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  Subjects -> NUTRITION AND DIETETICS (Total: 201 journals)
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Nutrition Today
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.32
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 14  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0029-666X - ISSN (Online) 1538-9839
Published by LWW Wolters Kluwer Homepage  [330 journals]
  • Black Seeds: Potential Health Benefits

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      Authors: Singletary; Keith W.
      Abstract: imageBlack seeds, sometimes called black cumin, are obtained from the spicy medicinal herb Nigella sativa that is native to a broad region encompassing the eastern Mediterranean, southwest Asia, and northern Africa. The seed and its oil have a distinctive aroma and taste, diversely described as bitter, peppery, metallic, and pungent. Both are frequent ingredients in numerous foods, especially in the Middle East and India. In these same regions N sativa has an extensive history as a folk medicine dating back millenia for relief for a variety of health conditions such as asthma, headache, bronchitis, amenorrhea, allergies, infections, and hypertension. The antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and immunomodulatory properties of N sativa seeds observed in preclinical studies provided an impetus for clinical trials examining the seeds' effects on cardiovascular, respiratory, and neurological disorders, among others. This narrative review summarizes findings from publications addressing several these and other disorders and provides suggestions for future research.
      PubDate: Mon, 28 Nov 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Nutrition 2022: A Year of Learning, Networking, and Engaging

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      Abstract: No abstract available
      PubDate: Tue, 01 Nov 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Nutrition Gazette

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      Abstract: No abstract available
      PubDate: Tue, 01 Nov 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Newsbreaks

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      Abstract: No abstract available
      PubDate: Tue, 01 Nov 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • No Smell, No Taste—Dealing With a “Senseless” Phase of the Pandemic:
           Nutritional Management of COVID-19 and Postacute Sequelae of COVID-19

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      Authors: Naidu; A. Satyanarayan; Clemens, Roger A.
      Abstract: imageThe SARS-CoV-2 infection alters smell and taste sensations in many patients. These 2 neurosensory impairments, namely, (1) the loss of smell, an olfactory dysfunction (OD) or anosmia, and (2) the loss of taste, a gustatory dysfunction (GD) or ageusia, are often the earliest and, sometimes, the only signs in otherwise asymptomatic individuals. Both OD and GD are recognized by the international scientific community as one of the critical symptoms of COVID-19. The prevalence of COVID-19–related OD is higher among women (although less likely to experience severe forms of SARS-CoV-2 infection) than men. The total loss of taste sense or GD is more common among the elderly COVID-19 patients than in the younger population. In “long” COVID or postacute sequelae of COVID-19 (PASC) patients, OD/GD could persist for months to years, depending on the extent of damage caused by the SARS-CoV-2 infection to the olfactory and gustatory systems. Olfactory dysfunction and GD manifestations may severely disrupt quality of life, which includes altered eating habits, loss of appetite, weight change, and loss of pleasure in food consumption, and may further affect psychological well-being, social bonding, altered intimacy, and relationship to self and others. The hedonic value of diet relies exclusively on its flavor; however, the onset of OD/GD during SARS-CoV-2 infection deprives such organoleptic experiences of nutrition. To compensate for these OD/GD issues, the chemosensory focus of COVID-19/PASC patients during dietary consumption may shift toward food texture (to stimulate trigeminal nerves) and food colors (to stimulate brain activity), to sustain appetite as well as enhance the pleasure of eating. Olfactory training with repeated exposure to 4 intense odors twice daily has been a traditional rehabilitation practice to alleviate olfactory impairments in COVID-19. The neurosensory impairments in COVID-19 pathobiology culminate from iron-redox dysregulation, viral-induced host metabolic reprogramming, and host mitochondrial dysfunction. Therefore, nutritional restoration of host metabolic reprogramming and mitochondrial function could provide an effective strategy to reverse iron-redox dysregulation syndrome and combat OD/GD in COVID-19 and PASC patients. Innate regulators of iron-redox homeostasis, such as lactoferrin, heme oxygenase-1, erythropoietin, and hepcidin modulators, could serve as potential interventions for OD/GD recovery.
      PubDate: Tue, 01 Nov 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Misconceptions in the Use of Body Mass Index: A Review of the Literature

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      Authors: Solorzano; Amberly Ashly; Stevens, Sarah Marie; Doak, Colleen Marie
      Abstract: imageOrganizations such as the World Health Organization, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and American Medical Association all recognize the limitations of using body mass index (BMI) to define obesity (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2). However, BMI is commonly used for screening and is also used in clinical practice as a standalone measure to define “overweight” (BMI, 25-29.9 kg/m2) and “obesity” (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2). This review describes the genesis of the use of BMI and its value in research and description of populations, while showing that when it is used for diagnosis at the individual level, it falls down at certain age, sex, and race/ethnic groups. A brief history of the BMI, from its inception to its current use in identifying “obesogenic” environments, is provided. Although BMI is currently used in screening, for clinical assessment and management, many other indices are more accurate and useful. This report summarizes the benefits of BMI, in monitoring the ongoing global obesity epidemic, and its limitations as a screening or diagnostic tool in clinical settings.
      PubDate: Tue, 01 Nov 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Health/Nutrition Science: Communicating Conflict or Collaboration'

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      Authors: Rowe; Sylvia; Alexander, Nick
      Abstract: The health and nutrition science communication literature is replete with articles about financial conflicts of interest. Relatively little appears concerning conflicts among scientists and communicators themselves—the opinions, perspectives, and biases that obstruct consensus. In recent years, researchers and communicators have spoken of the need for science collaborations in exploring such complex issues as obesity, food security, personalized nutrition, and others. But some experts have identified obstacles to cooperation and sought to encourage holistic approaches to achieving research and communication goals in health and nutrition science. In the present article, the authors explore collaboration obstacles and discuss ways health and nutrition science communications might embrace more comprehensive strategies to bring disparate scientific disciplines together and advance understanding.
      PubDate: Tue, 01 Nov 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Doris Howes Calloway: Her Work and Legacy on Nutritionally Vulnerable
           Populations in North America

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      Authors: Butte; Nancy F.; Kuhnlein, Harriet V.; Murphy, Suzanne P.; Yates, Allison A.; King, Janet C.; Kretsch, Molly J.; Blackburn, Mary L.
      Abstract: imageDr Doris Howes Calloway had a keen interest in nutritionally vulnerable populations in North America and around the world. Given her scientific reputation and interests, she advised many national and international agencies on improving the health and well-being of populations at increased risk of malnutrition. In North America, she and her graduate students laid the groundwork for improvement of the diets of several Indigenous peoples including the Cocopah, Hopi, and Navajo. They found that improvement of the nutritional and health status of the Cocopah tribe was unlikely without addressing underlying social and economic factors. Among the Hopi tribe, the replacement of traditional foods by energy-dense foods of low nutritional quality increased the risks of nutrient inadequacies and obesity. Dr Calloway also had a keen interest in understanding the effects of nutrition on biological functions that increase nutritional demand and thus vulnerability, as demonstrated in studies of pregnancy and lactation among Navajo women, and growth of children from Mexican American farmworker families. They demonstrated the limits of federal nutrition programs at that time. They identified the double burden of stunting and obesity among Mexican American children. Dr Calloway's standards of academic excellence and rigorous research influenced her students to pursue careers that enhanced science-based policies and programs to promote the health and wellness of nutritionally vulnerable populations.
      PubDate: Tue, 01 Nov 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • A Reflection on the Life of Len Storlien

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      Authors: Tapsell; Linda; Cooney, Gregory; Baur, Louise; Oscarsson, Jan; James, David; Simpson, Stephen; Huang, Xu Feng; Caterson, Ian
      Abstract: imageNo abstract available
      PubDate: Tue, 01 Nov 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • How to Help My Older Patient With Obesity Lose Weight Safely When the
           Evidence Is Not Clear

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      Abstract: No abstract available
      PubDate: Tue, 01 Nov 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • How to Help My Older Patient With Obesity Lose Weight Safely When the
           Evidence Is Not Clear

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      Authors: Nowicki; Kylie; Daugherty, Janice E.; Craven, Kay; Kolasa, Kathryn M.
      Abstract: imageUntil recently, despite the deleterious the health consequences of their obesity, intentional weight loss by older adults usually was not recommended. Factors such as maladaptive metabolic changes and declines in physiologic function predispose this population to sarcopenic obesity, frailty, and impaired mobility, while accumulation of chronic comorbidities often results in polypharmacy. These considerations and more complicate both the decision to pursue weight loss and the safest method of doing so. Currently, specific guidelines for managing weight loss in older adults with obesity are widely lacking. We present a case from our Family Medicine practice of an older woman with obesity struggling with weight management. We present our recommendations for safely navigating the weight loss she desires using an evidence-based approach that incorporates a medically supervised calorie restricted diet, improved diet quality, and healthy physical activity recommendations that include resistance exercise.
      PubDate: Fri, 21 Oct 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
 
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