A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z  

        1 2        [Sort by number of followers]   [Restore default list]

  Subjects -> NUTRITION AND DIETETICS (Total: 201 journals)
Showing 1 - 64 of 64 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acta Portuguesa de Nutrição     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Digestive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Advances in Eating Disorders : Theory, Research and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Advances in Food and Nutrition Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 63)
Advances in Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 55)
African Journal of Biomedical Research     Open Access  
African Journal of Food, Agriculture, Nutrition and Development     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Aktuelle Ernährungsmedizin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
American Journal of Botany     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
American Journal of Clinical Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 178)
American Journal of Food and Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 48)
American Journal of Food Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Amerta Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Amino Acids     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 52)
Annual Review of Food Science and Technology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Annual Review of Nutrition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 40)
Appetite     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Arab Journal of Nutrition and Exercise     Open Access  
Archive of Food and Nutritional Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Archivos Latinoamericanos de Nutrición     Open Access  
Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Asian Journal of Clinical Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Bangladesh Journal of Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Bioactive Carbohydrates and Dietary Fibre     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
BMC Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
BMJ Nutrition, Prevention & Health     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
British Journal Of Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 96)
Cahiers de Nutrition et de Diététique     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Canadian Food Studies / La Revue canadienne des études sur l'alimentation     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Canadian Journal of Dietetic Practice and Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Case Reports in Clinical Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Childhood Obesity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Clinical Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 94)
Clinical Nutrition ESPEN     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Clinical Nutrition Experimental     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Clinical Nutrition Insight     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Clinical Nutrition Open Science     Open Access  
Clinical Obesity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Comparative Exercise Physiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Current Developments in Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Current Nutrition & Food Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Current Nutrition Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Current Opinion in Clinical Nutrition & Metabolic Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Current Research in Nutrition and Food Science     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
DEMETRA : Alimentação, Nutrição & Saúde     Open Access  
Diabetes, Metabolic Syndrome and Obesity     Open Access   (Followers: 48)
Eating and Weight Disorders - Studies on Anorexia, Bulimia and Obesity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Ecology of Food and Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Egyptian Journal of Nutrition and Health     Open Access  
Egyptian Journal of Obesity, Diabetes and Endocrinology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Endocrinología, Diabetes y Nutrición     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Endocrinología, Diabetes y Nutrición (English Edition)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Ernährung & Medizin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
European Journal of Clinical Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 75)
European Journal of Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
European Journal of Nutrition & Food Safety     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Food & Nutrition Research     Open Access   (Followers: 35)
Food and Environmental Virology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Food and Foodways: Explorations in the History and Culture of     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Food and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Food and Nutrition Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Food and Waterborne Parasitology     Open Access  
Food Digestion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Food Frontiers     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Food Hydrocolloids for Health     Open Access  
Food Quality and Safety     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Food Science & Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 59)
Food, Culture and Society: An International Journal of Multidisciplinary Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Frontiers in Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Frontiers in Sustainable Food Systems     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Functional Foods in Health and Disease     Open Access  
Gazi Sağlık Bilimleri Dergisi     Open Access  
Genes & Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Hacettepe University Faculty of Health Sciences Journal     Open Access  
Human Nutrition & Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian Journal of Nutrition and Dietetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Indonesian Food and Nutrition Progress     Open Access  
International Journal for Vitamin and Nutrition Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity     Open Access   (Followers: 31)
International Journal of Child Health and Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Eating Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
International Journal of Food Safety, Nutrition and Public Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
International Journal of Food Science and Nutrition Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Food Sciences and Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
International Journal of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, Transplant and Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Nutrition and Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 23)
International Journal of Nutrition, Pharmacology, Neurological Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Obesity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 93)
International Journal of Sport Nutrition & Exercise Metabolism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 88)
Journal of Advanced Nutrition and Human Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Agriculture, Food Systems, and Community Development     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Dietary Supplements     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Eating Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Ethnic Foods     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Food & Nutritional Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Food and Nutrition Research     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Food Chemistry and Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Food Science and Nutrition Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Health, Population and Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 52)
Journal of Hunger & Environmental Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Medical Nutrition and Nutraceuticals     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Medicinal Herbs and Ethnomedicine     Open Access  
Journal of Muscle Foods     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Nutraceuticals and Herbal Medicine     Open Access  
Journal of Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42)
Journal of Nutrition & Intermediary Metabolism     Open Access  
Journal of Nutrition and Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Nutrition in Gerontology and Geriatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Nutrition, Health and Aging     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Journal of Nutritional & Environmental Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Nutritional Disorders & Therapy     Open Access  
Journal of Nutritional Ecology and Food Research     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Nutritional Science     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Obesity     Open Access   (Followers: 24)
Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition (JPGN)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 52)
Journal of Pharmacy and Nutrition Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Renal Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal of Renal Nutrition and Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Sensory Studies     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Spices and Aromatic Crops     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 61)
Journal of the American College of Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of the Australasian College of Nutritional and Environmental Medicine     Full-text available via subscription  
Jurnal Gizi dan Dietetik Indonesia : Indonesian Journal of Nutrition and Dietetics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Jurnal Gizi Indonesia / The Indonesian Journal of Nutrition     Open Access  
Jurnal Gizi Klinik Indonesia     Open Access  
Jurnal Penelitian Gizi dan Makanan     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Jurnal Riset Kesehatan     Open Access  
La Ciencia al Servicio de la Salud y Nutrición     Open Access  
Lifestyle Genomics     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Lifestyle Journal     Open Access  
Maternal & Child Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Médecine & Nutrition     Full-text available via subscription  
Media Gizi Indonesia     Open Access  
Metabolism and Nutrition in Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Molecular Nutrition & Food Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
NFS Journal     Open Access  
Nigerian Food Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Nigerian Journal of Nutritional Sciences     Full-text available via subscription  
npj Science of Food     Open Access  
Nutrición Hospitalaria     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Nutrients     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Nutrire     Hybrid Journal  
Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Nutrition & Dietetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Nutrition & Food Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Nutrition & Diabetes     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
Nutrition & Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Nutrition - Science en évolution     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Nutrition and Cancer     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Nutrition and Dietary Supplements     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Nutrition and Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Nutrition and Metabolic Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Nutrition Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Nutrition Bytes     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Nutrition in Clinical Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
Nutrition Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Nutrition Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Nutrition Research Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Nutrition Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
Nutrition Today     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Nutritional Neuroscience : An International Journal on Nutrition, Diet and Nervous System     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Obesity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 58)
Obesity Facts     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Obesity Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Oil Crop Science     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Open Food Science Journal     Open Access  
Open Nutrition Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Open Obesity Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Pakistan Journal of Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Pediatric Obesity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Perspectivas en Nutrición Humana     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
PharmaNutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Plant Foods for Human Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Plant Production Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Proceedings of the Nutrition Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Progress in Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Public Health Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
RBNE - Revista Brasileira de Nutrição Esportiva     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
RBONE - Revista Brasileira de Obesidade, Nutrição e Emagrecimento     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Chilena de Nutricion     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Revista Española de Nutrición Humana y Dietética     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Revista Mexicana de Trastornos Alimentarios     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Salud Pública y Nutrición     Open Access  
Segurança Alimentar e Nutricional     Open Access  
South African Journal of Clinical Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
The Australian Coeliac     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Topics in Clinical Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
UNICIÊNCIAS     Open Access  
Universal Journal of Food and Nutrition Science     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
World Food Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)

        1 2        [Sort by number of followers]   [Restore default list]

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Public Health Nutrition
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.122
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 30  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1368-9800 - ISSN (Online) 1475-2727
Published by Cambridge University Press Homepage  [352 journals]
  • PHN volume 26 issue 2 Cover and Front matter

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Pages: 1 - 3
      PubDate: 2023-01-24
      DOI: 10.1017/S136898002300006X
       
  • PHN volume 26 issue 2 Cover and Back matter

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Pages: 1 - 1
      PubDate: 2023-01-24
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980023000071
       
  • Partial replacement of red and processed meat with legumes: a modelling
           study of the impact on nutrient intakes and nutrient adequacy on the
           population level

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Kaartinen; Niina E, Tapanainen, Heli, Maukonen, Mirkka, Päivärinta, Essi, Valsta, Liisa M, Itkonen, Suvi T, Pajari, Anne-Maria, Männistö, Satu
      Pages: 303 - 314
      Abstract: Objective:The shift towards plant-based diets with less meat and more legumes is a global target and requires an understanding of the consequences of dietary adequacy on the population level. Our aim was to model the impact of partial replacement of red and processed meat with legumes on nutrient intakes and population shares below dietary reference intakes.Design:Modelling study with three scenarios anchored in meat cut-offs: ≤ 70 g/d (Finnish dietary guideline); ≤ 50 g/d (Danish dietary guideline); ≤ 30 g/d (EAT-Lancet recommendation). In all subjects, the amount of meat in grams over the cut-off was replaced with the same amount of legumes. The SPADE method was used to model usual intake distributions. Meaningful differences in average intakes and in population shares below dietary reference intakes compared to the reference (FinDiet) were evaluated based on non-overlapping 95 % CI.Setting:Finnish national food consumption survey (FinDiet 2017).Subjects:Finnish adults (n 1655) aged18–74 years (47 % men).Results:The scenarios introduced increases in the average intakes of fibre, folate, K, Mg, Cu and Fe, and decreases in intakes of saturated fat, niacin, vitamin B12, Se and Zn. Meaningful shifts of the usual intake distributions of fibre and folate towards improvement in intakes emerged already in ‘scenario 70 g’. Overall, distribution shifts towards a higher probability of inadequate intakes of the studied nutrients were not observed.Conclusions:These results support the public health message to partly replace meat with legumes and may benefit nutrition policy actions towards sustainable diets in the Nordic countries and beyond.
      PubDate: 2022-11-07
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980022002440
       
  • Trans-fat labelling information on prepackaged foods and beverages sold in
           Hong Kong in 2019

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Cheng; Christopher Chi Wai, Wu, Jason HY, Louie, Jimmy Chun Yu
      Pages: 315 - 322
      Abstract: Objective:To examine the labelling status of trans-fat of pre-packaged foods sold in Hong Kong.Design:Data from 19 027 items in the 2019 FoodSwitch Hong Kong database were used. Ingredient lists were screened to identify specific (e.g. partially hydrogenated vegetable oil, PHVO) and non-specific trans-fat ingredient indicators (e.g. hydrogenated oil). Trans-fat content was obtained from the on-pack nutrition labels, which was converted into proportion of total fat (%total fat). Descriptive statistics were calculated for trans-fat content and the number of specific, non-specific and total trans-fat ingredients indicators found on the ingredients lists. Comparisons were made between regions using one-way ANOVA and χ2 for continuous and categorical variables, respectively.Setting:Cross-sectional audit.Participants:Not applicable.Results:A total of 729 items (3·8 % of all products) reported to contain industrially produced trans-fat, with a median of 0·4 g/100 g or 100 ml (interquartile range (IQR): 0·1–0·6) and 1·2 %totalfat (IQR: 0·6–2·9). ‘Bread and bakery products’ had the highest proportion of items with industrially produced trans-fat (18·9 %). ‘Non-alcoholic beverages’ had the highest proportion of products of ‘false negatives’ labelling (e.g. labelled as 0 trans-fat but contains PHVO; 59·3 %). The majority of products with trans-fat indicator originated from Asia (70 %).Conclusions:According to the labelling ∼4 % of pre-packaged food and beverages sold in Hong Kong in 2019 contained industrially produced trans-fat, and a third of these had trans-fat>2 %total fat. The ambiguous trans-fat labelling in Hong Kong may not effectively assist consumers in identifying products free from industrially produced trans-fat.
      PubDate: 2022-11-23
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980022002464
       
  • Childhood BMI and other measures of body composition as a predictor of
           cardiometabolic non-communicable diseases in adulthood: a systematic
           review

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Bander; Amela, Murphy-Alford, Alexia J, Owino, Victor O, Loechl, Cornelia U, Wells, Jonathan CK, Gluning, Imara, Kerac, Marko
      Pages: 323 - 350
      Abstract: Objective:There is growing evidence that childhood malnutrition is associated with non-communicable diseases (NCD) in adulthood and that body composition mediates some of this association. This review aims to determine if childhood body composition can be used to predict later-life cardiometabolic NCD and which measures of body composition predicts future NCD.Design:Electronic databases were searched for articles where: children aged under 5 years had body composition measured; cardiometabolic health outcomes were measured a minimum of 10 years later.Setting:The databases Embase, Medline and Global Health were searched through July 2020.Participants:Children aged under 5 years with a follow-up of minimum 10 years.Results:Twenty-nine studies met the inclusion criteria. Though a poor proxy measure of body composition, body mass index (BMI) was commonly reported (n 28, 97 %). 25 % of these studies included an additional measure (ponderal index or skinfold thickness). Few studies adjusted for current body size (n 11, 39 %).Conclusions:Many studies reported that low infant BMI and high childhood BMI were associated with an increased risk of NCD-related outcomes in later life but no conclusions can be made about the exact timing of child malnutrition and consequent impact on NCD. Because studies focussed on BMI rather than direct measures of body composition, nothing can be said about which measures of body composition in childhood are most useful. Future research on child nutrition and long-term outcomes is urgently needed and should include validated body composition assessments as well as standard anthropometric and BMI measurements.
      PubDate: 2022-10-24
      DOI: 10.1017/S136898002200235X
       
  • Associations between variety of fruits and vegetables consumed, diet
           quality and socio-demographic factors among 8th and 11th grade adolescents
           in Texas

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Marshall; Allison N, Ranjit, Nalini, van den Berg, Alexandra, Gill, Montana, Hoelscher, Deanna M
      Pages: 351 - 362
      Abstract: Objective:To examine demographic and dietary correlates of consumption of a variety of fruits and vegetables (FV) among Texas adolescents. Different types of FV are needed for adequate dietary intake of vitamins and phytochemicals for proper development and functioning throughout the lifespan.Design:Cross-sectional analysis from the Texas Surveillance of Physical Activity and Nutrition (Texas SPAN) data comparing consumption of a variety of fruit and vegetables by gender, race/ethnicity and region (Texas-Mexico border/non-border).Setting:Middle, high schools in Texas.Participants:8th, 11th grade Texas adolescents (n 9056 representing n 659 288) mean age 14·8 years.Results:Within this sample, mean fruit and vegetable variety scores (0–7) ranged from 2·47 to 2·65. Boys consumed a significantly greater variety of fruit than girls (mean = 1·12 compared with 1·04). Adolescents in non-border regions consumed a greater variety of vegetables and FV compared with those in border regions. FV variety was associated with healthier eating in the full sample, particularly in the highest socio-economic status (SES) tertile. Within the highest SES tertile, a one-unit increase in variety of fruit, vegetable and FV was associated with significant increases (P < 0·001) in a healthy eating measure, the SPAN Healthy Eating Index: Fruit variety (β = 1·33, se = 0·29), vegetable variety (β = 0·90, se = 0·28) and FV variety (β = 0·81, se = 0·19).Conclusions:Consumption of a greater variety of FV appears to be associated with a healthier overall diet. Associations of FV variety with healthy eating were most significant in the highest SES tertile. These findings support the need to further examine consuming a variety of FV within healthy eating behaviour.
      PubDate: 2022-08-18
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980022001690
       
  • Strengthening maternal nutrition counselling during routine health
           services: a gap analysis to guide country programmes

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Kavle; Justine A
      Pages: 363 - 380
      Abstract: Objective:The WHO recommends counselling on healthy eating, weight gain, and physical activity during antenatal care (ANC) and postnatal care (PNC), yet advice and information are often not tailored to women’s nutritional needs and contexts. The purpose of the gap analysis was to identify key elements related to the provision of maternal nutrition counselling during routine health contacts and provide programme considerations to strengthen quality service delivery.Design:A search of PubMed, Cochrane Library, CINAHL Plus and Scopus databases was conducted to retrieve studies from January 2010 to December 2021. Using inclusion criteria, quantitative, qualitative and mixed methods studies were included in the final gap analysis.Setting:Low-, middle- and high-income country contexts.Participants:Following application of gap analysis criteria, thirty-seven articles from sixteen countries were included in the analysis.Results:Gaps in delivery of maternal nutrition counselling include provider capacity building, frequency, content and delivery platforms. Globally, counselling on appropriate weight gain during pregnancy is often not delivered with the desired content nor quality, while targeted counselling to overweight and obese women was provided in several high-income country contexts. Delivery of maternal nutrition counselling through multiple delivery platforms demonstrated improvements in maternal diet and/or weight gain during pregnancy.Conclusions:Strengthening the integration of maternal nutrition counselling into pre- and in-service curricula, routine health provider training, supportive supervision and provider mentoring is needed. Future efforts may consider generating global and regional weight gain guidelines and incorporating maternal nutrition counselling indicators as part of quality-of-care ANC/PNC standards and routine health systems.
      PubDate: 2022-10-10
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980022002129
       
  • Degree of adherence to plant-based diet and total and cause-specific
           mortality: prospective cohort study in the Million Veteran Program

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Wang; Dong D, Li, Yanping, Nguyen, Xuan-Mai T, Song, Rebecca J, Ho, Yuk-Lam, Hu, Frank B, Willett, Walter C, Wilson, Peter, Cho, Kelly, Gaziano, J Michael, Djoussé, Luc
      Pages: 381 - 392
      Abstract: Objective:To examine the association between adherence to plant-based diets and mortality.Design:Prospective study. We calculated a plant-based diet index (PDI) by assigning positive scores to plant foods and reverse scores to animal foods. We also created a healthful PDI (hPDI) and an unhealthful PDI (uPDI) by further separating the healthy plant foods from less-healthy plant foods.Setting:The VA Million Veteran Program.Participants:315 919 men and women aged 19–104 years who completed a FFQ at the baseline.Results:We documented 31 136 deaths during the follow-up. A higher PDI was significantly associated with lower total mortality (hazard ratio (HR) comparing extreme deciles = 0·75, 95 % CI: 0·71, 0·79, Ptrend < 0·001]. We observed an inverse association between hPDI and total mortality (HR comparing extreme deciles = 0·64, 95 % CI: 0·61, 0·68, Ptrend < 0·001), whereas uPDI was positively associated with total mortality (HR comparing extreme deciles = 1·41, 95 % CI: 1·33, 1·49, Ptrend < 0·001). Similar significant associations of PDI, hPDI and uPDI were also observed for CVD and cancer mortality. The associations between the PDI and total mortality were consistent among African and European American participants, and participants free from CVD and cancer and those who were diagnosed with major chronic disease at baseline.Conclusions:A greater adherence to a plant-based diet was associated with substantially lower total mortality in this large population of veterans. These findings support recommending plant-rich dietary patterns for the prevention of major chronic diseases.
      PubDate: 2022-03-21
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980022000659
       
  • Temporal patterns of sleep and eating among children during school closure
           in Japan due to COVID-19 pandemic: associations with lifestyle behaviours
           and dietary intake

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Sugimoto; Minami, Murakami, Kentaro, Sasaki, Satoshi
      Pages: 393 - 407
      Abstract: Objective:To identify temporal patterns of sleep and eating among school-age children during school closure due to the COVID-19 pandemic and to examine their associations with lifestyle behaviours and dietary intake.Design:In this cross-sectional study, questionnaires were used to assess sleep and eating times, lifestyle behaviours and dietary intake during school closure. Latent class analysis was performed to identify temporal patterns of sleep and eating based on self-reported clock times for wake-up, going to bed and eating meals. Lifestyle behaviours and dietary intake were compared between latent classes.Setting:Forty-eight primary and secondary schools in Japan.Participants:Totally, 6220 children (aged 8–15 years).Results:Four patterns, labelled ‘Very early (20 % of children)’, ‘Early (24 %)’, ‘Late (30 %)’ and ‘Very late (26 %),’ were identified and ordered according to the circadian timing. Latter patterns were characterised by later timings of sleep and eating, especially in clock times for wake-up, breakfast and lunch compared with earlier patterns. Children with latter patterns had a less physically active lifestyle, longer screen time (≥4 h/d), shorter study time (
      PubDate: 2022-05-16
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980022001148
       
  • Depressive symptoms among Mexican adolescent girls in relation to iron
           status, anaemia, body weight and pubertal status: results from a latent
           class analysis

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Zarate-Ortiz; Arli Guadalupe, Verhoef, Hans, Melse-Boonstra, Alida, Woods, Bo-Jane, Lee-Bazaldúa, Elida Estefania, Feskens, Edith JM, Quiroga-Garza, Angelica, Cepeda-Lopez, Ana Carla
      Pages: 408 - 415
      Abstract: Objective:The study examined the association between depressive symptoms and iron status, anaemia, body weight and pubertal status among Mexican adolescent girls.Design:In this cross-sectional study, depressive symptoms were assessed by the 6-item Kutcher Adolescent Depression Scale, and latent class analysis (LCA) was used to identify and characterise groups of girls based on depressive symptoms. Iron status and inflammation were assessed using ferritin and soluble transferrin receptor, C-reactive protein and alpha-1-acid glycoprotein, respectively. Multiple logistic and linear regressions were applied to model class membership as a function of iron status, anaemia, body weight and pubertal status.Participants:We collected data from 408 girls aged 12–20 years.Setting:Public schools in northern Mexico.Results:LCA yielded three classes of depressive symptoms: 44·4 % of the adolescents were ‘unlikely to be depressed’, 41·5 % were ‘likely to be depressed’ and 14·1 % were ‘highly likely to be depressed’. Our analyses demonstrated that iron-deficient girls had greater odds of being ‘likely depressed’ (OR 2·01, 95 % CI 1·01, 3·00) or ‘highly likely depressed’ (OR 2·80, 95 % CI 1·76, 3·84). Linear regression analyses revealed that lower Hb concentrations and higher body weight increased the probability of being ‘likely depressed’. There was no evidence that depressive symptoms were associated with age at menarche and years since menstruation.Conclusions:This study shows that iron-deficient adolescent girls are more likely to suffer from depressive symptoms and that lower concentrations of Hb and higher body weight increased the probability of experiencing depressive symptoms.
      PubDate: 2022-05-18
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980022001203
       
  • Association of genetic variants related to combined exposure to higher BMI
           and waist-to-hip ratio on lifelong cardiovascular risk in UK Biobank

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Wan; Eric Yuk Fai, Fung, Wing Tung, Yu, Esther Yee Tak, Cheng, Will Ho Gi, Chan, Kam Suen, Wang, Yuan, Chan, Esther Wai Yin, Wong, Ian Chi Kei, Lam, Cindy Lo Kuen
      Pages: 416 - 424
      Abstract: Objective:This study examines the individual and combined association of BMI and waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) with CVD risk using genetic scores of the obesity measurements as proxies.Design:A 2 × 2 factorial analysis approach was applied, with participants divided into four groups of lifetime exposure to low BMI and WHR, high BMI, high WHR, and high BMI and WHR based on weighted genetic risk scores. The difference in CVD risk across groups was evaluated using multivariable logistic regression.Setting:Cohort study.Participants:A total of 408 003 participants were included from the prospective observational UK Biobank study.Results:A total of 58 429 CVD events were recorded. Compared to the low BMI and WHR genetic scores group, higher BMI or higher WHR genetic scores were associated with an increase in CVD risk (high WHR: OR, 1·07; 95 % CI (1·04, 1·10)); high BMI: OR, 1·12; 95 % CI (1·09, 1·16). A weak additive effect on CVD risk was found between BMI and WHR (high BMI and WHR: OR, 1·16; 95 % CI (1·12, 1·19)). Subgroup analysis showed similar patterns between different sex, age (
      PubDate: 2022-05-27
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980022001276
       
  • Dietary quality of school meals and packed lunches: a national study of
           primary and secondary schoolchildren in the UK

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Haney; Erin, Parnham, Jennie C, Chang, Kiara, Laverty, Anthony A, von Hinke, Stephanie, Pearson-Stuttard, Jonathan, White, Martin, Millett, Christopher, Vamos, Eszter P
      Pages: 425 - 436
      Abstract: Objective:School lunches represent a key opportunity to improve diets and health of schoolchildren. No recent nationally representative studies have examined the nutritional differences between school meals and packed lunches in the UK. This study aimed to characterise and compare the nutritional quality of school meals and packed lunches among primary and secondary school-age children.Design:A pooled cross-sectional analysis of the UK’s National Diet and Nutrition Survey (2008–2017).Setting:United Kingdom.Participants:3001 children (aged 4–16 years) who completed a 3/4-d food diary which recorded meal type (school meal/packed lunch). Multivariable logistic regression models assessed associations of meeting food and nutrient recommendations by meal type. Analyses were stratified by academic key stages (KS).Results:KS-1 (4–7 years) and 2 (8–11 years) children consuming school meals were more likely to meet minimum recommendations for vegetables, protein-rich foods and fibre, and not exceed maximum recommendations for salt, savoury and sweet snacks compared with pupils consuming packed lunches. However, in KS-3 (12–14 years) and 4 (14–16 years), these effects were reduced. As children aged, the median weight of fruits, vegetables, protein-rich foods and dairy products consumed typically decreased for both school meals and packed lunches, and generally an increasing proportion of school meals contained sweet and savoury snacks.Conclusion:These findings suggest school meals are nutritionally superior to packed lunches but are not yet optimal. Quality declined at higher KS. Actions to improve lunches of primary and secondary schoolchildren across the UK are needed, with attention to KS-3 and 4 in secondary schools.
      PubDate: 2022-06-01
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980022001355
       
  • Individual and family predictors of ultra-processed food consumption in
           Spanish children: The SENDO project

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: García-Blanco; Lorena, de la O Pascual, Víctor, Berasaluce, Arantxa, Moreno-Galarraga, Laura, Martínez-González, Miguel Ángel, Martín-Calvo, Nerea
      Pages: 437 - 445
      Abstract: Background:Ultra-processed food (UPF) consumption is increasing exponentially, becoming a matter of concern for Public Health, given its adverse health effects.Objective:To identify individual and faGmily factors predicting UPF consumption in childhood.Design:The SENDO project is an ongoing prospective dynamic cohort of Spanish children. In this study, we used baseline information of participants recruited between January 2015 and June 2021. Dietary information was collected with a validated semi-quantitative FFQ, and food items were classified using the NOVA classification. Individual and family factors associated with UPF consumption (P < 0·20) in univariate analyses were introduced in a model of generalised estimating equations which accounted for intra-cluster correlations between siblings.Setting:The SENDO project (Spain), 2015–2021.Participants:Spanish children are recruited at the age of 4–5 years and followed yearly through online questionnaires completed by parents.Results:In this sample of 806 participants (49 % girls; mean age 5 years (sd: 0·90)), the mean UPF consumption was 37·64 % of total energy intake (sd: 9·59). Large family size and longer exposure to screens predicted higher consumption of UPF. On the other hand, better knowledge of children’s dietary recommendations, healthy dietary attitudes towards child’s eating habits and longer breastfeeding were associated with lower consumption of UPF. All these factors accounted for approximately 16 % of the variability on the consumption of UPF in childhood.Conclusion:Since most of the factors identified in this study are modifiable, they should be considered in public health strategies aimed at promoting healthy dietary habits in early life.
      PubDate: 2022-05-27
      DOI: 10.1017/S136898002200132X
       
  • Food availability and affordability in a Mediterranean urban context:
           associations by store type and area-level socio-economic status

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Fernández-Escobar; Carlos, Díez, Julia, Martínez-García, Alba, Bilal, Usama, O’Flaherty, Martin, Franco, Manuel
      Pages: 446 - 454
      Abstract: Objective:Although food environments have been highlighted as potentially effective targets to improve population diets, evidence on Mediterranean food environments is lacking. We examined differences in food availability and affordability in Madrid (Spain) by store type and area-level socio-economic status (SES).Design:Cross-sectional study. Trained researchers conducted food store audits using the validated Nutrition Environment Measures Survey in Stores for Mediterranean contexts (NEMS-S-MED) tool to measure the availability and price of twelve food groups (specific foods = 35). We computed NEMS-S-MED scores and summarised price data with a Relative Price Index (RPI, comparing prices across stores) and an Affordability Index (normalising prices by area-level income). We compared the availability and affordability of ‘healthier–less healthy’ food pairs, scores between food store types (supermarkets, specialised, convenience stores and others) and area-level SES using ANOVA and multi-level regression models.Setting:City of Madrid. 2016 and 2019 to cover a representative sample.Participants:Food stores within a socio-economically diverse sample of sixty-three census tracts (n 151).Results:Supermarkets had higher food availability (37·5/49 NEMS-S-MED points), compared to convenience stores (13·5/49) and specialised stores (8/49). Supermarkets offered lower prices (RPI: 0·83) than specialised stores (RPI: 0·97) and convenience stores (RPI: 2·06). Both ‘healthy’ and ‘less healthy’ items were more available in supermarkets. We found no differences in food availability or price by area-level SES, but affordability was higher in higher-income areas.Conclusions:Supermarkets offered higher food availability and affordability for healthy and less healthy food items. Promoting healthy food availability through supermarkets and specialised stores and/or limiting access to convenience stores are promising policy options to achieve a healthier food environment.
      PubDate: 2022-10-24
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980022002348
       
  • School food programmes in the Pacific Islands: exploring opportunities and
           challenges for creating healthier school food environments

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Burkhart; Sarah, Hayman, Ann, Lam, Fiasili, Jones, Breanna, Horsey, Bridget, Craven, Dana, Underhill, Steven
      Pages: 455 - 466
      Abstract: Objective:The school setting can provide an environment that supports healthy behaviours, including the provision of food. School food activities, that is, school feeding, are commonplace globally, but not well understood in the Pacific Islands region. The aim of this research is to explore learnings associated within existing school food programmes (SFP), and adoption resistors in those Pacific Island Countries and Territories (PICT) without SFP, with the intent of improving current and future SFP interventions.Design:This observational cross-sectional study utilised four facilitated workshop sessions to explore SFP within an existing framework.Setting:Pacific Islands region.Participants:Fourteen participants representing the education and health sectors from eleven PICT, and two participants representing regional organisations.Results:Most countries reported some form of related policy, but key critical constraints to the use of SFP included local food environments, strategic alignment to organisational priorities, advocacy and organisational leadership, and community and cultural connections and collaboration. There are opportunities for integration of SFP into existing frameworks (i.e. Health Promoting Schools), increased collaboration, greater professional development and awareness activities, improved monitoring and evaluation, improved awareness of SFP and promotion of healthy eating for the wider school community.Conclusions:Given the current health, social and economic challenges faced by countries and territories in the Pacific Islands region, SFP should be considered as an opportunity for food provision and associated nutrition education for students and their wider community. Further research is needed to understand the critical constraints of SFP in this region and how to support stakeholders to advocate for, develop and sustain SFP that are contextually and culturally appropriate.
      PubDate: 2022-11-21
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980022001951
       
  • Association between ultra-processed foods consumption and micronutrient
           intake and diet quality in Iranian adults: a multicentric study

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Haghighatdoost; Fahimeh, Hajihashemi, Parisa, Mohammadifard, Noushin, Najafi, Farid, Farshidi, Hossein, Lotfizadeh, Masoud, Kazemi, Tooba, Karimi, Simin, Shirani, Shahin, Solati, Kamal, Sarrafzadegan, Nizal
      Pages: 467 - 475
      Abstract: Objective:To identify ultra-processed foods (UPF) contribution to daily energy and nutrient intake in Iranians and examine whether UPF intake is associated with nutrient profile and diet quality.Design:In this cross-sectional study, a validated FFQ was used to evaluate usual dietary intake over the preceding year. NOVA system was applied to categorise foods based on their levels of processing. Diet quality was evaluated using the nutrient adequacy ratio (NAR), Nutrient Rich Food Index (NRF) and hybrid nutrient density.Setting:The LIPOKAP study conducted in five cities of Iran (Isfahan, Birjand, Bandar Abbas, Kermanshah and Shahrekord).Participants:A total of 1994 adults aged ≥18 years were recruited using stratified multistage random cluster sampling method.Results:UPF were responsible for 8·5 % of daily energy intake. In the adjusted model, UPF consumption was inversely associated with carbohydrate, protein, refined and whole grains, fibre, fruit and meat, but was positively linked to energy, total fat, saturated and trans fatty acids and cholesterol. Compared with those in the lowest tertile, individuals in the highest tertile of UPF had smaller NAR for Ca, Mg, Zn, Fe, phosphorus, thiamin, niacin, folate and vitamin C. Both NRF and hybrid nutrient density decreased when the share of daily energy intake from UPF increased.Conclusion:The higher consumption of UPF is associated with poorer diet quality and lower nutrient intake. It is recommended that UPF be replaced with minimally processed foods to improve diet quality and nutrient profile.
      PubDate: 2022-10-24
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980022002038
       
  • ¡Míranos! a comprehensive preschool obesity prevention programme in
           low-income Latino children: 1-year results of a clustered randomised
           controlled trial

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Yin; Zenong, Liang, Yuanyuan, Howard, Jeffrey T, Errisuriz, Vanessa, Estrada, Vanessa Marie, Martinez, Cristina, Li, Shiyu, Ullevig, Sarah Lynn, Sosa, Erica, Olmstead, Todd, Small, Sharon, Ward, Dianne Stanton, Parra-Medina, Deborah
      Pages: 476 - 487
      Abstract: Objective:To test a culturally tailored obesity prevention intervention in low-income, minority preschool age children.Design:A three-group clustered randomised controlled trial.Setting:Twelve Head Start centres were randomly assigned to a centre-based intervention, a combined centre- and home-based intervention, or control using a 1:1:1 ratio. The centre-based intervention modified centre physical activity and nutrition policies, staff practices, and child behaviours, while the home-based intervention supported parents for obesity prevention at home.Study outcomes:The primary end point was change in children’s BMI (kg/m2) at post-test immediately following completion of the 8-month intervention. Secondary end points included standardised scores for BMI (BMIz) and body weight (WAZ), and BMI percentiles (BMI pctl).Participants:Three-year-old children enrolled in Head Start in San Antonio, Texas, with written parent consent (n 325), 87 % Latino, 57 % female with mean age (sd) of 3·58 years (0·29).Results:Change in BMI at post-test was 1·28 (0·97), 1·28 (0·87) and 1·41 (0·71) in the centre + home-based intervention, centre-based intervention and control, respectively. There was no significant difference in BMI change between centre + home-based intervention and control or centre-based intervention and control at post-test. BMIz (adjusted difference –0·12 (95 % CI, –0·24, 0·01), P = 0·06) and WAZ (adjusted difference, –0·09 (–0·17, –0·002), P = 0·04) were reduced for children in centre + home-based intervention compared with control group.Conclusions:There was no reduction in BMI at post-test in children who received the intervention. Findings shed light on methodological challenges in childhood obesity research and offer future directions to explore health equity-oriented obesity prevention.
      PubDate: 2022-11-11
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980022002439
       
  • Salt intake reduction using umami substance-incorporated food: a secondary
           analysis of NHANES 2017–2018 data

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Nomura; Shuhei, Tanaka, Shiori, Eguchi, Akifumi, Kawashima, Takayuki, Nakamura, Haruyo, Lwin, Kaung Suu, Yamasaki, Lisa, Yoneoka, Daisuke, Tanoe, Yuta, Adachi, Megumi, Hayabuchi, Hitomi, Koganemaru, Shosei, Nishimura, Toshihide, Sigel, Byron, Uneyama, Hisayuki, Shibuya, Kenji
      Pages: 488 - 495
      Abstract: Objective:Excessive salt intake raises blood pressure and increases the risk of non-communicable diseases (NCD), such as CVD, chronic kidney disease and stomach cancer. Reducing the Na content of food is an important public health measure to control the NCD. This study quantifies the amount of salt reduced by using umami substances, i.e. glutamate, inosinate and guanylate, for adults in the USA.Design:The secondary data analysis was performed using data of the US nationally representative cross-sectional dietary survey, the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2017–2018. Per capita daily salt intake corresponding to the NHANES food groups was calculated in the four hypothetical scenarios of 0 %, 30 %, 60 % and 90 % market share of low-Na foods in the country. The salt reduction rates by using umami substances were estimated based on the previous study results.Setting:The USAParticipants:4139 individuals aged 20 years and older in the USAResults:Replacing salt with umami substances could help the US adults reduce salt intake by 7·31–13·53 % (7·50–13·61 % for women and 7·18–13·53 % for men), which is equivalent to 0·61–1·13 g/d (0·54–0·98 g/d for women and 0·69–1·30 g/d for men) without compromising the taste. Approximately, 21·21–26·04 % of the US adults could keep their salt intake below 5 g/d, the WHO’s recommendation in the scenario where there is no low-Na product on the market.Conclusions:This study provides essential information that the use of umami substances as a substitute for salt may help reduce the US adults’ salt intake.
      PubDate: 2022-12-01
      DOI: 10.1017/S136898002200249X
       
  • The climate crisis is here: a primer and call to action for public health
           nutrition researchers and practitioners in high-income countries

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Bell; Brooke M
      Pages: 496 - 502
      Abstract: Dietary behaviours and the food systems in which they occur have a significant impact on climate change. The 2022 Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) reports and other major climate reports have identified population-level dietary shifts towards balanced, sustainable healthy diets as an important mitigation (i.e. prevention) solution for climate change. Thus, public health nutrition researchers and practitioners have a crucial role to play in combatting the climate crisis. They have the content expertise, interdisciplinary training and technical skills needed to facilitate wide-scale dietary behaviour changes at multiple levels of influence and ultimately improve both human and planetary health. This commentary article: (i) summarises how dietary behaviours and food systems contribute to climate change, with a particular focus on high-income countries; (ii) reviews food-system-related climate change mitigation solutions most relevant to public health nutrition researchers and practitioners; and (iii) identifies key gaps in the literature and future research directions for the field.
      PubDate: 2022-11-04
      DOI: 10.1017/S1368980022002427
       
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


Your IP address: 3.222.251.91
 
Home (Search)
API
About JournalTOCs
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-