A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z  

  Subjects -> NUTRITION AND DIETETICS (Total: 201 journals)
We no longer collect new content from this publisher because the publisher has forbidden systematic access to its RSS feeds.
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Nutrition Research Reviews
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.756
Citation Impact (citeScore): 5
Number of Followers: 13  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0954-4224 - ISSN (Online) 1475-2700
Published by Cambridge University Press Homepage  [353 journals]
  • NRR volume 35 issue 1 Front matter

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Pages: 1 - 1
      PubDate: 2022-06-03
      DOI: 10.1017/S0954422422000051
       
  • List of Reviewers

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Pages: 159 - 160
      PubDate: 2022-01-18
      DOI: 10.1017/S0954422421000391
       
  • Determining the glycaemic responses of foods: conventional and emerging
           approaches

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Priyadarshini; S R, Moses, J A, Anandharamakrishnan, C
      Pages: 1 - 27
      Abstract: A low-glycaemic diet is crucial for those with diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. Information on the glycaemic index (GI) of different ingredients can help in designing novel food products for such target groups. This is because of the intricate dependency of material source, composition, food structure and processing conditions, among other factors, on the glycaemic responses. Different approaches have been used to predict the GI of foods, and certain discrepancies exist because of factors such as inter-individual variation among human subjects. Besides other aspects, it is important to understand the mechanism of food digestion because an approach to predict GI must essentially mimic the complex processes in the human gastrointestinal tract. The focus of this work is to review the advances in various approaches for predicting the glycaemic responses to foods. This has been carried out by detailing conventional approaches, their merits and limitations, and the need to focus on emerging approaches. Given that no single approach can be generalised to all applications, the review emphasises the scope of deriving insights for improvements in methodologies. Reviewing the conventional and emerging approaches for the determination of GI in foods, this detailed work is intended to serve as a state-of-the-art resource for nutritionists who work on developing low-GI foods.
      PubDate: 2021-02-01
      DOI: 10.1017/S0954422421000020
       
  • Effects of betaine on non-alcoholic liver disease

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Chen; Weiqiang, Xu, Minjuan, Xu, Minwen, Wang, Yucai, Zou, Qingyan, Xie, Shuixiang, Wang, Liefeng
      Pages: 28 - 38
      Abstract: The increasing prevalence of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) poses a growing challenge in terms of its prevention and treatment. The ‘multiple hits’ hypothesis of multiple insults, such as dietary fat intake, de novo lipogenesis, insulin resistance, oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, gut dysbiosis and hepatic inflammation, can provide a more accurate explanation of the pathogenesis of NAFLD. Betaine plays important roles in regulating the genes associated with NAFLD through anti-inflammatory effects, increased free fatty oxidation, anti-lipogenic effects and improved insulin resistance and mitochondrial function; however, the mechanism of betaine remains elusive.
      PubDate: 2021-04-05
      DOI: 10.1017/S0954422421000056
       
  • Adolescent undernutrition in South Asia: a scoping review

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Estecha Querol; Sara, Gill, Paramjit, Iqbal, Romaina, Kletter, Maartje, Ozdemir, Neslihan, Al-Khudairy, Lena
      Pages: 39 - 49
      Abstract: Undernutrition is a growing public health challenge affecting growth and development during adolescence in many low- and middle-income countries. This scoping review maps the evidence on adolescent undernutrition (stunting, thinness and micronutrient deficiencies) in South Asia and highlights gaps in knowledge. Using Arksey and O’Malley’s framework and the Joanna Briggs Institute Reviewers’ Manual, the search included electronic bibliographic databases (Medline (OVID), Embase, Cochrane Library, Web of Science, CINAHL, PsycInfo, and Scopus) as well as various grey literature sources published up to March 2019. In total, 131 publications met the inclusion criteria of this review. All the included evidence used quantitative data and 115 publications used a cross-sectional design. Nearly 70% (n = 86) of the included publications were conducted in India. Prevalence of undernutrition was reported based on different growth references and cut-offs. Evidence is divided into publications that included an intervention component (n = 12) and publications that did not include an intervention component (n = 116), and presented in a narrative synthesis. This scoping review provides a wide range of publications on adolescent undernutrition in South Asia and identifies future research priorities in the field.
      PubDate: 2021-04-16
      DOI: 10.1017/S0954422421000068
       
  • The potential nutrition-, physical- and health-related benefits of cow’s
           milk for primary-school-aged children

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Rumbold; Penny, McCullogh, Nicola, Boldon, Ruth, Haskell-Ramsay, Crystal, James, Lewis, Stevenson, Emma, Green, Benjamin
      Pages: 50 - 69
      Abstract: Cow’s milk is a naturally nutrient-dense foodstuff. A significant source of many essential nutrients, its inclusion as a component of a healthy balanced diet has been long recommended. Beyond milk’s nutritional value, an increasing body of evidence illustrates cow’s milk may confer numerous benefits related to health. Evidence from adult populations suggests that cow’s milk may have a role in overall dietary quality, appetite control, hydration and cognitive function. Although evidence is limited compared with the adult literature, these benefits may be echoed in recent paediatric studies. This article, therefore, reviews the scientific literature to provide an evidence-based evaluation of the associated health benefits of cow’s milk consumption in primary-school-aged children (4–11 years). We focus on seven key areas related to nutrition and health comprising nutritional status, hydration, dental and bone health, physical stature, cognitive function, and appetite control. The evidence consistently demonstrates cow’s milk (plain and flavoured) improves nutritional status in primary-school-aged children. With some confidence, cow’s milk also appears beneficial for hydration, dental and bone health and beneficial to neutral concerning physical stature and appetite. Due to conflicting studies, reaching a conclusion has proven difficult concerning cow’s milk and cognitive function; therefore, a level of caution should be exercised when interpreting these results. All areas, however, would benefit from further robust investigation, especially in free-living school settings, to verify conclusions. Nonetheless, when the nutritional-, physical- and health-related impact of cow’s milk avoidance is considered, the evidence highlights the importance of increasing cow’s milk consumption.
      PubDate: 2021-04-27
      DOI: 10.1017/S095442242100007X
       
  • Antioxidants in smokers

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Astori; Emanuela, Garavaglia, Maria L., Colombo, Graziano, Landoni, Lucia, Portinaro, Nicola M., Milzani, Aldo, Dalle-Donne, Isabella
      Pages: 70 - 97
      Abstract: Cigarette smoke (CS) is likely the most common preventable cause of human morbidity and mortality worldwide. Consequently, inexpensive interventional strategies for preventing CS-related diseases would positively impact health systems. Inhaled CS is a powerful inflammatory stimulus and produces a shift in the normal balance between antioxidants and oxidants, inducing oxidative stress in both the respiratory system and throughout the body. This enduring and systemic pro-oxidative state within the body is reflected by increased levels of oxidative stress and inflammation biomarkers seen in smokers. Smokers might benefit from consuming antioxidant supplements, or a diet rich in fruit and vegetables, which can reduce the CS-related oxidative stress. This review provides an overview of the plasma profile of antioxidants observable in smokers and examines the heterogeneous literature to elucidate and discuss the effectiveness of interventional strategies based on antioxidant supplements or an antioxidant-rich diet to improve the health of smokers. An antioxidant-rich diet can provide an easy-to-implement and cost-effective preventative strategy to reduce the risk of CS-related diseases, thus being one of the simplest ways for smokers to stay in good health for as long as possible. The health benefits attributable to the intake of antioxidants have been observed predominantly when these have been consumed within their natural food matrices in an optimal antioxidant-rich diet, while these preventive effects are rarely achieved with the intake of individual antioxidants, even at high doses.
      PubDate: 2021-04-30
      DOI: 10.1017/S0954422421000093
       
  • Sarcopenia and homocysteine: is there a possible association in the
           elderly' A narrative review

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: De Giuseppe; Rachele, Tomasinelli, Chiara Elena, Vincenti, Alessandra, Di Napoli, Ilaria, Negro, Massimo, Cena, Hellas
      Pages: 98 - 111
      Abstract: Background:Sarcopenia (SA) is a progressive skeletal muscle disorder, associated with increased risk of adverse outcomes, including falls, fractures, physical disability and mortality. Several risks factors may contribute to the development of SA in the elderly; among them, nutrition plays a key role in muscle health. The elderly are at risk of inadequate intake in terms of micronutrients affecting muscle homeostasis, such as B vitamins, related to homocysteine (Hcy) metabolism.Objectives and methods:This narrative review analysed the association between increased Hcy levels and SA, according to the criteria of the International Working Group on Sarcopenia, the European Working Group on Sarcopenia in Older People and the Asian Working Group for Sarcopenia. The authors focused not only on SA per se but also on exploring the association between increased Hcy levels and components of SA, including muscle mass, muscle strength and physical performance.Results:Results are inconsistent, except for muscle mass, showing no significant associations with Hcy levels.Conclusions:Few and conflicting data emerged in this review on the association between SA and increased Hcy levels due to numerous differences between studies that change the significance of the association of Hcy and SA, as well as the muscle strength, muscle mass and physical performance. Furthermore, because the ageing process is not uniform in the population owing to differences in genetics, lifestyle and general health, chronological age fails to address the observed heterogeneity among the ‘elderly’ of the studies reported in this revision. Therefore, further studies are still needed.
      PubDate: 2021-04-30
      DOI: 10.1017/S095442242100010X
       
  • A scoping review of chronotype and temporal patterns of eating of adults:
           tools used, findings, and future directions

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Phoi; Yan Yin, Rogers, Michelle, Bonham, Maxine P., Dorrian, Jillian, Coates, Alison M.
      Pages: 112 - 135
      Abstract: Circadian rhythms, metabolic processes and dietary intake are inextricably linked. Timing of food intake is a modifiable temporal cue for the circadian system and may be influenced by numerous factors, including individual chronotype – an indicator of an individual’s circadian rhythm in relation to the light–dark cycle. This scoping review examines temporal patterns of eating across chronotypes and assesses tools that have been used to collect data on temporal patterns of eating and chronotype. A systematic search identified thirty-six studies in which aspects of temporal patterns of eating, including meal timings; meal skipping; energy distribution across the day; meal frequency; time interval between meals, or meals and wake/sleep times; midpoint of food/energy intake; meal regularity; and duration of eating window, were presented in relation to chronotype. Findings indicate that, compared with morning chronotypes, evening chronotypes tend to skip meals more frequently, have later mealtimes, and distribute greater energy intake towards later times of the day. More studies should explore the difference in meal regularity and duration of eating window amongst chronotypes. Currently, tools used in collecting data on chronotype and temporal patterns of eating are varied, limiting the direct comparison of findings between studies. Development of a standardised assessment tool will allow future studies to confidently compare findings to inform the development and assessment of guidelines that provide recommendations on temporal patterns of eating for optimal health.
      PubDate: 2021-05-14
      DOI: 10.1017/S0954422421000123
       
  • Malnutrition in early life and its neurodevelopmental and cognitive
           consequences: a scoping review

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Suryawan; A., Jalaludin, M.Y., Poh, B.K., Sanusi, R., Tan, V.M.H., Geurts, J.M., Muhardi, L.
      Pages: 136 - 149
      Abstract: The negative impact of stunting and severe underweight on cognitive neurodevelopment of children is well documented; however, the effect of overweight/obesity is still unclear. The 2018 Global Nutrition Report reported that stunting and overweight concurrently affect 189 million children worldwide. As existing reviews discuss undernutrition and overweight/obesity separately, this scoping review aims to document the impact of mild/moderate and severe underweight, stunting, and overweight/obesity among children aged 0–60 months on their cognitive neurodevelopmental trajectories. Twenty-six articles were analysed to extract significant information from literature retrieved from PubMed and Cochrane databases published from 1 January 2009 to 31 October 2019. Length gain is associated with cognitive neurodevelopment in normo-nourished and stunted children aged under 24 months. Among stunted children, it seems that cognitive and neurodevelopmental deficits can potentially be recovered before 8 years of age, particularly in those whose nutritional status has improved. The impact of overweight/obesity on cognitive neurodevelopment appears to be limited to attention, gross motor skills and executive control. Parental education level, birth weight/length, breastfeeding duration, and sanitation level are some identifiable factors that modify the impact of undernutrition and overweight/obesity on cognitive and neurodevelopment. In conclusion, underweight, stunting and overweight/obesity have a significant impact on cognitive neurodevelopment. Multidimensional approaches with various stakeholders should address all issues simultaneously, such as improving sanitation levels, assuring parental job security and adequate social welfare, and providing access to adequate nutrients for catch-up growth among underweight or stunted children and to affordable healthy foods for those who are overweight/obese and from low socio-economic status.
      PubDate: 2021-06-08
      DOI: 10.1017/S0954422421000159
       
  • Modulation of intestinal stem cell homeostasis by nutrients: a novel
           therapeutic option for intestinal diseases

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Wang; Dan, Li, Pei, Odle, Jack, Lin, Xi, Zhao, Jiangchao, Xiao, Kan, Liu, Yulan
      Pages: 150 - 158
      Abstract: Intestinal stem cells, which are capable of both self-renewal and differentiation to mature cell types, are responsible for maintaining intestinal epithelial homeostasis. Recent evidence indicates that these processes are mediated, in part, through nutritional status in response to diet. Diverse dietary patterns including caloric restriction, fasting, high-fat diets, ketogenic diets and high-carbohydrate diets as well as other nutrients control intestinal stem cell self-renewal and differentiation through nutrient-sensing pathways such as mammalian target of rapamycin and AMP-activated kinase. Herein, we summarise the current understanding of how intestinal stem cells contribute to intestinal epithelial homeostasis and diseases. We also discuss the effects of diet and nutrient-sensing pathways on intestinal stem cell self-renewal and differentiation, as well as their potential application in the prevention and treatment of intestinal diseases.
      PubDate: 2021-06-08
      DOI: 10.1017/S0954422421000172
       
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


Your IP address: 3.235.140.84
 
Home (Search)
API
About JournalTOCs
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-