A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z  

        1 2        [Sort alphabetically]   [Restore default list]

  Subjects -> NUTRITION AND DIETETICS (Total: 201 journals)
Showing 1 - 64 of 64 Journals sorted by number of followers
American Journal of Clinical Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 194)
Clinical Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 97)
British Journal Of Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 94)
International Journal of Sport Nutrition & Exercise Metabolism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 90)
European Journal of Clinical Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 77)
Advances in Food and Nutrition Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 67)
Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 62)
Food Science & Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 62)
Advances in Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 60)
International Journal of Obesity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 58)
American Journal of Food and Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 54)
Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 52)
Nutrition in Clinical Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
Annual Review of Nutrition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 41)
Obesity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 41)
Journal of Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
Diabetes, Metabolic Syndrome and Obesity     Open Access   (Followers: 39)
Nutrition Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
European Journal of Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37)
Food & Nutrition Research     Open Access   (Followers: 37)
Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity     Open Access   (Followers: 34)
Nutrition & Dietetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Journal of Renal Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Journal of Nutrition, Health and Aging     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Public Health Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Current Nutrition & Food Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Clinical Nutrition ESPEN     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Current Opinion in Clinical Nutrition & Metabolic Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Eating and Weight Disorders - Studies on Anorexia, Bulimia and Obesity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Appetite     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Comparative Exercise Physiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
International Journal of Nutrition and Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 23)
International Journal of Eating Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Advances in Eating Disorders : Theory, Research and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
International Journal of Food Safety, Nutrition and Public Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Nutrition Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Topics in Clinical Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Clinical Obesity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Canadian Journal of Dietetic Practice and Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Nutrition & Diabetes     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
BMJ Nutrition, Prevention & Health     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
Nutrition & Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Obesity Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
African Journal of Food, Agriculture, Nutrition and Development     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Nutrition and Dietary Supplements     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Middle East Journal of Therapeutic Nutrition and Complementary Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Nutrition in Gerontology and Geriatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Eating Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
BMC Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Food, Culture and Society: An International Journal of Multidisciplinary Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Maternal & Child Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Nutrition Research Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Nutrition Today     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Nutrients     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Advances in Digestive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Nutrition Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Annual Review of Food Science and Technology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Clinical Nutrition Insight     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Ecology of Food and Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Food and Foodways: Explorations in the History and Culture of     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Nutrition and Cancer     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Asian Journal of Clinical Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Health, Population and Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
International Journal of Food Sciences and Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Nutrition Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
International Journal for Vitamin and Nutrition Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Pediatric Obesity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Nutrition & Food Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
American Journal of Food Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Dietary Supplements     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Food and Nutrition Research     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Proceedings of the Nutrition Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Current Developments in Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Egyptian Journal of Nutrition and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Nutritional Neuroscience : An International Journal on Nutrition, Diet and Nervous System     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Current Nutrition Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Nutrition and Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Hunger & Environmental Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Food Science and Nutrition Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Journal of the American College of Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Current Research in Nutrition and Food Science     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Amino Acids     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
South African Journal of Clinical Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Genes & Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Plant Foods for Human Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Nutrition Bytes     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Food Digestion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Food Chemistry and Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Child Health and Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Food and Nutrition Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Molecular Nutrition & Food Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Nutrition and Metabolic Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Metabolism and Nutrition in Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Bangladesh Journal of Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Revista Española de Nutrición Humana y Dietética     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Nutrition & Food Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Open Nutrition Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
World Food Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
European Journal of Nutrition & Food Safety     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Ernährung & Medizin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Nutrición Hospitalaria     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
PharmaNutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Frontiers in Sustainable Food Systems     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Plant Production Science     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Agriculture, Food Systems, and Community Development     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Food Frontiers     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Oil Crop Science     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Nutritional & Environmental Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Aktuelle Ernährungsmedizin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Revista Chilena de Nutricion     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Pakistan Journal of Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Nutritional Science     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
The Australian Coeliac     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Nigerian Food Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Bioactive Carbohydrates and Dietary Fibre     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Endocrinología, Diabetes y Nutrición (English Edition)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Jurnal Gizi dan Dietetik Indonesia : Indonesian Journal of Nutrition and Dietetics     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Food Quality and Safety     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Spices and Aromatic Crops     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Open Obesity Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Acta Portuguesa de Nutrição     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Human Nutrition & Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Cahiers de Nutrition et de Diététique     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Food and Environmental Virology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Médecine & Nutrition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Ethnic Foods     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Clinical Nutrition Experimental     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian Journal of Nutrition and Dietetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Canadian Food Studies / La Revue canadienne des études sur l'alimentation     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Nutrition - Science en évolution     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Food and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Jurnal Riset Kesehatan     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Archive of Food and Nutritional Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Open Food Science Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Salud Pública y Nutrición     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Arab Journal of Nutrition and Exercise     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
npj Science of Food     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Clinical Nutrition Open Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Food Hydrocolloids for Health     Open Access  
Journal of Nutraceuticals and Herbal Medicine     Open Access  
Nutrire     Hybrid Journal  
Archivos Latinoamericanos de Nutrición     Open Access  
Indonesian Food and Nutrition Progress     Open Access  
Journal of Medicinal Herbs and Ethnomedicine     Open Access  
La Ciencia al Servicio de la Salud y Nutrición     Open Access  
Media Gizi Indonesia     Open Access  
NFS Journal     Open Access  
Journal of Nutrition & Intermediary Metabolism     Open Access  
Food and Waterborne Parasitology     Open Access  
Nigerian Journal of Nutritional Sciences     Full-text available via subscription  
African Journal of Biomedical Research     Open Access  
Journal of the Australasian College of Nutritional and Environmental Medicine     Full-text available via subscription  
Endocrinología, Diabetes y Nutrición     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Sensory Studies     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Muscle Foods     Hybrid Journal  

        1 2        [Sort alphabetically]   [Restore default list]

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Public Health Nutrition
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.122
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 29  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1368-9800 - ISSN (Online) 1475-2727
Published by Cambridge University Press Homepage  [353 journals]
  • Comprehensive evaluation of body composition in a wide age range of
           Iranian adults using bioelectrical impedance analysis: Tehran Lipid and
           Glucose Study

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Mohamadzadeh; Mahdieh, Valizadeh, Majid, Hosseinpanah, Farhad, Momenan, Amirabbas, Mahdavi, Maryam, Barzin, Maryam, Azizi, Feridoun
      First page: 24
      Abstract: Objective:To evaluate sex- and age-stratified body composition (BC) parameters in subjects with wide age range of 20–79 years.Design:Cross-sectional.Setting:Participants of Tehran Lipid and Glucose Study (TLGS).Participants:Two thousand nine hundred seventy participants met our inclusion criteria. They were divided into five age groups, and BC parameters were analysed based on sex and age using a bioelectrical impedance analyser (BIA).Result:The mean age of the participants was 42·1 ± 12·5 years, and 54 % of them were males. The mean BMI was 26·7 ± 3·7 kg/m2. Obesity indices were significantly higher in females (P < 0·001); however, skeletal muscle mass (SMM) and fat-free mass (FFM) were significantly higher in males (P < 0·001). Both SMM and FFM decreased significantly after the age of 50 years. Obesity indices significantly increased from the age group of 20–29 to 30–39 years in males and the age groups of 30–39 to 40–49 years and 40–49 to 50–59 years in females. The fat mass ratio (fat mass/SMM) showed two peaks in both sexes (after the ages of 30 and 50 years in males and 40 and 50 years in females). A strong correlation was found between BMI and percentage of body fat (r = 0·823 in females v. r = 0·768 in males).Conclusion:This is the first community-based study in the MENA region identifying sex- and age-stratified BC values using BIA. Our findings can be used as a reference for comparison in appropriate settings.
      PubDate: 2024-01-02
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980023002835
       
  • Implementation and effectiveness of a school-based intervention to
           increase adherence to national school meal guidelines: a non-randomised
           controlled trial

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Randby; Jorunn Sofie, Ogden, Terje, Lien, Nanna
      First page: 25
      Abstract: Objective:Implementation of school meal guidelines is often inadequate, and evidence for effective implementation strategies for school-based nutrition interventions is limited. The aim of the present study was to examine the implementation and effectiveness of a multi-strategy implementation intervention to increase adherence to the Norwegian national school meal guideline.Design:The study was a school-based hybrid implementation effectiveness trial with a pre–post non-equivalent control group design, testing three implementation strategies: internal facilitation, training and an educational meeting.Setting:Primary schools and after-school services in two counties in south-east Norway.Participants:School principals, after-school leaders and class teachers from thirty-three schools in the intervention county and principals and after-school leaders from thirty-four schools in a comparison county.Results:There was a significant difference of 4 percentage points in change scores between the intervention and the comparison groups at follow-up, after adjusting for baseline adherence (B = 0·04, se B = 0·01, t = 3·10, P = 0·003). The intervention effect was not associated with the school’s socio-economic profile. School-level fidelity was the implementation dimension that was most strongly correlated (rs = 0·48) with the change scores in the intervention group, indicating that principals’ support is important for gaining the largest intervention effects.Conclusions:A school-based intervention with low intensity, based on trained teachers as internal facilitators, can increase adherence to the national school meal guideline among Norwegian primary schools, irrespective of local socio-economic conditions. Implementation fidelity, at an organisational level, may be a useful predictor for intervention outcomes in schools.
      PubDate: 2024-01-02
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980023002938
       
  • Empirically derived dietary patterns in relation to periodontitis and
           number of teeth among Norwegian adults

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Petrenya; Natalia, Brustad, Magritt, Hopstok, Laila A, Holde, Gro Eirin, Jönsson, Birgitta
      First page: 27
      Abstract: Objectives:To explore dietary patterns in relation to periodontitis and number of teeth.Design:A cross-sectional study.Setting:We used data from the seventh survey of the Tromsø Study in Norway, 2015–2016. Three periodontitis groups were compared: (i) no periodontitis/slow bone loss; (ii) moderate bone loss; and (iii) rapid bone loss. Number of teeth was categorised as 25–28, 20–24 and ≤ 19. Dietary patterns were identified by principal component analysis. Multiple logistic regression was applied to examine associations between tertiles of dietary pattern scores and periodontitis, and between these same tertiles and number of teeth.Participants:1487 participants (55·5 % women) aged 40–79 years who were free of major chronic diseases, attended an oral health examination and completed a FFQ.Results:Four dietary patterns were identified, which explained 24 % of the total variability in food intake: fruit and vegetables, Westernised, meat/fish and potatoes, and refined grain and dessert. The fruit and vegetables pattern was inversely associated with periodontitis characterised by rapid bone loss when compared with no periodontitis/slow bone loss (OR tertile 3 v. 1 0·49, 95 % CI: 0·25, 0·98). Participants who were in the highest tertile of the refined grain and dessert pattern (tertile 3 v. 1) had 2·38- and 3·52-fold increased odds of having ≤ 19 than 20–24 and 25–28 teeth, respectively.Conclusion:Out of four identified dietary patterns, only the fruit and vegetables pattern was negatively associated with advanced periodontitis. A more apparent positive association was observed between the refined grain and dessert pattern and having fewer teeth (≤ nineteen teeth).
      PubDate: 2024-01-15
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980023002690
       
  • Development and application of a 2-step methodology to select a reference
           society providing Dietary Reference Values for national implementation

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Jotterand Chaparro; Corinne, Moullet, Clémence, Bertoni Maluf, Valeria A, Parel, Nicolas, Tume, Lyvonne N, Chatelan, Angeline, Benzi Schmid, Clara, Reinert, Raphaël, Bucher Della Torre, Sophie
      First page: 28
      Abstract: Objective:To describe and discuss a 2-step methodology developed to select a reference society that provides Dietary Reference Values (DRV) for national implementation and to illustrate its application in Switzerland with one macronutrient and one micronutrient.Design:During Step 1, we searched and compared DRV and methodologies used to define DRV from eight European societies for seven selected nutrients. We repeated this procedure during Step 2 for DRV from two preselected societies for forty-four nutrients.Setting:The 2-step methodology applied here for Switzerland may be used in other countries.Participants:The research team commissioned six external experts from three linguistic regions of Switzerland, who provided their opinions through two online surveys, individual interviews and a focus group.Results:After Step 1, we excluded five societies because of old publication dates, irrelevant publication languages for Switzerland, difficulty in accessing documents, or because their DRV were mainly based on another society. After Step 2, the two societies were qualified based on the analysis of the values and methodologies used. The need for free and easily accessible scientific background information favoured the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA). We chose alternative societies for nine nutrients for the overall population or subgroups and for the elderly.Conclusions:To manage heterogeneous and complex data from several societies, adopting a 2-step methodology including fewer nutrients and more societies during Step 1, and fewer societies but all nutrients in Step 2, was very helpful. With some exceptions, we selected EFSA as the main society to provide DRV for Switzerland.
      PubDate: 2024-01-02
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980023002902
       
  • Trends of risk factors associated with childhood stunting and anaemia in
           Ghana: evidence from the Demographic Health Survey and Multiple Indicator
           Cluster Survey (2003–2017)

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Sewor; Christian, Jayalakshmi, Rajeev
      First page: 29
      Abstract: Objective:This study investigated the trend of effect estimates of the key risk factors of childhood stunting and anaemia between 2003 and 2017.Design:A secondary analysis of the Demographic Health Survey (DHS) and Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey (MICS) data for the Ghanaian population between 2003 and 2017. Associations of selected socio-demographic (child age and gender; maternal age and education), economic (household wealth), environmental, dietary (minimum dietary diversity and iodine use) and health system (place of delivery and vaccination) factors were explored using the Poisson regression model. Trend analysis was explored using a fitted linear regression line on a time series plot.Setting:GhanaParticipants:Children under 5 yearsResults:The results showed a reduction in the prevalence of stunting and anaemia over the 15-year duration. These health outcomes were found to be negatively associated with a wide array of socio-demographic (child age and gender, maternal age and education, residency), economic (household wealth), dietary (iodised salt use) and health service (place of delivery and vaccination) factors; however, the most consistent statistically significant association was observed between child’s age and belonging to the poor wealth quintile.Conclusion:In order to prevent these indicators of child malnutrition, key consideration must be given to the early developmental stages of life. Child health policies must focus on addressing the key contextual factors of child malnutrition.
      PubDate: 2024-01-23
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980023002951
       
  • Predictors of anaemia in mothers and children in Uttar Pradesh, India

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Larson; Leila M, Thomas, Tinku, Kurpad, Anura V, Martorell, Reynaldo, Hoddinott, John, Adebiyi, Victoria Oluwapamilerin, Swaminathan, Sumathi, Neufeld, Lynnette M
      First page: 30
      Abstract: Objective:Anaemia affects more than half of Indian women and children, but the contribution of its causes remains unquantified. We examined interrelationships between Hb and nutritional, environmental, infectious and genetic determinants of anaemia in non-pregnant mothers and children in Uttar Pradesh (UP).Design:We conducted a cross-sectional survey of households in twenty-five districts of UP between October and December 2016. We collected socio-demographic data, anthropometry and venous blood in 1238 non-pregnant mothers and their children. We analysed venous blood samples for malaria, Hb, ferritin, retinol, folate, Zn, vitamin B12, C-reactive protein, α1-acid glycoprotein (AGP) and β-thalassaemia. We used path analysis to examine pathways through which predictors of anaemia were associated with Hb concentration.Setting:Rural and urban households in twenty-five districts of UP.Participants:Mothers 18–49 years and children 6–59 months in UP.Results:A total of 36·4 % of mothers and 56·0 % of children were anaemic, and 26·7 % of women and 44·6 % of children had Fe deficiency anaemia. Ferritin was the strongest predictor of Hb (β (95 % CI) = 1·03 (0·80, 1·27) g/dL in women and 0·90 (0·68, 1·12) g/dL in children). In children only, red blood cell folate and AGP were negatively associated with Hb and retinol was positively associated with Hb.Conclusions:Over 70 % of mothers and children with anaemia had Fe deficiency, needing urgent attention. However, several simultaneous predictors of Hb exist, including nutrient deficiencies and inflammation. The potential of Fe interventions to address anaemia may be constrained unless coexisting determinants are jointly addressed.
      PubDate: 2024-01-08
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980024000028
       
  • Mid-upper arm circumference only protocol in Pakistan: missed
           opportunities for children suffering from severe acute malnutrition' A
           mixed-methods observational study

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Guesdon; Benjamin, Faruqi, Meena Iqbal, Siddiqui, Muhammad Ilyas, Usman, Gulzar, Ariser, Kanwal Naz, Shah, Rafaina, Amin, Fatima, Masoud, Muntaha, Tagar, Qamar Din, Tonon, Brigitte, Lesieur, Elise, Memon, Khalida Naz
      First page: 31
      Abstract: Objective:We investigated the missed treatment opportunities affecting programmes using mid-upper arm circumference (MUAC) as the sole anthropometric criterion for identification and monitoring of children suffering from severe acute malnutrition (SAM).Design:Alongside MUAC, we assessed weight-for-height Z-score (WHZ) in children screened and treated according to the national MUAC only protocol in Pakistan. Besides, we collected parents’ perceptions regarding the treatment received by their children through qualitative interviews.Setting:Data were collected from October to December 2021 in Tando Allah Yar District, Sindh.Subjects:All children screened in the health facilities (n 8818) and all those discharged as recovered (n 686), throughout the district, contributed to the study. All children screened in the community in the catchment areas of five selected health facilities also contributed (n 8459). Parents of forty-one children randomly selected from these same facilities participated in the interviews.Results:Overall, 80·3 % of the SAM cases identified during community screening and 64·1 % of those identified in the health facilities presented a ‘WHZ-only’ diagnosis. These figures reached 93·9 % and 84·5 %, respectively, in children aged over 24 months. Among children treated for SAM and discharged as recovered, 25·3 % were still severely wasted according to WHZ. While parents positively appraised the treatment received by their children, they also recommended to extend eligibility to other malnourished children in their neighbourhood.Conclusion:In this context, using MUAC as the sole anthropometric criterion for treatment decisions (referral, admission and discharge) resulted in a large number of missed opportunities for children in need of timely and adequate care.
      PubDate: 2024-01-10
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980024000041
       
  • Assessing association of household diet diversity with mother’s time use
           on productive and reproductive activities: a case for gender sensitive
           social safety nets

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Chaturvedi; Surabhi, Swaminathan, Sumathi, Makkar, Sanchit, John, Anjaly Teresa, Thomas, Tinku
      First page: 33
      Abstract: Objective:In South Asia, while women make substantial economic contributions through their participation in agricultural sector, these contributions are undercounted as most of their work is underpaid or unpaid. This paper examines how mothers allocate their time to productive and reproductive activities and its association with a household’s ability to achieve high household diet diversity score.Design:The analysis uses data on household consumption and expenditure including food during the kharif (June to October) season (seeds are sown) and a modular time-use survey.Setting:Two districts of rural Bihar, India.Participants:Mothers with children less than 5 years of age and supported by the head of the household from 2026 households.Results:The estimates indicate that the high household diet diversity (High HDDS ≥ 10) is associated with greater time spent in reproductive activities by all women (OR = 1·12, 95 % CI: 1·06, 1·18). However, with increasing time spent in productive activities by the women the odds of achieving ‘High HDDS’ reduced (OR = 0·83, 95 % CI: 0·77, 0·89) in adjusted logistic regression analysis.Conclusion:The findings highlight propensity to achieve ‘High HDDS’ in Bihar increased with mothers allocating time towards reproductive activities, while it had an opposing effect with mothers allocating time on productive activities. Our study highlights that the policies that encourage women’s participation in agriculture or livestock should acknowledge the unpaid nature of some of the productive activities and design programs to improve economic agency of women to actuate the true potential of agriculture-nutrition pathways.
      PubDate: 2024-01-04
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980023002963
       
  • The environmental impact of beef and ultra-processed food consumption in
           Brazil

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: da Cruz; Gabriela Lopes, da Costa Louzada, Maria Laura, Silva, Jacqueline Tereza da, Maria Fellegger Garzillo, Josefa, Rauber, Fernanda, Schmidt Rivera, Ximena, Reynolds, Christian, Levy, Renata Bertazzi
      First page: 34
      Abstract: Objective:This study evaluated the independent and combined environmental impacts of the consumption of beef and ultra-processed foods in Brazil.Design:Cross-sectional study.Setting:Brazil.Participants:We used food purchases data from a national household budget survey conducted between July 2017 and July 2018, representing all Brazilian households. Food purchases were converted into energy, carbon footprints and water footprints. Multiple linear regression models were used to assess the association between quintiles of beef and ultra-processed foods in total energy purchases and the environmental footprints, controlling for sociodemographic variables.Results:Both beef and ultra-processed foods had a significant linear association with carbon and water footprints (P < 0·01) in crude and adjusted models. In the crude upper quintile of beef purchases, carbon and water footprints were 47·7 % and 30·8 % higher, respectively, compared to the lower quintile. The upper quintile of ultra-processed food purchases showed carbon and water footprints 14·4 % and 22·8 % higher, respectively, than the lower quintile. The greatest reduction in environmental footprints would occur when both beef and ultra-processed food purchases are decreased, resulting in a 21·1 % reduction in carbon footprint and a 20·0 % reduction in water footprint.Conclusions:Although the environmental footprints associated with beef consumption are higher, dietary patterns with lower consumption of beef and ultra-processed foods combined showed the greatest reduction in carbon and water footprints in Brazil. The high consumption of beef and ultra-processed foods is harmful to human health, as well as to the environment; thus, their reduction is beneficial to both.
      PubDate: 2024-01-04
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980023002975
       
  • Factors associated with Mediterranean diet adherence in a sample of high
           socio-economic status children from southern Spain

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Villodres; Gracia Cristina, Salvador Pérez, Federico, Muros, José Joaquín
      First page: 35
      PubDate: 2024-01-15
      DOI: 10.1017/S136898002400003X
       
  • Food provision to support improved nutrition and well-being of people
           experiencing disadvantage – perspectives of service providers

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Vaiciurgis; Verena T, Clancy, AK, Charlton, KE, Stefoska-Needham, A, Beck, EJ
      First page: 36
      Abstract: Objective:Diet quality is significantly impacted by social and environmental factors. People experiencing socio-economic disadvantage face inequitable barriers to accessing nutritious foods and health services, resulting in significant health disparities. This study aimed to explore the barriers faced by organisations that provide food support to people experiencing disadvantage as well as to identify potential strategies to enhance this support for improved well-being of clients.Design:Semi-structured interviews using an exploratory approach and inductive thematic analysis.Setting:Australia.Participants:Individuals from organisations involved in the provision of food support for people experiencing disadvantage aged ≥16 years.Results:Two major themes were identified from thirteen interviews. ‘Dignity and respect for clients’ serves as a guiding principle for food-related services across all organisations, while ‘food’ was a point of connection and a potential gateway to additional support pathways. Five additional subthemes included ‘food as a platform to reduce social isolation, foster connection and promote participation’, challenges with ‘servicing clients with diverse experiences and needs’, ‘dependence on staff and volunteers with varying knowledge and skillsets’, ensuring ‘adequate access to services, resources and facilities’ and ‘necessity of community collaboration’.Conclusions:This study highlights the unique position of organisations involved in food support to identify client-specific needs and implement broader holistic health support. Future interventions should prioritise dignity, respect and social connection in design. Organisations require an adequately trained, sustainable workforce, with shared or enhanced services, resources and facilities, and greater community coordination with other services to maximise effectiveness.
      PubDate: 2024-01-15
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980024000132
       
  • The effects of health-related food taxes on the environmental impact of
           consumer food purchases: secondary analysis of data from a randomised
           controlled trial in a virtual supermarket

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Eykelenboom; Michelle, Mersch, Derek, Grasso, Alessandra C, Vellinga, Reina E, Temme, Elisabeth HM, Steenhuis, Ingrid HM, Olthof, Margreet R
      First page: 37
      Abstract: Objective:To measure the effects of health-related food taxes on the environmental impact of consumer food purchases in a virtual supermarket.Design:This is a secondary analysis of data from a randomised controlled trial in which participants were randomly assigned to a control condition with regular food prices (n 152), an experimental condition with a sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) tax (n 131) or an experimental condition with a nutrient profiling tax based on Nutri-Score (n 112). Participants were instructed to undertake their typical weekly grocery shopping for their households. Primary outcome measures were three environmental impact indicators: greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, land use and blue water use per household per week. Data were analysed using linear regression analyses.Setting:Three-dimensional virtual supermarket.Participants:Dutch adults (≥ 18 years) who were responsible for grocery shopping in their household (n 395).Results:GHG emissions (–7·6 kg CO2-eq; 95 % CI –12·7, –2·5) and land use (–3·9 m2/year; 95 % CI –7·7, –0·2) were lower for the food purchases of participants in the nutrient profiling tax condition than for those in the control condition. Blue water use was not affected by the nutrient profiling tax. Moreover, the SSB tax had no significant effect on any of the environmental impact indicators.Conclusions:A nutrient profiling tax based on Nutri-Score reduced the environmental impact of consumer food purchases. An SSB tax did not affect the environmental impact in this study.
      PubDate: 2024-01-15
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980024000090
       
  • Do financial constraint and perceived stress modify the effects of food
           tax schemes on food purchases: moderation analyses in a virtual
           supermarket experiment

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Djojosoeparto; Sanne K, Poelman, Maartje P, Eykelenboom, Michelle, Beenackers, Mariëlle A, Steenhuis, Ingrid HM, van Stralen, Maartje M, Olthof, Margreet R, Renders, Carry M, van Lenthe, Frank J, Kamphuis, Carlijn BM
      First page: 38
      Abstract: Objective:To investigate whether financial constraint and perceived stress modify the effects of food-related taxes on the healthiness of food purchases.Design:Moderation analyses were conducted with data from a trial where participants were randomly exposed to: a control condition with regular food prices, an sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) tax condition with a two-tiered levy on the sugar content in SSB (5–8 g/100 ml: €0·21 per l and ≥8 g/100 ml: €0·28 per l) or a nutrient profiling tax condition where products with Nutri-Score D or E were taxed at a 20 percent level. Outcome measures were overall healthiness of food purchases (%), energy content (kcal) and SSB purchases (litres). Effect modification was analysed by adding interaction terms between conditions and self-reported financial constraint or perceived stress in regression models. Outcomes for each combination of condition and level of effect modifier were visualised.Setting:Virtual supermarket.Participants:Dutch adults (n 386).Results:Financial constraint or perceived stress did not significantly modify the effects of food-related taxes on the outcomes. Descriptive analyses suggest that in the control condition, the overall healthiness of food purchases was lowest, and SSB purchases were highest among those with moderate/high levels of financial constraint. Compared with the control condition, in a nutrient profiling tax condition, the overall healthiness of food purchases was higher and SSB purchases were lower, especially among those with moderate/high levels of financial constraint. Such patterns were not observed for perceived stress.Conclusion:Further studies with larger samples are recommended to assess whether food-related taxes differentially affect food purchases of subgroups.
      PubDate: 2024-01-15
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980024000077
       
  • Adolescents’ experiences with the food selection at the sports arena in
           the area of Oslo, Norway: a focus group study

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Garnweidner-Holme; Lisa, Leganger Wattenberg, Pauline Alise, Fostervold Mathisen, Therese, Myhrstad, Mari Charlotte Wik
      First page: 39
      Abstract: Objective:To investigate adolescents’ experiences with the food selection at the sport arena.Design:Four focus group interviews were conducted with 4–6 participants each. Interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim. The transcripts were coded in NVivo and the analysis was guided by thematic analysis.Setting:Adolescents from handball and football clubs in Oslo and Viken, Norway, participated in the study.Participants:A total of nine boys (11–14 years old) and ten girls (11–14 years old) participated in the study.Results:We identified four main themes: interest for healthy food; experiences with the food selection at the sports arena; factors influencing participants’ food choices at the sports arena and expectations related to a healthy food selection at the sports arena. Adolescents across the focus groups experienced the food selection at the sports arena as unhealthy. Price, marketing and availability of unhealthy food were important factors that influenced their food choices at the sports arena. The trainer appeared to motivate the participants to eat healthy.Conclusions:Participants wished for a healthier food selection at the sports arena. Cost of food emerged as a factor that influenced their food choices. Our study also indicates that marketing of unhealthy food and beverages should be restricted, to influence adolescence food choice towards healthier alternatives.
      PubDate: 2024-01-19
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980024000181
       
  • Adverse childhood experiences and unhealthy dietary behaviours in
           adulthood

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Testa; Alexander, Zhang, Lixia, Jackson, Dylan B, Ganson, Kyle T, Raney, Julia H, Nagata, Jason M
      First page: 40
      Abstract: Objective:This study assesses the relationship between adverse childhood experiences (ACE) occurring before the age of 18 years and patterns of fast-food consumption and sugary beverage consumption in adulthood. The study also examines how perceived stress and socio-economic status (SES) (college educational attainment and income) in adulthood mediate this relationship.Design:Using data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adulthood Health (N 8599), multinomial logistic regression analyses were carried out to assess the association between ACE and unhealthy dietary behaviours in adulthood. Karlson–Holm–Breen mediation analysis is used to determine the mediating effects of SES and perceived stress.Setting:Persons living in the USA in 2016–2018.Participants:Adults (n 8599) aged 33–44 years.Results:The findings show an association between four or more ACE and high fast-food (relative risk ratio (RRR) = 1·436, 95 % CI = 1·040, 1·983) and high sugary beverage consumption (RRR = 1·435, 95 % CI = 1·002, 2·055). The association between ACE and high fast-food consumption is partially mediated by college educational attainment, and the association between ACE and high sugary beverage consumption is partially mediated by perceived stress and college educational attainment.Conclusions:ACE can have long-term consequences for unhealthy dietary behaviours in adulthood, and this relationship is partially due to a lower likelihood of higher perceived stress and college educational attainment among ACE-exposed persons. Future research is needed to understand further the influence of ACE on dietary patterns over the life course.
      PubDate: 2024-01-18
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980024000144
       
  • Dietary intake of low-income adults in South Africa: ultra-processed food
           consumption a cause for concern

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Frank; Tamryn, Ng, Shu Wen, Lowery, Caitlin M, Thow, Anne-Marie, Swart, Elizabeth C
      First page: 41
      Abstract: Objective:Given the rapidly changing food environment and proliferation of ultra-processed foods (UPF) in South Africa (SA), this study aimed to critically evaluate dietary quality and adequacy of low-income adults using the Nova classification system and WHO and World Cancer Research Fund dietary guidelines.Design:Secondary household data and 1-d 24-h recalls were analysed from two cross-sectional studies conducted in 2017–2018. Foods consumed were classified according to the Nova classification system. Compliance with WHO dietary guidelines and UPF consumption trends were evaluated.Setting:Three low-income areas (Langa, Khayalitsha and Mount Frere) in SA were included.Participants:In total, 2521 participants (18–50 years) were included in the study.Results:Participants had a mean energy intake of 7762 kJ/d. Most participants were within the acceptable WHO guideline range for saturated fat (80·4 %), total fat (68·1 %), Na (72·7 %) and free sugar (57·3 %). UPF comprised 39·4 % of diets among the average adult participant. Only 7·0 % of all participants met the WHO guideline for fruit and vegetables and 18·8 % met the guideline for fibre. Those within the highest quartile of share of energy from UPF consumed statistically higher amounts of dietary components to limit and were the highest energy consumers overall.Conclusions:Low-income adults living in SA are consuming insufficient protective dietary components, while UPF consumption is prevalent. Higher UPF consumers consume larger amounts of nutrients linked to increased chronic disease risk. Policy measures are urgently needed in SA to protect against the proliferation of harmful UPF and to promote and enable consumption of whole and less UPF.
      PubDate: 2024-01-11
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980023002811
       
  • Do 20-minute neighbourhoods moderate associations between work and commute
           hours with food consumption' – ADDENDUM

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Oostenbach; Laura Helena, Lamb, Karen Elaine, Crawford, David, Timperio, Anna, Thornton, Lukar Ezra
      First page: 43
      PubDate: 2024-02-08
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980024000314
       
  • Urban school neighbourhoods dominated by unhealthy food retailers and
           advertisements in Greater Tunis: a geospatial study in the midst of the
           nutrition transition

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Akl; Christelle, El-Helou, Nehmat, Safadi, Gloria, Semaan, Aline, El Sammak, Aya, Trabelsi, Tarek, Sassi, Sonia, Akik, Chaza, El Ati, Jalila, Traissac, Pierre, Ghattas, Hala, ,
      First page: 44
      Abstract: Objective:Food environments are a major determinant of children’s nutritional status. Scarce evidence on food environments exists in low- and middle-income countries (LMIC). This study aims to fill this gap by documenting the obesogenicity of food environments around schools in Greater Tunis, Tunisia – an LMIC of the Middle East and North Africa region with an ongoing nutrition transition and increasing rates of childhood obesity.Design:In this cross-sectional study, we assessed built food environments around fifty primary schools. Ground-truthing was performed to collect geographic coordinates and pictures of food retailers and food advertisement sets within an 800-m road network buffer of each school. Retailers and advertisement sets were categorised as healthy or unhealthy according to a NOVA-based classification. Associations between school characteristics and retailers or advertisement sets were explored using multinomial regression models.Setting:Greater Tunis, Tunisia.Participants:Random sample of fifty (thirty-five public and fifteen private) primary schools.Results:Overall, 3621 food retailers and 2098 advertisement sets were mapped. About two-thirds of retailers and advertisement sets were labelled as unhealthy. Most retailers were traditional corner stores (22 %) and only 6 % were fruit and vegetable markets. The prevailing food group promoted was carbonated and sugar-sweetened beverages (22 %). The proportion of unhealthy retailers was significantly higher in the richest v. poorest areas.Conclusions:School neighbourhood food environments included predominantly unhealthy retailers and advertisements. Mapping of LMIC food environments is crucial to document the impact of the nutrition transition on children’s nutritional status. This will inform policies and interventions to curb the emergent childhood obesity epidemic.
      PubDate: 2024-01-03
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980023002860
       
  • Turkish adaptation, validation and reliability of the US Adult Food
           Security Survey Module in university students

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Açar; Yasemin, Sukan Karaçağıl, Betül, Demirkoparan, Meleknur, Şeref, Betül, Kalaycı, Zeynep, Uçar, Ayda, Yıldıran, Hilal
      First page: 45
      Abstract: Objective:To evaluate the validity and reliability of the Turkish version of the US Adult Food Security Survey Module (AFSSM).Design:A cross-sectional study collected data from 117 university students. The AFSSM questionnaire was completed by all participants. Psychometric evaluation for scale, content, construct, and convergent validity and reliability of the scale was tested. The construct validity was assessed by exploratory factor analysis (EFA) and confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) on data collected from university students. Cronbach’s α (internal consistency) and composite reliability were used to assess the reliability (P < 0·05).Setting:Students were recruited from the university.Participants:This research was conducted with volunteer university students with a mean age of 22·74 ± 4·19 years.Results:Three factors were extracted from eight items through EFA: (1) inadequate nutrition, (2) economic concern and (3) hunger. These factors accounted for 77·4 % of the total variance, and factor loadings ranged from 0·755 to 0·953. Cronbach’s α was 0·769. The results of the CFA suggested the fit indices were acceptable (χ2/sd = 0·235, root mean error of approximation: 0·034, goodness-of-fit index: 0·994, comparative fit index: 0·992 and normed fit index: 0·986).Conclusions:This is the first study that validates and reports the Turkish version of AFSSM in university students, and the results of our study show that the Turkish AFSSM is a valid and reliable tool for determining food security in university students. AFSSM can be used by researchers to examine the food security of university students.
      PubDate: 2024-01-22
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980024000223
       
  • Relationship between home garden ownership and the consumption of fruits
           and vegetables

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Saaka; Mahama, Awini, Simon, Kizito, Fred, Nang, Eric
      First page: 46
      Abstract: Objective:This study assessed the extent to which access to home gardens associate with the frequency of fruit and vegetable (FV) consumption.Setting:The study was carried out in fifty rural communities in Northern Ghana where food insecurity and malnutrition including micronutrient deficiencies are prevalent.Design:A community-based comparative analytical cross-sectional study.Participants:A sample of 847 randomly selected rural households.Results:The proportion of households that consumed FV at least 3 d in a week was 45 %. Members in households who owned a home garden were 1·5 times more likely to consume FV at least 3 d in a week (adjusted OR (AOR) = 1·46 (95 % CI 1·06–2·0)), compared with their counterparts who had no home gardens. Furthermore, households in which mothers had a positive attitude towards FV consumption were 1·6 times more likely to consume FV (AOR = 1·63 (95 % CI 1·17–2·27)) compared with mothers who were less positive.Conclusions:Our results suggest that food and nutrition policy measures that promote home gardens can improve consumption of diversified diets including FV among vulnerable rural households in Northern Ghana. Additionally, households with lower income may benefit from nutrition behaviour change communication campaigns directed towards increasing a positive attitude to FV intake.
      PubDate: 2024-01-23
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980024000272
       
  • Harmonising dietary datasets for global surveillance: methods and findings
           from the Global Dietary Database

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Karageorgou; Dimitra, Lara Castor, Laura, Padula de Quadros, Victoria, Ferreira de Sousa, Rita, Holmes, Bridget Anna, Ioannidou, Sofia, Mozaffarian, Dariush, Micha, Renata
      First page: 47
      Abstract: Objective:The Global Dietary Database (GDD) expanded its previous methods to harmonise and publicly disseminate individual-level dietary data from nutrition surveys worldwide.Design:Analysis of cross-sectional data.Setting:Global.Participants:General population.Methods:Comprehensive methods to streamline the harmonisation of primary, individual-level 24-h recall and food record data worldwide were developed. To standardise the varying food descriptions, FoodEx2 was used, a highly detailed food classification and description system developed and adapted for international use by European Food Safety Authority (EFSA). Standardised processes were developed to: identify eligible surveys; contact data owners; screen surveys for inclusion; harmonise data structure, variable definition and unit and food characterisation; perform data checks and publicly disseminate the harmonised datasets. The GDD joined forces with FAO and EFSA, given the shared goal of harmonising individual-level dietary data worldwide.Results:Of 1500 dietary surveys identified, 600 met the eligibility criteria, and 156 were prioritised and contacted; fifty-five surveys were included for harmonisation and, ultimately, fifty two were harmonised. The included surveys were primarily nationally representative (59 %); included high- (39 %), upper-middle (21 %), lower-middle (27 %) and low- (13 %) income countries; usually collected multiple recalls/ records (64 %) and largely captured both sexes, all ages and both rural and urban areas. Surveys from low- and lower-middle v. high- and upper-middle income countries reported fewer nutrients (median 17 v. 30) and rarely included nutrients relevant to diet-related chronic diseases, such as n-3 fatty acids and Na.Conclusions:Diverse 24-h recalls/records can be harmonised to provide highly granular, standardised data, supporting nutrition programming, research and capacity development worldwide.
      PubDate: 2024-01-19
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980024000211
       
  • Food marketing on digital platforms: what do teens see'

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Elliott; Charlene D, Truman, Emily
      First page: 48
      Abstract: Objective:Given the aggressive marketing of foods and beverages to teenagers on digital platforms, and the paucity of research documenting teen engagement with food marketing and its persuasive content, the objective of this study is to examine what teenagers see as teen-targeted food marketing on four popular digital platforms and to provide insight into the persuasive power of that marketing.Design:This is an exploratory, participatory research study, in which teenagers used a special mobile app to capture all teen-targeted food and beverage marketing they saw on digital media for 7 d. For each ad, participants identified the brand, product and specific appeals that made it teen-targeted, as well as the platform on which it was found.Setting:Online (digital media) with teenagers in Canada.Participants:Two hundred and seventy-eight teenagers, aged 13–17 years, were participated. Most participants were girls (63 %) and older teenagers (58 % aged 16–17 years).Results:Participants captured 1392 teen-targeted food advertisements from Instagram, Snapchat, TikTok and YouTube. The greatest number of food marketing examples came from Instagram (46 %) (with no difference across genders or age), while beverages (28·7 %), fast food (25·1 %) and candy/chocolate were the top categories advertised. When it comes to persuasive power, visual style was the top choice across all platforms and participants, with other top techniques (special offer, theme and humour), ranking differently, depending on age, gender and platform.Conclusions:This study provides insight into the nature of digital food marketing and its persuasive power for teenagers, highlighting considerations of selection and salience when it comes to examining food marketing and monitoring.
      PubDate: 2024-01-25
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980024000235
       
  • Empirically derived portion sizes from the DOrtmund Nutritional and
           Anthropometric Longitudinally Designed (DONALD) study for 4- to
           18-year-old children and adolescents to simplify analysis of dietary data
           using FFQ

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Schnermann; Maike Elena, Nöthlings, Ute, Alexy, Ute
      First page: 49
      Abstract: Objective:To apply FFQ, knowledge about portion sizes is relevant. According to increased energy and nutrient requirements, average portion sizes of foods are supposed to increase during growth. We provide empirically derived portion sizes for 4- to 18-year-olds in different age groups to facilitate analyses of FFQ data in children and adolescents.Design:Using data from the dynamic DOrtmund Nutritional and Anthropometric Longitudinally Designed cohort study, quantile regression for smoothing percentiles was used to derive portion sizes as a function of age from which age- and food group-specific portion sizes were calculated as median food group intake (g).Setting:Dortmund, Germany.Participants:Data from 3-day weighed dietary records (WDR) of 1,325 participants (♀: 653) were analysed. Participants provided in total 9,828 WDR (on average 7·5 per participant) between 1985 and 2022. WDR were grouped into five age groups, whereby each age group covered 3 years of age.Results:In total, 11 955 food items were reported and categorised into sixteen major food groups with seventy-one sub-groups. Portion sizes tended to increase with age, except for milk- and plant-based alternatives. Comparing 4- to 6-year-olds to 16- to 18-year-olds, portion size increased between 22·2 % (processed meat: 18 g v. 22 g) and 173·3 % (savoury snacks: 15 g v. 41 g).Conclusion:We provide empirically derived portion sizes for children and adolescents. These data are useful to establish dietary assessment methods based on estimates of portion sizes, such as FFQ, for children and adolescents.
      PubDate: 2024-01-23
      DOI: 10.1017/S136898002400017X
       
  • Mediators and moderators of the effects of a school-based intervention on
           adolescents’ fruit and vegetable consumption: the HEIA study

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Daas; Merel Celine, Gebremariam, Mekdes Kebede, Poelman, Maartje P, Andersen, Lene Frost, Klepp, Knut-Inge, Bjelland, Mona, Lien, Nanna
      First page: 50
      Abstract: Objective:To examine whether targeted determinants mediated the effects of the HEalth In Adolescents (HEIA) intervention on fruit and vegetable (FV) consumption and explore if these mediating effects were moderated by sex, parental education or weight status.Design:Cluster-randomised controlled trial.Setting:The HEIA study (2007–2009) was a Norwegian 20-month multi-component school-based intervention to promote healthy weight development. FV consumption and targeted determinants were self-reported at baseline, mid-way (8 months) and post-intervention (20 months).Participants:Adolescents (11–13-year-old) in twenty-five control schools (n 746) and twelve intervention schools (n 375).Results:At post-intervention, more adolescents in the intervention group compared with the control group had knowledge of the FV recommendations (OR: 1·4, 95 % CI 1·1, 1·9) and reported a decreased availability of vegetables at home (β: –0·1, 95 % CI –0·2, 0·0). Availability/accessibility of FV at home, availability of vegetables at dinner, taste preferences for different types of FV and knowledge of the FV recommendations were positively associated with the consumption of FV. However, none of the post-intervention determinants significantly mediated the intervention effects on FV consumption. Although no moderating influences by sex, parental education or weights status were observed on the mediating effects, exploratory analyses revealed significant moderations in the b-paths.Conclusions:Since none of the targeted determinants could explain the increase in FV consumption, it remains unclear why the intervention was effective. Reporting on a wide range of mediators and moderators in school-based interventions is needed to reveal the pathways through which intervention effects are achieved.
      PubDate: 2024-01-25
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980024000260
       
  • Parliamentary reaction to the announcement and implementation of the UK
           Soft Drinks Industry Levy: applied thematic analysis of 2016–2020
           parliamentary debates

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Jones; Catrin P, Lawlor, Emma R, Forde, Hannah, van Tulleken, Dolly RZ, Cummins, Steven, Adams, Jean, Smith, Richard, Rayner, Mike, Rutter, Harry, Penney, Tarra L, Alliot, Olivia, Armitage, Sofie, White, Martin
      First page: 51
      Abstract: Objective:The UK Soft Drinks Industry Levy (SDIL) (announced in March 2016; implemented in April 2018) aims to incentivise reformulation of soft drinks to reduce added sugar levels. The SDIL has been applauded as a policy success, and it has survived calls from parliamentarians for it to be repealed. We aimed to explore parliamentary reaction to the SDIL following its announcement until two years post-implementation in order to understand how health policy can become established and resilient to opposition.Design:Searches of Hansard for parliamentary debate transcripts that discussed the SDIL retrieved 186 transcripts, with 160 included after screening. Five stages of Applied Thematic Analysis were conducted: familiarisation and creation of initial codebooks; independent second coding; codebook finalisation through team consensus; final coding of the dataset to the complete codebook; and theme finalisation through team consensus.Setting:The United Kingdom ParliamentParticipants:N/AResults:Between the announcement (16/03/2016) – royal assent (26/04/2017), two themes were identified 1: SDIL welcomed cross-party 2: SDIL a good start but not enough. Between royal assent – implementation (5/04/2018), one theme was identified 3: The SDIL worked – what next' The final theme identified from implementation until 16/03/2020 was 4: Moving on from the SDIL.Conclusions:After the announcement, the SDIL had cross-party support and was recognised to have encouraged reformulation prior to implementation. Lessons for governments indicate that the combination of cross-party support and a policy’s documented success in achieving its aim can help cement the resilience of it to opposition and threats of repeal.
      PubDate: 2024-01-24
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980024000247
       
  • An overview of the nutritional status of childbearing age women, children
           and adolescents living in a rural area of Madagascar: preliminary results
           of the Tany Vao project

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Conti; Maria Vittori, Itani, Leila, Beretta, Alice, Yaghi, Kassandra, Filosa, Asia, Monti, Cristina, Cena, Hellas
      First page: 52
      Abstract: Objective:To describe the food consumption, nutrition knowledge and nutritional assessment of childbearing age women and their children, living in rural villages in Madagascar. The results presented are related to the Tany Vao research study.Design:A cross-sectional pilot study.Setting:The study was carried out in Ampanitosoha village on Nosy Mitsio island in Madagascar.Participants:32 women (14–49 years) and 36 children and adolescents (2–17 years).Results:70 % of the women lacked nutrition knowledge and did not reach the Minimum Dietary Diversity Index for Women cut-off. The median BMI was 21·1 kg/m2 but 55·2 % of the women exceeded the cut-off for waist-to-hip ratio, 51·7 % for waist-to-height ratio and 81·2 % for mid-upper arm circumference (MUAC). Almost all had adequate intake of energy, protein and carbohydrates, while 27·6 % had excessive fat intake and 75·9 % of added sugars. Over half of the women did not meet the micronutrients Reference Daily Intake (RDI). For children, the MUAC z-score was lower for boys than for girls (P-value = 0·041).Conclusions:These results underline the importance of increasing women’s nutritional knowledge to promote healthy pregnancy and lactation. Moreover, it is fundamental to provide people living in rural areas with sustainable tools to improve dietary diversity and support long-term health.
      PubDate: 2024-01-29
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980024000259
       
  • Exploring the world of food with families: perspectives of low-income
           families on factors influencing their food choices

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Vaughan; Elena, Spyreli, Eleni, McKinley, Michelle, Hennessy, Marita, Woodside, Jayne, Kelly, Colette
      First page: 53
      Abstract: Objective:The aim of this study was to investigate the social and environmental factors involved in the food decision-making processes of families living on lower incomes on the Island of Ireland.Design:A qualitative design was employed for this study, using photovoice and creative mapping methods. Parents were requested to take photos and draw maps of their food environments. Interviews were then conducted with parents, using the materials produced by parents as a cue to discuss their food environments, influences and decision-making processes around food choices.Setting:The participants were interviewed online via Microsoft Teams.Participants:The participants were parents or guardians of children between the ages of 2 and 18 who self-defined as ‘living on a tight budget’.Results:Twenty-eight participants were recruited and interviewed for this study, including twelve parents in Northern Ireland and sixteen in the Republic of Ireland. The findings were mapped on to Bronfenbrenner’s Ecological Systems Theory and showed that multiple, overlapping and intersecting factors at the individual, micro-, meso-, exo-, macro- and chrono-system were implicated in family food choices. Upstream factors in particular, including structural, policy and commercial determinants, appear to be significant drivers of behaviour.Conclusions:While the findings suggest that a complex range of factors are involved in family food choices, it is clear that policy measures and regulations are needed to stave off the impacts of rising social inequality and food poverty. Health promoters should strive to find non-stigmatising interventions to bridge the nutritional divide experienced by lower-income families.
      PubDate: 2024-01-18
      DOI: 10.1017/S136898002400020X
       
  • An analysis of the dual burden of childhood stunting and wasting in
           Myanmar: a copula geoadditive modelling approach

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Bhadra; Dhiman
      First page: 54
      Abstract: Objective:To analyse the spatial variation and risk factors of the dual burden of childhood stunting and wasting in Myanmar.Design:Analysis was carried out on nationally representative data obtained from the Myanmar Demographic and Health Survey conducted during 2015–2016. Childhood stunting and wasting are used as proxies of chronic and acute childhood undernutrition. A child with standardised height-for-age Z score (HAZ) below –2 is categorised as stunted while that with a weight-for-height Z score (WHZ) below –2 as wasted.Setting:A nationally representative sample of households from the fifteen states and regions of Myanmar.Participants:Children under the age of five ( 4162).Results:Overall marginal prevalence of childhood stunting and wasting was 28·9 % (95 % CI 27·5, 30·2) and 7·3 % (95 % CI 6·5, 8·0) while their concurrent prevalence was 1·6 % (95 % CI 1·2, 2·0). The study revealed mild positive association between stunting and wasting across Myanmar. Both stunting and wasting had significant spatial variation across the country with eastern regions having higher burden of stunting while southern regions having higher prevalence of wasting. Child age and maternal WHZ score had significant non-linear association with both stunting and wasting while child gender, ethnicity and household wealth quintile had significant association with stunting.Conclusion:The study provides data-driven evidence about the association between stunting and wasting and their spatial variation across Myanmar. The resulting insights can aid in the formulation and implementation of targeted, region-specific interventions towards improving the state of childhood undernutrition in Myanmar.
      PubDate: 2024-01-19
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980024000193
       
  • Evaluation of a digital FFQ using 24 h recalls as reference method, for
           assessment of habitual diet in women with South Asian origin in Norway

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Carlsen; Monica H, Totland, Torunn Holm, Kumar, Radhika, Lensnes, Therese ML, Sharma, Archana, Suntharalingam, A Anita, Tran, Anh Thi, Birkeland, Kåre I, Sommer, Christine
      First page: 55
      Abstract: Objective:Dietary assessment tools should be designed for the target population. We developed an FFQ designed to assess diet in South Asian women in Norway. The study objective was to evaluate this FFQ using 24-h dietary recalls as reference method.Design:Approximately 3 weeks after the participants (n 40) had filled in the FFQ, the first of three non-consecutive 24-h dietary recalls was completed. The recalls were telephone-based, unannounced and performed by a trained dietitian, with 2–3 weeks between each interview.Setting:The DIASA 1 study, in Oslo, Norway.Participants:Women of South Asian ethnic origin participating in the DIASA 1 study were invited to participate in the evaluation study.Results:The WebFFQasia significantly overestimated the absolute intake of energy, protein, fat and carbohydrates compared with the 24-h dietary recalls. Absolute intakes of sugar, starch and fibre did not differ significantly between the methods. For energy percentages (E%), there were no significant differences, except for monounsaturated fat. Correlations were strong for E% from sugar and saturated fat and moderate for E% from fibre, carbohydrate, total fat and protein. Fourteen food groups out of twenty three were not significantly different compared with the reference method, and sixteen groups showed strong to moderate correlations.Conclusion:The WebFFQasia may be used to assess E% from habitual diet and can adequately estimate intakes and rank participants according to nutrient intake and main food categories at group level.
      PubDate: 2024-02-06
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980024000302
       
  • Background commentary on the Researching the Obesogenic Food Environment
           (ROFE) project

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Annan; Reginald Adjetey, Agyapong, Nana Ama Frimpomaa, Thow, Anne Marie, Swart, Elizabeth Catherina
      First page: 56
      Abstract: Objective:The objective of this commentary is to provide an overview of the rationale and objectives of the Researching the Obesogenic Food Environment (ROFE) project that was conducted in Ghana and South Africa.Design:Narration has been used to describe the main objectives, phases as well as the methods used for the conduct of this project.Setting:The project described in this commentary was conducted in Khayelitsha and Mount Frere in South Africa and Ahodwo and Ejuratia for Ghana.Participant:Participants of the study described here include households in South Africa and Ghana, stakeholders and policymakers, and various actors within the food chain in both countries.Results:The ROFE findings provide a good understanding of the extent of the impact of the food environment on consumption, characteristics of value chains of healthy and unhealthy foods, as well as the potential for improved governance and policy that is relevant to the region. The supplement provides the opportunity to share the extensive findings of the ROFE project. Nine papers that describe the process and findings of the three phases of the ROFE project have been presented. Some of the papers focus on phases of the ROFE, while others cut across different phases and explore the linkages between the phases. Briefly descriptions of key findings of some of the papers in the supplement are provided.Conclusion:Together, the findings of the ROFE study presented in this supplement have increased understanding of how communities in SA and Ghana interact with their food supplies and have led to identification of specific opportunities to improve food supply policies, in ways that create incentives for the production and consumption of healthy, relative to unhealthy foods.
      PubDate: 2024-01-17
      DOI: 10.1017/S136898002300280X
       
  • The caffeine dilemma: unraveling the intricate relationship between
           caffeine use disorder, caffeine withdrawal symptoms and mental well-being
           in adults

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Bodur; Mahmut, Kaya, Seda, Ilhan-Esgin, Merve, Çakiroğlu, Funda Pınar, Özçelik, Ayşe Özfer
      First page: 57
      Abstract: Objective:This study aimed to explore the relationship between caffeine use disorder (CUD), caffeine withdrawal symptoms and the prevalence of depression, anxiety and stress (DASS) in adults.Design:The study utilised a cross-sectional design to assess the relationships between CUD, caffeine withdrawal symptoms and DASS.Setting:Participants’ CUD was evaluated through the Caffeine Use Disorder Questionnaire (CUDQ), while the Depression Anxiety Stress Scale-21 (DASS-21) measured DASS levels. Caffeine withdrawal symptoms and total caffeine intake were calculated based on self-reported consumption of caffeine-rich products.Participants:The study involved 618 participants with an average age of 27·8 (sd 7·8) years.Results:Participants consumed an average of 461·21 (sd 11·09) mg/d of caffeine, showing a positive correlation between CUD and total caffeine intake. The risk of CUD increased alongside levels of DASS. Individuals with caffeine withdrawal symptoms had higher CUDQ and DASS scores. A multiple linear regression model revealed significant associations between total caffeine intake (P < 0·001) and DASS-21 score (P < 0·001) with CUDQ score.Conclusions:The study concluded that caffeine, while recognised for its potential health benefits, also exhibits properties that may lead to addiction. The development of caffeine use disorder and cessation of caffeine intake can increase DASS levels in adults, indicating the need for awareness and appropriate interventions in public health nutrition.
      PubDate: 2024-02-02
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980024000399
       
  • Determinants of household-, maternal- and child-related factors associated
           with nutritional status among children under five in Mali: evidence from a
           Demographic and Health Survey, 2018

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Gebreegziabher; Tafere, Sidibe, Saran
      First page: 58
      Abstract: Objective:The current study aims to determine household-, maternal- and child-related factors influencing nutritional status among children under five in Mali.Design:Quantitative cross-sectional study using secondary data extracted from Mali DHS-VI 2018.Setting:Urban and rural areas of Mali.Participants:A total of 8908 children participated, with 3999 in the younger age group (0–24 months) and 4909 in the older age group (25–59 months).Results:In the younger age group, the prevalence of stunting, wasting and underweight was 18·8 % (95 % CI%: 17·5, 20·0), 24·6 % (95 % CI: 23·2, 26·0) and 13·2 % (95 % CI: 12·1, 14·3), respectively, while in the older age group, it was 24·9 % (95 % CI: 23·7, 26·2), 22·7 % (95 % CI: 21·5, 24·0) and 5·7 % (95 % CI: 5·0, 6·5), respectively. Being average or large size at birth, having piped source of water, receiving Zn, deworming, high maternal BMI, receiving Fe during pregnancy, higher maternal education and being rich were associated with lower odds of one or more form of undernutrition in both groups. On the other hand, children who were anaemic, drank from a bottle, maternal anaemia, current pregnancy of mothers and living in rural areas were associated with higher odds of stunting, wasting or underweight. Interestingly, children who received Fe supplementation had a higher odds of wasting in the younger group but lower odds of all forms of undernutrition in the older group.Conclusions:This study emphasised the potential risk factors associated with undernutrition in children. Children who consume non-potable water, have mothers with lower levels of education and BMI and reside in rural areas are more likely to experience undernutrition.
      PubDate: 2024-02-05
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980024000363
       
  • Identifying barriers and facilitators to increase fibre intakes in UK
           primary school children and exploring the acceptability of intervention
           components: a UK qualitative study

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Donin; Angela S, Goldsmith, Lucy P, Sharp, Clare, Wahlich, Charlotte, Whincup, Peter H, Ussher, Michael H
      First page: 59
      Abstract: Objective:Within the UK, dietary fibre intakes are well below recommended intakes and associated with increased risk of obesity. This study aimed to explore the views of parents and children on barriers and facilitators to increasing fibre intakes and improving diets, alongside investigating the appropriateness of intervention components to overcome modifiable barriers.Design:Qualitative study including semi-structured interviews and focus groups informed by the Theoretical Domains Framework (TDF) and the Capability-Opportunity-Motivation-Behaviour (COM-B) model.Participants:Year 5 children (aged 9–10-years) and parents, recruited through London primary schoolsResults:A total of twenty-four participants (eleven parents and thirteen children) took part. Five key themes were identified as barriers and facilitators, namely lack of (and improving) knowledge, social factors (including parent–child conflicts, limited time for food preparation, influence of peer and family members), current eating habits, influence of the school, community and home environment in shaping eating behaviours, and the importance of choice and variety in finding foods that are healthy and tasty. Parents strongly supported school-based dietary interventions to enable consistent messaging at home and school and help support dietary behaviour change. Practical sessions (such as workshops to strengthen knowledge, taste tests and food swap ideas) were supported by parents and children.Conclusions:By using a theory-driven approach to explore the barriers and facilitators to increasing fibre intake, this research identified important themes and modifiable barriers to behaviour change and identifies acceptable intervention components to overcome barriers and bring about sustained dietary behaviour change in primary school children.
      PubDate: 2024-02-01
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980024000089
       
  • Direct and indirect associations of experience of racial discrimination,
           dietary patterns and obesity in adults from southern Brazil

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Fanton; Marcos, Rodrigues, Ylana Elias, Schuch, Ilaine, de Lima Cunha, Caroline Marques, Pattussi, Marcos Pascoal, Canuto, Raquel
      First page: 60
      Abstract: Objective:To analyse the direct and indirect associations of experience of racial discrimination on dietary patterns (DP), obesity and abdominal obesity.Design:This is a cross-sectional population-based study. The main exposure was self-reported experiences of racial discrimination (Experiences of Discrimination scale). The mediator variables were the DP: healthy, Brazilian traditional, sugar and carbohydrates, and fast food. The outcomes were obesity (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2) and abdominal obesity (waist circumference ≥ 88 cm for women; ≥ 102 cm for men). Structural equation modelling was applied.Setting:Porto Alegre, Brazil.Participants:Totally, 400 adults aged between 20 and 70 years were participated.Results:The mean age of participants was 47·2 years (sd = 13·9), and 75 % were women. Experiencing racial discrimination had a positive direct effect on obesity (healthy DP: β = 0·153, P < 0·05; Brazilian DP: β = 0·156, P < 0·05; sugar and carbohydrates DP: β = 0·156, P < 0·05; and fast-food DP: β = 0·153, P < 0·05) and abdominal obesity (healthy DP: β = 0·206, P < 0·01; Brazilian DP: β = 0·210, P < 0·01; sugar and carbohydrates DP: β = 0·204, P < 0·01; and fast-food DP: β = 0·204, P < 0·01). The experience of racial discrimination did not have a direct effect on DP, nor did it exert an indirect effect on obesity and abdominal obesity through any DP.Conclusions:A higher experience of racial discrimination is associated with obesity and abdominal obesity, independent of diet.
      PubDate: 2024-02-01
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980024000338
       
  • Increasing food insecurity severity is associated with lower diet quality

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Kent; Katherine, Schumacher, Tracy, Kocar, Sebastian, Seivwright, Ami, Visentin, Denis, Collins, Clare E, Lester, Libby
      First page: 61
      PubDate: 2024-02-05
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980024000417
       
  • Longitudinal changes in home food availability and concurrent associations
           with food and nutrient intake among children at 24–48 months

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Barton; Jennifer M, McMath, Arden L, Montgomery, Stewart P, Donovan, Sharon M, Fiese, Barbara H
      First page: 62
      Abstract: Objectives:To describe changes in home food availability during early childhood, including modified, developmentally sensitive obesogenic scores, and to determine whether home food availability is associated with food and nutrient intakes of children concurrently, over time.Design:Data were drawn from the STRONG Kids 2 longitudinal, birth cohort to achieve the study objectives. Home food availability was assessed with the Home Food Inventory (HFI) and included fifteen food groups (e.g. fruit and vegetables) and three obesogenic scores (one original and two modified). Food and nutrient intakes were measured using the Block FFQ and included twenty-seven food groups and eighteen nutrients (e.g. vitamins A and C, protein). HFI and FFQ were completed by trained researchers or mothers, respectively, at 24, 36 and 48 months. Repeated-measures ANOVA and Spearman’s correlations were used to achieve the study objectives.Setting:Central Illinois, USA.Participants:Participants were 468 children at 24, 36 and 48 months of age.Results:Availability of less nutritious foods and obesogenic foods and beverages increased as children aged, and availability of both nutritious and less nutritious foods were associated with child food and nutrient intake. The three obesogenic scores demonstrated similar, positive associations with the intake of energy, saturated fat, added sugars and kilocalories from sweets.Conclusion:These findings offer novel insight into changes in home food availability and associations with food and nutrient intake during early childhood. Additional attention is needed examining antecedents (e.g. built environments, purchasing behaviours) and consequences (e.g. child diet quality and weight) of home food availability.
      PubDate: 2024-02-02
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980024000375
       
  • Complementarity between the updated version of the front-of-pack nutrition
           label Nutri-Score and the food-processing NOVA classification

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Sarda; Barthélemy, Kesse-Guyot, Emmanuelle, Deschamps, Valérie, Ducrot, Pauline, Galan, Pilar, Hercberg, Serge, Deschasaux-Tanguy, Melanie, Srour, Bernard, Fezeu, Leopold K, Touvier, Mathilde, Julia, Chantal
      First page: 63
      Abstract: Objective:To compare the initial and the updated versions of the front-of-pack label Nutri-Score (related to the nutritional content) with the NOVA classification (related to the degree of food processing) at the food level.Design:Using the OpenFoodFacts database – 129,950 food products – we assessed the complementarity between the Nutri-Score (initial and updated) with the NOVA classification through a correspondence analysis. Contingency tables between the two classification systems were used.Settings:The food offer in France.Participants:Not applicable.Results:With both versions (i.e. initial and updated) of the Nutri-Score, the majority of ultra-processed products received medium to poor Nutri-Score ratings (between 77·9 % and 87·5 % of ultra-processed products depending on the version of the algorithm). Overall, the update of the Nutri-Score algorithm led to a reduction in the number of products rated A and B and an increase in the number of products rated D or E for all NOVA categories, with unprocessed foods being the least impacted (–3·8 percentage points (–5·2 %) rated A or B and +1·3 percentage points (+12·9 %) rated D or E) and ultra-processed foods the most impacted (–9·8 percentage points (–43·4 %) rated A or B and +7·8 percentage points (+14·1 %) rated D or E). Among ultra-processed foods rated favourably with the initial Nutri-Score, artificially sweetened beverages, sweetened plant-based drinks and bread products were the most penalised categories by the revision of Nutri-Score while low-sugar flavoured waters, fruit and legume preparations were the least affected.Conclusion:These results indicate that the update of the Nutri-Score reinforces its coherence with the NOVA classification, even though both systems measure two distinct health dimensions at the food level.
      PubDate: 2024-02-01
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980024000296
       
  • ‘It is human work’: qualitatively exploring community roles that
           facilitate cultural food security for people from refugee backgrounds

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Gingell; Tina, Adhikari, Rishita, Eltahir, Nehal, Ntahomvukiye, Fulgence, Pe, Evelyn, Murray, Kate, Correa-Velez, Ignacio, Gallegos, Danielle
      First page: 64
      Abstract: Objectives:Cultural food security is crucial for cultural health and, for people from refugee backgrounds, supports the settlement journey. Cultural communities are vital in facilitating access to cultural foods; however, it is not understood how refugee-background communities sustain cultural food security in the Australian context. This study aimed to explore key roles in refugee-background communities to understand why they were important and how they facilitate cultural food security.Design:Interviews were conducted by community researchers, and data analysis was undertaken using best-practice framework for collaborative data analysis.Setting:Greater Brisbane, Australia.Participants:Six interviews were conducted between August and December 2022 with people from a refugee-background community, lived in Greater Brisbane and who fulfilled a key food role in the community that facilitated access to cultural foods.Results:Fostering improved cultural food security supported settlement by creating connections across geographical locations and cultures and generated a sense of belonging that supported the settlement journey. Communities utilised communication methods that prioritised the knowledge, wisdom and experience of community members. It also provided community members with influence over their foodways. Community leaders had an ethos that reflected collectivist values, where community needs were important for their own health and well-being.Conclusions:Communities are inherently structured and communicate in a way that allows collective agency over foodways. This agency promotes cultural food security and is suggestive of increased food sovereignty. Researchers and public health workers should work with communities and recognise community strengths. Food security interventions should target cultural food security and autonomy.
      PubDate: 2024-02-06
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980024000326
       
  • Food and nutrition information requirements of Australian primary school
           parents

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Aydin; Gozde, Margerison, Claire, Worsley, Anthony, Booth, Alison
      First page: 65
      Abstract: Objective:To explore what Australian primary school parents want to learn about food and nutrition to improve their children’s eating behaviours, as well as the associations between parents’ personal and demographic characteristics and their views regarding their food and nutrition knowledge needs.Design:An online nationwide cross-sectional survey was conducted in 2021 using a mixed-methods approach. Logistic regression analysis was utilised to examine the relationship between parents’ demographics, personal values and their views. Content analysis was performed using Leximancer.Setting:Australia.Participants:Seven hundred and eighty-seven parents.Results:Fifty-one per cent wanted to learn more about food and nutrition to improve their children's healthy eating habits, and 77% of those preferred schools to provide that information. Online/printed newsletters and YouTube were the most preferred methods for receiving food and nutrition related information. Higher universalism-concern value (concern for the welfare of those in the larger society and world) scores were positively associated parents’ preference for schools to provide food and nutrition-related information. Parents with non-English-speaking backgrounds and younger parents were more likely to want to learn about food and nutrition. Parents wanted to learn more about encouraging healthy eating, ideas for the lunchbox, food labels and age-specific portion sizes and recommendations.Conclusions:Findings can inform public health educators and assist them in designing future food and nutrition education programmes and resources targeting primary school parents.
      PubDate: 2024-02-05
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980024000387
       
  • Exploring the prospective acceptability of a healthy food incentive
           program from the perspective of people with type 2 diabetes and
           experiences of household food insecurity in Alberta, Canada

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Tariq; Saania, Olstad, Dana Lee, Beall, Reed F, Spackman, Eldon, Lipscombe, Lorraine, Dunn, Sharlette, Lashewicz, Bonnie M, Elliott, Meghan J, Campbell, David JT
      First page: 66
      Abstract: Objective:FoodRx is a 12-month healthy food prescription incentive program for people with type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and experiences of household food insecurity. In this study, we aimed to explore potential users’ prospective acceptability (acceptability prior to program use) of the design and delivery of the FoodRx incentive and identify factors influencing prospective acceptability.Design:We used a qualitative descriptive approach and purposive sampling to recruit individuals who were interested or uninterested in using the FoodRx incentive. Semi-structured interviews were guided by the theoretical framework of acceptability, and corresponding interview transcripts were analysed using differential qualitative analysis guided by the socioecological model.Setting:Individuals living in Alberta, Canada.Participants:In total, fifteen adults with T2DM and experiences of household food insecurity.Results:People who were interested in using the FoodRx incentive (n 10) perceived it to be more acceptable than those who were uninterested (n 5). We identified four themes that captured factors that influenced users’ prospective acceptability: (i) participants’ confidence, views and beliefs of FoodRx design and delivery and its future use (intrapersonal), (ii) the shopping routines and roles of individuals in participants’ social networks (interpersonal), (iii) access to and experience with food retail outlets (community), and (iv) income and food access support to cope with the cost of living (policy).Conclusion:Future healthy food prescription programs should consider how factors at all levels of the socioecological model influence program acceptability and use these data to inform program design and delivery.
      PubDate: 2024-02-02
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980024000429
       
  • Household food insecurity and physical activity behaviour in Ecuadorian
           children and adolescents: findings from the Ecuador 2018 National Health
           and Nutrition Survey (ENSANUT-2018)

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Chakraborty; Rishika, Armijos, Rodrigo X, Weigel, M Margaret
      First page: 67
      Abstract: Objective:Ecuador has a high prevalence of household food insecurity (HFI) and is undergoing nutritional and epidemiologic transition. Evidence from high-income countries has reported negative or null associations between HFI and physical activity (PA) in children. It remains uncertain whether the same is true of those from low- and middle-income countries like Ecuador whose environmental and socio-demographic characteristics are distinct from those of high-income countries. We aimed to investigate the association of HFI with PA, sedentary behaviour (SB) and anthropometric indicators in children.Design:Cross-sectional analysis of data from the nationally representative 2018 Ecuadorian National Health and Nutrition Survey. Data were collected on HFI, PA, SB, socio-demographic characteristics and measured height and weight. Unadjusted and adjusted linear, log-binomial and multinomial logistic regression analyses assessed the relationship of HFI with PA, SB, stunting and BMI-for-age.Setting:Ecuador.Participants:23 621 children aged 5–17 years.Results:Marginal and moderate-severe HFI was prevalent in 24 % and 20 % of the households, respectively. HFI was not associated with PA, SB, stunting nor underweight. Moderate-severe HFI was associated with a lower odds of overweight and obesity. However, adjustment for household assets attenuated this finding for overweight (adjusted OR:0·90, 95 % CI: 0·77, 1·05) and obesity (adjusted OR: 0·88, 95 % CI: 0·71, 1·08).Conclusion:HFI is a burden in Ecuadorian households, but is not associated with PA, SB nor anthropometric indicators in children aged 5–17 years. However, a concerning prevalence of insufficient PA was reported, emphasising the critical need for evidence-based interventions aimed at promoting PA and reducing SB.
      PubDate: 2024-02-02
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980024000351
       
  • Associations between food insecurity and diabetes risk factors in US
           adolescents in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey
           (NHANES) 2007–2016

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Fulay; Aarohee P, Lee, Joyce M, Baylin, Ana, Wolfson, Julia A, Leung, Cindy W
      First page: 68
      Abstract: Objective:To evaluate the associations between household food insecurity and diabetes risk factors among lower-income US adolescents.Design:Cross-sectional analysis. Household food security status was measured using the 18-item Food Security Survey Module. Simple and multivariable linear and logistic regressions were used to assess the association between food security status and fasting plasma glucose (FPG), oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), HbA1C and homoeostatic model assessment – insulin resistance (HOMA-IR). The analyses were adjusted for household and adolescent demographic and health characteristics.Setting:USA.Participants:3412 US adolescents aged 12–19 years with household incomes ≤300 % of the federal poverty line from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey cycles 2007–2016.Results:The weighted prevalence of marginal food security was 15·4 % and of food insecurity was 32·9 %. After multivariate adjustment, adolescents with food insecurity had a 0·04 % higher HbA1C (95 % CI 0·00, 0·09, P-value = 0·04) than adolescents with food security. There was also a significant overall trend between severity of food insecurity and higher HbA1C (Ptrend = 0·045). There were no significant mean differences in adolescents’ FPG, OGTT or HOMA-IR by household food security.Conclusions:Food insecurity was associated with slightly higher HbA1c in a 10-year sample of lower-income US adolescents aged 12–19 years; however, other associations with diabetes risk factors were not significant. Overall, this suggests slight evidence for an association between food insecurity and diabetes risk in US adolescents. Further investigation is warranted to examine this association over time.
      PubDate: 2024-02-12
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980024000284
       
  • Giving fruits and vegetables a tax break: lessons from a Dutch attempt

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Hagenaars; Luc L, Fazzino, Tera L, Mackenbach, Joreintje Dingena
      First page: 70
      Abstract: Objective:Food taxation can improve diets by making unhealthy foods more expensive and by making healthy foods cheaper. In the Netherlands, a political window of opportunity arose in December 2021 to reduce the value-added tax (VAT) on fruits and vegetables to zero percent. The policy is now facing institutional friction along several fronts, however, delaying and potentially averting its implementation. We analysed this institutional friction to inform future food tax policies.Design:We qualitatively analysed open-access fiscal and health experts’ position papers about benefits and downsides of the zero-rate that were discussed with members of parliament in June 2023.Setting:The Netherlands.Participants:Not applicable.Results:Health and fiscal experts expressed noticeably different viewpoints towards the utility of the zero-rate. One important argument fiscal experts based their negative advice upon pertained to the legal restrictions for distinguishing between healthier and unhealthier forms of fruits and vegetables (i.e. the principle of neutrality). A zero-rate VAT on unhealthier forms of fruits and vegetables, e.g. processed cucumber, mixed with salt and sugar, would be undesirable, but differentiating between raw and processed cucumber would offend the neutrality principle.Conclusions:The Dutch attempt to give fruits and vegetables a tax break highlights the need for crystal-clear food classifications when designing food tax policies. Public health nutritionists should combine classifications based on caloric density, palatability, degree of processing and nutrient content to provide a database for evidence-informed tax differentiation according to food item healthfulness.
      PubDate: 2024-02-15
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980024000442
       
  • Evaluation of three prediction formulas of 24-hour urinary sodium
           excretion in Chinese residents: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Qi; Zijing, Tang, Shuai, Wu, Beike, Li, Yanxing, Yang, Hongmei, Wang, Kunbo, Li, Zhifang
      First page: 71
      Abstract: Objective:To determine the appropriateness of three widely used formulas estimating 24-h urinary Na (24hUNa) from spot urine samples in the Chinese population.Design:Systematic review and meta-analysis.Setting:Literature review was conducted to identify studies for estimating 24hUNa using the Kawasaki, Tanaka and INTERSALT formulas simultaneously in PubMed, Embase and the Cochrane library databases. The mean difference (MD) and correlation coefficients (r) between measures and estimates from different formulas were assessed.Participants:Information extraction and quality assessment were performed in thirteen studies involving 8369 subjects.Results:Two studies which affected the overall robustness were excluded in the ‘leave-one-out’ sensitivity analyses. Within the final meta-analysis included eleven studies and 7197 participants, 36·07 mmol/d (95 %CI 16·89, 55·25) of MD was observed in the Kawasaki formula, and –19·62 mmol/d (95 %CI –37·37, –1·87) in the Tanaka formula and –35·78 mmol/d (95 %CI –50·76, –20·80) in the INTERSALT formula; a pooled r-Fisher’s Z of 0·39 (95 %CI 0·32, 0·45) in the Kawasaki formula, 0·43 (95 %CI 0·37, 0·49) in the Tanaka formula and 0·36 (95 %CI 0·31, 0·42) in the INTERSALT formula. Subgroup analyses were conducted to explore the possible factors affecting the accuracy of the formula estimation from three mainly aspects: population types, Na intake levels and urine specimen types.Conclusions:The meta-analysis suggested that the Tanaka formula performed a more accurate estimate in Chinese population. Time of collecting spot urine specimens and Na intake level of the sample population might be the main factors affecting the accuracy of the formula estimation.
      PubDate: 2024-02-02
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980024000168
       
  • The relationship between social media addiction and emotional appetite: a
           cross-sectional study among young adults in Turkey

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Sevim; Sumeyra, Gumus, Damla, Kizil, Mevlude
      First page: 72
      Abstract: Objective:The present study focused on the relationship between addiction to social media (SM) and emotional appetite in young adults.Design:Cross-sectional online survey.Setting:The Bergen Social Media Addiction Scale (BSMAS) and Emotional Appetite Questionnaire (EMAQ) were used, and the duration and frequency of SM tools usage were analysed.Participants:Five hundred and twenty-four participants (144 men and 380 women) aged between 18 and 25 years.Results:The mean of SM usage duration of participants was 3·2 ± 2·2 h per d along with a mean of BSMAS score of 16·1 ± 5·9. Concerning emotional appetite, the mean scores for positive and negative aspects of EMAQ were 4·4 ± 1·9 and 3·1 ± 1·2, respectively. The predominant SM tools were YouTube (92·6 %) and Instagram (90·3 %). Notably, a significant association was observed between SM addiction and the frequency of access to YouTube, Instagram, and Twitter, with addiction levels increasing as access frequency rose (P < 0·01).Conclusion:This study demonstrated a possible relationship between SM addiction and emotional appetite among young adults. However, further research with more prominent participants and a lengthier follow-up duration is necessary to elucidate how SM tools affect eating behaviour.
      PubDate: 2024-02-15
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980024000466
       
  • Does an antihypertensive diet cost more' Analysis from the Chinese
           Heart-Healthy diet trial

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Guo; Yishan, Su, Danping, Chen, Hong, Ding, Yanxi, Zhang, Shiyu, Sun, Hong, Chen, Dandi, Yin, Wenya, Li, Xiang, Zeng, Guo
      First page: 73
      Abstract: Objective:To determine whether the Chinese heart-healthy diet (Sichuan cuisine version) (CHH diet-SC) was more expensive than the conventional Sichuan diet and explore the food groups and nutrients that mainly affected the cost of CHH diet-SC.Design:Cost analysis of 4-week intervention diets in the Sichuan center representing southwestern China in the CHH diet study.Setting:A multicentre, parallel-group, single-blind, randomised feeding trial evaluating the efficacy of lowering blood pressure with the cuisine-based CHH diet.Participants:Totally, fifty-three participants with hypertension aged 25–75 years in the Sichuan center were randomised into the control group (n 26) or the CHH diet-SC group (n 27).Results:The CHH diet-SC was more expensive than the control diet (¥27·87 ± 2·41 v. ¥25·18 ± 2·79 equals $3·90 ± 0·34 v. $3·52 ± 0·39, P < 0·001), and the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio for a 1-mm Hg systolic blood pressure reduction was ¥9·12 ($1·28). Intakes and the cost of seafood, dairy products, fruits, soybeans and nuts, whole grains and mixed beans were higher for the CHH diet-SC than for the control diet (P < 0·001). Intakes of vitamin B1, vitamin B6, vitamin C, Mg and phosphorus were positively correlated with the cost (P < 0·05).Conclusions:The CHH diet-SC costs more than the conventional Sichuan diet, partly due to the high cost of specific food groups. Positive correlations between the intakes of vitamin B1, vitamin B6, vitamin C, Mg, phosphorus and the dietary cost could be a direction to adjust the composition within the food groups to reduce the cost of the CHH diet-SC.
      PubDate: 2024-03-06
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980024000430
       
  • Adherence to the healthy eating index-2010 and alternative healthy eating
           index-2010 in relation to metabolic syndrome among African Americans in
           the Jackson heart study

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Reeder; Nicole K, Reneker, Jennifer C, Beech, Bettina M, Bruce, Marino A, Heitman, Elizabeth, Norris, Keith C, Talegawkar, Sameera A, Thorpe, Roland J
      First page: 74
      Abstract: Objective:The primary objective of this study was to determine whether Healthy Eating Index (HEI) and Alternative Healthy Eating Index (AHEI) scores were associated with incident metabolic syndrome.Design:This study is a secondary analysis of data from the Jackson Heart Study. HEI and AHEI scores were divided into quintiles and Cox proportional hazards regression models were analysed for 1864 African American adults free from metabolic syndrome at Exam 1 to examine the incidence of metabolic syndrome by quintile of dietary quality score.Setting:Hinds, Madison and Rankin counties, Mississippi, USA.Participants:African American adults, ages 21–94 years, 60·9 % female.Results:Over a mean follow-up time of 6·7 years, we observed 932 incident cases of metabolic syndrome. After adjusting for multiple covariates, a higher HEI score at Exam 1 was not associated with the risk of incident metabolic syndrome, except when looking at the trend analysis for the subgroup of adults with two metabolic syndrome components at Exam 1 (P-trend = 0·03). A higher AHEI score at Exam 1 was associated with the risk of incident metabolic syndrome (hazard ratio for those in the highest quintile compared to the lowest: 0·80 (95 % CI: 0·65, 0·99), P-trend = 0·03).Conclusion:These findings suggest that a dietary pattern that scores higher on the AHEI may help reduce the risk of metabolic syndrome, even for adults who already have two of the minimum of three components required for a diagnosis of metabolic syndrome.
      PubDate: 2024-02-16
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980024000016
       
  • An analysis of the transformative potential of Australia’s national food
           policies and policy actions to promote healthy and sustainable food
           systems

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Ribeiro de Melo; Patricia, Baker, Phillip, Machado, Priscila Pereira, Howse, Elly, Slater, Scott, Lawrence, Mark
      First page: 75
      Abstract: Objective:Despite commitment by many countries to promote food system transformation, Australia has yet to adopt a national food policy. This study aimed to evaluate Australian Federal Government’s (AFG) food policies and policy actions potential to promote healthy and sustainable food systems.Design:This study is a desk-based policy mapping followed by a theoretically guided evaluation of policy actions. This involved three steps: (1) identification of government departments and agencies that could influence Australia’s food system; (2) identification of food policies and policy actions within these departments and (3) use of a conceptual framework to evaluate policy actions’ potential of changing the food system as adjust (first-order change), reform (second-order change) or transform (third-order change).Setting:Australia.Participants:None.Results:Twenty-four food policies and sixty-two policy actions were identified across eight AFG departments and the Food Regulation System and evaluated based on the order of change they represented. Most policies were led by individual departments, reflecting the absence of a joined-up approach to food policy in Australia. Most policy actions (n 25/ 56·5 %) were evaluated as having adjust potential, whereas no transformative policy action was identified.Conclusions:These findings suggest that Australia is likely to proceed incrementally towards achieving food system change through adjustments and reforms but lacking transformative impact. To promote transformative change, all three orders of change must be strategically implemented in a coherent and coordinated matter. A comprehensive national food policy and a national coordinating body are needed to ensure a cohesive approach to policy.
      PubDate: 2024-02-20
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980024000478
       
  • Examining the influence of child nutritional disorders on early childhood
           development in Bangladesh: insights from the multiple indicator cluster
           survey

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Khanam; Shimlin Jahan, Khan, Md Nuruzzaman
      First page: 76
      Abstract: Objective:The objective of this study was to explore the relationship between various forms of child nutritional disorders and early childhood development in Bangladesh.Design:We analysed data from the nationally representative cross-sectional 2019 Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey. Early childhood development was evaluated using the Early Childhood Development Index (ECDI), which comprised 10 yes-or-no questions across four domains: literacy-numeracy, physical well-being, socio-emotional development, and learning abilities. Nutritional disorders (e.g. stunting, wasting, and underweight) were measured based on the World Health Organization’s height and weight guidelines. To investigate the relationships between child development and nutritional disorders, we used multilevel logistic regression models.Setting:Bangladesh.Participants:Data of 9,455 children aged 3 and 4 years.Results:Approximately 38 % of the children analysed experienced a nutritional disorder, with stunting being the most prevalent at 28·15 %. Overall, 25·27 % did not meet expected developmental progress measured by the ECDI. Stunted children were more likely to be off track developmentally, while those without any nutritional disorder were more likely to be on track. Socio-demographic factors, including age, sex, attendance in early childhood education programme, maternal education, maternal functional difficulties, region, and income, were identified as determinants of ECDI.Conclusions:Childhood nutrition and socio-demographic factors significantly affect multiple developmental domains and overall ECDI among children aged 3–4 years. Prioritising policies and programmes that improve nutrition and address these determinants are crucial for fostering optimal development in children.
      PubDate: 2024-02-22
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980024000521
       
  • Promoting responsive care and early learning practices in Northern Ghana:
           results from a counselling intervention within nutrition and health
           services

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Aidam; Enam, Varela, Veronica, Abukari, Fauzia, Torres, Kelsey A, Nisingizwe, Marie Paul, Yourkavitch, Jennifer, Yakubu, Eliasu, Abubakari, Abdulai, Ibrahim, Rashida, Oot, Lesley, Beck, Kathryn, Azumah, Selorme, Issahaku, Al-Hassan, Apoassan Jambeidu, Joyce, Abdul-Rahman, Lutuf, Adu-Asare, Catherine, Uyehara, Malia, Cashin, Kristen, Karnati, Romilla, Kirk, Catherine M
      First page: 77
      Abstract: Objective:This study assesses change in caregiver practices after integrating responsive care and early learning (RCEL) in nutrition and health services and community platforms in northern Ghana.Design:We trained health facility workers and community health volunteers to deliver RCEL counselling to caregivers of children under 2 years of age through existing health facilities and community groups. We assessed changes in caregivers’ RCEL practices before and after the intervention with a household questionnaire and caregiver–child observations.Setting:The study took place in Sagnarigu, Gushegu, Wa East and Mamprugu-Moagduri districts from April 2022 to March 2023. Study sites included seventy-nine child welfare clinics (CWC) at Ghana Health Service facilities and eighty village savings and loan association (VSLA) groups.Participants:We enrolled 211 adult caregivers in the study sites who had children 0–23 months at baseline and were enrolled in a CWC or a VSLA.Results:We observed improvements in RCEL and infant and young child feeding practices, opportunities for early learning (e.g. access to books and playthings) in the home environment and reductions in parental stress.Conclusions:This study demonstrates the effectiveness of integrating RCEL content into existing nutrition and health services. The findings can be used to develop, enhance and advocate for policies integrating RCEL into existing services and platforms in Ghana. Future research may explore the relationship between positive changes in caregiver behaviour and improvements in child development outcomes as well as strategies for enhancing paternal engagement in care practices, improving child supervision and ensuring an enabling environment.
      PubDate: 2024-02-08
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980024000156
       
  • Measuring the intangible resources caregivers need to provide nurturing
           care during the complementary feeding period: a scoping review in low- and
           lower-middle-income countries

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Martin; Stephanie L, Zongrone, Amanda A, Craig, Hope C, Litvin, Kate, Fort, Peyton, Cooper, Stephanie, Haller, Mia, Dickin, Katherine L
      First page: 78
      Abstract: Objective:Caregivers require tangible (e.g. food and financial) and intangible resources to provide care to ensure child health, nutrition and development. Intangible resources include beliefs and knowledge, education, self-efficacy, perceived physical health, mental health, healthy stress levels, social support, empowerment, equitable gender attitudes, safety and security and time sufficiency. These intangible caregiver resources are included as intermediate outcomes in nutrition conceptual frameworks yet are rarely measured as part of maternal and child nutrition research or evaluations. To facilitate their measurement, this scoping review focused on understudied caregiver resources that have been measured during the complementary feeding period in low- and lower-middle-income countries.Design:We screened 9,232 abstracts, reviewed 277 full-text articles and included 163 articles that measured caregiver resources related to complementary feeding or the nutritional status of children 6 months to 2 years of age.Results:We identified measures of each caregiver resource, though the number of measures and quality of descriptions varied widely. Most articles (77 %) measured only one caregiver resource, mental health (n 83) and social support (n 54) most frequently. Psychometric properties were often reported for mental health measures, but less commonly for other constructs. Few studies reported adapting measures for specific contexts. Existing measures for mental health, equitable gender attitudes, safety and security and time sufficiency were commonly used; other constructs lacked standardised measures.Conclusions:Measurement of caregiver resources during the complementary feeding period is limited. Measuring caregiver resources is essential for prioritising caregivers and understanding how resources influence child care, feeding and nutrition.
      PubDate: 2024-01-15
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980024000065
       
  • Estimating minimum dietary diversity for children aged 6–23 months: a
           comparison of agreement and cost of two recall methods in Cambodia and
           Zambia

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Hackl; Laura S, Du-Skabrin, Lidan, Ok, Amry, Kumwenda, Chiza, Sin, Navy, Mwelwa-Zgambo, Lukonde, Dhakal, Ramji, Thandie Hamaimbo, Bubala, Reynolds, Elise C, Adams, Katherine P, Arnold, Charles D, Stewart, Christine P, Milner, Erin M, Pedersen, Sarah, Yourkavitch, Jennifer
      First page: 79
      Abstract: Objective:To compare the agreement and cost of two recall methods for estimating children’s minimum dietary diversity (MDD).Design:We assessed child’s dietary intake on two consecutive days: an observation on day one, followed by two recall methods (list-based recall and multiple-pass recall) administered in random order by different enumerators at two different times on day two. We compared the estimated MDD prevalence using survey-weighted linear probability models following a two one-sided test equivalence testing approach. We also estimated the cost-effectiveness of the two methods.Setting:Cambodia (Kampong Thom, Siem Reap, Battambang, and Pursat provinces) and Zambia (Chipata, Katete, Lundazi, Nyimba, and Petauke districts).Participants:Children aged 6–23 months: 636 in Cambodia and 608 in Zambia.Results:MDD estimations from both recall methods were equivalent to the observation in Cambodia but not in Zambia. Both methods were equivalent to the observation in capturing most food groups. Both methods were highly sensitive although the multiple-pass method accurately classified a higher proportion of children meeting MDD than the list-based method in both countries. Both methods were highly specific in Cambodia but moderately so in Zambia. Cost-effectiveness was better for the list-based recall method in both countries.Conclusion:The two recall methods estimated MDD and most other infant and young child feeding indicators equivalently in Cambodia but not in Zambia, compared to the observation. The list-based method produced slightly more accurate estimates of MDD at the population level, took less time to administer and was less costly to implement.
      PubDate: 2024-01-22
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980024000107
       
  • Wild fish consumption and latitude as drivers of vitamin D status among
           Inuit living in Nunavik, northern Québec

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Little; Matthew, Brockington, Meghan, Aker, Amira, Kenny, Tiff-Annie, Andrade-Rivas, Federico, Ayotte, Pierre, Lemire, Mélanie
      First page: 81
      Abstract: Objective:To measure vitamin D status and estimate factors associated with serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) in Nunavimmiut (Inuit living in Nunavik) adults in 2017.Design:Data were from Qanuilirpitaa' 2017 Nunavik Inuit Health Survey, a cross-sectional study conducted in August–October 2017. Participants underwent a questionnaire, including an FFQ, and blood samples were analysed for total serum 25(OH)D.Setting:Nunavik, northern Québec, Canada.Participants:A stratified proportional model was used to select respondents, including 1,155 who identified as Inuit and had complete data.Results:Geometric mean serum vitamin D levels were 65·2 nmol/l (95 % CI 62·9–67·6 nmol/l) among women and 65·4 nmol/l (95 % CI 62·3–68·7 nmol/l) among men. The weighted prevalence of serum 25(OH)D < 75 nmol/l,
      PubDate: 2024-02-22
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980024000491
       
  • The association between consideration of future consequences and food
           intake is mediated by food choice motives in a French adult population

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Bénard; Marc, Robert, Margaux, Méjean, Caroline, Allès, Benjamin, Kesse-Guyot, Emmanuelle, Paolassini-Guesnier, Pauline, Bellisle, France, Etilé, Fabrice, Reach, Gérard, Hercberg, Serge, Touvier, Mathilde, Péneau, Sandrine
      First page: 82
      Abstract: Objectives:Consideration of future consequences (CFC) distinguishes individuals who adopt behaviours based on immediate needs and concerns from individuals who consider the future consequences of their behaviours. We aimed to assess the association between CFC and diet, and testing the mediating role of food choice motives on this relationship.Design:Individuals (aged ≥ 18 years) completed the CFC-12 questionnaire in 2014, at least three 24-h dietary records, and a food choice motive questionnaire. A multiple mediator analysis allowed to assess the mediating effect of food choice motives on the cross-sectional association between CFC and diet, adjusted for socio-demographic factors.Setting:Data from the NutriNet-Santé cohort study.Participants:27 330 participants.Results:CFC was associated with all food choice motives (P < 0·001), with the strongest positive associations for avoidance for environmental reasons, absence of contaminants and health motives and the strongest negative associations for innovation and convenience. Positive total effects were found between CFC and the consumption of healthy food groups (fruits and vegetables, whole-grain foods, legumes), and negative total effects for alcohol, meat and poultry and processed meat (P < 0·001). CFC was positively associated with diet quality (P < 0·001). Across food groups, major mediators of these relationships were higher health (8·4–32·6%), higher environmental (13·7–22·1 %) and lower innovation (7·3–25·1 %) concerns.Conclusions:CFC was associated with healthier dietary intake, essentially mediated by a greater motivation of future-oriented participants for self-centred and altruistic outcomes, including health and environment. Focusing on the awareness of future benefits in public health interventions might lead to healthier dietary behaviours.
      PubDate: 2024-02-08
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980023002501
       
  • Public policy interventions to mitigate household food insecurity in
           Canada: a systematic review

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Idzerda; Leanne, Corrin, Tricia, Lazarescu, Calin, Couture, Alix, Vallières, Eric, Khan, Sara, Tarasuk, Valerie, McIntyre, Lynn, Jaramillo Garcia, Alejandra
      First page: 83
      Abstract: Objective:The objective of this systematic review is to synthesise the evidence on public policy interventions and their ability to reduce household food insecurity (HFI) in Canada.Design:Four databases were searched up to October 2023. Only studies that reported on public policy interventions that might reduce HFI were included, regardless of whether that was the primary purpose of the study. Title and abstract screening, full-text screening, data extraction, risk of bias and certainty of the evidence assessments were conducted by two reviewers.Results:Seventeen relevant studies covering three intervention categories were included: income supplementation, housing assistance programmes and food retailer subsidies. Income supplementation had a positive effect on reducing HFI with a moderate to high level of certainty. Housing assistance programmes and food retailer studies may have little to no effect on HFI; however, there is low certainty in the evidence that could change as evidence emerges.Conclusion:The evidence suggests that income supplementation likely reduces HFI for low-income Canadians. Many questions remain in terms of how to optimise this intervention and additional high-quality studies are still needed.
      PubDate: 2024-01-15
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980024000120
       
  • Food insecurity and disability among working-age and older adults

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Hadfield-Spoor; Mia, Avendano, Mauricio, Loopstra, Rachel
      First page: 84
      Abstract: Objective:To explore relationships between disability, food insecurity (FI) and age and examine how socio-economic factors impact risk of FI among disabled people in working and older age.Design:Logistic regression models used to analyse the contribution of socio-economic factors to gaps in risk of FI for disabled people. In models stratified into working and older age groups, differences in risk of FI for disabled and non-disabled people were examined by employment, education and assets.Setting:England, Wales and Northern Ireland, 2016 and 2018Participants:A representative sample of 6187 adults aged 16+, of whom 28 % were disabled, from the Food & You survey.Results:The gap in FI risk by disability status decreased as age increased. For ages 25–34 for disabled v. non-disabled people, risk of FI was 31 % (95 % CI 21–41 %) v. 10 % (8–12 %); at ages 45 to 54, it was 18 % (11–23 %) v. 7 % (5–8 %), and at ages 75+, there was no gap in risk. Accounting for socio-economic variables halved the gap in risk among working ages. However, among working-age adults, FI among disabled people in full-time work was 15 % (11–20 %) compared with only 7 % (6–9 %) among non-disabled people in full-time work. Among older people, disabled people without savings were at higher risk of FI (5 % (3–7 %)) than non-disabled people without savings (2 % (1–3 %)) but having savings closed risk gap.Conclusions:Socio-economic resources partially explain disparities in FI risk when disabled. Disparities remained for people in full-time work and among people without savings in older age.
      PubDate: 2024-02-26
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980024000570
       
  • Association of consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages with elevated
           blood pressure among college students in Yunnan Province, China

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Xu; Honglv, Zhao, Yun, Tan, Rui, Li, Min, Yu, Chunjie, Rui, Danyun, Li, Jiangli, Xiong, Yuan, Zheng, Weibin
      First page: 85
      Abstract: Objective:Although some studies have examined the association between eating behaviour and elevated blood pressure (EBP) in adolescents, current data on the association between sugar-sweetened beverages (SSB) and EBP in adolescents in Yunnan Province, China, are lacking.Setting:Cluster sampling was used to survey freshmen at a college in Kunming, Yunnan Province, from November to December. Data on SSB consumption were collected using an FFQ measuring height, weight and blood pressure. A logistic regression model was used to analyse the association between SSB consumption and EBP, encompassing prehypertension and hypertension with sex-specific analyses.Participants:The analysis included 4781 college students.Results:Elevated systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) were detected in 35·10 % (1678/4781) and 39·34 % (1881/4781) of patients, respectively. After adjusting for confounding variables, tea beverage consumption was associated with elevated SBP (OR = 1·24, 95 % CI: 1·03, 1·49, P = 0·024), and carbonated beverage (OR = 1·23, 95 % CI: 1·04, 1·45, P = 0·019) and milk beverage (OR = 0·81, 95 % CI: 0·69, 0·95, P = 0·010) consumption was associated with elevated DBP in college students. Moreover, fruit beverage (OR = 1·32, 95 % CI: 1·00, 1·75, P = 0·048) and milk beverage consumption (OR = 0·69, 95 % CI: 0·52, 0·93, P = 0·014) was associated with elevated DBP in males.Conclusion:Our findings indicated that fruit and milk beverage consumption was associated with elevated DBP in males, and no association was observed with EBP in females.
      PubDate: 2024-02-29
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980024000569
       
  • The dietary approaches to stop hypertension (DASH) dietary pattern in
           childhood in relation to cardiometabolic risk in adolescence and early
           adulthood in the ALSPAC birth cohort

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Loizou; Panayiotis, Taylor, Caroline M, Buckland, Genevieve
      First page: 86
      Abstract: Objective:To investigate the relationship between the dietary approaches to stop hypertension (DASH)-style dietary patterns in childhood and cardiometabolic risk (CMR) in adolescence/early adulthood.Design:Data were obtained from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) prospective cohort. Diet diary data collected at 7, 10 and 13 years were used to calculate DASH-style diet scores (DDS). Multivariable linear regression models were used to investigate the associations between the DDS at 7, 10 and 13 years and CMR scores, calculated at 17 and 24 years.Setting:The ALSPAC cohort included children born in south-west England in 1991–1992.Participants:Children with complete dietary, covariate and cardiometabolic data at 17 (n 1,526) and 24 years (n 1,524).Results:A higher DDS at 7 and 10 years was negatively associated with CMR scores at 17 years (β = –0·64 (95 % CI –1·27, –0·006), Ptrend=0·027 for fifth v. first DDS quintile at 7 years; β = –0·73 (95 % CI –1·35, –0·12) and Ptrend=0·037 for fifth v. first DDS quintile at 10 years) and at 24 years (β = –0·92 (95 % CI –1·49, –0·34) Ptrend = 0·001 for fifth v. first DDS quintile at 7 years; β = –0·60 (95 % CI –1·20, –0·05) Ptrend = 0·092 for fifth v. first DDS quintile at 10 years). No associations were found between the DDS at 13 years and CMR score at 17 and 24 years.Conclusion:Greater adherence with a DASH-style diet during childhood was associated with better cardiometabolic health in adolescence/adulthood in the ALSPAC cohort. The components of the DASH diet could be recommended to improve children’s cardiometabolic health.
      PubDate: 2024-03-21
      DOI: 10.1017/S136898002400048X
       
  • Evaluation of a long day care intervention targeting the mealtime
           environment and curriculum to increase children’s vegetable intake: a
           cluster randomised controlled trial using the multiphase optimisation
           strategy framework

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Morgillo; Samantha, Bell, Lucinda K, Gardner, Claire, Kashef, Shabnam, Stafford, Karen, Zarnowiecki, Dorota, Poelman, Astrid AM, Cochet-Broch, Maeva O, Johnson, Brittany J, Gulyani, Aarti, Cox, David N, Golley, Rebecca K
      First page: 87
      Abstract: Objective:To determine the reach, adoption, implementation and effectiveness of an intervention to increase children’s vegetable intake in long day care (LDC).Design:A 12-week pragmatic cluster randomised controlled trial, informed by the multiphase optimisation strategy (MOST), targeting the mealtime environment and curriculum. Children’s vegetable intake and variety was measured at follow-up using a modified Short Food Survey for early childhood education and care and analysed using a two-part mixed model for non-vegetable and vegetable consumers. Outcome measures were based on the RE-AIM framework.Setting:Australian LDC centres.Participants:Thirty-nine centres, 120 educators and 719 children at follow-up.Results:There was no difference between intervention and waitlist control groups in the likelihood of consuming any vegetables when compared with non-vegetable consumers for intake (OR = 0·70, (95 % CI 0·34–1·43), P = 0·32) or variety (OR = 0·73 (95 % CI 0·40–1·32), P = 0·29). Among vegetable consumers (n 652), there was no difference between groups in vegetable variety (exp(b): 1·07 (95 % CI:0·88–1·32, P = 0·49) or vegetable intake (exp(b): 1·06 (95 % CI: 0·78, 1·43)), P = 0·71) with an average of 1·51 (95 % CI 1·20–1·82) and 1·40 (95 % CI 1·08–1·72) serves of vegetables per day in the intervention and control group, respectively. Intervention educators reported higher skills for promoting vegetables at mealtimes, and knowledge and skills for teaching the curriculum, than control (all P < 0·001). Intervention fidelity was moderate (n 16/20 and n 15/16 centres used the Mealtime environment and Curriculum, respectively) with good acceptability among educators. The intervention reached 307/8556 centres nationally and was adopted by 22 % eligible centres.Conclusions:The pragmatic self-delivered online intervention positively impacted educator’s knowledge and skills and was considered acceptable and feasible. Intervention adaptations, using the MOST cyclic approach, could improve intervention impact on children’ vegetable intake.
      PubDate: 2024-02-26
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980024000557
       
  • The use of private regulatory measures to create healthy food retail
           environments: a scoping review

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Dancey; Jane, Reeve, Belinda, Jones, Alexandra, Ferguson, Megan, van Burgel, Emma, Brimblecombe, Julie
      First page: 88
      Abstract: Objective:Different forms of public and private regulation have been used to improve the healthiness of food retail environments. The aim of this scoping review was to systematically examine the types of private regulatory measures used to create healthy food retail environments, the reporting of the processes of implementation, monitoring, review and enforcement and the barriers to and enablers of these.Design:Scoping review using the Johanna Briggs Institute guidelines. Ovid MEDLINE, PsycINFO, Embase, CINAHL Plus, Business Source Complete and Scopus databases were searched in October 2020 and again in September 2023 using terms for ‘food retail’, ‘regulation’ and ‘nutrition’. Regulatory measure type was described by domain and mechanism. Deductive thematic analysis was used to identify reported barriers and enablers to effective regulatory governance processes using a public health law framework.Setting:Food retail.Participants:Food retail settings using private regulatory measures to create healthier food retail environments.Results:In total, 17 694 articles were screened and thirty-five included for review from six countries, with all articles published since 2011. Articles reporting on twenty-six unique private regulatory measures cited a mix of voluntary (n 16), mandatory (n 6) measures, both (n 2) or did not disclose (n 2). Articles frequently reported on implementation (34/35), with less reporting on the other regulatory governance processes of monitoring (15/35), review (6/35) and enforcement (2/35).Conclusions:We recommend more attention be paid to reporting on the monitoring, review and enforcement processes used in private regulation to promote further progress in improving the healthiness of food retail environments.
      PubDate: 2024-03-11
      DOI: 10.1017/S136898002400065X
       
  • Strengthening national salt reduction strategies using multiple methods
           process evaluations: case studies from Malaysia and Mongolia

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: McKenzie; Briar L, Mustapha, Feisul Idzwan, Battumur, Bat-Erdene, Batsaikhan, Enkhtungalag, Chandran, Arunah, Michael, Viola, Webster, Jacqui, Trieu, Kathy
      First page: 89
      Abstract: Objective:To understand the extent to which national salt reduction strategies in Malaysia and Mongolia were implemented and achieving their intended outcomes.Design:Multiple methods process evaluations conducted at the mid-point of strategy implementation, guided by theoretical frameworks.Setting:Malaysia (2018–2019) and Mongolia (2020–2021).Participants:Desk-based reviews of related documents, interviews with key stakeholders (n 12 Malaysia, n 10 Mongolia), focus group discussions with health professionals in Malaysia (n 43) and health provider surveys in Mongolia (n 12).Results:Both countries generated high-quality local evidence about salt intake and levels in foods and culturally specific education resources. In Malaysia, education and reformulation activities were delivered with moderate dose (quantity) but reach among the population was low. Within 5 years, Mongolia implemented education among schools, health professionals and food producers on salt reduction with high reach, but with moderate dose (quantity) and reach among the general population. Both countries faced challenges in implementing legislative interventions (mandatory salt labelling and salt limits in packaged foods) and both could improve the scaling up of their reformulation and education activities.Conclusions:In the first half of Malaysia’s and Mongolia’s strategies, both countries generated necessary evidence and education materials, mobilised health professionals to deliver salt reduction education and achieved small-scale reformulation in foods. Both subsequently should focus on implementing regulatory policies and achieving population-wide reach and impact. Process evaluations of existing salt reduction strategies can help strengthen intervention delivery, aiding achievement of WHO’s 30 % reduction in salt intake by 2025 target.
      PubDate: 2024-02-12
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980023002781
       
  • Food environment trajectories: a sequence analysis from the CARTaGENE
           cohort

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Adamou; Habila, Robitaille, Éric, Paquette, Marie-Claude, Lebel, Alexandre
      First page: 90
      Abstract: Objective:The purpose of this study was to create a typology of longitudinal exposure to food environment based on socio-economic context.Design:Food environment trajectories were modelled using a sequence analysis method, followed by a logistic regression to describe those trajectories.Setting:The study took place in Quebec, Canada, using food environment data from 2009, 2011 and 2018 merged with participants’ demographic and socio-economic characteristics.Participant:At recruitment, 38 627 participants between the ages of 40 and 69 years from six urban areas in Quebec were included in the CARTaGENE cohort study. The cohort was representative of the Quebec urban population within this age range.Results:Our study revealed five trajectories of food access over time: (1) limited access to food stores throughout the study period, (2) limited access improving, (3) good access diminishing, (4) good access throughout the period and (5) low access throughout the period. Logistic regression analysis showed that participants who were unable to work (OR = 1·42, CI = 1·08–1·86), lived in households with five or more persons (OR = 1·69, CI = 1·17–2·42) and those living in low-income households (OR = 1·32, CI = 1·03–1·71) had higher odds of experiencing a disadvantaged food environment trajectory. Additionally, the level of education and age of participants were associated with the odds of experiencing a disadvantaged food environment trajectory.Conclusions:The study demonstrates that people facing socio-economic disadvantage are more likely to experience a disadvantaged food environment trajectory over time.
      PubDate: 2024-01-22
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980024000119
       
  • The association between dairy intake in adolescents on inflammation and
           risk markers of type 2 diabetes during young adulthood: results of the
           DONALD study

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Hohoff; Eva, Jankovic, Nicole, Perrar, Ines, Schnermann, Maike, Herder, Christian, Nöthlings, Ute, Libuda, Lars, Alexy, Ute
      First page: 91
      Abstract: Objective:The aim of this analysis was to investigate whether habitual intake of total dairy (TD) or different dairy types (liquid, solid, fermented, non-fermented, low-fat, high-fat, low-sugar and high-sugar dairy) during adolescence is associated with biomarkers of low-grade inflammation as well as risk factors of type 2 diabetes in young adulthood.Design:Multivariable linear regression analyses were used to investigate prospective associations between estimated TD intake as well as intake of different types of dairy and a pro-inflammatory score, based on high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, IL-6, IL-18, leptin and adiponectin, and insulin resistance assessed as Homeostasis Model Assessment Insulin Resistance in an open-cohort study.Setting:Dortmund, Germany.Participants:Data from participants (n 375) of the DOrtmund Nutritional and Anthropometric Longitudinally Designed (DONALD) study were included, for whom at least two 3-d weighed dietary records during adolescence (median age: 11 years) and one blood sample in young adulthood (>18 years) were available.Results:There was no statistically significant association between TD intake or intake of any dairy type and the pro-inflammatory score (all P> 0·05). TD intake as well as each dairy type intake and insulin resistance also showed no association (all P> 0·05).Conclusions:The habitual intake of dairy or individual types of dairy during adolescence does not seem to have a major impact on low-grade systemic inflammation and insulin resistance in the long term. There was no indication regarding a restriction of dairy intake for healthy children and adolescents in terms of diabetes risk reduction.
      PubDate: 2024-03-13
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980024000624
       
  • Attitudes, subjective norms and perceived behavioural control factors
           influencing Canadian secondary school students’ milk and milk
           alternatives consumption

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Thompson; Carise M, Elliott, Susan J, Meyer, Samantha, Leatherdale, Scott T, Majowicz, Shannon E
      First page: 92
      Abstract: Objective:The research objectives were to evaluate factors that influence Canadian secondary school students’ milk and milk alternatives (MMA) consumption and to explore associations through age and gender lenses.Design:A qualitative design was used, consisting of semi-structured interviews and photo-elicitation methods. Analysis was guided by the Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB). Deductive and inductive thematic analyses were used to generate themes, charting data based on attributes such as gender and age.Setting:Interviews were held virtually or via telephone.Participants:Participants were twenty-eight high school students from Ontario, Canada, diverse in terms of gender and age.Results:Both desirable and undesirable beliefs about the health outcomes of consuming MMA were commonly discussed. These included health benefits such as strong bones, muscular strength, and growth, and health consequences like unwanted skin conditions, weight gain, and diseases. While boys and girls associated MMA consumption with muscular strength, boys predominantly considered this favourable, while girls discussed outcomes like unwanted skin conditions and weight gain more often. Adolescents’ perspectives on taste/perceived enjoyment, environmentally friendly choices and animal welfare also influenced their MMA preferences. Parental influences were most cited among social factors, which appeared to be stronger during early adolescence. Factors involving cost, time and accessibility affected adolescents’ beliefs about how difficult it was to consume MMA.Conclusions:Recommendations for shifting attitudes towards MMA are provided to address unfavourable beliefs towards these products. Interventions to increase MMA consumption among adolescents should include parents and address cost barriers.
      PubDate: 2024-03-08
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980024000661
       
  • How energy balance-related behaviours, temperament, stress and overweight
           associate: a cross-sectional study of Finnish preschoolers

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Vepsäläinen; Henna, Korkalo, Liisa, Skaffari, Essi, Abdollahi, Anna M, Pajulahti, Riikka, Lehto, Reetta, Engberg, Elina, Leppänen, Marja H, Lehto, Elviira, Ray, Carola, Roos, Eva, Erkkola, Maijaliisa
      First page: 93
      Abstract: Objective:This study aimed to (1) examine the clustering of energy balance-related behaviours (EBRB) and (2) investigate whether EBRB clusters, temperament and hair cortisol concentration (HCC) associate with overweight.Design:We assessed food consumption using food records, screen time (ST) using sedentary behaviour diaries, sleep consistency and temperament (negative affectivity, surgency, effortful control) using questionnaires and HCC using hair samples. Accelerometers were used to assess physical activity (PA) intensities, sleep duration and sleep efficiency. Researchers measured each child’s weight and height. We used finite mixture models to identify EBRB clusters and multilevel logistic regression models to examine the associations between EBRB clusters, temperament, HCC and overweight.Setting:The cross-sectional DAGIS survey, data collected in 2015–2016.Participants:Finnish 3–6-year-olds (n 864) recruited through preschools.Results:One-third of the participants were categorised into the cluster labelled ‘Unhealthy diet, excessive screen time’, characterised by unhealthy dietary choices (e.g. greater consumption of high-fat, high-sugar dairy products) and longer ST. Two-thirds were categorised into the second cluster, labelled ‘Healthy diet, moderate screen time’. PA and sleep were irrelevant for clustering. Higher negative affectivity and lower effortful control associated with the ‘Unhealthy diet, excessive screen time’ cluster. EBRB clusters and HCC did not associate with overweight, but surgency was positively associated with overweight (OR = 1·63, 95 % CI 1·17, 2·25).Conclusions:Of the EBRB, food consumption and ST seem to associate. As temperament associates with EBRB clusters and overweight, tailored support acknowledging the child’s temperament could be profitable in maintaining a healthy weight.
      PubDate: 2024-03-04
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980024000612
       
  • Demographic and health characteristics associated with fish and n-3 fatty
           acid supplement intake during pregnancy: results from pregnancy cohorts in
           the ECHO programme

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Oken; Emily, Musci, Rashelle J, Westlake, Matthew, Gachigi, Kennedy, Aschner, Judy L, Barnes, Kathrine L, Bastain, Theresa M, Buss, Claudia, Camargo, Carlos A, Cordero, Jose F, Dabelea, Dana, Dunlop, Anne L, Ghassabian, Akhgar, Hipwell, Alison E, Hockett, Christine W, Karagas, Margaret R, Lugo-Candelas, Claudia, Margolis, Amy E, O’Connor, Thomas G, Shuster, Coral L, Straughen, Jennifer K, Lyall, Kristen
      First page: 94
      Abstract: Objective:n-3 fatty acid consumption during pregnancy is recommended for optimal pregnancy outcomes and offspring health. We examined characteristics associated with self-reported fish or n-3 supplement intake.Design:Pooled pregnancy cohort studies.Setting:Cohorts participating in the Environmental influences on Child Health Outcomes (ECHO) consortium with births from 1999 to 2020.Participants:A total of 10 800 pregnant women in twenty-three cohorts with food frequency data on fish consumption; 12 646 from thirty-five cohorts with information on supplement use.Results:Overall, 24·6 % reported consuming fish never or less than once per month, 40·1 % less than once a week, 22·1 % 1–2 times per week and 13·2 % more than twice per week. The relative risk (RR) of ever (v. never) consuming fish was higher in participants who were older (1·14, 95 % CI 1·10, 1·18 for 35–40 v.
      PubDate: 2024-02-27
      DOI: 10.1017/S136898002400051X
       
  • Associations of regular consumption of breakfast, lunch and dinner with
           Body Mass Index during adolescence: longitudinal findings by weight status
           among the Eating and Activity over Time 2010–2018 cohort

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Yoon; Cynthia Y, Arlinghaus, Katherine R, Ledoux, Tracey A, Johnston, Craig A, Larson, Nicole, Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne
      First page: 95
      Abstract: Objective:To examine how the associations between meal consumption and BMI over 8 years differ by weight status in a sample of adolescents.Design:Longitudinal, population-based study. Breakfast, lunch and dinner consumption and BMI were self-reported. Linear regressions were used to examine how the associations between meal consumption and BMI differed by weight status.Setting:Adolescents in the Minneapolis/St. Paul metropolitan area.Participants:Adolescents (n 1,471) were surveyed as part of the EAT 2010–2018 in 2009–2010 (Mage = 14·3 years) and 2017–2018 (Mage = 22·0 years).Results:The prevalence of regular breakfast, lunch and dinner consumption (≥ 5 times/week) ranged from 45 to 65 %, 75 to 89 % and 76 to 94 %, respectively, depending on weight status category. Among adolescents with a sex- and age-specific BMI < 15th percentile, regular consumptions of breakfast, lunch and dinner during adolescence were positively associated with BMI in emerging adulthood compared with irregular consumption of breakfast, lunch and dinner (
      PubDate: 2024-02-22
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980024000454
       
  • Is this advertisement designed to appeal to you' Adolescents’ views
           about Instagram advertisements promoting ultra-processed products

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Ares; Gastón, Antúnez, Lucía, Alcaire, Florencia, Natero, Virginia, Otterbring, Tobias
      First page: 96
      Abstract: Objective:Examine the key elements that characterise social media advertisements targeted at adolescents by asking adolescents which features of Instagram ads promoting ultra-processed products make them designed to appeal to adolescents.Design:Instagram ads promoting ultra-processed products and brands were selected from a database in which ads had been classified regarding whether they were primarily targeted at adolescents from an adult perspective. Adolescents completed a sorting task in small groups and were requested to reach a consensus through discussions and sticky notes regarding whether sixty ads were designed to appeal to them. The sorting task was analysed using content analysis based on inductive coding.Setting:One private secondary school and two after-school clubs.Participants:Convenience sample of 105 Uruguayan adolescents aged 11–17 years.Results:Ten categories were identified regarding the reasons for sorting ads as (not) designed to appeal to adolescents: product type, graphic design, explicit references to age groups, language, activities or themes, memes, celebrities, characters, promotions and novelty. Product type emerged as a key element, with adolescents perceiving ads as designed to appeal to them simply because they promoted specific products.Conclusions:This research contributes to the validation of criteria defined in previous studies and can be used for the development of tools to monitor the prevalence and power of adolescent-targeted digital marketing. However, the importance attributed to type of product suggests that regulations should not exclusively focus on exposure to digital marketing specifically targeted at adolescents but also on exposure to marketing in general.
      PubDate: 2024-03-07
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980024000533
       
  • Three approaches to assessing dietary quality in Mexican adolescents from
           2006 to 2018 with data from national health and nutrition surveys

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Gaona-Pineda; Elsa Berenice, López-Olmedo, Nancy, Moreno-Macías, Hortensia, Shamah-Levy, Teresa
      First page: 97
      Abstract: Objective:To assess trends in the dietary quality of Mexican adolescents from 2006 to 2018, both overall and by sociodemographic indicators, using adaptations of the EAT-Lancet Planetary Health (PH) recommendations, optimal intake estimated by the Global Burden of Disease (GBD) and 2015 Mexican Dietary Guidelines (MDG) in nationally representative samples.Design:Using dietary data from a semi-quantitative FFQ, dietary quality indexes were constructed as adaptations of three dietary intake recommendations. Trends in adherence to recommendations were evaluated with multivariate quantile regression models with survey year as the main independent variable and adjusted for age, sex, energy intake, dwelling area, geographical region, household assets condition, and student/non-student status. P values and CI were Bonferroni-corrected.Setting:Mexico.Participants:Non-pregnant or lactating adolescents aged 12–19 years (n 16 520).Results:Adherence to the PH index was about 40 %, GBD was nearly 35 % and MDG was about 37 %. The lowest adherences were for added sugars, sugar-sweetened beverages, nuts and seeds, red meats, processed meats, and legumes (
      PubDate: 2024-03-11
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980024000648
       
  • Reducing the carbon footprint of diets across socio-demographic groups in
           Finland: a mathematical optimisation study

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Irz; Xavier, Tapanainen, Heli, Saarinen, Merja, Salminen, Jani, Sares-Jäske, Laura, Valsta, Liisa M
      First page: 98
      Abstract: Objectives:To characterise nutritionally adequate, climate-friendly diets that are culturally acceptable across socio-demographic groups. To identify potential equity issues linked to more climate-friendly and nutritionally adequate dietary changes.Design:An optimisation model minimises distance from observed diets subject to nutritional, greenhouse gas emissions (GHGE) and food-habit constraints. It is calibrated to socio-demographic groups differentiated by sex, education and income levels using dietary intake data. The environmental coefficients are derived from life cycle analysis and an environmentally extended input–output model.Setting:Finland.Participants:Adult population.Results:Across all population groups, we find large synergies between improvements in nutritional adequacy and reductions in GHGE, set at one-third or half of the current level. Those reductions result mainly from the substitution of meat with cereals, potatoes and roots and the intra-category substitution of foods, such as beef with poultry in the meat category. The simulated more climate-friendly diets are thus flexitarian. Moving towards reduced-impact diets would not create major inadequacies related to protein and fatty acid intakes, but Fe could be an issue for pre-menopausal females. The initial socio-economic gradient in the GHGE of diets is small, and the patterns of adjustments to more climate-friendly diets are similar across socio-demographic groups.Conclusions:A one-third reduction in GHGE of diets is achievable through moderate behavioural adjustments, but achieving larger reductions may be difficult. The required changes are similar across socio-demographic groups and do not raise equity issues. A population-wide policy to promote behavioural change for diet sustainability would be appropriate.
      PubDate: 2024-03-04
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980024000508
       
  • Utilising emerging perspectives at the global and regional level to frame
           multisectoral nutrition governance landscape in Kenya

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Korir; Jacob, Oldewage-Theron, Wilna, Mugambi, Gladys, Gichohi-Wainaina, Wanjiku N
      First page: 99
      Abstract: Objective:Multisectoral nutrition governance (MNG) is a vital enabling determinant of improved nutrition outcomes. Despite this, it remains to be a complex phenomenon that lacks adequate understanding, especially in developing countries like Kenya. This narrative review aims to discuss the evolution of MNG, the current state of MNG, barriers and challenges, and based on these identify entry points for improvement within the complex governance structure in Kenya.Design:The Peer Review of Electronic Search Strategies (PRESS) and Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines were used to ensure rigorous and transparent identification of literature and interpretation.Setting:Kenya and developing countries with similar contexts.Participants:The review included forty-five documents (peer-reviewed articles and grey literature) that reported on MNG in developing countries.Results:We acknowledge that MNG is a complex and evolving determinant of better nutrition outcomes. The paper highlights challenges Kenya and other developing countries face such as inadequate leadership, inadequate coordination, insufficient capacity, inadequate monitoring and evaluation systems, and limited financial resources, among others. For Kenya in particular, there is inadequate understanding of what MNG is and how it can be effectively operationalised and tracked.Conclusions:To enhance understanding of MNG in Kenya, a country-specific assessment of MNG processes and impact outcomes using standard tools and defined metrics is vital. Such assessment will generate evidence of progress, successes, and challenges that will compel the government and stakeholders to invest more in multisectoral nutrition approaches to achieve its nutrition goals.
      PubDate: 2024-03-20
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980024000727
       
  • Environmental impact of Norwegian self-selected diets: comparing current
           intake with national dietary guidelines and EAT-Lancet targets

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Lengle; Julie Marie, Michaelsen Bjøntegaard, Marie, Hauger Carlsen, Monica, Jafarzadeh, Sepideh, Frost Andersen, Lene
      First page: 100
      Abstract: Objectives:Dietary environmental impact in a Norwegian adult population was estimated for six environmental impact categories. Moreover, environmental benefits of scenario diets complying with the Norwegian Food-Based Dietary Guidelines (FBDG) and the EAT-Lancet reference diet were assessed.Design:The current diet of Norwegian adults was estimated according to 24-h dietary recall data from a national dietary surveillance survey (Norkost 3). Scenario diets were modelled to represent the Norwegian FBDG and the EAT-Lancet healthy reference diet. Dietary environmental impact in terms of global warming potential, freshwater and marine eutrophication, terrestrial acidification, water use and transformation and use of land was estimated for the current and scenario diets using environmental impact data representative of the Norwegian market. Significant associations between impact and gender/educational attainment were assessed at P < 0·05.Setting:Norway.Participants:Adults (n=1787) aged 18–70 years who participated in the Norkost 3 survey (2010–2011).Results:Environmental impact varied significantly by gender and educational attainment. The food groups contributing most to environmental impact of Norwegian diets were meat, dairy, beverages, grains and composite dishes. Compared with the current Norwegian diet, the FBDG scenario reduced impacts from 2 % (freshwater eutrophication) to 32 % (water use), while the EAT-Lancet scenario reduced impacts from 7 % (marine eutrophication) to 61 % (land use). The EAT-Lancet scenario resulted in 3–48 % larger reductions in impact than the FBDG scenario.Conclusions:The Norwegian FBDG, while not as environmentally friendly as the EAT-Lancet reference diet, can still be an important tool in lessening environmental burden of Norwegian diets.
      PubDate: 2024-03-25
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980024000715
       
  • Effects of egg as an early complementary food on growth of 6- to
           9-month-old infants: a randomised controlled trial

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Ricci; Hannah, Faber, Mieke, Ricci, Cristian, Kruger, Herculina S, Malan, Linda, Nakiranda, Regina, Visser, Marina, Smuts, Cornelius Marius
      First page: 1
      Abstract: Objective:To assess the effect of daily egg consumption for six months on linear growth (primary outcome), weight-for-age, weight-for-length, mid-upper arm circumference-for-age, head circumference-for-age Z-scores, gross motor milestones development, anaemia and iron status (secondary outcomes) in a low socioeconomic community.Participants:Infants aged 6 to 9 months living in the peri-urban Jouberton area, in the Matlosana Municipality, South Africa.Design:A randomised controlled trial with a parallel design was implemented. Eligible infants were randomly allocated to the intervention (n 250) receiving one egg/day and the control group (n 250) receiving no intervention. The participants were visited weekly to monitor morbidity and gross motor development, with information on adherence collected for the intervention group. Trained assessors took anthropometric measurements, and a blood sample was collected to assess anaemia and iron status. There was blinding of the anthropometric assessors to the groups during measurements and the statistician during the analysis.Results:Baseline prevalence of stunting, underweight, wasting, overweight and anaemia was 23·8 %, 9·8 %, 1·2 %, 13·8 % and 29·2 %, respectively, and did not differ between groups. Overall, 230 and 216 participants in the intervention and control groups completed the study, respectively. There was no intervention effect on length-for-age, weight-for-age, weight-for-length Z-scores, gross motor milestone development, anaemia and iron status.Conclusions:Daily egg intake did not affect linear growth, underweight, wasting, motor milestones development, anaemia and iron status. Other interventions are necessary to understand the effect of animal-source food intake on children’s growth and development. This trial was registered at https://clinicaltrials.gov/ (NCT05168085).
      PubDate: 2023-11-29
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980023002604
       
  • Assessing the performance of national sentinel food lists at subnational
           levels in six countries

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Vogliano; Chris, Varela, Veronica, Woldt, Monica, Alayon, Silvia, Hackl, Laura S, Kennedy, Gina, Pedersen, Sarah H, Milner, Erin M, Yourkavitch, Jennifer
      First page: 2
      Abstract: Objective:To assess how well national sentinel lists of the most frequently consumed foods in each food group capture data at subnational levels to measure minimum diet diversity (MDD).Design:We analysed data from seven surveys with 24-h open dietary recalls to evaluate: (1) the percentage of reported foods that were included in each sentinel food list; (2) whether these lists captured consumption of some food groups better than others and (3) differences between estimates of dietary diversity calculated from all food items mentioned in the open 24-h recall v. only food items included in the sentinel lists.Setting:Seven subnational areas: Bangladesh (2), Benin, Colombia, Kenya, Malawi and Nepal.Participants:8094 women 15–49 years; 4588 children 6–23 months.Results:National sentinel food lists captured most foods reportedly consumed by women (84 %) and children (86 %). Food groups with the highest variability were ‘other fruits’ and ‘other vegetables.’ MDD calculated from the sentinel list was, on average, 6·5 (women) and 4·1 (children) percentage points lower than when calculated from open 24-h recalls, with a statistically significant difference in most subnational areas.Conclusion:National sentinel food lists can provide reliable data at subnational levels for most food groups, with some variability by country and sub-region. Assessing the accuracy of national sentinel food lists, especially for fruits and vegetables, before using them at the subnational level could avoid potentially underestimating dietary diversity and provide more accurate local information for programmes, policy and research.
      PubDate: 2023-12-15
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980023002823
       
  • Cost and affordability of healthy diets in Vietnam

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Van; Duong TT, Herforth, Anna W, Trinh, Huong T, Dao, Binh TT, Do, Ha TP, Talsma, Elise F, Feskens, Edith JM
      First page: 3
      Abstract: Objectives:To estimate the cost and affordability of healthy diets recommended by the 2016–2020 Vietnamese food-based dietary guidelines (FBDG).Design:Cross-sectional analysis. The Cost of a Healthy Diet (CoHD) indicator was used to estimate the lowest cost of healthy diets and compare the cost differences by food group, region and seasonality. The affordability of healthy diets was measured by further comparing the CoHD to food expenditures and incomes.Setting:Food prices of 176 food items from January 2016 to December 2020 were derived using data from monthly Consumer Price Index databases nationally and regionally.Participants:Food expenditures and incomes of participants from three latest Vietnam Household Living Standard Surveys were used.Results:The average CoHD between 2016 and 2020 in Vietnam was 3·08 international dollars using 2017 Purchasing Power Parity (24 070 Vietnamese Dongs). The nutrient-rich food groups, including protein-rich foods, vegetables, fruits and dairy, comprised approximately 80 % of the total CoHD in all regions, with dairy accounting for the largest proportion. Between 2016 and 2020, the cheapest form of a healthy diet was affordable for all high-income and upper-middle-income households but unaffordable for approximately 70 % of low-income households, where adherence to the Vietnamese FBDG can cost up to 70 % of their income.Conclusions:Interventions in local food systems must be implemented to reduce the cost of nutrient-rich foods to support the attainment of healthier diets in the Vietnamese population, especially for low-income households.
      PubDate: 2023-12-01
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980023002665
       
  • Effects of in-store marketing on food and beverage purchases: a
           longitudinal study of households with children

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Grummon; Anna H, Petimar, Joshua, Moran, Alyssa J, Anderson, Emma, Lurie, Peter, John, Sara, Rimm, Eric B, Thorndike, Anne N
      First page: 4
      Abstract: Objective:Most food retailers display foods in prominent locations as a marketing strategy (i.e. ‘placement promotions’). We examined the extent to which households with children change their food and beverage purchases in response to these promotions.Design:We analysed a novel dataset of all products promoted in two supermarkets from 2016 to 2017, including promotion dates and locations (e.g. aisle endcaps and front registers). We linked promotions to all purchases from the supermarkets from 2016 to 2017 by a cohort of households with children. We calculated the number of weekly promotions in each of thirteen food and beverage groups (e.g. bread; candy) and used fixed effects regressions to estimate associations between number of weekly promotions and households’ weekly food purchases, overall and by Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) participation.Setting:Two large supermarkets in Maine, USA.Participants:Eight hundred and twenty-one households with children.Results:Most promotions (74 %) were for less healthy foods. The most promoted food groups were sweet and salty snacks (mean = 131·0 promotions/week), baked goods (mean = 68·2) and sugar-sweetened beverages (mean = 41·6). Households generally did not change their food group purchases during weeks when they were exposed to more promotions for those groups, except that a 1-sd increase in endcap candy promotions (about 1 promotion/week) was associated with $0·19/week (about 14·5 %) increase in candy purchases among SNAP nonparticipants (adjusted P < 0·001).Conclusions:In-store placement promotions for food groups were generally not associated with purchases of promoted food groups, perhaps because exposure to unhealthy food marketing was consistently high. Substantial changes to in-store food marketing may be needed to promote healthier purchases.
      PubDate: 2023-12-01
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980023002641
       
  • The prevalence of vegetarians, vegans and other dietary patterns that
           exclude some animal-source foods in a representative sample of New Zealand
           adults

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Greenwell; James, Grant, Megan, Young, Leanne, Mackay, Sally, Bradbury, Kathryn Erica
      First page: 5
      Abstract: Objective:This study aimed to estimate the prevalence of vegetarians, vegans and other dietary patterns that exclude some animal-source foods in New Zealand adults. We also examined socio-demographic and lifestyle correlates of these dietary patterns.Design:The New Zealand Health Survey is a representative rolling cross-sectional survey of New Zealanders; data from the 2018/19 and 2019/20 waves were used for this analysis. Participants were asked if they completely excluded red meat, poultry, fish/shellfish, eggs or dairy products from their diet.Setting:New Zealand.Participants:Adults, aged ≥ 15 years (n 23 292).Results:The prevalence of red-meat excluders (2·89 %), pescatarians (1·40 %), vegetarians (2·04 %) and vegans (0·74 %) was low. After adjustment for socio-demographic and lifestyle factors, women (OR = 1·54, 95 % CI: 1·22, 1·95), Asian people (OR = 2·56, 95 % CI: 1·96, 4·45), people with tertiary education (OR = 1·71, 95 % CI: 1·18, 2·48) and physically active people (OR = 1·36, 95 % CI: 1·04, 1·76) were more likely to be vegetarian/vegan. Those aged ≥ 75 years (OR = 0·28, 95 % CI: 0·14, 0·53) and current smokers (OR = 0·42, 95 % CI: 0·23, 0·76) were less likely to be vegetarian/vegan. Similar associations were seen between socio-demographic and lifestyle factors and the odds of being a red-meat excluder/pescatarian.Conclusions:Approximately 93 % of New Zealand adults eat red meat and a very small number exclude all animal products from their diets. The Eating and Activity Guidelines for New Zealand adults recommend a plant-based diet with moderate amounts of animal-source foods. A comprehensive national nutrition survey would provide detailed information on the amount of red meat and other animal-source foods that the New Zealand population currently consumes.
      PubDate: 2023-12-05
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980023002677
       
  • Breastfeeding duration and associations with prevention of accelerated
           growth among infants from low-income, racially and ethnically diverse
           backgrounds

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Dharod; Jigna M, Frazier, Christina M, Labban, Jeffery, Black, Maureen M
      First page: 6
      Abstract: Objective:To describe breastfeeding rates from early to late infancy and to examine associations between breastfeeding duration and infant growth, including rapid weight gain (RWG,> 0·67 SD increase in weight-for-age Z-score), among infants from low-income, racially and ethnically diverse backgrounds.Design:A short, prospective cohort study was conducted assessing breastfeeding status at infant ages 2, 4, 6, 9 and 12 months. Infant length and weight measurements were retrieved from electronic health records to calculate weight-for-length Z-scores and the rate of weight gain.Setting:Pediatric clinic in the Southeastern USA.Participants:Mother-infant dyads (n = 256).Results:Most participants were African American (48 %) or Latina (34 %). Eighty-one per cent were participating in the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children. Infants were breastfed for a median duration of 4·75 months, with partial more common than exclusive breastfeeding. At 12 months, 28 % of the participants were breastfeeding. Infants breastfed beyond 6 months had significantly lower growth trajectories than infants breastfed for 0–2 months (β = 0·045, se = 0·013, P = 0·001) or 3–6 months (β = 0·054, se = 0·016, P = 0·001). Thirty-six per cent of the infants experienced RWG. RWG was more common among infants who were breastfed for 2 months or less than 6+ month breastfed group (relative risk = 1·68, CI95 (1·03, 2·74), P = 0·03).Conclusions:Breastfeeding beyond 6 months is associated with the prevention of accelerated growth among infants from low-income, racially and ethnically diverse backgrounds, suggesting progress toward health equity.
      PubDate: 2023-12-04
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980023002689
       
  • Food insecurity is associated with chronic pain and high-impact chronic
           pain in the USA

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Tamargo; Javier A, Strath, Larissa J, Karanth, Shama D, Spector, Antoinette L, Sibille, Kimberly T, Anton, Stephen, Cruz-Almeida, Yenisel
      First page: 7
      Abstract: Objective:This study evaluated whether food insecurity (US Adult Food Security Survey) was associated with chronic pain (≥ 3 months) and high-impact chronic pain (i.e. pain that limits work and life) among US adults.Design:Cross-sectional analysis.Setting:Nationally representative sample of non-institutionalised adults in the USA.Participants:79 686 adults from the National Health Interview Survey (2019–2021).Results:Marginal, low and very low food security were associated with increased prevalence odds of chronic pain (OR: 1·58 (95 % CI 1·44, 1·72), 2·28 (95 % CI 2·06, 2·52) and 3·37 (95 % CI 3·01, 3·78), respectively) and high-impact chronic pain (OR: 1·28 (95 % CI 1·14, 1·42), 1·55 (95 % CI 1·37, 1·75) and 1·90 (95 % CI 1·65, 2·18), respectively) in a dose–response fashion (P-trend < 0·0001 for both), adjusted for sociodemographic, socio-economic and clinically relevant factors. Participation in Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) and age modified the association between food insecurity and chronic pain.Conclusions:These findings illustrate the impact of socio-economic factors on chronic pain and suggest that food insecurity may be a social determinant of chronic pain. Further research is needed to better understand the complex relationship between food insecurity and chronic pain and to identify targets for interventions. Moreover, the consideration of food insecurity in the clinical assessment of pain and pain-related conditions among socio-economically disadvantaged adults may be warranted.
      PubDate: 2023-12-13
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980023002732
       
  • Higher adherence to the Mediterranean Diet is associated with lower
           micronutrient inadequacy in children: the SENDO project

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Oliver Olid; Asier, Fabios, Elise, García-Blanco, Lorena, Moreno-Villares, Jose Manuel, Martínez-González, Miguel Ángel, Martín-Calvo, Nerea
      First page: 8
      Abstract: Objective:To assess whether the Mediterranean Diet (MedDiet) is associated with lower micronutrients inadequacy in a sample of Spanish preschoolers.Design:We conducted a cross-sectional study with 4–5-year-old children participating in the SENDO project. Information was gathered through an online questionnaire completed by parents. Dietary information was collected with a previously validated semi-quantitative FFQ. The estimated average requirements or adequate intake levels as proposed by the Institute of Medicine were used as cut-off point to define inadequate intake.Statistical analyses:Crude and multivariable adjusted estimates were calculated with generalised estimated equations to account for intra-cluster correlation between siblings.Participants:We used baseline information of 1153 participants enrolled in the SENDO project between January 2015 and June 2022.Main outcomes measures:OR and 95 % CI of presenting an inadequate intake of ≥ 3 micronutrients associated with the MedDiet.Results:The adjusted proportion of children with inadequate intake of ≥ 3 micronutrients was 27·2 %, 13·5 % and 8·1 % in the categories of low, medium and high adherence to the MedDiet, respectively. After adjusting for all potential confounders, children who had a low adherence to the MedDiet showed a significant lower odds of inadequate intake of ≥ 3 micronutrients compared to those with a high adherence (OR 9·85; 95 % CI 3·33, 29·09).Conclusion:Lower adherence to the MedDiet is associated with higher odds of nutritional inadequacy.
      PubDate: 2023-12-05
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980023002707
       
  • Association between a lifestyle score and all-cause mortality: a
           prospective analysis of the Chilean National Health Survey 2009–2010

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Petermann-Rocha; Fanny, Diaz-Toro, Felipe, Troncoso-Pantoja, Claudia, Martínez-Sanguinetti, María Adela, Leiva-Ordoñez, Ana María, Nazar, Gabriela, Concha-Cisternas, Yeny, Díaz Martínez, Ximena, Lanuza, Fabian, Carrasco-Marín, Fernanda, Martorell, Miquel, Ramírez-Alarcón, Karina, Labraña, Ana María, Parra-Soto, Solange, Villagran, Marcelo, Lasserre-Laso, Nicole, Cigarroa, Igor, Mardones, Lorena, Vásquez-Gómez, Jaime, Celis-Morales, Carlos A
      First page: 9
      Abstract: Objective:To investigate the association between a lifestyle score and all-cause mortality in the Chilean population.Design:Prospective study.Settings:The score was based on seven modifiable behaviours: salt intake, fruit and vegetable intake, alcohol consumption, sleep duration, smoking, physical activity and sedentary behaviours. 1-point was assigned for each healthy recommendation. Points were summed to create an unweighted score from 0 (less healthy) to 7 (healthiest). According to their score, participants were then classified into: less healthy (0–2 points), moderately healthy (3–4 points) and the healthiest (5–7 points). Associations between the categories of lifestyle score and all-cause mortality were investigated using Cox proportional hazard models adjusted for confounders. Nonlinear associations were also investigated.Participants:2706 participants from the Chilean National Health Survey 2009–2010.Results:After a median follow-up of 10·9 years, 286 (10·6 %) participants died. In the maximally adjusted model, and compared with the healthiest participants, those less healthy had 2·55 (95 % CI 1·75, 3·71) times higher mortality risk due to any cause. Similar trends were identified for the moderately healthy group. Moreover, there was a significant trend towards increasing the mortality risk when increasing unhealthy behaviours (hazard ratio model 3: 1·61 (95 % CI 1·34, 1·94)). There was no evidence of nonlinearity between the lifestyle score and all-cause mortality.Conclusion:Individuals in the less healthy lifestyle category had higher mortality risk than the healthiest group. Therefore, public health strategies should be implemented to promote adherence to a healthy lifestyle across the Chilean population.
      PubDate: 2023-12-06
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980023002598
       
  • Testing a conceptual Hierarchy of Effects model of food marketing exposure
           and associations with children and adolescents’ diet-related outcomes

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Kelly; Bridget, Boyland, Emma, Tatlow-Golden, Mimi, Christiansen, Paul
      First page: 10
      Abstract: Objective:Children’s exposure to unhealthy food marketing contributes to poor diets by influencing the foods that children like, request, buy and consume. This study aimed to use confirmatory mediational analyses to test a hypothetical model of marketing effects, to better understand the mechanisms behind food marketing’s impacts on children.Design:Children responded to a cross-sectional online survey about their attitudes towards, and purchase and consumption behaviours of, ten frequently promoted food/beverage brands and their media use. Structural equation modelling tested a priori potential pathways for the effects of food marketing exposure on children’s diets.Participants:10–16-year-old children (n 400).Setting:Australia.Results:There was a significant positive correlation between children’s commercial screen media use and their attitudes towards brands (related to perceived social norms) and their brand purchasing behaviours, including their own purchases and requests to parents. The use of strategies to avoid advertising in commercial screen media reduced but did not remove the association between media use and brand purchases. Other brand exposures (on clothing, outdoor advertising, sponsorships) had a positive association with children’s perceived social norms about brands and their brand purchases and requests. Non-commercial screen media use was not associated with any brand-related outcomes.Conclusions:Commercial screen media use and other brand exposures were strongly positively associated with children’s perceptions and purchasing behaviours of frequently marketed food/beverages. Regulations to restrict children’s exposures to food marketing on-screen and through other media are required to reduce the effect of marketing exposure on children’s food purchasing behaviours.
      PubDate: 2023-12-07
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980023002616
       
  • Validity and reliability of the Perceived Nutrition Environment Measures
           Survey (NEMS-P) for use in Brazil

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Avelar; Bruna Aparecida, Hino, Adriano Akira Ferreira, Santos, Anabele Pires, Mendes, Larissa Loures, Cardoso Carraro, Júlia Cristina, Mendonça, Raquel de Deus, Menezes, Mariana Carvalho de
      First page: 11
      Abstract: Objective:The aim of this study is to evaluate the validity and reliability of the Perceived Nutrition Environment Measures Survey (NEMS-P) translated and adapted for use in Brazil.Design:Validation of the NEMS-P questionnaire. The questionnaires were applied to assess validity and reliability, based on exploratory factor analysis, Cronbach’s α coefficient and intra-class correlation, with a significance level of 95 %.Setting:Brazil.Participants:Adults over 20 years of age diagnosed with hypertension were included in the internal validity and reliability test (n 176) and intra-rater reliability (subsample n 35).Results:Factor analysis obtained satisfactory results. Internal consistency was acceptable for most items, with Cronbach’s α ranging from 0·6 to 0·9. The intra-rater reliability of the subsample was also valid, with intra-class correlation coefficient values ranging from 0·5 to 0·9.Conclusion:This work reveals the usefulness of the instrument to assess the perceived food environment in the Brazilian context, being able to measure what is proposed according to its theoretical model, and reproduces the values when applied to a sample different from its original validation. However, refinement of some questions is suggested. Finally, it demonstrates the possibility of using the entire instrument or each section independently, according to the food environments to be investigated.
      PubDate: 2023-12-11
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980023002653
       
  • Perceptions, barriers and enablers on salt reduction in the out-of-home
           sectors in Malaysia (MySaltOH) from the perspective of street food
           vendors, caterers and consumers

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Zainal Arifen; Zainorain Natasha, Haron, Hasnah, Shahar, Suzana, Harun, Zaliha, Michael, Viola, You, Yee Xing, Manaf, Zahara Abdul, Majid, Hazreen Abdul, Chia, Yook Chin, He, Feng J, Brown, Mhairi Karen, MacGregor, Graham A
      First page: 12
      Abstract: Objective:To explore the perspectives, barriers and enablers on salt reduction in out-of-home sectors in Malaysia among street food vendors, caterers and consumers.Design:A qualitative study involving twenty-two focus group discussions and six in-depth interviews was conducted, recorded and transcribed verbatim. An inductive thematic analysis approach was employed to analyse the data.Setting:Two in-depth interviews and twenty-two focus group discussions were conducted face-to-face. Four in-depth interviews were conducted online.Participants:Focus group discussions were conducted among twenty-three street food vendors, twenty-one caterers and seventy-six consumers of various eateries. In-depth interviews were conducted among two street food vendors and four caterers, individually.Results:Consumers and food operators perceived a high-salt intake within Malaysia’s out-of-home food sectors. Food operators emphasised the necessity for a comprehensive salt reduction policy in the out-of-home sector involving all stakeholders. Consumers faced limited awareness and knowledge, counterproductive practices among food operators and challenges in accessing affordable low-Na food products, whereas food operators faced the lack of standardised guidelines and effective enforcement mechanisms and uncooperative consumer practices. Both groups expressed that food quality and price of salt were also the barriers, and they advocated for awareness promotion, enhanced regulation of manufactured food products and stricter enforcement targeting vendors. Consumers also suggested promoting and recognising health-conscious food premises, whereas food operators suggested on knowledge enhancement tailored to them, strategies for gaining consumers acceptance and maintaining food quality.Conclusions:These findings provide valuable insights that serve as foundational evidence for developing and implementing salt reduction policies within Malaysia’s out-of-home sectors.
      PubDate: 2023-12-15
      DOI: 10.1017/S136898002300277X
       
  • Store-specific grocery shopping patterns and their association with
           objective and perceived retail food environments

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Recchia; Daisy, Perignon, Marlène, Rollet, Pascaline, Bricas, Nicolas, Vonthron, Simon, Perrin, Coline, Sirieix, Lucie, Charreire, Hélène, Méjean, Caroline, ,
      First page: 13
      Abstract: Objective:To explore store-specific grocery shopping patterns and assess associations with the objective and perceived retail food environment (RFE).Design:This cross-sectional study used principal component analysis and hierarchical cluster analysis to identify grocery shopping patterns and logistic regression models to assess their associations with the RFE, while adjusting for household characteristics.Setting:The Montpellier Metropolitan Area, France.Participants:To be eligible for inclusion, participants had to be 18 years of age or older and reside in the Montpellier Metropolitan Area. Analyses were carried out on 415 households.Results:Households of cluster ‘Supermarket’ (49 % of households) primarily shopped at supermarkets and were less likely to live near a convenience store. Households of cluster ‘Diversified’ (18 %) shopped mostly at organic stores, at markets, at specialised stores, and from producers and were more likely to have a market in their activity space. Households of cluster ‘Discount’ (12 %) primarily shopped at discounters and were less likely to perceive a producer in their activity space. Households of cluster ‘Convenience’ (12 %) mostly shopped online or in convenience stores. Finally, households of cluster ‘Specialized’ (9 %) had high expenditures in greengrocers and in other specialised food stores and were more likely to live near a specialised food store.Conclusions:This study highlighted the importance of considering both perceived and objective RFE indicators, as well as assessments around the home and in activity space. Understanding how people buy food and interact with their RFE is crucial for policymakers seeking to improve urban food policies.
      PubDate: 2023-12-11
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980023002720
       
  • Obesogenic neighborhood environment is associated with body fat and
           low-grade inflammation in Brazilian children: could the mother’s BMI be
           a mediating factor'

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Filgueiras; Mariana De Santis, Pessoa, Milene Cristine, Bressan, Josefina, do Carmo, Ariene Silva, Fogal Vegi, Aline Siqueira, Albuquerque, Fernanda Martins de, Novaes, Juliana Farias de
      First page: 14
      Abstract: Objective:To evaluate the direct and indirect associations of obesogenic and leptogenic neighborhood environments with body fat, and pro- and anti-inflammatory adipokines in Brazilian children.Design:Cross-sectional study. The body fat distribution was assessed using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Concentrations of leptin and adiponectin were measured. Four hundred meters (0·25 miles) road network buffer was the neighborhood unit used to assess the environmental characteristics around households. Obesogenic and leptogenic environments were the latent variables obtained from the observed characteristics. The mother’s BMI, ultra-processed food consumption, and physical activity before and after school, were tested as mediating variables. A hybrid model of structural equations was used to test the direct and indirect associations of obesogenic and leptogenic environments with body fat, leptin and adiponectin concentrations.Setting:Urban area of Viçosa, Minas Gerais, Brazil.Participants:Children aged 8- and 9-years (n 367).Results:Obesogenic environment was directly associated with the mother’s BMI (β: 0·24, P = 0·02) and the child’s body fat (β: 0·19, P = 0·02). The mother’s BMI and body fat mediated the association of the obesogenic environment with leptin concentrations (β: 0·05, P = 0·02).Conclusions:Obesogenic neighborhood environment was directly associated with body fat and mother's BMI, and indirectly associated with leptin concentrations in Brazilian children, mediated by the mother’s BMI and body fat.
      PubDate: 2023-11-30
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980023002628
       
  • Impact of COVID-19 program adaptations on costs and cost-effectiveness of
           community management of acute malnutrition program in South Sudan

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Alier; Kemish Kenneth, Tappis, Hannah, Ismail, Sule, Doocy, Shannon
      First page: 15
      Abstract: Objective:We assessed the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic and the protocol adaptations on cost and cost-effectiveness of community management of acute malnutrition (CMAM) program in South Sudan.Design:Retrospective program expenditure-based analysis of non-governmental organisation (NGO) CMAM programs for COVID-19 period (April 2020–December 2021) in respect to pre-COVID period (January 2019–March 2020).Setting:Study was conducted as part of a bigger evaluation study in South Sudan.Participants:International and national NGOs operating CMAM programs under the nutrition cluster participated in the study.Results:The average cost per child recovered from the programme declined by 20 % during COVID from $133 (range: $34–1174) pre-COVID to $107 (range: $20–333) during COVID. The cost per child recovered was negatively correlated with programme size (pre-COVID r-squared = 0·58; during COIVD r-squared = 0·50). Programmes with higher enrollment were cheaper compared with those with low enrolment. Salaries, ready to use food and community activities accounted for over two-thirds of the cost per recovery during both pre-COVID (69 %) and COVID (79 %) periods. While cost per child recovered decreased during COVID period, it did not negatively impact on the programme outcome. Enrolment increased by an average of 19·8 % and recovery rate by 4·6 % during COVID period.Conclusions:Costs reduced with no apparent negative implication on recovery rates after implementing the COVID CMAM protocol adaptations with a strong negative correlation between cost and programme size. This suggests that investing in capacity, screening and referral at existing CMAM sites to enable expansion of caseload maybe a preferable strategy to increasing the number of CMAM sites in South Sudan.
      PubDate: 2023-12-14
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980023002719
       
  • Mapping the behaviour change potential of meal kits to positively
           influence parental food literacy

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Fraser; Kylie, Johnson, Brittany J, Love, Penelope, Spence, Alison, Laws, Rachel, Campbell, Karen J
      First page: 16
      Abstract: Objective:This study aimed to examine the theoretical potential of meal kit subscription services in Australia to promote parental food literacy using the retrospective application of behaviour change frameworks.Design:A one-week subscription was purchased for all Australian-based meal kit subscription services (n 9) to access content and features available to subscribers. Behaviour change techniques (BCTs) identified in the subscription and meal planning features, meal kit delivery (i.e. ingredients and recipes) and website were coded using the behaviour change technique taxonomy (BCTTv1) and associated behaviour change frameworks. Identified BCTs were mapped to the theoretical domains framework to identify potential mechanisms of action for influencing parental food literacy development.Setting:Australia.Results:Thirty-five BCTs were identified across the nine meal kit services reviewed, ranging from nineteen to twenty-nine BCTs per company. Sixteen BCTs were common to all meal kits services, from the hierarchical clusters of ‘goals and planning’, ‘shaping knowledge’, ‘social support’, ‘natural consequences’, ‘comparison of behaviour’, ‘repetitions and substitution’, ‘associations’, ‘reward and threat’, ‘antecedents’ and ‘regulation’. Across the meal kit services, the most frequently identified mechanisms of action were motivation (n 27) and capability (n 19).Conclusion:These findings support the applicability of behaviour change frameworks to commercial meal kit subscription services and provide a theory-informed process for identifying BCTs that may be relevant for promoting parental food literacy within this context. Further research is required to explore how families engage with meal kit subscription services to determine the exposure and delivery of identified BCT content and to evaluate the potential influence on food literacy development.
      PubDate: 2023-12-01
      DOI: 10.1017/S136898002300263X
       
  • Ours to eat and own: assessing the feasibility of a cooperative meal-kit
           service to improve food access

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Robinson-Oghogho; Joelle N, Gittelsohn, Joel, Bowie, Janice, Dankwa, Lois, Thorpe, Roland J
      First page: 17
      Abstract: Objective:Although typically serving higher income and younger demographic groups, meal-kit subscription services have the potential to improve food availability and dietary quality in communities experiencing low food access due to systemic discrimination. This study describes the development and characteristics of a pilot community-led meal-kit service (SouthEats) and evaluates key implementation outcomes of adoption, acceptability, and feasibility among households experiencing less income.Design:We utilised a mixed methods study design, including data from administrative records, customer surveys and worker interviews. Thematic qualitative analyses and descriptive quantitative analyses were conducted to illuminate the characteristics and extent the pilot meal-kit service was adopted, acceptable, and financially feasible among the target populations.Setting:The study took place in Washington DC, USA.Participants:Study participants included SouthEats consumers (n 35) and workers (n 3).Results:During the pilot period, sixty-seven community members signed up for the meal-kit service, with 52 % making recurring purchases. Our results suggest that the meal-kit service is acceptable among people living in low food access areas. Our feasibility analysis indicates that, although not without challenges, the SouthEats model could be financially feasible.Conclusion:These preliminary insights can inform the scalability and potential replication of this service and provide foundational evidence for an approach that may be used to improve food access.
      PubDate: 2023-12-21
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980023002884
       
  • Prevalence and determinants of goitre among children of South Kordofan
           state, Sudan, 2021: an urgent need for effective implementation of
           universal salt iodisation

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Abdalla; Azza Elfadil, Altahir, Anfal Mahmoud, Hasabo, Elfatih A., Alrawa, Salma Salah, Elazrag, Amna Mutasim, Ahmed, Hayat Abdoallah, Ali, Hiba Abubakr, Abdelrazig, Ibrahim Mysara, Ahmed, Mohamed Yaser, Alagib, Mohamed Alsiddig, Siddig, Musab Mohammed, Asmally, Rofida Salah, Mohamedelrasheed, Salma Mohamed, Elnaiem, Walaa Abdulgadir, Malik, Elfatih Mohammed
      First page: 18
      Abstract: Objective:This study aimed to determine the prevalence and determinants of goitre among children aged 6–12 years at South Kordofan state.Design:This was a cross-sectional facility-based study.Setting:The study was conducted in twenty villages of South Kordofan state during a medical mission.Participants:All 575 school-age children (6–12 years) who attended the medical day were examined for clinical assessment of goitre.Results:The prevalence of goitre among children of South Kordofan was 42·8 % (grade 1: 15·7 %, grade 2: 27·1 %). Only 24·2 % of caregivers reported using iodised salt. Mothers working as farmers (OR: 3·209, CI 95 % 1·437, 7·167; P = 0·004) and children of Darforian tribes (OR: 21·799, CI 95 % 2·566, 185·226; P = 0·005) were found to be significantly associated with higher prevalence of goitre among children. This contrasts with children of African tribes, where they were found to have less goitre prevalence (OR: 0·432, CI 95 % 0·213, 0·875; P = 0·02). Iodised salt utilisation (OR = 0·523, CI 95 % 0·320, 0·854; P = 0·01) was found associated with a lower prevalence of goitre.Conclusion:Even though National Iodine Deficiency Disorders control programs were initiated in Sudan more than 25 years ago, the prevalence of goitre among children in South Kordofan state was alarming (42·8 %). Efforts to improve access to iodised salt, increase utilisation and raise awareness are urgently needed.
      PubDate: 2023-12-14
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980023002744
       
  • Fruits and vegetable consumption, and its association with hypertension
           among women in Ghana: a cross-sectional study

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Okyere; Joshua, Ayebeng, Castro, Owusu, Bernard Afriyie, Dickson, Kwamena Sekyi
      First page: 19
      Abstract: Objective:This study aimed to examine the association between fruit and vegetable consumption (FVC) and the risk of hypertension among women in Ghana.Design:Data from the 2014 Ghana Demographic and Health Survey were used. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed using Stata version 14. The study reports the adjusted OR (AOR) and CI.Setting:GhanaParticipants:A total sample of 4168 women was used in the analysis.Results:Among women who met the WHO’s recommended intake of FVC, 13·1 % had hypertension. The intake of the recommended servings of fruit and vegetables was not significantly associated with hypertension. However, the likelihood of being hypertensive was significantly associated with increasing age (AOR = 6·1; 95 % CI = 4·29, 8·73), being married (AOR = 1·7; 95 % CI = 1·14, 2·57) or formerly married (AOR = 2·3; 95 % CI = 1·44, 3·70), and being overweight (AOR = 1·6; 95 % CI = 1·24, 2·07) or obese (AOR = 2·4; 95 % CI = 1·82, 3·20).Conclusion:The study concludes that there is no significant association between FVC and hypertension risk among women in Ghana. While this study did not find a significant association between FVC and hypertension risk among women in Ghana, it underscores the point that other multifaceted factors influence hypertension risk. As such, public health campaigns should emphasise a balanced and holistic approach to promoting cardiovascular health, including factors beyond FVC. The findings also highlight the need to target high-risk populations (i.e. older women, married and formerly married women, and overweight or obese women) with hypertension prevention education and related interventions.
      PubDate: 2023-12-27
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980023002896
       
  • Food tax policies in Pacific Island Countries and Territories: systematic
           policy review

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Walby; Emilee, Jones, Amanda C, Smith, Moira, Na’ati, Elisiva, Snowdon, Wendy, Teng, Andrea M
      First page: 20
      Abstract: Objective:To systematically identify and review food taxation policy changes in Pacific Island Countries and Territories (PICTs).Design:Food taxation polices, regarding excise taxes and tariffs applied from 2000 to 2020 in twenty-two PICTs, and their key characteristics were reviewed. The search was conducted using databases, government legal repositories and broad-based search engines. Identified documents for screening included legislation, reports, academic literature, news articles and grey literature. Key informants were contacted from each PICT to retrieve further data and confirm results. Results were analysed by narrative synthesis.Setting:Noncommunicable diseases (NCD) are the leading cause of premature death in PICTs and in many jurisdictions globally. An NCD crisis has been declared in the Pacific, and food taxation policy has been recommended to address the dietary risk factors associated with. Progress is unclear.Results:Of the twenty-two PICTs included in the study, fourteen had food taxation policies and five introduced excise taxes. Processed foods, sugar and salt were the main target of excise taxes. A total of eighty-four food taxation policy changes were identified across all food groups. There was a total of 279 taxes identified by food group, of which 85 % were tariffs and 15 % were excise taxes. Individual tax rates varied substantially. The predominant tax design was ad valorem, and this was followed by volumetric.Conclusions:A quarter of PICTs have introduced food excise taxes from 2000 to 2020. Further excise taxes, specifically tiered or nutrient-specific designs, could be introduced and more systematically applied to a broader range of unhealthy foods.
      PubDate: 2023-12-21
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980023002914
       
  • Mothers’ experiences of reducing family mealtime screen use in
           Australian households with young children

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Litterbach; Eloise-Kate, Laws, Rachel, Zheng, Miaobing, Campbell, Karen J, Spence, Alison C
      First page: 21
      Abstract: Objective:Screen use at mealtimes is associated with poor dietary and psychosocial outcomes in children and is disproportionately prevalent among families of low socio-economic position (SEP). This study aimed to explore experiences of reducing mealtime screen use in mothers of low SEP with young children.Design:Motivational interviews, conducted via Zoom or telephone, addressed barriers and facilitators to reducing mealtime screen use. Following motivational interviews, participants co-designed mealtime screen use reduction strategies and trialled these for 3–4 weeks. Follow-up semi-structured interviews then explored maternal experiences of implementing strategies, including successes and difficulties. Transcripts were analysed thematically.Setting:Australia.Participants:Fourteen mothers who had no university education and a child between six months and six years old.Results:A range of strategies aimed to reduce mealtime screen use were co-designed. The most widely used strategies included changing mealtime location and parental modelling of expected behaviours. Experiences were influenced by mothers’ levels of parenting self-efficacy and mealtime consistency, included changes to mealtime foods and an increased value of mealtimes. Experiences were reportedly easier, more beneficial and offered more opportunities for family communication, than anticipated. Change required considerable effort. However, effort decreased with consistency.Conclusions:The diverse strategies co-designed by mothers highlight the importance of understanding why families engage in mealtime screen use and providing tailored advice for reduction. Although promising themes were identified, in this motivated sample, changing established mealtime screen use habits still required substantial effort. Embedding screen-free mealtime messaging into nutrition promotion from the inception of eating will be important.
      PubDate: 2023-12-15
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980023002847
       
  • New Zealand household purchases of sugar-sweetened, artificially
           sweetened, and unsweetened beverages: 2015–2019

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Eyles; Helen, Dodd, Sah, Garton, Kelly K, Jiang, Yannan, Gontijo de Castro, Teresa
      First page: 22
      Abstract: Objective:To assess annual household purchases of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs), artificially sweetened beverages (AFSBs), and unsweetened beverages (USBs) by household composition and income, and over time.Design:Observational cohort study using beverage purchasing data linked to a supermarket database. ANOVA was used to compare total household purchase volumes (L) and the contribution of beverages purchased by category, household composition (size), household income (four categories from New Zealand (NZ) < $30 000 to> $90 000), and over time (trend from 2015 to 2019).Setting:Aotearoa NZ.Participants:∼1800 households in the NielsenIQ Homescan® market research panel.Results:In 2019, the mean (sd) annual household purchase volume and relative contribution to total beverage volume of SSBs were 72·3 (93·0) L and 33 %, respectively. Corresponding values for AFSBs were 32·5 (79·3) L (15 %), and USBs were 112·5 (100·9) L (52 %). Larger households purchased more of all beverage types except AFSBs. Total purchases were similar by income, but households earning < $NZ 30 000 purchased fewer AFSBs and USBs (but not SSBs) than households earning> $NZ 90 000. Total and USB purchases were unchanged over time, but SSBs dropped by 5·9 L (P-trend = 0·04), and AFSBs increased by 5·3 L (P-trend = 0·00).Conclusions:USBs contributed the most to household beverage purchases. Total purchases were higher for larger households and similar by income, including for SSBs. The reduction over time was too small for health benefits. Findings support policies and interventions to reduce SSB consumption and highlight the importance of focusing on equitable outcomes.
      PubDate: 2023-12-20
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980023002793
       
  • Development and evaluation of food preservation lessons for gardeners:
           application of the DESIGN process

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Beavers; Alyssa W, Kennedy, Allison O, Blake, Jessica P, Comstock, Sarah S
      First page: 23
      Abstract: Objective:This study presents the development and evaluation of food preservation lessons for gardeners.Design:Lessons were developed using the DESIGN process, a nutrition education program planning framework. This study examines the effectiveness of this curriculum at increasing knowledge of proper food preservation practices and increasing participants’ confidence in home food preservation, identifies challenges participants experienced with home food preservation and assesses the perceived influence of home food preservation on vegetable intake and aspects of food security. We used the DESIGN process developed by Contento and Koch to develop the curricula and used social cognitive theory to guide the lesson development. Lessons on three types of food preservation (freezing, water bath canning and pressure canning) were developed and presented to adult gardeners. The evaluation consisted of post-lesson surveys and a follow-up survey several months after the lessons.Setting:Mid-Michigan, USA.Participants:Adult gardeners.Results:Food preservation confidence increased following the lessons. At follow-up, 64 % of participants agreed or strongly agreed that they ate more fruit and vegetables because of preserving food, 57 % of respondents agreed or strongly agreed that they spend less money on food due to preserving, while 71 % reported being better able to provide food for themselves and their family. Lastly, 93 % reported feeling better about where their food comes from and wasting less food due to preserving.Conclusions:This study provides evidence that home food preservation may be beneficial in promoting fruit and vegetable intake and food security among gardeners.
      PubDate: 2023-12-27
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980023002926
       
  • Beverage industry TV advertising shifts after a stepwise mandatory food
           marketing restriction: achievements and challenges with regulating the
           food marketing environment

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Mediano Stoltze; Fernanda, Correa, Teresa, Corvalán Aguilar, Camila Luz, Taillie, Lindsey Smith, Reyes, Marcela, Dillman Carpentier, Francesca Renee
      First page: 26
      Abstract: Objective:Sugar-sweetened beverages (SSB) are heavily advertised globally, and SSB consumption is linked to increased health risk. To reduce unhealthy food marketing, Chile implemented a regulation for products classified as high in energies, sugar, saturated fat or sodium, starting with a 2016 ban on child-targeted advertising of these products and adding a 06.00–22.00 daytime advertising ban in 2019. This study assesses changes in television advertising prevalence of ready-to-drink beverages, including and beyond SSB, to analyse how the beverage industry shifted its marketing strategies across Chile’s implementation phases.Design:Beverage advertisements were recorded during two randomly constructed weeks in April-May of 2016 (pre-implementation) through 2019 (daytime ban). Ad products were classified as ‘high-in’ or ‘non-high-in’ according to regulation nutrient thresholds. Ads were analysed for their programme placement and marketing content.Setting:Chile.Results:From pre-regulation to daytime ban, child-targeted, daytime and total ads decreased by 51·8 percentage points (p.p.), 51·5 p.p. and 61·8 p.p. for high-in products and increased by 62·9 p.p., 54·9 p.p. and 61·8 p.p. for non-high-in products (Ps < 0·001). Additionally, total ready-to-drink beverage ads increased by 5·4 p.p. and brand-only ads (no product shown) by 7 p.p.Conclusions:After the regulation implementation, ‘high-in’ ads fell significantly, but ‘non-high-in’ ads rose and continued using strategies targeting children and being aired during daytime. Given research showing that advertising one product can increase preferences for a different product from that same brand and product categories, broader food marketing regulation approaches may be needed to protect children from the harmful effects of food marketing.
      PubDate: 2023-12-27
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980023002872
       
  • Sensory panel results of a dried fish powder supplement among caregivers
           and young children in Zambia

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Ragsdale; Kathleen, Read-Wahidi, Mary R, Mudege, Netsayi N, Iannotti, Lora L, Muzungaire, Lizzy, Funduluka, Priscilla
      First page: 32
      Abstract: Objective:To evaluate the acceptability of traditional Zambian dishes fortified with Complementary Food for Africa+Dried Fish Powder (ComFA+Fish), a locally sourced protein/micronutrient blend designed to impact nutrient deficiencies among infants and young children (IYC) and improve pregnancy and birth outcomes among women of reproductive age (WRA).Design:During two sensory panels, caregivers evaluated: (1) the acceptability of four ComFA+Fish dishes for household consumption, including fortified chibwabwa fisashi, savory Kapenta chutney, fortified complementary maize porridge and fortified bean-vegetable soup and (2) whether their IYC found the fortified complementary maize porridge acceptable.Setting:Lake Kariba, Southern Province, Zambia.Participants:Women of reproductive age (n 42) and their IYC aged 6–11 months (n 16) and 12–23 months (n 26) were recruited from fishing villages in Gwembe, Siavonga and Sinazongwe District.Results:A majority of caregivers extremely liked/liked the: (1) fortified chibwabwa fisashi’s sensory attributes (94·7 %), convenience (92·8 %) and overall acceptability (100 %); (2) savory Kapenta chutney’s sensory attributes (81·8 %), convenience (92·8 %) and overall acceptability (100 %); (3) fortified complementary porridge’s sensory attributes (83·5 %), convenience (90·5 %) and overall acceptability (88·1 %) and (4) fortified bean-vegetable soup’s sensory attributes (66·8 %), convenience (87·5 %) and overall acceptability (87·5 %). Further, a majority of caregivers evaluated the fortified complementary porridge as highly acceptable to their IYC.Conclusions:Results suggest that ComFA+Fish is strategically well placed to fill nutritional gaps among IYC and WRA in Zambia and has the potential to be scaled across sub-Saharan Africa.
      PubDate: 2023-11-30
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980023002586
       
  • Is evoking fear effective' Exploratory findings from a randomised
           experiment on the impacts of health warning labels on sugar-sweetened
           beverages

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Malik; Shelly, Ong, Zoe
      First page: 42
      Abstract: Objective:Health warning labels (HWL) have been suggested to be effective in reducing consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSB). Yet, the efficacy and acceptability of SSB HWL of different formats (textual/pictorial) and severity remain unclear. This exploratory study aims to examine the extent and mechanism through which HWL of different formats and severity may affect responses towards the HWL and SSB consumption.Design:Randomised online experiment. Participants were exposed to images of a hypothetical SSB bearing a HWL of one of three conditions: text-only HWL, moderately severe pictorial HWL and highly severe pictorial HWL. They then responded to theory-based affective, cognitive and behavioural measures.Setting:SingaporeParticipants:One hundred and twenty-seven young adult consumers from a public universityResults:Direct effects were found for fear, avoidance, reactance and acceptability of the HWL, but not attitude, intention or motivation to consume less SSB. Pictorial (moderately severe and highly severe) HWL were associated with greater fear, avoidance, and reactance, and lower acceptability than text-only HWL. There was weak evidence that highly severe pictorial HWL resulted in greater reactance than moderately severe pictorial HWL. Fear mediated the effect of HWL of different severity levels on avoidance, reactance, intention and motivation, but not for attitude or acceptability.Conclusions:Exploratory findings indicate that although pictorial HWL were less acceptable, they may still be effective in influencing intention and motivation to reduce SSB consumption through the psychological mechanism of fear. Hence, graphic HWL should not be dismissed too quickly when considering strategies for reducing SSB consumption.
      PubDate: 2023-12-21
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980023002859
       
  • Behavioural drivers of child feeding during and after illness in the
           Democratic Republic of the Congo: results from a qualitative study through
           the lens of behavioural science

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Zimmerman; Emily, Kau, Madeline, Tovohasimbavaka, Riantsoa Kanto Najaina, Ngandu, Augustin, Kangudie, Didier Mbayi, Van Lith, Lynn, Rajan, Radha, Naugle, Danielle, Sherburne, Lisa
      First page: 80
      Abstract: Objective:For young children experiencing an illness, adequate nutrition is critical for recovery and to prevent malnutrition, yet many children do not receive the recommended quantities of food during illness and recuperation. Our research applied a behavioural science lens to identify drivers of feeding behaviours, including barriers inhibiting caregivers from following the feeding guidelines.Design:In 2021, we conducted qualitative research informed by the behavioural design process. Data from in-depth interviews and observations were analysed for themes.Setting:Research was conducted in South Kivu, Democratic Republic of the Congo.Participants:Research participants included caregivers of young children, other family members, health workers and other community members.Results:Five key findings about behavioural drivers emerged: (1) poverty and scarcity impose practical constraints and a cognitive and emotional burden on caregivers; (2) health providers are distracted and discouraged from counselling on feeding during sick visits; (3) a focus on quality and hesitations about quantity obscure benefits of feeding greater amounts of available foods; (4) perceptions of inappropriate foods limit caregivers’ choices; and (5) deference to a child’s limited appetite leads to missed opportunities to encourage them to eat.Conclusions:Each of these behavioural drivers is triggered by one or more addressable features in caregivers’ and health workers’ environment, suggesting concrete opportunities for programmes to support caregivers and health workers to improve feeding of young children during illness and recovery. In other settings where these features of the environment are similar, the insights and programming implications are likely to translate.
      PubDate: 2023-12-27
      DOI: 10.1017/S136898002300294X
       
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


Your IP address: 44.213.60.33
 
Home (Search)
API
About JournalTOCs
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-
JournalTOCs
 
 

 A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z  

        1 2        [Sort alphabetically]   [Restore default list]

  Subjects -> NUTRITION AND DIETETICS (Total: 201 journals)
Showing 1 - 64 of 64 Journals sorted by number of followers
American Journal of Clinical Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 194)
Clinical Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 97)
British Journal Of Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 94)
International Journal of Sport Nutrition & Exercise Metabolism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 90)
European Journal of Clinical Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 77)
Advances in Food and Nutrition Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 67)
Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 62)
Food Science & Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 62)
Advances in Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 60)
International Journal of Obesity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 58)
American Journal of Food and Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 54)
Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 52)
Nutrition in Clinical Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
Annual Review of Nutrition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 41)
Obesity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 41)
Journal of Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
Diabetes, Metabolic Syndrome and Obesity     Open Access   (Followers: 39)
Nutrition Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
European Journal of Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37)
Food & Nutrition Research     Open Access   (Followers: 37)
Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity     Open Access   (Followers: 34)
Nutrition & Dietetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Journal of Renal Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Journal of Nutrition, Health and Aging     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Public Health Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Current Nutrition & Food Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Clinical Nutrition ESPEN     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Current Opinion in Clinical Nutrition & Metabolic Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Eating and Weight Disorders - Studies on Anorexia, Bulimia and Obesity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Appetite     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Comparative Exercise Physiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
International Journal of Nutrition and Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 23)
International Journal of Eating Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Advances in Eating Disorders : Theory, Research and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
International Journal of Food Safety, Nutrition and Public Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Nutrition Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Topics in Clinical Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Clinical Obesity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Canadian Journal of Dietetic Practice and Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Nutrition & Diabetes     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
BMJ Nutrition, Prevention & Health     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
Nutrition & Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Obesity Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
African Journal of Food, Agriculture, Nutrition and Development     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Nutrition and Dietary Supplements     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Middle East Journal of Therapeutic Nutrition and Complementary Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Nutrition in Gerontology and Geriatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Eating Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
BMC Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Food, Culture and Society: An International Journal of Multidisciplinary Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Maternal & Child Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Nutrition Research Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Nutrition Today     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Nutrients     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Advances in Digestive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Nutrition Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Annual Review of Food Science and Technology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Clinical Nutrition Insight     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Ecology of Food and Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Food and Foodways: Explorations in the History and Culture of     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Nutrition and Cancer     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Asian Journal of Clinical Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Health, Population and Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
International Journal of Food Sciences and Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Nutrition Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
International Journal for Vitamin and Nutrition Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Pediatric Obesity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Nutrition & Food Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
American Journal of Food Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Dietary Supplements     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Food and Nutrition Research     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Proceedings of the Nutrition Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Current Developments in Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Egyptian Journal of Nutrition and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Nutritional Neuroscience : An International Journal on Nutrition, Diet and Nervous System     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Current Nutrition Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Nutrition and Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Hunger & Environmental Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Food Science and Nutrition Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Journal of the American College of Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Current Research in Nutrition and Food Science     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Amino Acids     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
South African Journal of Clinical Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Genes & Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Plant Foods for Human Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Nutrition Bytes     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Food Digestion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Food Chemistry and Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Child Health and Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Food and Nutrition Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Molecular Nutrition & Food Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Nutrition and Metabolic Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Metabolism and Nutrition in Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Bangladesh Journal of Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Revista Española de Nutrición Humana y Dietética     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Nutrition & Food Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Open Nutrition Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
World Food Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
European Journal of Nutrition & Food Safety     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Ernährung & Medizin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Nutrición Hospitalaria     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
PharmaNutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Frontiers in Sustainable Food Systems     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Plant Production Science     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Agriculture, Food Systems, and Community Development     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Food Frontiers     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Oil Crop Science     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Nutritional & Environmental Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Aktuelle Ernährungsmedizin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Revista Chilena de Nutricion     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Pakistan Journal of Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Nutritional Science     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
The Australian Coeliac     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Nigerian Food Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Bioactive Carbohydrates and Dietary Fibre     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Endocrinología, Diabetes y Nutrición (English Edition)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Jurnal Gizi dan Dietetik Indonesia : Indonesian Journal of Nutrition and Dietetics     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Food Quality and Safety     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Spices and Aromatic Crops     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Open Obesity Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Acta Portuguesa de Nutrição     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Human Nutrition & Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Cahiers de Nutrition et de Diététique     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Food and Environmental Virology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Médecine & Nutrition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Ethnic Foods     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Clinical Nutrition Experimental     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian Journal of Nutrition and Dietetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Canadian Food Studies / La Revue canadienne des études sur l'alimentation     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Nutrition - Science en évolution     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Food and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Jurnal Riset Kesehatan     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Archive of Food and Nutritional Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Open Food Science Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Salud Pública y Nutrición     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Arab Journal of Nutrition and Exercise     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
npj Science of Food     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Clinical Nutrition Open Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Food Hydrocolloids for Health     Open Access  
Journal of Nutraceuticals and Herbal Medicine     Open Access  
Nutrire     Hybrid Journal  
Archivos Latinoamericanos de Nutrición     Open Access  
Indonesian Food and Nutrition Progress     Open Access  
Journal of Medicinal Herbs and Ethnomedicine     Open Access  
La Ciencia al Servicio de la Salud y Nutrición     Open Access  
Media Gizi Indonesia     Open Access  
NFS Journal     Open Access  
Journal of Nutrition & Intermediary Metabolism     Open Access  
Food and Waterborne Parasitology     Open Access  
Nigerian Journal of Nutritional Sciences     Full-text available via subscription  
African Journal of Biomedical Research     Open Access  
Journal of the Australasian College of Nutritional and Environmental Medicine     Full-text available via subscription  
Endocrinología, Diabetes y Nutrición     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Sensory Studies     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Muscle Foods     Hybrid Journal  

        1 2        [Sort alphabetically]   [Restore default list]

Similar Journals
Similar Journals
HOME > Browse the 73 Subjects covered by JournalTOCs  
SubjectTotal Journals
 
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


Your IP address: 44.213.60.33
 
Home (Search)
API
About JournalTOCs
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-