A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z  

  Subjects -> DISABILITY (Total: 103 journals)
The end of the list has been reached or no journals were found for your choice.
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Stigma and Health
Number of Followers: 1  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 2376-6972 - ISSN (Online) 2376-6964
Published by APA Homepage  [89 journals]
  • Race moderates the relation between internalized stigma and suicidal
           thoughts and behaviors in youth with psychosis-risk syndromes and early
           psychosis.

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Suicide is a leading cause of death among youth on the psychosis spectrum. Internalized mental health stigma is one risk factor for suicide that may be particularly salient for youth with psychosis-risk syndromes and early psychosis. Among this population, Black youth may face exposure to racism-related stressors that may exacerbate the negative effects of internalized stigma. This study examined whether internalized stigma and race interact to predict suicidal thoughts and behaviors (STB) in a help-seeking sample of Black and White adolescents with psychosis-risk syndromes and early psychosis. Findings suggest that Black youth with early psychosis spectrum disorders may be particularly vulnerable to the negative effects of internalized stigma as they pertain to STB. Internalized stigma may therefore represent an important treatment target in suicide prevention efforts among this population. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 13 Oct 2022 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Affective, cognitive, and behavioral mental illness stigma in health care:
           A comparison between general ward nurses and the general population.

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Stigma from health professionals and the general population can be a barrier in health care for people with mental illness. The aim of this study was to compare experiences with and perceptions of people with mental illness between general ward nurses and the general population in the United Kingdom as well as to examine the associated mechanisms. Participants were general ward nurses (n = 101) and the general population (n = 116) in the United Kingdom who completed a survey for this cross-sectional study. Nurses reported poorer contact experiences with people with mental illness (less frequent positive contact, more frequent negative contact, lower contact quality, fewer friendships) than the general population. They also reported greater stigma (more negative attitudes, higher attribution of negative and lower attribution of positive human uniqueness traits to people with mental illness, greater differences between themselves and people with mental illness, lower behavioral intentions). Intergroup anxiety and intergroup empathy mediated the associations between group and contact quality, attitudes as well as behavioral intentions. Understanding differences in stigma between health professionals and the general population will be important to support people with mental illness in seeking treatment and receiving optimal physical and mental health care as well as to support health professionals in their roles. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 13 Oct 2022 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Stigma of mental illness and its association with empathic abilities in
           mental health trainees.

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: The study aimed to assess stigmatizing attitudes, affects, and behavioral intentions toward patients with mental illness in mental health trainees and to address the relationship between these stigmatizing factors and empathic abilities. A correlational cross-sectional study was conducted. A survey was sent to mental health trainees. It comprised the Attribution Questionnaire assessing nine stigma-related attitudes, affects, and behavioral intentions and the Interpersonal Reactivity Index evaluating self-oriented and other-oriented cognitive and affective empathy dimensions. The sample included 160 mental health trainees. Hierarchical regression analysis revealed that mental health trainees’ empathic abilities were independent predictors of anger, pity, help, and segregation. Participants with stronger perspective-taking were more likely to endorse helping, and those with stronger empathic concern reported less anger, more pity, more helping intentions, and were less likely to endorse segregation. Participants with higher personal distress scores reported more anger toward patients with mental illness. These results shed light to the role-played by empathy dimensions in predicting stigma factors of the responsibility model. Other-oriented cognitive and affective empathy were associated with positive attitudes and less discrimination toward patients with mental illness. Personal distress, a self-oriented affective empathy dimension, was a positive predictor of anger. Promoting mental health trainees’ empathic abilities may positively impact their stigmatizing attitudes toward patients with mental illness. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 22 Sep 2022 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Stigmatizing Attitudes, Beliefs, and Actions Scale toward abortion: A
           Turkish validity and reliability study.

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: In this methodological study, the researchers aimed to test the validity and reliability of the Turkish version of the Stigmatizing Attitudes, Beliefs, and Actions Scale (SABAS) toward abortion, which is an 18-item Likert-type scale. It is important to determine the views and attitudes of individuals toward abortion in reducing stigma toward abortion. The sample consisted of 243 university students in Turkey who met the inclusion criteria of the study. The data were collected between July and October 2020 using a personal information form and the SABAS. The data were analyzed using IBM SPSS Statistics 22 and SPSS Amos 24. The mean age of the participants was 20.65 ± 1.51. The content validity index of SABAS was found as 0.98. The item-total score correlation coefficients of the scale ranged from 0.448 to 0.815. The Cronbach’s α coefficient of the scale was 0.907. In the confirmatory factor analysis, the goodness-of-fit indices of the scale showed an acceptable fit. After removing four items of SABAS, it was determined that the 14-item form was valid and reliable in evaluating stigmatizing actions, beliefs, and attitudes toward abortion. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 15 Sep 2022 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • “Thin and muscular”: A cross-sectional mixed methods study of
           people’s descriptions of health.

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: As weight status is frequently associated with health and the COVID-19 pandemic has raised attention to weight status, we used a cross-sectional mixed-methods design to explore how weight status or body size is described when defining health. We recruited 288 participants who were 18 years and older and living in the United States to complete a study about health and health behaviors during the pandemic. First, we used directed content analysis to explore if and how weight status/body size is described when asked to define health. Next, we used intensity sampling and a constant comparison approach to assess whether descriptions of health differed by diagnosis of a chronic disease, sex, and weight bias internalization. Seventy percent (n = 202) of participants described an aspect of weight, body size, or shape when defining health, the majority of which (65%) indicated someone could be unhealthy due to their weight or size. Only 29% (n = 84) of participants implied or directly stated a person could be healthy regardless of weight or size. There were no significant differences in the description of health by chronic disease status or weight bias internalization. Women included health behaviors more frequently than men. Our findings indicate that weight was inextricably linked with health among most adults in the United States. To promote health and reduce the damaging effects of weight stigma, it is imperative that preventive interventions and policies include weight-inclusive messages that underscore the importance of the multiple indicators of health, beyond weight and size. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Mon, 12 Sep 2022 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Having a community helps: Environmental context influences the
           relationship between outness and psychological distress in transgender and
           gender diverse populations.

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Transgender and gender diverse (TGD) individuals are often in a position where they face difficult and complex decisions about revealing their identity to others. Such revelations, referred to as “coming out,” have been suggested to have ambivalent relationships with mental health depending on circumstantial and environmental factors. To explore how negative (gender-identity related discrimination) and positive (community connectedness) environmental factors may influence the relationship between outness and psychological distress, data collected from a cross-sectional sample of TGD participants (N = 342) were analyzed to assess connections between outness, gender-related discrimination, community connectedness, and psychological distress. Using principles of decomposition and counterfactual frameworks, a mediation model was constructed to assess the direct effect of outness on psychological distress once accounting for indirect effects of outness on psychological distress as mediated by discrimination. To determine how this direct effect varied depending on the level of community connectedness, a follow-up moderated mediation model was constructed. Analyses showed a significant direct effect of outness on psychological distress after removing indirect effects, b = −.48, 95% CI [−.80, −.17]. This direct effect appeared greatest for those with moderate (b = −.39, 95% CI [−.76, −0.2]) and high (b = −1.31, 95% CI [−2.17, −.47]) levels of community connectedness. The relationship between outness and decreased psychological distress is one that appears to be highly influenced by environment into which one reveals their gender identity. Community and policy-focused interventions may ameliorate the mental health disparities faced by TGD populations. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Mon, 29 Aug 2022 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Diabetes stigma predicts higher HbA1c levels in Australian adolescents
           with type 1 diabetes.

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Adolescents with Type 1 diabetes (T1D) often need to undertake self-management tasks in public or disclose their diagnosis to others. Therefore, they may be subjected to negative reactions from the public, known as enacted stigma. Adolescents with T1D may also be concerned about experiencing stigma, even without being directly subjected to it, known as felt stigma. Both types of stigma could negatively impact psychological well-being and engagement with treatment regimens. This cross-sectional study had three aims: (a) to explore the prevalence of diabetes stigma in adolescents with T1D, (b) to explore differences in adolescent reports of diabetes stigma compared to adults, and (c) to investigate if diabetes stigma is associated with glycemic control in adolescents. Seventy-six Australian adolescents with T1D completed an online questionnaire that included the Type 1 Diabetes Stigma Assessment Scale, which measures enacted and felt diabetes stigma. Their latest glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) level was obtained from medical records. Nearly, all participants (98.7%) reported experiencing diabetes stigma, most commonly through blame and judgment from others (a form of enacted stigma). Adolescents also reported more felt stigma compared to a sample of Australian adults. After controlling for confounders, regression models showed that enacted and felt stigma predicted higher HbA1c levels. These novel results indicate that adolescents who report experiencing high levels of diabetes stigma are more likely to have higher HbA1c levels, which can place them at risk of long-term health complications. These findings should inform public health initiatives to address the misconceptions that lead to diabetes stigma. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Mon, 29 Aug 2022 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • COVID-19 racial discrimination and mental health of Korean Americans: Role
           of ethnic identity and coping strategy.

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: The onset of COVID-19 has resulted in higher rates of racial discrimination toward Asian American and Pacific Islanders, including Korean Americans. This study used moderated mediation analyses to examine the relationship between COVID-19-related racial discrimination and anxiety, depression, and life satisfaction among Korean Americans (KA; N = 270) and explored the buffering effect of ethnic identity and coping strategies. Experiences of pandemic-related racial discrimination were linked to the severity of anxiety and depression levels among KA, which resulted in lower levels of life satisfaction. Coping strategies moderated the link between depression and life satisfaction but not between anxiety and life satisfaction. Ethnic identity exacerbated the relationship between racial discrimination and levels of anxiety and depression. The significance of these findings highlights the important role of coping strategy and ethnic identity in mental health among KA during the pandemic. Based on these findings, implications for professional counselors are outlined. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 18 Aug 2022 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • The impact of army resilience training on the self-stigma of seeking help
           in student veterans with and without disabilities.

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: The literature has highlighted the concerning disparity between the percentage of veterans with mental health disabilities and the percentage of those who seek psychological services. Stigma, specifically self-stigma, has been associated with a low rate of seeking help among veterans. The purpose of this study is to contribute to the current knowledge on resilience training by exploring the relationship between previous army resilience training, self-stigma of help-seeking, personality traits, and service-connected disability among student veterans. First, researchers psychometrically validated the Self-Stigma of Seeking Help scale and examined whether U.S. Army resiliency training predicted self-stigma of seeking help after controlling for sociodemographic factors and Big Five personality traits. Findings of this study revealed that resilience training was negatively associated with self-stigma of seeking help. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 04 Aug 2022 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • The association of perceived, internalized, and enacted HIV stigma with
           medication adherence, barriers to adherence, and mental health among young
           people living with HIV in Zambia.

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Few studies have examined the independent effects of different manifestations of HIV stigma experiences on health outcomes among youth living with HIV in low- and middle-income countries. We examined the association of internalized, enacted, and perceived HIV stigmas with medication adherence, self-esteem, depression, and barriers to adherence. Young people living with HIV aged 18–21 years (N = 120) were purposively sampled from two health facilities in Eastern Province, Zambia, and completed self-report measures. Results indicated heterogeneous associations. Internalized HIV stigma was positively associated with depression and negatively associated with adherence, adherence motivation, behavioral adherence skills, and self-esteem. Perceived stigma was negatively associated with self-esteem. No significant association was observed between enacted stigma and health outcomes. The complexity of HIV stigma requires a precise explication of the associations among different HIV stigma experiences and outcomes, which can inform the development of stigma-reduction interventions targeting one or more stigma experiences. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 04 Aug 2022 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Trust in science, homonegativity, and HIV stigma: Experimental data from
           the United Kingdom and Germany.

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) stigma and its corollary HIV fear constitute significant barriers to HIV prevention. This quasi-experimental study examined social–psychological predictors of HIV stigma and HIV fear, respectively, based on data from 516 participants in the United Kingdom and Germany. Participants completed baseline measures of HIV knowledge, trust in science and scientists, and homonegativity. They were then randomly assigned to one of three experimental conditions with vignettes describing (a) a gay man with HIV, (b) a heterosexual man with HIV, or (c) the control condition. Participants completed postmanipulation measures of HIV stigma and HIV fear. HIV knowledge and trust in science and scientists were negatively associated with HIV stigma and fear. Baseline homonegativity was positively correlated with HIV stigma and fear. Being exposed to a vignette describing a heterosexual man led to less HIV stigma than being exposed to a vignette describing a gay man and the control condition (in which no sexual orientation was explicitly mentioned). The results suggest that, in addition to promoting HIV knowledge and trust in science and scientists, public health messaging concerning HIV should shift from a focus on gay men to heterosexuals and that homonegativity (higher in men) must continue to be tackled. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 04 Aug 2022 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Overcoming stigma as a barrier to children’s mental health care: The
           role of empowerment and mental health literacy.

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: The authors use the gateway provider model to examine how parents’/guardians’ willingness to seek mental health care for their children is impacted by experiences of affiliate stigma and label avoidance. Although efforts to understand and reduce the detrimental influence of stigma on mental illness are growing, research on possible facilitators to combat stigma and promote treatment seeking is sorely lacking. To address this gap, a cross-sectional survey (N = 89) of young adults aged 18–30, who had been diagnosed with mental illness in childhood, examines the ways in which affiliate stigma, label avoidance, mental health literacy (MHL), and family empowerment (FE) interact to predict parents’/guardians’ willingness to seek mental health care for their children. Moderation hypotheses are tested using Hayes’ process macro to perform multiple regression analyses involving a two-way interaction among continuous variables. As predicted, the relationship between label avoidance and care seeking is negative and significant at average and high levels of affiliate stigma. Conversely, the relationship between family empowerment and care seeking is positive and significant at low and average levels of MHL. MHL and FE act as the facilitators to care seeking; the relationship between label avoidance and care seeking is negative and significant at low levels of MHL, and the relationship between affiliate stigma and care seeking is negative and significant at low and average levels of FE. Overall, these results indicate that MHL and FE have the potential to buffer the detrimental effects of stigma on care seeking for children’s mental healthcare. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 28 Jul 2022 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Public health noncompliance: Targets with COVID-19 are stigmatized when
           they fail to follow public health protocols.

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Perceived controllability of health conditions influences stigma; yet, limited research has examined stigma associated with COVID-19. Across two samples (N = 1,457), participants read about an individual who complied with COVID-19 health protocols (vs. not) and contracted COVID-19 (vs. not). Participants indicated their attitudes toward the target, willingness to help the target, blame/responsibility toward the target, and willingness to interact with the target. Results demonstrated that participants disliked individuals who did not comply with health protocols regardless of COVID-19 status. Participants felt the target was more to blame, were less willing to interact with the target, and were less willing to help the target that did not comply with health protocols and contracted COVID-19 relative to the target with COVID-19 who complied with protocols. Some individuals exhibit lasting effects of COVID-19 and may require long-term help; these results suggest stigma related to not following safety precautions may present a barrier for these individuals. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Mon, 16 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Weight stigma among heterosexual and sexual minority individuals: Dating
           and hiring preferences.

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: This study examined the impact of weight bias on heterosexual and sexual minority men and women’s dating and hiring preferences and personality trait attributions. The sample consisted of sexual minority and heterosexual men and women. Participants (N = 977) were drawn from introductory psychology classes and a variety of supplemental recruitment platforms (Facebook, Instagram, Reddit, MTurk, etc.). Because of modest numbers of bisexual men, pansexual individuals, and other sexualities, only lesbian women 7.9% (N = 77), gay men 7.8% (N = 76), bisexual women 15.3% (N = 146), heterosexual men 20.1% (N = 197), and heterosexual women 49.2% (N = 481) were examined. Participants completed questions online related to dating and hiring preferences and personality trait attributions after reading brief vignettes of a potential romantic interaction or hiring situation accompanied by a picture (thinner or heavier man or woman). Participants were randomly assigned to see one of each weight condition (thin or heavy dating or hiring scenario) by the end of the survey. Findings indicated that the impact of weight bias on potential dating and hiring preferences and personality trait attributions differed greatly by heterosexual and sexual minority group status. Group differences were more evident for dating than hiring scenarios. Weight bias was strongest among heterosexual participants and gay men and weakest or nonexistent among lesbian and bisexual women. These results indicate a potential significant negative impact of weight bias among gay men and a much lower potential effect among sexual minority women. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 28 Apr 2022 00:00:00 GMT
       
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


Your IP address: 44.201.99.222
 
Home (Search)
API
About JournalTOCs
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-