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  Subjects -> DISABILITY (Total: 103 journals)
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Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.81
Citation Impact (citeScore): 4
Number of Followers: 87  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1573-3432 - ISSN (Online) 0162-3257
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2467 journals]
  • Vocal Emotion Recognition in Autism: Behavioral Performance and
           Event-Related Potential (ERP) Response

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      Abstract: Abstract Autistic youth display difficulties in emotion recognition, yet little research has examined behavioral and neural indices of vocal emotion recognition (VER). The current study examines behavioral and event-related potential (N100, P200, Late Positive Potential [LPP]) indices of VER in autistic and non-autistic youth. Participants (N = 164) completed an emotion recognition task, the Diagnostic Analyses of Nonverbal Accuracy (DANVA-2) which included VER, during EEG recording. The LPP amplitude was larger in response to high intensity VER, and social cognition predicted VER errors. Verbal IQ, not autism, was related to VER errors. An interaction between VER intensity and social communication impairments revealed these impairments were related to larger LPP amplitudes during low intensity VER. Taken together, differences in VER may be due to higher order cognitive processes, not basic, early perception (N100, P200), and verbal cognitive abilities may underlie behavioral, yet occlude neural, differences in VER processing.
      PubDate: 2023-01-24
       
  • Limited Reliability and Validity of the Autism Spectrum Quotient Short
           form (AQ-10) to Screen Autistic Traits in Undergraduate Students

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      PubDate: 2023-01-23
       
  • Self-reported Everyday Sources of Happiness and Unhappiness in Autistic
           Adults

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      Abstract: Abstract Purpose: Daily mood can be influenced by a range of experiences. Identifying everyday life experiences that make autistic adults happy and unhappy holds potential to foster positive mood and tackle mental health problems amongst this group. Methods: A total of 293 autistic adults between the ages of 18 to 35 years old (mean age of 26.51 years old (SD = 4.62); 43.3% female gender, 4.8% nonbinary) provided open-text responses regarding everyday sources of happiness and unhappiness. Using an iterative process of inductive coding, 14 happy themes and 22 unhappy themes of mood-changing life experiences were identified based on self-report qualitative data. Results: Common themes across the happy and unhappy domain involved social partners, social interactions, and engagement in recreational and employment activities, with additional distinct themes specific to happy or unhappy mood. Top themes identified in the happy domain emphasizes encouraging quality relationships and positive interactions with others and cultivating supportive work/societal environments to build a sense of achievement and value. Meanwhile, emotional tolls accompanied negative relationships and interactions, underscoring the necessity to provide autistic adults with conflict resolution and coping skills to increase feelings of happiness. Conclusion: Overall, the wide range of sources of happy and unhappy everyday experiences highlights the importance of considering personal preferences in engagement with others and activities in treatment.
      PubDate: 2023-01-23
       
  • The Methodological Quality and Intervention Fidelity of Randomised
           Controlled Trials Evaluating Social Skills Group Programs in Autistic
           Adolescents: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

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      Abstract: Abstract A systematic review and meta-analysis were utilised to explore the methodological quality, program fidelity, and efficacy of social skills group programs (SSGPs) aiming to support autistic adolescents in navigating their everyday social worlds. The study evaluated the methodological quality and theoretical fidelity of studies, with a random effect meta-analysis conducted to summarise the overall efficacy of SSGP and its effect on social communication and interaction, behavioural/emotional challenges, adaptive functioning, and autism characteristics. Although findings from the 18 identified studies indicated an adjusted medium overall effect with these programs successfully supporting autistic adolescents’ socialisation needs (g = 0. 60, p < 0.001), most studies demonstrated medium to low program fidelity despite their good methodological quality. Given the significant heterogeneity of SSGPs and variations in the design and measurement frameworks of efficacy studies, understanding the generalisability of the findings of this research is unclear.
      PubDate: 2023-01-21
       
  • Estimating the Prevalence of Autism Spectrum Disorder in New South Wales,
           Australia: A Data Linkage Study of Three Routinely Collected Datasets

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      Abstract: Abstract Routinely collected data help estimate the prevalence of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in jurisdictions without active autism surveillance. We created a population-based cohort of 1,211,834 children born in 2002–2015 in New South Wales, Australia using data linkage. Children with ASD were identified in three datasets – disability services, hospital admissions, and ambulatory mental health data. The prevalence of ASD in the cohort was 1.3% by age 12 and prevalence at age 6 increased an average of 4.1% per year (95% Confidence Interval, 3.3%, 4.8%). Most children with ASD were identified in disability services data (87%), although data linkage identified 1,711 additional cases that were more likely female, older at first contact, and living in major cities and less disadvantaged areas.
      PubDate: 2023-01-18
       
  • Autistic Traits, Gender Minority Stress, and Mental Health in Transgender
           and Non-Binary Adults

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      Abstract: Abstract The present study investigated the relation between autistic traits and gender minority stress and the relative importance of autistic traits and gender minority stress in predicting mental health outcomes in gender minority adults. An online survey was completed by 90 transgender women, 72 transgender men, 48 non-binary individuals assigned male at birth (AMAB), and 98 non-binary individuals assigned female at birth (AFAB). Autistic traits positively correlated with internalised transphobia in the non-binary groups. In general, higher autistic traits and gender minority stress correlated with poorer mental health outcomes. After controlling for gender minority stress, autistic traits accounted for additional variance of suicidality across gender minority groups, anxiety symptoms in the non-binary groups, and all mental health outcomes in non-binary AFAB.
      PubDate: 2023-01-18
       
  • Plasma Amino Acid Profile in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder in
           Southern China: Analysis of 110 Cases

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      Abstract: Abstract To retrospectively explore the characteristics of plasma amino acids (PAAs) in children with autism spectrum disorder and their clinical association via case-control study. A total of 110 autistic and 55 healthy children were recruited from 2014 to 2018. The clinical phenotypes included severity of autism, cognition, adaptability, and regression. Compared with the control group, autistic children had significantly elevated glutamate, γ-Amino-n-butyric acid, glutamine, sarcosine, δ-aminolevulinic acid, glycine and citrulline. In contrast, their plasma level of ethanolamine, phenylalanine, tryptophan, homocysteine, pyroglutamic acid, hydroxyproline, ornithine, histidine, lysine, and glutathione were significantly lower. Elevated neuroactive amino acids (glutamate) and decreased essential amino acids were mostly distinct characteristics of PAAs of autistic children. Increased level of tryptophan might be associated with severity of autism.
      PubDate: 2023-01-18
       
  • Virtual Training of Medical Students to Promote the Comfort and
           Cooperation of Patients with Neurodevelopmental Disabilities

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      Abstract: Abstract Patients with neurodevelopmental disabilities generally have less access to necessary medical care compared to those without disabilities. Barriers to adequate care include patient fear and uncooperative behavior during routine medical procedures and inadequate preparation of medical professionals to treat this population. Researchers have identified multiple behavior-analytic procedures for promoting comfort and cooperation during medical treatments. Efficient, cost-effective training programs are needed to widely disseminate behavior-analytic procedures to medical students and professionals. The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy of a virtual training to prepare medical students to implement behavioral procedures that could be easily incorporated into typical wellness examinations. Seven medical students received behavioral skills training (BST) delivered remotely via the Internet. Results showed that the training successfully increased students’ correct implementation of the procedures in roleplay with the experimenter and with patients with neurodevelopmental disabilities. Responding also maintained at high levels 2 weeks after the training. These findings suggest that virtual BST is an efficient, practical approach for training health care professionals to implement general behavior management strategies to increase the comfort and cooperation of patients with NDD.
      PubDate: 2023-01-17
       
  • Autistic Adults Show Intact Learning on a Visuospatial Serial Reaction
           Time Task

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      Abstract: Abstract Some theories have proposed that autistic individuals have difficulty learning predictive relationships. We tested this hypothesis using a serial reaction time task in which participants learned to predict the locations of a repeating sequence of target locations. We conducted a large-sample online study with 61 autistic and 71 neurotypical adults. The autistic group had slower overall reaction times, but demonstrated sequence-specific learning equivalent to the neurotypical group, consistent with other findings of typical procedural memory in autism. The neurotypical group, however, made significantly more prediction-related errors early in the experiment when the stimuli changed from repeated sequences to random locations, suggesting certain limited behavioural differences in the learning or utilization of predictive relationships for autistic adults.
      PubDate: 2023-01-14
       
  • Correction to: Using Structural Equation Modeling to Analyze Handwriting
           of Children and Youth with Autism Spectrum Disorder

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      PubDate: 2023-01-13
       
  • The Relationship Between Parenting Stress and Parental Burnout Among
           Chinese Parents of Children with ASD: A Moderated Mediation Model

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      Abstract: Abstract This study investigated the role of resilience as a mediator and the place of residence as a moderator of parenting stress and parental burnout. The Parenting Stress Index-Short Form, Parental Burnout Assessment, and Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale were administered to 249 Chinese parents of children with ASD (M = 33.95 years, SD = 7.6). Results show that resilience partially mediates the relation between parenting stress and parental burnout. Besides, both the effect of parenting stress on parental burnout and the mediating effect of resilience are moderated by rural/urban residence. This study highlights parenting stress is a risk factor for parental burnout and resilience is the potential mechanism underlying this relation. These findings provide implications for family services for parents of children with ASD.
      PubDate: 2023-01-13
       
  • Associations Among Autism Symptom Domains and Facets of Caregiver Strain

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      Abstract: Abstract Parents of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) often experience elevated levels of caregiver strain (CGS). Few studies have examined the relationship between core ASD symptoms and each facet of CGS: objective, subjective internalized, and subjective externalized strain. The predictive effect of core and associated features of ASD on CGS facets were investigated, while also exploring the moderating effect of age. Atypical behaviors and behavior problems were the strongest predictors of all types of caregiver strain. For younger children, more repetitive behaviors predicted higher externalized strain, yet the opposite was true for parents of adolescents. Given that caregiver strain impacts parents’ service utilization patterns, future research should focus on strategies to support parents in reducing caregiver strain.
      PubDate: 2023-01-13
       
  • Caregiver Perceptions of Social Communication and Interaction: Development
           and Validation of the SCIPS

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      Abstract: Abstract Social communication and interaction (SC/I) skill quality may be influenced by cultural values, norms, and expectations. Because difficulties in SC/I is a core criterion for identifying autism and is a frequent construct of interest in autism research, a measure designed to capture cross-cultural differences in the perspectives of SC/I skills is warranted. To address this need we developed and validated the Social Communication and Interaction Perceptions Scale (SCIPS), a caregiver report measure for children ages 6–18 years, that measures both frequency and perceived importance of various SC/I skills. Results from 401 diverse caregiver participants showed that for both domains (i.e., Frequency and Importance) the SCIPS has good reliability (α = 0.88-0.95) and two factors that examine basic and advanced aspects of SC/I skills. Findings support the use of the SCIPS as a measure of caregiver perspectives of SC/I skills in clinical and research contexts.
      PubDate: 2023-01-13
       
  • Musical Beat Perception Skills of Autistic and Neurotypical Children

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      Abstract: Abstract Many autistic children show musical interests and good musical skills including pitch and melodic memory. Autistic children may also perceive temporal regularities in music such as the primary beat underlying the rhythmic structure of music given some work showing preserved rhythm processing in the context of basic, nonverbal auditory stimuli. The temporal regularity and prediction of musical beats can potentially serve as an excellent framework for building skills in non-musical areas of growth for autistic children. We examine if autistic children are perceptually sensitive to the primary beat of music by comparing the musical beat perception skills of autistic and neurotypical children. Twenty-three autistic children and 23 neurotypical children aged 6–13 years with no group differences in chronological age and verbal and nonverbal mental ages completed a musical beat perception task where they identified whether beeps superimposed on musical excerpts were on or off the musical beat. Overall task performance was above the theoretical chance threshold of 50% but not the statistical chance threshold of 70% across groups. On-beat (versus off-beat) accuracy was higher for the autistic group but not the neurotypical group. The autistic group was just as accurate at detecting beat alignments (on-beat) but less precise at detecting beat misalignments (off-beat) compared to the neurotypical group. Perceptual sensitivity to beat alignments provides support for spared music processing among autistic children and informs on the accessibility of using musical beats and rhythm for cultivating related skills and behaviours (e.g., language and motor abilities).
      PubDate: 2023-01-13
       
  • Perceived Social Support, Normalization, and Subjective Well-Being Among
           Family Members of a Child with Autism Spectrum Disorder

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      Abstract: Abstract The experience of family members of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is not uniform. This study focused on mothers of a child with ASD (Study 1) and typically developing siblings (TDSs) during their emerging adulthood (Study 2). Similarities and differences were explored regarding a proposed model examining the paths of perceived social support (PSS) and normalization (a coping strategy) with subjective well-being: satisfaction with life (SWL) and positive affect (PA). Similarities were found in the paths between PSS, normalization, and SWL, in mothers and TDSs, but differences emerged regarding PA. These findings highlight the importance of PSS as a resource that contributes to normalization and SWL. Professional awareness of family members’ PSS and their engagement in normalization is needed.
      PubDate: 2023-01-13
       
  • Effect of Emotional Valence on Emotion Recognition in Adolescents with
           Autism Spectrum Disorder

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      Abstract: Abstract This study investigated how emotional valence of a perceived emotional state impacted performance on the Reading the Mind in the Eyes task (RMET) in adolescents with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and typically developing (TD) controls. Valence of items on the RMET, Adult (RMET-A) and Child (RMET-C) versions, was first classified in a survey of 113 medical students. Adolescents with ASD (N = 33) and TD adolescents (N = 30) were administered both RMET versions. Individuals with ASD made more errors than TD controls on positive and negative, but not neutral, valence items. The difference in performance was accentuated on the RMET-A compared to the RMET-C. Both emotional valence and complexity of language contribute to RMET performance in individuals with ASD.
      PubDate: 2023-01-13
       
  • Spatial Language and Cognition in Autistic Preschoolers

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      Abstract: Abstract Purpose: ASD is associated with relative strengths in the visuospatial domain but varying abilities in the linguistic domain. Previous studies suggest parallels between spatial language and spatial cognition in older autistic individuals, but no research to date has examined this relationship in young autistic children. Therefore, the purpose of the present study was to investigate the connection between children’s spatial language production and nonverbal spatial cognition over time. We also examined two potential predictors of spatial language observed in previous literature, ASD symptom severity and parent spatial language input. Methods: In past work investigating spatial language in NT children of the same age, parent-child interactions have been a primary context for study. Therefore, in the present study, we analyzed transcripts of dyadic naturalistic play interactions between autistic children and their parents over three visits from age 30 to 66 months and administered standardized cognitive and ASD diagnostic assessments at each visit. Results: Spatial language production was related to nonverbal spatial cognition even when accounting for overall language production, though the strength of that relationship decreased over time. Parent spatial input (but not ASD severity) significantly predicted children’s spatial language production over and above the effect of overall language production. Conclusion: Spatial language is associated with spatial cognition in young autistic children and appears to reflect the interaction of overall linguistic skills and nonverbal spatial cognitive ability regardless of autism severity. Parent-mediated interventions may be a promising context for increasing spatial language in autistic preschoolers.
      PubDate: 2023-01-13
       
  • Concordance Between Accelerometer-Measured and Self-Reported Physical
           Activity and Sedentary Time in Adults with Autism

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      Abstract: Abstract This study examined the concordance between accelerometry-measured and self-reported physical activity (PA) and sedentary time in adults with autism. Twenty-four participants wore an ActiGraph GT3X + accelerometer for seven consecutive days and completed the International Physical Activity Questionnaire-Short Form (IPAQ-SF) on the last day of their study participation. Bland-Altman plots assessed the magnitude of agreement between the two measures. Nearly 80% of the participants accumulated the recommended ≥ 150 min of moderate to vigorous PA (MVPA)/week, but were also sedentary for over nine hours/day according to accelerometry data. Findings showed that adults with autism tended to overreport MVPA (b = 1.606, p < 0.01) and underreport sedentary time (b = 1.161, p = 0.03) via the IPAQ-SF, as compared to objective measurements.
      PubDate: 2023-01-13
       
  • Response to Music-Mediated Intervention in Autistic Children with Limited
           Spoken Language Ability

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      Abstract: Abstract Purpose: Autistic children with limited spoken language ability (LSLA) often do not respond to traditional interventions, reducing their social inclusion. It is essential to identify effective interventions, and sensitive measures to track their intervention response. Methods: Using data from an RCT comparing music-mediated and play-based interventions, we investigated the impact of spoken language ability on outcomes, and measured response to intervention through natural language sample measures. Results: Children with lower verbal IQ, relative to higher verbal IQ, made some greater gains over the course of music-mediated intervention. Natural language samples were helpful in characterizing communication and tracking change. Conclusion: Music-mediated interventions hold promise as effective interventions for autistic children with LSLA. Natural language samples are robust in characterizing this subgroup.
      PubDate: 2023-01-13
       
  • Mind the NIH-Funding Gap: Structural Discrimination in Physical
           Health–Related Research for Cognitively Able Autistic Adults

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      Abstract: Abstract Autistic adults experience disparities in physical health and health care access. A major barrier to addressing these disparities is a lack of federal funding for research on this topic. In seeking funding from the National Institutes of Health (NIH), we discovered nodes that contribute to structural discrimination in physical health–related research for autistic adults. To examine this structural discrimination, we systematically searched funded research on all physical health–disparity conditions in autistic adults using NIH RePORTER. Among 61 unique studies, none focused on improving the relevant physical health condition through intervention, programs, or services for autistic adults. Thus, we need updated policies and procedures that support research on physical health disparities in populations with developmental or mental health conditions.
      PubDate: 2023-01-13
       
 
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