Subjects -> RELIGION AND THEOLOGY (Total: 749 journals)
    - BUDDHIST (14 journals)
    - EASTERN ORTHODOX (1 journals)
    - HINDU (6 journals)
    - ISLAMIC (148 journals)
    - JUDAIC (22 journals)
    - OTHER DENOMINATIONS AND SECTS (4 journals)
    - PROTESTANT (22 journals)
    - RELIGION AND THEOLOGY (500 journals)
    - ROMAN CATHOLIC (32 journals)

RELIGION AND THEOLOGY (500 journals)            First | 1 2 3     

Showing 401 - 197 of 197 Journals sorted alphabetically
Revue Mabillon     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Revue Théologique de Louvain     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Ruch Biblijny i Liturgiczny     Open Access  
Ruch Filozoficzny     Open Access  
Rural Theology : international, ecumenical and interdisciplinary perspectives     Hybrid Journal  
Sacris Erudiri     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Sakarya Üniversitesi İlahiyat Fakültesi Dergisi / Journal of Sakarya University Faculty of Theology     Open Access  
Scandinavian Journal of the Old Testament: An International Journal of Nordic Theology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Science et Esprit     Open Access  
Scottish Church History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Scottish Journal of Theology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Scrinium : Journal of Patrology and Critical Hagiography     Open Access  
Scripta Instituti Donneriani Aboensis     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Scripta Theologica     Full-text available via subscription  
Secularism and Nonreligion     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Shofar : An Interdisciplinary Journal of Jewish Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Sikh Formations: Religion, Culture, Theory     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Siwö' : Revista de Teología / Revista de Estudios Sociorreligiosos     Open Access  
Social Sciences and Missions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Sociedad y Religión     Open Access  
Sociology of Religion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Sophia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Speculum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 32)
Spiritus: A Journal of Christian Spirituality     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
St Mark's Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Stato, Chiese e pluralismo confessionale     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Stellenbosch Theological Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Studia Azjatystyczne     Open Access  
Studia Canonica     Full-text available via subscription  
Studia Historiae Ecclesiasticae     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Studia Liturgica     Full-text available via subscription  
Studia Orientalia Christiana     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Studia Theologica - Nordic Journal of Theology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Studia Universitatis Babes-Bolyai Theologia Orthodoxa     Open Access  
Studia z Prawa Wyznaniowego     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Studies in Chinese Religions     Hybrid Journal  
Studies in Church History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Studies in East European Thought     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Studies in Interreligious Dialogue     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Studies in Religion / Sciences Religieuses     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Studies in Spirituality     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Studies in World Christianity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Svensk teologisk kvartalskrift     Open Access  
Svenskt Gudstjänstliv     Open Access  
Symposia : The Journal of Religion     Open Access  
Tang Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Tarnowskie Studia Teologiczne     Open Access  
TEACH Journal of Christian Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Tear Online     Open Access  
Temenos     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
TEOL-information     Open Access  
Teoliterária : Revista Brasileira de Literaturas e Teologias     Open Access  
Teología     Open Access  
Teologia i Człowiek     Open Access  
Teologia i Moralność     Open Access  
Teologia Praktyczna     Open Access  
Teología y Vida     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Teologisk tidsskrift     Open Access  
The Biblical Annals     Open Access  
The Ecumenical Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
The Heythrop Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
The Jurist : Studies in Church Law and Ministry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
The Muslim World     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
The Person and the Challenges. The Journal of Theology, Education, Canon Law and Social Studies Inspired by Pope John Paul II     Open Access  
Theoforum     Full-text available via subscription  
TheoLogica : An International Journal for Philosophy of Religion and Philosophical Theology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Theologica Xaveriana     Open Access  
Theological Librarianship : An Online Journal of the American Theological Library Association     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Théologiques     Full-text available via subscription  
Theology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Theology & Sexuality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Theology and Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
ThéoRèmes : Enjeux des Approches Empiriques des Religions     Open Access  
Tijdschrift voor Theologie     Full-text available via subscription  
Toleransi     Open Access  
Tópicos del seminario     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Toronto Journal of Theology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Traditio     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Trajecta : Religion, Culture and Society in the Low Countries     Open Access  
Transformation: An International Journal of Holistic Mission Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Tydskrif vir Geesteswetenskappe     Open Access  
U.S. Catholic Historian     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
ULUM : Journal of Religious Inquiries     Open Access  
Uskonnontutkija : Religionsforskaren     Open Access  
Verbum et Ecclesia     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Verbum Vitae     Open Access  
Veritas : Revista de Filosofí­a y Teología     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Vetus Testamentum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
VFAST Transactions on Islamic Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Via Spiritus : Revista de História da Espiritualidade e do Sentimento Religioso     Open Access  
Vigiliae Christianae     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Vincentian Heritage Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Wacana : Journal of the Humanities of Indonesia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Wege zum Menschen : Zeitschrift für Seelsorge und Beratung, heilendes und soziales Handeln     Hybrid Journal  
Zeitschrift für junge Religionswissenschaft     Open Access  
Zeitschrift für neues Testament     Full-text available via subscription  
Zeitschrift für Religion, Gesellschaft und Politik     Hybrid Journal  
Zeitschrift für Religions- und Geistesgeschichte     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Zeszyty Naukowe Centrum Badań im. Edyty Stein     Open Access  
Zutot     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)

  First | 1 2 3     

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Studies in Church History
Number of Followers: 2  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0424-2084 - ISSN (Online) 2059-0644
Published by Cambridge University Press Homepage  [353 journals]
  • Introduction

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      Authors: Methuen; Charlotte, Spicer, Andrew
      Pages: 1 - 7
      PubDate: 2022-06-08
      DOI: 10.1017/stc.2022.23
       
  • STC volume 58 Cover and Front matter

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      Pages: 1 - 14
      PubDate: 2022-06-08
      DOI: 10.1017/stc.2022.21
       
  • STC volume 58 Cover and Back matter

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      Pages: 1 - 1
      PubDate: 2022-06-08
      DOI: 10.1017/stc.2022.22
       
  • Contagion of the Jews: Metaphorical and Rhetorical Uses of Sickness,
           Plague, and Disease in Pseudo-Hegesippus

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      Authors: Bay; Carson
      Pages: 8 - 27
      Abstract: Drawing upon discourses developed in earlier Graeco-Roman and Judaeo-Christian antiquity, the little-known text De excidio Hierosolymitano, also dubbed ‘Pseudo-Hegesippus’, develops a discourse of Jewish disease within a history of Jerusalem's destruction by the Romans in 70 CE. Based upon Flavius Josephus's Greek Jewish War, this Latin Christian text of Late Antiquity thus deploys a rhetoric of Jewish contagion within its historiographical solution to the Christian theological exigency of explaining the Jews out of history. Far from being an incidental or merely aesthetic component of this work, this article shows that a discourse of Jewish sickness constitutes a central component of Pseudo-Hegesippus's conceptualization and presentation of the end of Jerusalem and the historical demise of the Jews.
      PubDate: 2022-06-08
      DOI: 10.1017/stc.2022.1
       
  • Bede on Sickness, Episcopal Identity and Monastic Asceticism

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      Authors: Collett; Jessica
      Pages: 28 - 45
      Abstract: The value of bodily affliction as a means for integrating an active life of good works on earth with the contemplative values of heaven, prior to the return of Christ and the world's end, remains relatively unexplored, despite suffering saints being a common medieval trope. Using the work of Gregory the Great and the Venerable Bede, this article seeks to explore the interrelation of an active contemplative life and bodily affliction to shed light upon Bede's use of Gregory and his presentation of Cuthbert's episcopate to forge a distinctive understanding of the links between bodily illness, episcopal identity and the biblical ordering of time, as that ordering finds expression in biblical eschatology and apocalyptic.
      PubDate: 2022-06-08
      DOI: 10.1017/stc.2022.2
       
  • Healing Body and Soul in Early Medieval Europe: Medical Remedies with
           Christian Elements

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      Authors: Burridge; Claire
      Pages: 46 - 67
      Abstract: The early medieval period has been traditionally cast as the nadir of medicine in the West. Such an image stemmed in part from the negative perceptions of ‘superstitious’ charms and incantations, in which medicine was seen to be detrimentally affected by Christian and pagan influences alike. This outdated view has been revised substantially, and the intersections between medicine and religion are now understood to reflect a complex, multivalent approach to healing. However, this re-evaluation of early medieval medicine, and especially of recipe literature, has concentrated primarily on Old English material. As a result, the substantial corpus of early medieval Latin continental recipes found outside the established canon of classical and late antique texts has largely been overlooked. This article seeks to redress this imbalance, offering the first systematic investigation into the ways in which Christian elements appear in these comparatively understudied pharmaceutical writings. The article's findings have significant implications for our understanding of Latin recipe literature and of the evolution of medical knowledge in early medieval Europe.
      PubDate: 2022-06-08
      DOI: 10.1017/stc.2022.3
       
  • Plague and Popular Revival: Ecclesiastical Authorities and the Bianchi
           Devotions in 1399

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      Authors: Lee; Alexandra R. A.
      Pages: 68 - 90
      Abstract: Religious processions were commonly held during plague outbreaks in medieval Europe to provide succour against disease. The Bianchi of 1399, a popular religious revival, is one such example. This article addresses the Bianchi in Tuscany, demonstrating the crucial role of ecclesiastical authorities in moulding this response to plague, and contributing to both religious history and the history of medicine. It first problematizes the connection between the Bianchi and a punitive plague which could purportedly be remedied by religious devotions. The role of the clergy in the movement is then examined, demonstrating their prominence in preparing the populace, preaching and even leading processions. An assessment of Bianchi processional composition and routes reveals exploitation of pre-existing liturgical traditions. This localized, comparative analysis demonstrates how individual Tuscan towns organized and supported these devotional activities, successfully managing the popular response to plague expressed in the Bianchi devotions.
      PubDate: 2022-06-08
      DOI: 10.1017/stc.2022.4
       
  • Preaching during Plague Epidemics in Early Modern Germany,
           c.1520–1618

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      Authors: Christ; Martin
      Pages: 91 - 111
      Abstract: This article considers preaching during plague epidemics in early modern Germany, tracing how preachers and priests engaged with the crisis that befell their towns. It does so by discussing three important features of preaching during plague epidemics to illustrate the arrangements made during outbreaks of plague and what they can tell us more broadly about preaching during times of crisis. First, it shows the changes and continuities in personnel during plague epidemics. Second, it considers the contents of the sermons and how plague was a continuous feature of many early modern sermons. Third, the article discusses spaces and how they were used for preaching during outbreaks of plague. The article shows the malleability of sermons and how Protestants and Catholics adapted recurring themes to illustrate divine punishment and mercy.
      PubDate: 2022-06-08
      DOI: 10.1017/stc.2022.5
       
  • A Sixteenth-Century Clergyman and Physician: Timothy Bright's Dual
           Approach to Melancholia

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      Authors: Betz; Emily
      Pages: 112 - 133
      Abstract: This article explores the nexus of healing between clergy and physicians in late sixteenth- and early seventeenth-century medicine by focusing on the disease of melancholia, and in particular on the earliest extant English monograph on that subject, A Treatise of Melancholie (1586), by Timothy Bright. Melancholia was a disease especially apt to be treated by both medical practitioners and the clergy as it was widely defined as both corporal and spiritual in origin. What makes Bright's treatise particularly noteworthy is the vocation of the author: Bright was both doctor and cleric, and his work straddled both occupations as he defined, diagnosed and attempted to cure melancholy in his reader. By examining what Bright wrote about the various aspects of the disease, this article provides further insight into the clashes, conciliations and cooperation between early modern medical practitioners.
      PubDate: 2022-06-08
      DOI: 10.1017/stc.2022.6
       
  • Godly Preaching, in Sickness and Ill-Health, in Seventeenth-Century
           England

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      Authors: Daniel; Robert W.
      Pages: 134 - 149
      Abstract: This article examines the myriad ways that sickness affected, and was exacerbated by, puritan preaching in seventeenth-century England. The term ‘puritan’ is deployed here to encompass Church of England, and later Nonconformist, ministers who espoused the significance of preaching God's word as a pastoral duty. By exploring occasions of, and motivations for, sermonizing when sick, such a study reveals that illness played a much larger role in the pulpit performances of England's preachers, especially amongst puritan clerics, than has hitherto been acknowledged.
      PubDate: 2022-06-08
      DOI: 10.1017/stc.2022.7
       
  • Healthcare and Catholic Enlightenment in the Polish-Lithuanian
           Commonwealth

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      Authors: Witecki; Stanisław
      Pages: 150 - 172
      Abstract: In the eighteenth century, the ideal of the priest in society was reformed by Polish and Lithuanian Catholic bishops. Instrumental in these reforms were Ignacy Massalski (1726–94), bishop of Vilnius (1762–94) and Michał Poniatowski (1736–94), bishop of Płock (1773–85), then archbishop of Gniezno (1785–94), and simultaneously administrator of the diocese of Kraków (1782–90). Their programmes included making clergy responsible for medical education and the organization of healthcare, and seeking to reform customs which were viewed as detrimental to health. The article draws on pastoral letters, popular educational books and administrative decrees to ascertain what ideas reformers imposed on the clergy. Episcopal visitation protocols, sermons and parish school textbooks are analysed to verify the effects of reforms and ascertain what was taught about health in the parishes. The examination of the relatively rare egodocuments of priests sheds light on how they experienced their afflictions. The article concludes that healthcare was an important topic for Catholic enlighteners in the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth, and that priests played a significant role in promoting it. Reforms were driven by humanitarian and physiocratic principles, and were facilitated by an optimistic belief in the benefits of medicine. Nonetheless, many enlightened programmes failed because priests were unwilling or unable to implement changes that interfered with lived religion.
      PubDate: 2022-06-08
      DOI: 10.1017/stc.2022.8
       
  • Moral Sick Notes: Medical Exemptions to Religious Fasting in the
           Eighteenth-Century Spanish World

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      Authors: Klaeren; George A.
      Pages: 173 - 195
      Abstract: Eighteenth-century moral theologians in Spain expressed concern that many Catholics were obtaining permission to avoid fasting and abstinence from meat by claiming that they were ill and required medical dispensations. This article examines the theological and medical debate which occurred over a series of treatises and essays in which physicians and moral theologians sought to come to a common understanding of when a Spaniard was infirm enough to be medically excused from fasting and, perhaps more importantly, who had the authority to make this decision. Throughout the eighteenth century in Spain, this responsibility continued to be shared by priests and physicians. The debate highlights the contest for medical authority, mitigated by doubt. It also suggests that any understanding of early modern medical pluralism must include members of the theological community as well as health professionals.
      PubDate: 2022-06-08
      DOI: 10.1017/stc.2022.9
       
  • Pain as a Spiritual Barometer of Health: A Sign of Divine Love,
           1780–1850

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      Authors: Platt; Angela
      Pages: 196 - 216
      Abstract: A popular nineteenth-century spiritual barometer displays the steps one might take in the Christian life to bring oneself closer to either ‘glory’ or ‘perdition’. Near the top of the barometer, nearing ‘glory’ is the bearing of painful tribulations, connected to the cross of Christ. Whilst pain was undeniably an undesired presence in life, it was also a hallmark of spiritual progress. The denouement of Christian health, therefore, was often to be in pain. Looking at pain narratives of six evangelical Dissenters, this article explores how pain was perceived by these individuals through the lens of the atonement. As the atonement was a loving aspect of God's providence, so too was pain in the Christian life a quotidian display of divine love. The meaning and purpose of pain was sanctification, understood as a retributive, though mainly redemptive, implement of God's fatherly love. Whilst sharing a common framework of atonement, case studies from different denominations display nuanced differences in their pain narratives: the Baptists and Congregationalists examined here emphasized the sin that required the atonement, whereas the Quakers emphasized suffering with or alongside Christ.
      PubDate: 2022-06-08
      DOI: 10.1017/stc.2022.10
       
  • Caring for the Sick in Hamburg: Amalie Sieveking and the ‘Dormant
           Strength’ of Christian Women

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      Authors: Kloes; Andrew
      Pages: 217 - 240
      Abstract: Following an outbreak of cholera in Hamburg in 1831, Amalie Sieveking founded the Weiblicher Verein für Armen- und Krankenpflege (Women's Association for the Care of the Poor and the Sick). This was the first Protestant religious voluntary society in Germany organized and led by a woman. Sieveking's conception of the Christian life of faith and the contemporary needs of the kingdom of God convinced her that Protestant women needed to assume a more active role in German society. The Women's Association visited the homes of those who were sick or in other difficult personal circumstances. They attempted to promote the comprehensive well-being of those whom they assisted by providing food, clothing and other necessities of life, paid employment, housing and opportunities to cultivate their spiritual life.
      PubDate: 2022-06-08
      DOI: 10.1017/stc.2022.11
       
  • Health and Sickness as Reality and Metaphor in the Oratory Parish of F. W.
           Faber, 1849–63

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      Authors: Wilkinson; Melissa
      Pages: 241 - 261
      Abstract: This article examines the first London Oratory, located in King William St, London between May 1849 and March 1854, during the provostship of its founder F. W. Faber (1814–63). Beginning with a discussion of the physically unhealthy climate at the Oratory and the situation of its congregation, it then considers Faber's health while provost before examining his use of words such as sickness, illness, health and infection in written works and analysing his use of these as metaphors for the spiritual life. The metaphorical concepts of health and sickness are linked to his pessimism about humanity and his preoccupation with the four last things, obtaining eternal salvation, and the relationship between the individual Christian and God. The article thus highlights something of the spirituality, health and teaching of an individual priest, as well as the preoccupations of a parish in mid-nineteenth-century London.
      PubDate: 2022-06-08
      DOI: 10.1017/stc.2022.12
       
  • Ministering to Body and Soul: Medical Missions and the Jewish Community in
           Nineteenth-Century London

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      Authors: Jarman; Jemima
      Pages: 262 - 283
      Abstract: From 1879, evangelical missions aimed specifically at Jews began providing free medical services to the newly arrived immigrant community in London's East End. This article focuses on three specific medical missions to Jews belonging to the London Society for Promoting Christianity among the Jews, the British Society for the Propagation of the Gospel amongst the Jews and the Mildmay Mission to the Jews. It considers the particular attractions of these medical missions in terms of what they were able to offer the immigrant Jew that existing state and voluntary medical services did not provide, alongside the cost and possible risk posed by attendance. The article questions whether the popularity of evangelical medical missions within the Jewish East End is as surprising as it may first appear, if the limited health care options available to the nineteenth-century poor are considered in conjunction with the additional obstacles facing Jewish immigrants, such as cultural and religious differences, anti-Jewish prejudice and most notably the language barrier.
      PubDate: 2022-06-08
      DOI: 10.1017/stc.2022.13
       
  • The Church's Promotion of Public Health in the Southern Part of the
           Nineteenth-Century Austro-Hungarian Empire

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      Authors: Gabrić; Branka, Damjanović Barišić, Darija
      Pages: 284 - 305
      Abstract: Then part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire, the kingdom of Slavonia was characterized in the nineteenth century by constant political and administrative changes. After its liberation from Ottoman conquests, the rural area of the kingdom, already underpopulated, was left with damaged and poor infrastructure. In such circumstances, and as the most educated figures within their communities, Catholic bishops from the diocese of Đakovo and Srijem oversaw the reorganization and reform of local society, providing the foundations for further social development. They renewed and modernized local infrastructure and the production of basic goods, while also providing access to clean water and introducing hygiene measures in cemeteries to prevent the spread of infectious diseases. In addition, they played a crucial role in the opening of hospitals and schools in the region. In such work, one can detect elements of the approach later known as public health.
      PubDate: 2022-06-08
      DOI: 10.1017/stc.2022.14
       
  • ‘It is well with the child’: Changing Views on Protestant Missionary
           Children's Health, 1870s–1930s

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      Authors: Morrison; Hugh
      Pages: 306 - 329
      Abstract: Esme Cleall observes that for nineteenth-century British missionary families ill-health was constructed as being ‘reflexive of and contributory to a specifically missionary identity’. This article argues that while this was a persistent theme, a new and significantly different discourse emerged emphasizing missionary families’ health. Children were central to this discursive shift. The article focuses on missionary children's health, using selected Anglo-American cases. There was an uneasy overlap of religiously motivated rhetoric that still expected illness and death to be part of missionary childhood experience, and a professionalized discourse that redefined missionary families as sites of health and well-being. This culminated in medical and academic literature within religious and missionary circles that constructed missionaries’ children as a new category. Thus churches responded both to the development of the medical profession and to the development of modern child-centred thinking and practices, in the process developing a new missiological or theological response to childhood.
      PubDate: 2022-06-08
      DOI: 10.1017/stc.2022.15
       
  • Caring for the Sick and Dying in Early Twentieth-Century Anglo-Catholic
           Parishes

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      Authors: Cruickshank; Dan D.
      Pages: 330 - 351
      Abstract: This article explores the evidence given to the Royal Commission on Ecclesiastical Discipline (1904–6), to examine how Anglo-Catholic clergy and parishes across England were caring for the sick and dying at the beginning of the twentieth century. It considers why Anglo-Catholic clergy and parishes had come by that point to believe that the existing provisions for the care of the sick and the dying provided by the Book of Common Prayer were not wholly satisfactory. Through the replies of clergy to the commission, it discusses the extent to which these practices were born out of a need to find new ways to reach the sick and the dying in twentieth-century England, and to what extent they were seen as demonstrating an allegiance to a more ‘catholic’ theology.
      PubDate: 2022-06-08
      DOI: 10.1017/stc.2022.16
       
  • ‘Alleviating the Sum of Human Suffering’: The Origins, Attributes and
           Appeal of Hospital Sunday, 1859–1914

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      Authors: Ottewill; Roger
      Pages: 352 - 371
      Abstract: In many communities, from the mid-Victorian era until well into the twentieth century, one Sunday every year was dedicated to the work of local hospitals and dispensaries. Originating in Birmingham and designated Hospital Sunday, it enabled congregations to remember their responsibilities towards the sick and it raised much-needed funds for what was essentially voluntary provision, prior to the establishment of the National Health Service. In so doing, they were demonstrating their commitment to philanthropy and (for many) the tenets of the social gospel. Hospital Sunday also symbolized an element of interdenominational cooperation, with most denominations participating, at a time when relations between the established church and the Free Churches on other issues could sometimes be fraught. Moreover, it facilitated the engagement of churches with charitable organizations, such as friendly societies. This article aims to explore the origins of Hospital Sunday, to analyse its key attributes, to assess its appeal and to highlight some of the issues which arose during the Victorian and Edwardian eras.
      PubDate: 2022-06-08
      DOI: 10.1017/stc.2022.17
       
  • Hospital Sunday and the new National Health Service: An End to ‘The
           Voluntary Spirit’ in England'

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      Authors: Piggott; Robert
      Pages: 372 - 393
      Abstract: The advent of the welfare state has been seen by some historians as a decisive blow for British traditions of voluntarism, echoing some of the concerns raised in the lead up to the establishment of the National Health Service (NHS). This article examines the practice of Hospital Sunday in England in the post-war period. In doing so it evidences the effect of the nationalization of the voluntary hospitals in 1948 on the relationships between clergy, their congregations and health care. It argues that much greater attention needs to be paid to the continuities evident in Christian-inspired social action in the NHS in the long 1950s and after. Attending to the role of such Christian social action allows historians both to extend our knowledge of the importance of Christianity to social life in the period and to deepen our understanding of the operation of the welfare state.
      PubDate: 2022-06-08
      DOI: 10.1017/stc.2022.18
       
  • From Plato to Pentecostalism: Sickness and Deliverance in the Theology of
           Derek Prince

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      Authors: Stanley; Brian
      Pages: 394 - 414
      Abstract: This article analyses the intellectual sources and global influence of the demonology of Derek Prince (1915–2003), a former philosophy fellow of King's College, Cambridge, who, after his move to the United States in 1963, became a globally influential Pentecostal teacher and author. It argues that his academic expertise in the philosophy of Plato shaped his understanding of the invisible realm of spiritual powers and its impact on the health and material well-being of Christians. Prince's teaching on ancestral curses and the vulnerability of Christians to demonization has been widely received in Africa and other parts of the non-Western world, appearing to provide answers to endemic problems of chronic sickness and impoverishment.
      PubDate: 2022-06-08
      DOI: 10.1017/stc.2022.19
       
  • Masks vs. God and Country: The Conflict between Public Health and
           Christian Nationalism

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      Authors: Acors; Brittany
      Pages: 415 - 437
      Abstract: From its inception, the United States Public Health Service (USPHS) has been expressly areligious, aiming to promote the health of the American people during specific crises such as the COVID-19 pandemic, as well as responding to endemic issues such as heart disease, opioid addiction and obesity. However, some Christian nationalists perceive this areligious advocacy of science as a challenge to the moral authority of Christianity and the Bible. Protests against public health guidelines have utilized religious language to defend what participants see as their civil and God-given rights, deepening the divide between science and religion. Yet historically, public health advocates have built relationships with religious community leaders and employed educational campaigns to bridge this gap. Drawing on an analysis of USPHS history, Christian nationalist ideology and recent COVID-19 protests, this article argues that public health has historically used specific strategies to ensure a more favourable response and compliance, and makes the case that it should do so again.
      PubDate: 2022-06-08
      DOI: 10.1017/stc.2022.20
       
 
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