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  Subjects -> DISABILITY (Total: 103 journals)
Showing 1 - 200 of 310 Journals sorted alphabetically
Advances in Autism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 85)
Advances in Mental Health and Learning Disabilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Aequitas : Revue de Développement Humain, Handicap et Changement Social     Full-text available via subscription  
African Journal of Disability     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Ageing & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
American Annals of the Deaf     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 54)
Aphasiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 58)
Assistive Technology: The Official Journal of RESNA     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Audiology Research     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Augmentative and Alternative Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46)
Autism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 162)
Autism & Developmental Language Impairments     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Autism in Adulthood     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Autism Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
Autism's Own     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
British Journal of Learning Disabilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 102)
British Journal of Special Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
British Journal of Visual Impairment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Canadian Journal of Disability Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 35)
Deafness & Education International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Developmental Disabilities Research Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Disability & Rehabilitation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 83)
Disability & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 83)
Disability and Health Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Disability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
Disability Compliance for Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Disability Studies Quarterly     Open Access   (Followers: 39)
Disability, CBR & Inclusive Development     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Distúrbios da Comunicação     Open Access  
Early Popular Visual Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
European Review of Aging and Physical Activity     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Health Expectations     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Hearing, Balance and Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Intellectual Disability Australasia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
International Journal of Audiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
International Journal of Developmental Disabilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
International Journal of Language & Communication Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 58)
International Journal of Orthopaedic and Trauma Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
International Journal of Technology Assessment in Health Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal for Healthcare Quality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal of Accessibility and Design for All     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Adult Protection, The     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Aging and Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 54)
Journal of Assistive Technologies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 83)
Journal of Deaf Studies and Deaf Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Disability & Religion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Disability Policy Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Journal of Disability Studies in Education     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Early Hearing Detection and Intervention     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Elder Abuse & Neglect     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Enabling Technologies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Gerontological Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Integrated Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Intellectual & Developmental Disability     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 63)
Journal of Intellectual Disabilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 56)
Journal of Intellectual Disability - Diagnosis and Treatment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Intellectual Disability Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 67)
Journal of Learning Disabilities and Offending Behaviour     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Journal of Literary & Cultural Disability Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Occupational Therapy, Schools, & Early Intervention     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48)
Journal of Policy and Practice In Intellectual Disabilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Journal of Science Education for Students with Disabilities     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Social Work in Disability & Rehabilitation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 93)
Journal of Spinal Cord Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Visual Impairment & Blindness     Hybrid Journal  
Learning Disabilities : A Multidisciplinary Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Learning Disability Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Mental Health Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Music and Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Physical & Occupational Therapy in Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 67)
Physical Disabilities : Education and Related Services     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Public Policy and Aging Report     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Quality in Ageing and Older Adults     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
Research and Practice in Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Revista Espaço     Open Access  
Revista Española de Discapacidad     Open Access  
Revista Herediana de Rehabilitacion     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Revue francophone de la déficience intellectuelle     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Scandinavian Journal of Disability Research     Open Access   (Followers: 27)
Sexuality and Disability     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Siglo Cero. Revista Española sobre Discapacidad Intelectual     Open Access  
Sign Language Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Society and Mental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Speech Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Stigma and Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Stress     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Technology and Disability     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Tizard Learning Disability Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49)
Topics in Language Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Visual Cognition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Visual Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Visual Communication Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Visual Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Working with Older People     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)

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Journal of Visual Impairment & Blindness
Number of Followers: 0  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0145-482X - ISSN (Online) 1559-1476
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1174 journals]
  • Pandemic Influenced Future Published Research

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      Authors: Sandra Lewis
      First page: 125
      Abstract: Journal of Visual Impairment & Blindness, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Visual Impairment & Blindness
      PubDate: 2022-04-20T01:13:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0145482X221094128
       
  • Cultural Diversity in Children’s Braille Books

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      Authors: Monique A. Coleman, Judith Harrison
      First page: 127
      Abstract: Journal of Visual Impairment & Blindness, Ahead of Print.
      IntroductionChildren’s books help all young readers develop social understanding through recognition of themselves and their worlds and exposure to different cultures and places. Prior content analyses have revealed the underrepresentation of culturally diverse characters in print children’s books; however, the extent to which braille children’s books reflect racial and ethnic diversity has not been investigated. As such, this study examined racial and ethnic diversity in published children’s braille books.MethodsThe authors analyzed 328 braille books from the online catalogs of Seedlings Braille Books for Children and National Library Service for the Blind and Print Disabled (NLS), drawing from schema for describing African American children’s literature. This study presents a tactile version of Rudine Sims Bishop’s mirror, windows, and sliding glass doors metaphor for the purpose of understanding how braille books can enrich the lives of blind or low vision children.ResultsThe results indicated that characters of color were featured in 12% and 14% of children’s braille books in the Seedlings and NLS catalogs. Culturally conscious content was found in 68% and 86% of the books with characters of color in the Seedlings and NLS catalogs respectively.DiscussionIn the context of a highly multicultural society, the findings from this study are remarkably unfortunate. They demonstrate that racially and ethnically diverse children who are blind or have low vision have far fewer opportunities than their white counterparts to experience NLS and Seedlings braille books that represent themselves and their worlds or expose them to different worlds. We strongly encourage the children’s braille book industry to address these findings with urgency.Implications for PractitionersTeachers of children with visual impairments need to be aware of the literary and social benefits of culturally diverse books and incorporate more of these books into their literacy instruction. They need not wait for additional research or for the children’s braille book industry to publish more books featuring diverse racial and ethnic groups. Teachers of children with visual impairments can prepare culturally diverse braille books for their students and support families in adding braille overlays to culturally diverse print books in their home libraries.
      Citation: Journal of Visual Impairment & Blindness
      PubDate: 2022-04-21T03:40:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0145482X221090261
       
  • Towards a Universal Mathematical Braille Notation

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      Authors: Annemiek van Leendert, Michiel Doorman, Paul Drijvers, Johan Pel, Johannes van der Steen
      First page: 141
      Abstract: Journal of Visual Impairment & Blindness, Ahead of Print.
      IntroductionAcross the world, mathematical expressions are represented very differently in braille. The aim of this study was (1) to gain an overall insight in mathematical braille notations and (2) to investigate how mathematical braille notations support braille readers in reading and comprehending mathematical expressions.MethodTwenty teachers from sixteen countries (thirteen European Union, EU, and three non-EU) were asked to transform 21 mathematical expressions and equations into the mathematical braille notation currently used by their braille readers. Three mathematical expressions were selected, and the transformed expressions in the different braille notations were qualitatively compared at braille and mathematical structure level.ResultsThe results illustrated that most mathematical braille notations use mathematical structures that either support braille readers in getting an overview of an expression—for example, by announcing the start and end of a fraction—or facilitate communication between braille readers and people who can see.DiscussionThe method of comparing transformed expressions at structure level can be extended to other types of mathematical expressions and other mathematical braille notations. Agreement on the structure of different mathematical expressions can be a first step towards a universal mathematical braille notation.Implications for PractitionersMathematics teachers should be aware of and use the strengths of the mathematical braille notation and try to compensate for weaknesses of the notation in the support of braille readers.
      Citation: Journal of Visual Impairment & Blindness
      PubDate: 2022-05-19T12:23:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0145482X221089978
       
  • Unmet Needs of Individuals with Acute Traumatic Eye Injury

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      Authors: Angela M. Gerolamo, Alexzandra Gentsch, Rachel Alexander, Helen Paglia, Lauren Schlegel, Kristin L. Rising
      First page: 154
      Abstract: Journal of Visual Impairment & Blindness, Ahead of Print.
      IntroductionAlthough traumatic eye injuries can have a far-reaching impact on an individual and society, traumatic eye injury has not been a focus of research. The purpose of this study is to examine individuals’ experiences after traumatic vision loss and identify their needs.MethodsWe used a qualitative approach to conduct semi-structured interviews with individuals who experienced traumatic vision loss and were treated at a specialty eye hospital in an urban setting. Participants also completed a demographic survey and the National Eye Institute Visual Functioning Questionnaire–25 (VFQ-25). Content analysis was used to analyze qualitative data and descriptive statistics were used to summarize quantitative data.ResultsInterviews with 26 participants resulted in three categories of patient needs: informational, functional, and psychosocial. Participants wanted more information from providers about what to expect over time and identified driving as a significant challenge that affected their daily lives. Participants offered suggestions for addressing their functional needs including assistance with transportation to appointments, physical therapy, and occupational therapy. Participants also discussed how vision loss affected their livelihood and finances, with a subset of participants experiencing significant mental health distress. Some participants suggested that a recovery coach, peer support, support groups, and mental health services would be beneficial for addressing their psychosocial needs.DiscussionOur findings point to a significant gap in services available to meet the needs of individuals with traumatic eye injuries. Future research is needed to test the effect of an integrated-care model that includes routine offering of psychosocial and functional services for patients with acute vision loss to determine the effect on outcomes.Implications for PractitionersThis work has far-reaching implications for providers, since it supports the need for the development and delivery of integrated interventions that emphasize addressing psychosocial and functional aspects of recovery.
      Citation: Journal of Visual Impairment & Blindness
      PubDate: 2022-05-11T04:53:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0145482X221091825
       
  • Visual Rehabilitation after Retinal Prosthesis Implantation: An 18-month
           Case Report, From Candidate Selection to Follow-Up

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      Authors: Mathieu Carignan, Marie Courchesne, Sylvie Cantin, Vincent Moore, Frédérique Poncet
      First page: 167
      Abstract: Journal of Visual Impairment & Blindness, Ahead of Print.
      IntroductionVarious retinal implants are being developed and appear to be a promising option for improving the visual capacities of individuals with retinal dystrophy. A multidisciplinary approach to both assessment of a candidate’s factors and rehabilitation could contribute to improved activity and participation. The purpose of this study was (i) to document the approach taken by a multidisciplinary team in the candidate selection process and in training in the use of the Argus II retinal prosthesis system (RPS), and (ii) to examine the effects of the RPS on sensory and mental functions and on activity and participation.MethodsAn A1-B1-A2-B2 experimental case report was used, with repeated measures pre- and post-rehabilitation program design. The A phases represent the periods with the system off, whereas the B phases represent the periods with the system on. A 65-year-old man with retinitis pigmentosa and total blindness was followed by a multidisciplinary team for over 18 months. After receiving the retinal implant, he benefited from a 10-week rehabilitation program (twice per week; B1 phase).ResultsGlobally, the RPS improved vision in the B phases when the system was on and visual acuity was stable at 2.3 logMAR (functional blindness). The participant’s mental and neuromusculoskeletal function scores were generally stable throughout the data collection periods. Lower performance on some measures at the end of phase B2 coincided with a negative mood.DiscussionUse of the RPS improved activity, but this did not transfer into greater participation in the living environment. Despite efforts made by the rehabilitation team to manage the user’s expectations concerning the RPS, the interventions reactivated his grieving over his vision loss.Implications for PractitionersNew technologies can make users dream of unrealistic possibilities, and managing their expectations requires problem solving supported by a multidisciplinary team.
      Citation: Journal of Visual Impairment & Blindness
      PubDate: 2022-05-18T05:45:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0145482X221092020
       
  • Graphics Out Loud: Perceptions and Strategic Actions of Students With
           Visual Impairments When Engaging With Graphics

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      Authors: Kim T. Zebehazy, Adam P. Wilton, Bhagyalaxmi Velugu
      First page: 183
      Abstract: Journal of Visual Impairment & Blindness, Ahead of Print.
      IntroductionFacility in graphics use is critical to accessing data visualizations in science, technology, engineering, the arts, and mathematics (STEAM) content areas. Efforts to understand the cognitive processes underlying strategic action by students with visual impairments must consider both metacognition and self-regulated learning.MethodsThink-aloud transcripts were analyzed using a priori level one coding based on the Model of Graphic Interpretation (MoGI) followed by second-level coding to analyze nuanced commonalities and differences based on performance, medium, and level.ResultsDifferences in each component of the MoGI were found for print graphic and tactile graphic users, particularly based on performance and level. Higher performers were better able to articulate strategy use and reasons for selecting strategies.DiscussionFindings coincide with quantitative findings of the participants (see Zebehazy & Wilton, 2021). Transcripts provided additional confirming evidence of the interdependence of MoGI components.Implications for PractitionersUse of think aloud can support assessment and instruction of students with visual impairments to build strategic action and metacognition when engaging with graphics.
      Citation: Journal of Visual Impairment & Blindness
      PubDate: 2022-04-20T05:57:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0145482X221087727
       
  • Constituent Elements Affecting the Recognition of Tactile Graphics

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      Authors: Chih-Fu Wu, Hsiang-Ping Wu, Yung-Hsiang Tu, I-Ting Yeh, Chin-Te Chang
      First page: 194
      Abstract: Journal of Visual Impairment & Blindness, Ahead of Print.
      IntroductionMany tactile graphics designed for individuals with visual impairments consider single factors. According to the results of our previous study, there may be interactions among scale, representation, and complexity factors. We conducted this integrative study with these three factors. Additionally, for the representation factor, we introduced a new level that mixed the two common levels (line drawing, (LD), and texture picture, (TP)), into a textured-line drawing, (TLD).MethodsWe included 18 participants with congenital blindness. They were asked to identify and name tactile graphics. The design of tactile graphics involved three factors, each at different levels, including scale (large, medium, and small), representation (TP, LD, and TLD), and complexity (easy and complex). We recorded the identification time and accuracy and conducted three-way analysis of variance to investigate interactions.ResultsThe identification time for small-scale graphics was shorter than that for large-scale graphics. The accuracy for small-scale graphics was higher than medium-scale graphics. Under the TLD mode, the accuracy for small and medium-scale graphics was higher than that for large-scale graphics. For medium-scale graphics, TLD performed better than LD.DiscussionBecause the sizes of small-scale graphics were similar to those of actual objects, they were easy to identify. If the TLD mode is used for medium-scale graphics, the components in the operation area can be completely presented, which is helpful for identification. However, if large-scale graphics are used under the TLD mode, the operation area is relatively small and difficult to identify.Implications for PractitionersIt is recommended to present objects at 1:1 under the small-scale. Under the medium-scale, the operation area can be presented by closed plains, while non-operation areas can be presented using lines. Under the large-scale, it is recommended to reduce the size of the graphics to an extent where both hands can be used to explore.
      Citation: Journal of Visual Impairment & Blindness
      PubDate: 2022-04-21T03:49:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0145482X221092031
       
  • Effect of Container Shape, Age, and Visual Acuity on the Readability of
           Prescription Label Information in Persons With Visual Impairments

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      Authors: Elyse Connors, Helen Lee, Dae Kim, Amy Curtis, Amy Freeland
      First page: 204
      Abstract: Journal of Visual Impairment & Blindness, Ahead of Print.
      Introduction: The readability of prescription drug labels has been found to be faster with labels attached to flat surfaces compared to round surfaces, in persons with visual impairment. This study extends this finding by examining the readability of drug labels, as measured by speed and accuracy, as they interact with factors of age and vision acuity across different container shapes. Methods: A repeated-measure, three-factor design (container shape, age, and vision acuity) with within-subject control was used with 54 adults with vision loss. Participants read 3 unique prescription drug labels across four container shapes, for a total of 12 trials. The amount of time needed to locate and read aloud 6 pieces of label information and the number of errors made in reading were outcome measures. Results: A two-way interaction was found between container shape and acuity for the time it takes to read the label information (Wald χ2 = 22.836, df = 3, p < .001). The legally blind group required more time to read the label and had more variation in mean times across container type, compared to the low vision group. Both age and acuity showed statistically significant (p < 0.001) main effects on reading accuracy. Discussion: Within the legally blind acuity group, cylinder-shaped containers took statistically significantly longer to read compared to the flat label by 18 seconds. Increased age and lower visual acuity negatively affected reading accuracy, across all container shapes. Implications for Practitioners: Individuals with legal blindness may need more time to read prescription drug labels and may benefit from labels adhered to flat surfaces over traditional cylindrical containers. As medication safety is a critical skill for independent living, practitioners should assess their clients’ ability to access prescription drug label information, keeping in mind that these abilities may differ across different container shapes.
      Citation: Journal of Visual Impairment & Blindness
      PubDate: 2022-05-19T07:21:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0145482X221098701
       
  • An Investigation of the Implications of Visual Impairment for Illumination
           Requirements

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      Authors: Nico Hauck, Ardeshir Mahdavi
      First page: 216
      Abstract: Journal of Visual Impairment & Blindness, Ahead of Print.
      IntroductionThe present contribution mainly focuses on the evaluation of the visual performance of people with impaired vision and, for comparison purposes, individuals with typical vision under different lighting conditions. Methods: A monitor with adjustable brightness facilitated various test runs to determine the visual performance as a function of the adaptation luminance and glare. In addition, the subjective impressions of the participants with impaired vision were queried via interviews. The study included 98 people with impaired vision and 38 people without visual impairments. Results: The interview results suggest that most people with visual impairments require special lighting conditions. An increased lighting requirement is observed amongst 50% of this group. Moreover, 75% of this group display increased glare sensitivity. Likewise, adaptation problems and critical issues related to nonuniform lighting are manifest. Individuals with impaired vision included in this study display a greatly reduced contrast threshold and a higher subjective level of discomfort compared to individuals with typical vision.Discussion: Most visually impaired participants state that they require a higher degree of brightness to achieve their maximum personal visual performance. However, about a quarter of the participants reported that they achieve a better visual performance at lower brightness, while displaying an increased sensitivity to glare. In general, glare has a decisive influence on the visual performance of the participants with impaired vision in our study. Implications for Practitioners: The study reconfirms the essential importance of glare-free and uniform general lighting strategies (e.g., via predominantly indirect lighting) as well as avoiding abrupt spatiotemporal luminance changes (e.g., via provision of a transition zone between locations with very different luminance levels).
      Citation: Journal of Visual Impairment & Blindness
      PubDate: 2022-05-16T09:36:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0145482X221090230
       
  • The Social Validity of Using the Matrix Approach in Early Intervention
           with Children Who Are Blind or Have Low Vision

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      Authors: Mindy S. Ely, Michaelene M. Ostrosky, Allison Barton
      First page: 230
      Abstract: Journal of Visual Impairment & Blindness, Ahead of Print.
      Introduction: This paper provides a report of social validity and its usefulness in understanding study effects. Social validity data were drawn from a larger single-case study designed to investigate the effectiveness of the Matrix Approach in the practice of early intervention visual impairment professionals. Methods: Qualitative measures were used to assess social validity. According to Wolf (1978), validation of a study should encompass the significance of goals, appropriateness of procedures, and importance of outcomes. Therefore, data sources were created to provide evidence of social validity in these areas including pre- and post-intervention interviews of parents and professionals. Results: Three themes emerged from the social validity data. These are organized under the topics introduced by Wolf (1978) and identified as measures of quality by Horner et al. (2005). The themes are (a) Goals: role of the parent as learner and the professional as expert before using the Matrix Approach, (b) Procedures: helpfulness of coaching and the structure of the Matrix Approach, and (c) Outcomes: personal and professional growth as a result of using the Matrix Approach. Discussion: Evaluation of social validity in single-case research is an important component in a study’s design and in interpreting the study’s outcomes. Wolf’s framework proved valuable in promoting a robust evaluation of study effectiveness, especially when incorporated into the study design. Intentionally planning to measure social validity held the researchers accountable to the practical needs of the participants. In fact, there is value in gathering social validity data at various points in a study. Further, hearing the perspective of stakeholders can provide valuable insights as researchers seek to understand the complexities of change evident in the outcomes of a study. Implications for Practitioners: Collaborative planning is an essential component of early intervention. The Matrix Approach shows promise as a mechanism to foster such collaboration.
      Citation: Journal of Visual Impairment & Blindness
      PubDate: 2022-05-06T01:07:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0145482X221086644
       
  • Professional Preparation of Teachers of Students With Visual Impairments
           and Orientation and Mobility Specialists Regarding Physical Activity,
           Physical Education, and Sport

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      Authors: Jennifer Sladewski, Lauren J. Lieberman, Pamela Haibach-Beach, Paula Conroy
      First page: 240
      Abstract: Journal of Visual Impairment & Blindness, Ahead of Print.
      IntroductionThis aim of this online study was to determine what teachers of students with visual impairments (TVIs) and orientation and mobility (O&M) specialists learned and experienced in their professional preparation programs regarding physical education, physical activity, and sport for students with visual impairments.MethodsIn 2019, an initial questionnaire was sent to specialists in the field for validation. In 2020, 68 TVIs and O&M specialists participated in an online research study consisting of validated multiple choice, Likert scales, and short responses. This study was created through and accessed by participants on the website of Qualtrics, a survey tool.ResultsSixty percent of the participants did not feel that their professional preparation program provided an adequate amount of time discussing accommodations for students with visual impairments in physical education and physical activity. Eighty percent of participants learned very little or nothing at all in their courses related to physical activity, physical education, and sport; and 79% learned very little or nothing at all in their practicum experiences. Seventy-two percent of participants indicated that they wished that they had learned more about physical activity, physical education, and sport.DiscussionThe findings demonstrate that TVIs and O&M specialists are not prepared to assist physical education teachers in making physical activity, physical education, and sport accessible to students with visual impairments.Implications for PractitionersThe professional preparation programs of TVIs and O&M specialists can include more information on making physical activity, physical education, and sport accessible to students with visual impairments.
      Citation: Journal of Visual Impairment & Blindness
      PubDate: 2022-04-21T07:01:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0145482X221090526
       
  • Do You Know How People Who Are Blind Cross Streets' Mentally Stepping
           into Another’s Shoes Through Imitation

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      Authors: Güler Arsal, Joel Suss, Paul Ward, David W. Eccles
      First page: 252
      Abstract: Journal of Visual Impairment & Blindness, Ahead of Print.
      IntroductionThe objective of this study is to investigate the extent to which sighted persons understand thought processes of persons who are visually impaired (i.e., those who are blind or have low vision). The investigation focused on a street-crossing task.MethodParticipants were 15 visually impaired persons and 21 sighted persons. The sighted group included 6 orientation and mobility (O&M) specialists and 15 individuals who represent the sighted public and have infrequent interactions with people with visual impairments. Participants provided verbal reports of their thought processes associated with a street-crossing scenario twice, once as a “non-pretender” and once as a “pretender.” In the non-pretender role, participants verbalized their thinking in line with their actual state of sightedness. In the pretender role, participants with visual impairments pretended that they did not have any visual impairments, whereas sighted participants pretended that they were blind. Transcribed data were analyzed using thematic analysis, resulting in three themes with 14 subthemes. The genuine responses of visually impaired participants and the imitated responses of the sighted participants were compared using proportions of the subthemes.ResultsFisher’s exact z tests demonstrated that out of the 14 subthemes, the visually impaired participants’ proportions were (a) similar to those of sighted O&M specialists in 10 subthemes and (b) different from those of the other sighted participants in seven subthemes. Participants verbalized fewer thoughts when describing sighted navigation than when describing navigation as a person with visual impairment.DiscussionSighted persons with infrequent social interaction with people who are visually impaired seem to be less successful at “pretending to be blind,” indicating that they may have difficulties in adopting the perspective of people with visual impairments.Implications for PractitionersSighted O&M specialists develop an understanding of the cognitive processes of people who are visually impaired through training and contact. Other professionals that support these individuals (e.g., technology designers) could benefit from developing such an understanding and immersing themselves in the social life of people with visual impairments.
      Citation: Journal of Visual Impairment & Blindness
      PubDate: 2022-04-22T11:21:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0145482X221092049
       
  • Keeping Schools for Blind Students Vital in an Era of Inclusion: Key
           Elements for Success

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      Authors: Hisae Miyauchi, Danene Fast, Tiffany Wild
      First page: 265
      Abstract: Journal of Visual Impairment & Blindness, Ahead of Print.
      IntroductionThis research aims to learn what schools for blind students in the United States are currently doing to teach students with visual impairments and further explore the services these schools provide in their states.MethodsThis research used qualitative interviews with school administrators, staff members, and teachers at four schools for blind students in the United States. A constant comparison model was used to analyze common themes and trends within the data collected, allowing us to capture the voiced experiences of the interviewees.ResultsAll schools included in this research have built the capacity to serve a wide range of students with visual impairments through both on-campus programs and outreach services. To provide high-quality services, the on-campus programs and the outreach services embraced symbiosis with one another. In parallel to this effort, schools focused on building partnerships with districts and helped build capacity through indirect services.DiscussionUnderlying ideologies within schools for blind students were the value of inclusion, belief in every student receiving a quality education, and aspiration towards schools for blind students to stay relevant in an era of inclusion. Schools were led by individuals who possessed inspirational and strategic thinking.Implications for PractitionersThis research documents the effective ways specialized schools for blind students are relevant in an era of inclusion, documenting the importance of creating new paths within traditional programs. This research outlines successful practices and ideologies that can be implemented by specialized schools, while acknowledging traditional on-campus programming combined with inclusive outreach models to create sustainable programming for all students with visual impairments throughout a state.
      Citation: Journal of Visual Impairment & Blindness
      PubDate: 2022-04-20T07:07:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0145482X221092047
       
  • Beyond Employment Rates: Continuity of Employment for People with Visual
           Impairments

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Michele C. McDonnall, Jennifer L. Cmar, Zhen S. McKnight
      First page: 275
      Abstract: Journal of Visual Impairment & Blindness, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Visual Impairment & Blindness
      PubDate: 2022-05-07T11:33:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0145482X221091827
       
  • Geographic Variation in Employment for U.S. Adults by Visual Impairment
           Status

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Phoebe Tran, Lam Tran, Liem Tran
      First page: 281
      Abstract: Journal of Visual Impairment & Blindness, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Visual Impairment & Blindness
      PubDate: 2022-05-07T11:05:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0145482X221090979
       
  • Independent Living Older Blind Programs in the United States: State Trends
           Based on Best Practices in the Administration of the Older Blind Program

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      Authors: Sylvia Stinson-Perez, Anne H. Lang
      First page: 288
      Abstract: Journal of Visual Impairment & Blindness, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Visual Impairment & Blindness
      PubDate: 2022-05-06T02:34:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0145482X221090532
       
  • Confrontation Testing Echoidentification: Principle Perceptual Space for
           Novice Echoidentifiers

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      Authors: Dawn L. Anderson, Sarahelizabeth J. Baguhn
      First page: 294
      Abstract: Journal of Visual Impairment & Blindness, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Visual Impairment & Blindness
      PubDate: 2022-04-21T06:44:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0145482X221089970
       
  • Approaches to Qualitative Data Analysis

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Robert Wall Emerson
      First page: 300
      Abstract: Journal of Visual Impairment & Blindness, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Visual Impairment & Blindness
      PubDate: 2022-05-19T02:26:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0145482X221098711
       
  • Corrigendum to “Perceptions of Assistive Technology by Teachers of
           Students with Visual Impairments in Jordan”

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Journal of Visual Impairment & Blindness, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Visual Impairment & Blindness
      PubDate: 2021-01-06T09:11:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0145482X20986257
       
  • Erratum to The Effect of Tactile Illustrations on Comprehension of
           Storybooks by Three Children with Visual Impairments: An Exploratory Study
           

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Journal of Visual Impairment & Blindness, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Visual Impairment & Blindness
      PubDate: 2019-12-26T11:39:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0145482X19899497
       
 
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