some policy venues, and with public positions that clash with AND’s mission to improve health globally.
      PubDate: 2022-10-24
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980022001835
       
  • The importance of protein variety in a higher quality and lower
           environmental impact dietary pattern

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      Authors: Ridoutt; Bradley G, Baird, Danielle, Hendrie, Gilly A
      Pages: 3583 - 3588
      Abstract: Objective:Eating a variety of nutritious foods is fundamental to good nutrition. However, this principle is challenged when recommendations seeking to improve the environmental sustainability of diets call for avoidance of foods considered to have a higher environmental footprint, such as animal-sourced foods. Our objective was to assess the implications for nutritional adequacy of protein choice across Australian adult diets preselected as having higher quality and lower environmental impact scores.Design:Each individual diet was assessed for variety of food choice within the ‘Fresh meat and alternatives’ food group defined in the Australian Dietary Guidelines, which includes protein-rich foods such as eggs, nuts, tofu and legumes in addition to animal meats. Diets were grouped according to variety score and whether they included only animal meats, only alternatives or a variety of meat and alternatives. Nutrient content was assessed relative to estimated average requirements (EAR).Setting:Australia.Participants:1700 adults participating in the Australian Health SurveyResults:For diets with higher diet quality and lower environmental impact, the likelihood of achieving nutrient EAR significantly increased as variety of food choice in the ‘Fresh meat and alternatives’ food group increased (P < 0·001). Variety score and number of serves were also correlated (r = 0·52, P < 0·001) which is relevant since most diets did not meet the recommended minimum number of serves for this food group.Conclusions:Greater variety within the ‘Fresh meat and alternatives’ food group is beneficial to meeting EAR and lower environmental impact diets can include three or more selections including foods of animal origin.
      PubDate: 2022-10-10
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980022002221
       
 
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