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  Subjects -> DISABILITY (Total: 103 journals)
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Journal of Deaf Studies and Deaf Education
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.801
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 13  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1081-4159 - ISSN (Online) 1465-7325
Published by Oxford University Press Homepage  [419 journals]
  • Predicting Early Literacy: Auditory and Visual Speech Decoding in Deaf and
           Hard-of-Hearing Children

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      Pages: 311 - 323
      Abstract: AbstractThe current study investigated the relative contributions of auditory speech decoding (i.e., auditory discrimination) and visual speech decoding (i.e., speechreading) on phonological awareness and letter knowledge in deaf and hard-of-hearing (DHH) kindergartners (Mage = 6;4, n = 27) and hearing kindergartners (Mage = 5;10, n = 42). Hearing children scored higher on auditory discrimination and phonological awareness, with the DHH children scoring at chance level for auditory discrimination, while no differences were found on speechreading and letter knowledge. For DHH children, speechreading correlated with phonological awareness and letter knowledge, for the hearing children, auditory discrimination correlated with phonological awareness. Two regression analyses showed that speechreading predicted phonological awareness and letter knowledge in DHH children only. Speechreading may thus be a compensatory factor in early literacy for DHH children, at least for those who are exposed to spoken language in monolingual or in bilingual or bimodal-bilingual contexts, and could be important to focus on during early literacy instruction.
      PubDate: Tue, 12 Jul 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/deafed/enac019
      Issue No: Vol. 27, No. 4 (2022)
       
  • Speech-Language Pathologists’ Support for Parents of Young d/Deaf
           Multilingual Learners

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      Pages: 324 - 337
      Abstract: AbstractIncreasing cultural and linguistic diversity among children and families brings new challenges for early intervention professionals. The purpose of this study was to identify the specific roles and needs of speech-language pathologists (SLPs) who practice in early intervention settings with culturally and linguistically diverse families of d/Deaf multilingual learners (DMLs). Thirteen SLPs completed an online survey about their practices and needs. Interviews were conducted with five parents of DMLs. Results showed that SLPs have lower self-satisfaction with families of DMLs compared to mainstream families. Parents were highly satisfied with the support they received. Both groups of participants reported a need for specific tools or adaptations, especially if there was no shared language. Thematic analysis identified three themes: communication and partnership, professional resources for responding to diversity, and diversity of parental profiles. This article provides an insight into the perspectives of both professionals and culturally and linguistically diverse parents, and identifies specific aspects of early intervention services with parents of DMLs: developing partnership in the context of cultural and/or linguistic differences, discussing topics related to multilingualism, and providing highly adaptable family-centered services.
      PubDate: Sat, 20 Aug 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/deafed/enac024
      Issue No: Vol. 27, No. 4 (2022)
       
  • Online Multi-Component Cognitive Strategy Instruction for Cochlear Implant
           Users: Reading Comprehension

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      Pages: 338 - 354
      Abstract: AbstractThe aim of this study was to examine the effect of online multi-component strategy instruction (MCCSI) on students with cochlear implants (CIs) regarding their reading comprehension. Moreover, it was to examine whether the students maintained and generalized the skills they acquired as well as the student’ and their mothers’ opinions regarding the intervention. This research was carried out with a multiple probe design across subjects. Three students with CIs who were in the fourth or fifth grade participated in this study. As a result, online MCCSI was found to be effective with a large effect size for all three students, and the students maintained their acquired skills at three and six weeks following the intervention. Additionally, two of the students were able to generalize the strategies they learned. Moreover, the opinions of the participating students and families regarding the social validity of the research were positive.
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Jul 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/deafed/enac017
      Issue No: Vol. 27, No. 4 (2022)
       
  • Contribution of Lexical Quality and Sign Language Variables to Reading
           Comprehension

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      Pages: 355 - 372
      Abstract: AbstractThe lexical quality hypothesis proposes that the quality of phonological, orthographic, and semantic representations impacts reading comprehension. In Study 1, we evaluated the contributions of lexical quality to reading comprehension in 97 deaf and 98 hearing adults matched for reading ability. While phonological awareness was a strong predictor for hearing readers, for deaf readers, orthographic precision and semantic knowledge, not phonology, predicted reading comprehension (assessed by two different tests). For deaf readers, the architecture of the reading system adapts by shifting reliance from (coarse-grained) phonological representations to high-quality orthographic and semantic representations. In Study 2, we examined the contribution of American Sign Language (ASL) variables to reading comprehension in 83 deaf adults. Fingerspelling (FS) and ASL comprehension skills predicted reading comprehension. We suggest that FS might reinforce orthographic-to-semantic mappings and that sign language comprehension may serve as a linguistic basis for the development of skilled reading in deaf signers.
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Jul 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/deafed/enac018
      Issue No: Vol. 27, No. 4 (2022)
       
  • Deaf-Blindness through the Voices and Experiences of Parents and Educators

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      Pages: 373 - 384
      Abstract: AbstractThis qualitative study used the experiences of parents and educators to explore the developmental processes and behaviors of deafblind people of different ages and with different etiologies. It also explored which strategies of intervention and care employed by parents and educators best promote and stimulate the abilities and the autonomy of deafblind people. Eligible parents and educators were identified and recruited from the New York Parents Association for Deafblind and the Helen Keller National Center on Long Island using purposeful sampling. Seven mothers, one father, and two educators were interviewed using a narrative method. Data analysis was performed using Heideggerian hermeneutic phenomenology. The themes that emerged concern communication, expression of emotions, sense of self and external reality, autonomy, and the sphere of educational intervention. This research goes beyond existing knowledge on the syndromes/disabilities related to deafblindness, focusing instead on the combinations of varying degrees of hearing and sight deprivation.
      PubDate: Fri, 20 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/deafed/enac014
      Issue No: Vol. 27, No. 4 (2022)
       
  • Perspectives of D/HH-Students on Mainstream Higher Education: A
           Qualitative Study

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      Pages: 385 - 398
      Abstract: AbstractSocial, contextual, and technological changes affected the educational context for students who are deaf or hard of hearing (D/HH) in higher education in many countries. Although, several barriers to academic success already have been identified, the perspectives of D/HH-students on inclusion, educational facilities, and support are important to overcome them. This interview-based qualitative study describes the perspectives of 32 D/HH-students in mainstream higher education in The Netherlands. Within the dichotomy of environmental factors and personal factors, data have been analysed. Students experienced social acceptance by others with typical hearing, although participating in social events sometimes caused feelings of loneliness or separation. Access arrangements and adjustments in educational programs were necessary to cope with the experienced fatigue, participate during lectures or increase speech intelligibility of the lecturer. Especially poor classroom acoustics and limited intelligibility of speech hampered students during lectures. Students expressed their dissatisfaction about the way access arrangements and adjustments were arranged, yet at the same time, they do not know what the requested help should look like. A co-created policy in which D/HH-students, student support officers, and institutional policy makers are involved, would support D/HH-students in mainstream higher education in The Netherlands and abroad in their needs.
      PubDate: Sat, 09 Jul 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/deafed/enac020
      Issue No: Vol. 27, No. 4 (2022)
       
  • Discrimination and Deaf Adolescents’ Subjective Well-Being: The Role
           of Deaf Identity

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      Pages: 399 - 407
      Abstract: AbstractThis study tested the influence of Deaf identity (cognitive identification and affective identification) on the association between perceived deaf discrimination and subjective well-being among Chinese adolescents who are deaf and hard-of-hearing (DHH), based on the rejection-identification model. Questionnaires on perceived deaf discrimination, subjective well-being, Deaf identity, and demographic information were completed by 246 DHH students (15–23 years old) from special residential schools in China. The results indicated that: (1) higher level of perceived deaf discrimination was significantly associated with lower level of subjective well-being (direct effect = −0.24, 95% confidence interval [CI] = [−0.37, −0.12], p < .001); (2) there was a significant indirect effect of perceived deaf discrimination on subjective well-being via cognitive identification (indirect effect = −0.07, 95% CI = [−0.12, −0.01], p < .05); and (3) positive affective identification due to increased cognitive identification with Deaf community may help counteract the negative impact of perceived deaf discrimination on subjective well-being (indirect effect = 0.06, 95% CI = [0.03, 0.10], p < .001). These findings further support the notion that the different components of group identification should be examined separately.
      PubDate: Fri, 20 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/deafed/enac013
      Issue No: Vol. 27, No. 4 (2022)
       
  • Development of the Multidimensional Inventory of Deaf Acculturative Stress

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      Pages: 408 - 422
      Abstract: AbstractDeaf adults may experience acculturative stress as they navigate within and between the Hearing and Deaf communities. However, no measure has been developed to assess levels of deaf acculturative stress. This study aimed to develop the Multidimensional Inventory of Deaf Acculturative Stress (MIDAS). The MIDAS was developed through a sequential and iterative scale development procedure and then tested on a sample of 104 deaf adults across the United States (age range = 18–79; 74% female). Principal component analyses were run for item refinement and selection. The final analyses yielded four factors for Stress from the Hearing Community, three factors for Stress from the Deaf Community, and two factors for Intersectionality. Construct validity was demonstrated through correlations in the expected directions with measures of Hearing and Deaf acculturation identity and ethnic/racial identity. The utility of the MIDAS is discussed with regard to future research.
      PubDate: Sat, 09 Jul 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/deafed/enac016
      Issue No: Vol. 27, No. 4 (2022)
       
  • Training College Students with Hearing Loss in Theory of Mind

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      Pages: 423 - 433
      Abstract: AbstractThis paper explored training methods to improve the Theory of Mind levels of Chinese college students with hearing loss and investigated the transfer effect of training. Ninety Chinese college students with hearing loss were randomly divided into two groups: the ToM training group and the physical-conversation training group. The ToM training group received ToM training, and the physical-conversation training group as the control group received physical-conversation training. All the participants attended four separate 60-min lectures. The ToM Story Task and the False Belief Task were used to assess the training’s effect, and the ToM animation task was adopted to investigate the transfer effect. Before training, the level of ToM of the two participant groups was similar. After training, the ToM level of Chinese college students with hearing loss who participated in ToM training was significantly higher than the students who underwent physical-conversation training. Moreover, the findings revealed that ToM training has long-term transfer effects. This study thus showed that ToM training can effectively improve the ToM level of Chinese college students with hearing loss.
      PubDate: Fri, 08 Jul 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/deafed/enac015
      Issue No: Vol. 27, No. 4 (2022)
       
  • Development of a Health Behavior Screening Tool for Deaf College Students

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      Pages: 434 - 442
      Abstract: AbstractYoung adults who are Deaf or Hard-of-Hearing (D/HH) face behavioral health risks similar to hearing adults. Despite the emphasis on health behavior screening in health care settings, a brief screening tool in American Sign Language (ASL) does not exist. This manuscript describes the development and pilot testing of an online survey in ASL called the Deaf Health Behavior Report. The Deaf Health Behavior Report includes standardized questions for general health, health behaviors, and psychosocial topics. We invited all D/HH students at a university in Southern California to complete the Deaf Health Behavior Report. A total of 31 D/HH students completed the survey. The most prevalent health risks were related to nutrition, stress, and binge drinking. The Deaf Health Behavior Report is a useful tool for health promotion efforts on college campuses and in general health settings.
      PubDate: Sat, 20 Aug 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/deafed/enac021
      Issue No: Vol. 27, No. 4 (2022)
       
  • Turkish Sign Language Adaptation of the Turkish Health Literacy Scale-32

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      Pages: 443 - 452
      Abstract: AbstractSign language speakers are at a disadvantage in terms of health literacy due to the lack of health education materials in sign languages. Deaf and hard of hearing (DHH) individuals are excluded from health literacy research due to the lack of measurement tools in their language of excellent fluency. This study aims to provide the literature with a tool that allows the measurement of health literacy among DHH individuals. The Turkish Health Literacy Scale (THLS)-32 was translated into Turkish Sign Language (TSL). After the THLS-32 was translated into TSL in video format, it was tested for validity and reliability. The translated version of the scale was administered to participants from a DHH association in Turkey who are fluent in TSL. Subsequently, a study was conducted with 207 DHH individuals. The study group was assessed in terms of their mean index scores and evaluated to have “limited health literacy” according to the THLS-32 classification. We conclude that the THLS-32 in TSL is suitable to measure health literacy in DHH individuals and to assess the impact of the health education system.
      PubDate: Mon, 01 Aug 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/deafed/enac025
      Issue No: Vol. 27, No. 4 (2022)
       
  • Word-Level Instruction for Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Students: An
           Observation Study

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      Pages: 453 - 467
      Abstract: AbstractDespite the fact that children’s word reading and spelling skills are crucial for developing text-level comprehension and composition, little is known about what teachers do in classrooms to promote deaf and hard-of-hearing (DHH) students’ learning of word reading and spelling. This observational study examined strategies teachers of DHH students used when teaching word reading and spelling to DHH students who used spoken English. One day of language arts instruction in 23 kindergartens through second-grade classrooms was observed. Teachers’ word-level instruction was coded. Results indicated that teachers spent substantially more time on word-level instruction during decoding and encoding contexts than they did during text reading and writing contexts. In addition, differences were found in teachers’ use of strategies depending on the instructional contexts. Teachers utilized phonological strategies considerably more frequently than any other strategy in their word-level instruction.
      PubDate: Fri, 08 Jul 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/deafed/enac022
      Issue No: Vol. 27, No. 4 (2022)
       
  • Sounds Like Home: Growing Up Black and Deaf in the South

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      Pages: 468 - 468
      Abstract: Review of: (2019). 20th Anniversary Edition (with a New Introduction by Joseph Hill and Carolyn McCaskill) Gallaudet University Press.
      PubDate: Wed, 24 Aug 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/deafed/enac027
      Issue No: Vol. 27, No. 4 (2022)
       
 
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