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  Subjects -> DISABILITY (Total: 103 journals)
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Journal of Enabling Technologies
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.369
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 10  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 2398-6271 - ISSN (Online) 2398-6263
Published by Emerald Homepage  [362 journals]
  • Electromyography biofeedback system with visual and vibratory feedbacks
           designed for lower limb rehabilitation

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      Authors: Joao Vitor da Silva Moreira, Karina Rodrigues, Daniel José Lins Leal Pinheiro, Thaís Cardoso, João Luiz Vieira, Esper Cavalheiro, Jean Faber
      Abstract: One of the main causes of long-term prosthetic abandonment is the lack of ownership over the prosthesis, which was caused mainly by the absence of sensory information regarding the lost limb. The period where the patient learns how to interact with a prosthetic device is critical in rehabilitation. This ideally happens within the first months after amputation, which is also a period associated with the consolidation of brain changes. Different studies have shown that the introduction of feedback mechanisms can be crucial to bypass the lack of sensorial information. To develop a biofeedback system for the rehabilitation of transfemoral amputees – controlled via electromyographic (EMG) activity from the leg muscles – that can provide real-time visual and/or vibratory feedback for the user. The system uses surface EMG to control two feedback mechanisms, which are the knee joint of a prosthetic leg of a humanoid avatar in a virtual reality (VR) environment (visual feedback) and a matrix of 16 vibrotactile actuators placed in the back of the user (vibratory feedback). Data acquisition was inside a Faraday Cage using an OpenEphys® acquisition board for the surface EMG recordings. The tasks were performed on able-bodied participants, with no amputation, and for this, the dominant leg of the user was immobilized using an orthopedic boot fixed on the chair, allowing only isometric contractions of target muscles, according to the Surface EMG for Non-Invasive Assessment of Muscles (SENIAM) standard. The authors test the effectiveness of combining vibratory and visual feedback and how task difficulty affects overall performance. The authors' results show no negative interference combining both feedback modalities and that performance peaked at the intermediate difficulty. These results provide powerful insights of what can be accomplished with the population of amputee people. By using this biofeedback system, the authors expect to engage another sensory modality in the process of spatial representation of a virtual leg, bypassing the lack of information associated with the disruption of afferent pathways following amputation. The authors developed a showcase with a new protocol and feedback mechanisms showing the protocol's safety, efficiency and reliability. However, since this system is designed for patients with leg amputation, the full extent of the effects of the biofeedback training can only be assessed after the evaluation with the amputees, and the results obtained so far establish a safe and operational protocol to accomplish this. In this study, the authors proposed a new biofeedback device intended to be used in the preprosthetic rehabilitation phase for people with transfemoral amputation. With this new system, the authors propose a mechanism to bypass the lack of sensory information from a virtual prosthesis and help to assimilate visual and vibrotactile stimuli as a cue for movement representation. With this new system, the authors propose a mechanism to bypass the lack of sensory information from a virtual prosthesis and help to assimilate visual and vibrotactile stimuli as a cue for movement representation. The authors' results show that all users were capable of recognizing both feedback modalities, both separate and combined, being able to respond accordingly throughout the tasks. The authors also show that for a one-session protocol, the last difficulty level imposed a greater challenge for most users, explained by the significant drop in performance disregarding the feedback modality. Lastly, the authors believe this paradigm can provide a better process for the embodiment of prosthetic devices, fulfilling the lack of sensory information for the users.
      Citation: Journal of Enabling Technologies
      PubDate: 2023-01-03
      DOI: 10.1108/JET-05-2022-0039
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Teachers' perceived usefulness of assistive technology in Ontario
           classrooms

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      Authors: Bronwyn Lamond, Shimin Mo, Todd Cunningham
      Abstract: Despite the positive impact that assistive technology (AT) can have on the academic success of students with learning disabilities, it is often inconsistently implemented or abandoned. It has been established that teachers' perceived usefulness of AT can act as a barrier to classroom AT implementation. The purpose of this study is to expand the current understanding of the challenges with implementation of AT within the classroom environment to inform teacher training on AT tools, improve professional development around AT and address the systemic and practical barriers that impact AT implementation within Ontario classrooms. This research examined Grade 6–10 Ontario-certified teachers' (N = 111) perceptions of AT and the variables that predict perceived usefulness of AT. The study used a mixed methods design including a survey consisting of open- and closed-ended items that elicited information about teachers' AT knowledge and training, their access to AT resources, their perception of administrative support for access to and implementation of AT, the usefulness of AT and the barriers to AT use in the classroom. An exploratory linear regression was conducted to predict perceived usefulness of AT from AT training, AT resources and AT knowledge and revealed that AT resources and AT knowledge added statistically significantly to the prediction, whereas AT training did not. A thematic analysis of open-ended survey responses and interview data further identified that access, training, Internet and student motivation may influence AT use. Implications for teachers’ AT training and provision of AT resources are discussed.
      Citation: Journal of Enabling Technologies
      PubDate: 2022-12-08
      DOI: 10.1108/JET-05-2022-0040
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Immersive robotic telepresence system to support a person with
           intellectual and motor disabilities perform a daily task: a¬†case study

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      Authors: Lorenzo Desideri, Lisa Cesario, Chiara Sidoti, Massimiliano Malavasi
      Abstract: In this proof-of-concept study, the authors assessed the feasibility of using a humanoid robot controlled remotely via an immersive telepresence system to support a person with intellectual and motor disabilities performing a daily task (i.e. setting a table for lunch). The system involved a head-mounted display and two joysticks. A teleoperator was able to see through the video cameras of the robot and deliver the instructions verbally to the participant located in a different room. To assess the system, a baseline phase (A) was followed by an intervention (i.e. tele-operated support) phase (B) and a return to a baseline phase (A). Data showed a marked increase in the average frequency of task steps correctly performed from baseline (M = 15%) to intervention (M = 93%). Accuracy reached 100% in the return to baseline. These preliminary findings, along with qualitative feedback from users, suggest that an immersive telepresence system may be used to provide remote support to people with intellectual and motor disabilities.
      Citation: Journal of Enabling Technologies
      PubDate: 2022-11-03
      DOI: 10.1108/JET-05-2022-0042
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Using rhythm for rehabilitation: the¬†acceptability of a novel haptic
           cueing device in extended stroke rehabilitation

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      Authors: Josephine Wendy Tetley, Simon Holland, Sue Caton, Glenis Donaldson, Theodoros Georgiou, Federico Visi, Rachel Christina Stockley
      Abstract: Restoration of walking ability is a key goal to both stroke survivors and their therapists. However, the intensity and duration of rehabilitation available after stroke can be limited by service constraints, despite the potential for improvement which could reduce health service demands in the long run. The purpose of this paper is to present qualitative findings from a study that explored the acceptability of a haptic device aimed at improving walking as part of an extended intervention in stroke rehabilitation. Pre-trial focus groups and post-trial interviews to assess the acceptability of Haptic Bracelets were undertaken with seven stroke survivors. Five themes were identified as impacting on the acceptability of the Haptic Bracelet: potential for improving quality of life; relationships with technology; important features; concerns; response to trial and concentration. Participants were interested in the haptic bracelet and hoped it would provide them with more confidence making them: feel safer when walking; have greater ability to take bigger strides rather than little steps; a way to combat mistakes participants reported making due to tiredness and reduced pain in knees and hips. Haptic Bracelets are an innovative development in the field of rhythmic cueing and stroke rehabilitation. The haptic bracelets also overcome problems encountered with established audio-based cueing, as their use is not affected by external environmental noise. The peer review history for this article is available at: https://publons.com/publon 10.1108/JET-01-2021-0003
      Citation: Journal of Enabling Technologies
      PubDate: 2022-08-23
      DOI: 10.1108/JET-01-2021-0003
      Issue No: Vol. 16, No. 4 (2022)
       
  • A new era in psychiatry: the impacts of COVID-19 and the shift to
           telepsychiatry on clinical practice and clinician well-being

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      Authors: Lauren Celentano, Kristina Brenisin, Kieran C. Breen
      Abstract: The COVID-19 pandemic has actively changed the face of all medical disciplines, including mental health practices. In a matter of days from the introduction of the lockdown, clinicians have to adapt to new working models with many changing the consultation methods clinicians have utilized for years. To best understand the wider clinical impact, a limited study was carried out to assess the effect of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) on psychiatric clinical practice. A qualitative study was performed to analyze the impact of COVID-19 on clinician practice at a UK secure care mental health facility. A four-question free-text survey was distributed online to all physicians and seven responses were analyzed using thematic analysis. Four key themes were identified – use of technology, the importance of face-to-face contact, work/life balance and mental well-being. Overall, the results of the study reported that although some negative changes to the traditional work–life balance were identified, the clinicians found remote working within a secure care setting cultivated a more efficient working environment while allowing for more effective social distance practices. This study highlighted some of the challenges faced by clinicians employed in a secure care mental health setting following the introduction of lockdown measures in the UK associated with the COVID-19 pandemic. The study will also inform future work practices, including the potential of longer term remote working in this sector.
      Citation: Journal of Enabling Technologies
      PubDate: 2022-04-25
      DOI: 10.1108/JET-11-2021-0053
      Issue No: Vol. 16, No. 4 (2022)
       
  • Exploring patient's intention towards e-health consultation using an
           extended UTAUT model

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      Authors: Ajitabh Dash, Anjan Kumar Sahoo
      Abstract: This research explores the factors that influence patients' willingness to seek digital health advice in developing countries like India by extending the unified theory of acceptance and use of technology (UTAUT) with perceived risk (PR) and trust. Structural equation modeling (SEM) was used to test the hypotheses proposed for this study. The primary data for this study were acquired from 578 respondents using a judgmental sampling procedure. Results of this investigation reflected a positive and significant connexion of the intention of a patient towards e-health consultation with effort expectancy (EE), performance expectancy (PE), trust and social influence (SI); conversely, factors like facilitating condition (FC) and PR are not significantly connected with the same. The findings of this study will not only add to the existing literature on the behavioral intention (BI) by introducing new dimensions in the context of digital health consultation, but they will also aid service providers in developing strategies to encourage the use of e-health consultation services in emerging economies such as India.
      Citation: Journal of Enabling Technologies
      PubDate: 2022-03-22
      DOI: 10.1108/JET-08-2021-0042
      Issue No: Vol. 16, No. 4 (2022)
       
  • Editing assistance tool validation for English language learners

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      Authors: Bronwyn Lamond, Todd Cunningham
      Abstract: Editing assistance software programs are computer-based tools that check and make suggestions for the grammar, spelling and style of a piece of writing. These tools are becoming more popular as recommendations for students who struggle with written expression, such as English language learners (ELLs). The purpose of the present study is to compare the performance of four different programs with embedded editing assistance tools in their ability to identify errors in the writing of ELLs. Repeated measures ANOVAs were conducted to determine whether there were differences in the number of errors (i.e. spelling, grammar, punctuation and errors that change the meaning of the text) identified by editing assistance programs (i.e. Grammarly, Ginger, Microsoft Word, Google Docs and human raters) for writing by ELLs. The results of the present study indicate that the four programs did not differ in their identification of spelling errors. None of the editing assistance programs identified as many errors as the human raters; therefore, editing assistance cannot yet replace effective human editing for ELLs. Limitations with the present study include manual verification of errors flagged by editing programs, multiple raters, a small sample size and a young sample of students. The paper includes practical factors to consider when integrating editing assistance software into the classroom, including the development needs of students, the impact of students' first language and student training on the technology. This paper provides school psychologists, teachers and other professionals working with students with specific, evidence-based recommendations for implementation of editing assistance AT.
      Citation: Journal of Enabling Technologies
      PubDate: 2022-02-15
      DOI: 10.1108/JET-04-2021-0020
      Issue No: Vol. 16, No. 4 (2022)
       
 
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