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  Subjects -> DISABILITY (Total: 103 journals)
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Ageing & Society
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.756
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 39  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0144-686X - ISSN (Online) 1469-1779
Published by Cambridge University Press Homepage  [353 journals]
  • ASO volume 42 issue 6 Cover and Front matter

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      Pages: 1 - 2
      PubDate: 2022-05-20
      DOI: 10.1017/S0144686X22000617
       
  • ASO volume 42 issue 6 Cover and Back matter

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      Pages: 1 - 2
      PubDate: 2022-05-20
      DOI: 10.1017/S0144686X22000629
       
  • Ageing and the Crisis in Health and Social Care Bethany Simmonds, Policy
           Press, Bristol, UK, 2022, 156 pp., hbk £60.00, ISBN 13: 978 1 4473-4859-7
           

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      Authors: Scourfield; Peter
      Pages: 1485 - 1487
      PubDate: 2022-04-21
      DOI: 10.1017/S0144686X22000460
       
  • The experience of caring for an older relative in Chile: Going beyond the
           burden of care – ERRATUM

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      Authors: Palacios; Josefa, Pérez-Cruz, Pedro E., Webb, Andrew
      Pages: 1488 - 1488
      PubDate: 2022-05-20
      DOI: 10.1017/S0144686X2000183X
       
  • Finitude, choice and the right to die: age and the completed life

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      Authors: Gilleard; Chris
      Pages: 1241 - 1251
      Abstract: This paper explores the concept of the completed life outlined in recent writing in the Netherlands on euthanasia and assisted suicide and its implications for ageing studies. Central to this theme is the basic right of people to self-determine the length of their later life, linked with the subsidiary right to assistance in achieving such self-determination. Although the notion of weariness with life has a long history, the recent advocacy of a self-limited life seems shaped by the new social movements presaged upon individual rights together with what might be called a distinctly third-age habitus, giving centre stage to autonomy over the nature and extent of a desired later life, including choice over the manner and timing of a person's ending. In exploring this concept, consideration is given to the notion of a ‘right to die’, ‘rational suicide’ and the inclusion of death as a lifestyle choice. While reservations are noted over the unequivocal good attached to such self-determination, including the limits to freedom imposed by the duty to avoid hurt to society, the article concludes by seeing the notion of a completed life as a challenge to traditional ideas about later life.
      PubDate: 2020-10-30
      DOI: 10.1017/S0144686X2000149X
       
  • Health and health-care utilisation in old age: the case of older men
           living alone

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      Authors: Frausing; Kristian Park, Smærup, Michael, Larsen, Per Lindsø, Maibom, Kirsten, Juel, Knud, Munk, Karen Pallesgaard
      Pages: 1252 - 1279
      Abstract: A growing number of older men are living alone. They are often referred to as an at-risk group in health-care systems. The purpose of this article is to establish an overview of these men's health and health-care utilisation. We do so by drawing on three sources: an online survey with health-care professionals, data from a national self-report health study and register-based data on health-care utilisation. The results show that older men living alone generally have lower health scores than older men co-habiting and that, among older men living alone, lower educational level is associated with lower health scores but also a greater use of free-of-charge health-care services. Health-care professionals conducting preventive home visits consider older men's social needs the most pronounced problem for the men's wellbeing and call for new services to be custom made for them. In this article, we discuss differences between older men living in rural and urban areas and between those who are single, divorced or widowed. We conclude that health and social care systems must differentiate between sub-groups of older men living alone when developing new services and that free-of-charge services, such as general practitioners and home care, should be considered as vehicles for addressing health inequities.
      PubDate: 2020-10-19
      DOI: 10.1017/S0144686X20001439
       
  • Age-related loss of resources and perceived old age in China

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      Authors: Liu; Huijun, Yang, Ru, Feng, Zhixin
      Pages: 1280 - 1298
      Abstract: Life expectancy in China has increased. This paper explores the age when older adults (aged 60 and above) consider themselves to be an ‘older person’ and how age-related loss of resources (five dimensions: early cumulative factors, decline and loss of health resources, reduction and loss of economic resources, weakening and loss of social support resources, and personal role transition and experiences of losing family members) could impact their perceived old age. Using two waves of data from the China Longitudinal Ageing Social Survey (CLASS) in 2014 and 2016 (6,244 participants in 2014 and 2,989 participants in both 2014 and 2016), we found that the mean perceived old age is around 70 years at baseline (2014). Higher level of educational attainment and occupational types (early cumulative factors), better health condition, receiving support from friends and taking care of grandchildren are significantly associated with the perception that old age begins at an older age at baseline, while being Han-Chinese, being an urban resident (early cumulative factors) and reporting better health condition have significant positive effects on the perception that old age begins at an older age in the later wave. Our findings suggest that the age standard of older adults should be adjusted dynamically in response to social development and longevity, and also highlight the importance of early cumulative factors in shaping the ageing process besides age-related factors.
      PubDate: 2020-11-04
      DOI: 10.1017/S0144686X20001440
       
  • Rural place attachment and urban community integration of Chinese older
           adults in rural-to-urban relocation

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      Authors: Zhang; Jinfeng, Wang, Bin
      Pages: 1299 - 1317
      Abstract: With China's rapid urbanisation, many residents, especially older adults, are suffering from psychological problems induced by rural-to-urban relocation. This study examines the association between older adults’ rural place attachment and their depression after relocation, as well as the protective roles of neighbourhood social cohesion and sense of community in the relocation place. Chinese older adults (N = 224) who relocated from rural villages to urban communities completed a survey for this study. The results showed that older adults with stronger rural place attachment experienced more depressive symptoms and a lesser sense of community in the relocation place. In addition, the association between rural place attachment and depression was weakened by neighbourhood social cohesion. That is, compared with older adults perceiving low neighbourhood social cohesion, the positive association between rural place attachment and depression was weaker for older adults perceiving high neighbourhood social cohesion. Furthermore, neighbourhood social cohesion's protective role depended on sense of community. In particular, neighbourhood social cohesion buffered the association between rural place attachment and depression for older adults with a strong sense of community but not for older adults with a weak sense of community. These results have implications for developing resources within neighbourhoods and communities to promote relocation adjustment for older adults.
      PubDate: 2020-10-19
      DOI: 10.1017/S0144686X20001464
       
  • ‘I've never given it a thought’: older men's experiences with and
           perceptions of ageism during interactions with physicians

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      Authors: MacRae; Hazel
      Pages: 1318 - 1339
      Abstract: The subjective experience of ageism among older men has received little research attention. This study examines older Canadian men's experiences with and perceptions of ageism during interactions with physicians. In-depth, face-to-face interviews were conducted with 21 men aged 55 years and over. The findings indicate a seeming lack of awareness of ageism among many, and many did not believe ageism was likely to occur during patient–physician interaction. Negative stereotyping of older patients was common. A large majority of the participants reported that they had not personally experienced ageism during a medical encounter, nor were they concerned about it. Numerous rationales were proffered as explanations of why a particular participant had not experienced ageism and who was more likely to be a target.
      PubDate: 2020-10-26
      DOI: 10.1017/S0144686X20001476
       
  • The experience of caring for an older relative in Chile: going beyond the
           burden of care

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      Authors: Palacios; Josefa, Pérez-Cruz, Pedro, Webb, Andrew
      Pages: 1340 - 1359
      Abstract: Care in Chile, as in most Latin American countries, remains largely the responsibility of female family members in informal arrangements with little government support. The analysis of caring for a dependent older person has commonly been approached from the burden of care perspective, focusing on the tasks carried out, the time spent providing care and the negative (burdensome) consequences for the care-giver. This study reveals the daily experiences of family care-givers of older people through a thematic data analysis of 42 interviews with main family carers of an older person as experienced by the carers themselves. Findings highlight the complex nature of care work. Tasks carried out do not necessarily relate to the intensity of the care experience or a negative experience. Care-givers can work long hours providing care and still feel comfortable and find the experience emotionally rewarding. Care-givers might also carry out only a few tasks and experience pressure. The broader social and economic context can generate constraints that make a specific set of tasks easier or harder on the carer, but these contextual factors do not fully explain the experience of care. Relations, and particularly those that carry an emotional component such as the carer-older person, carer-siblings and carer-spouse, must be considered alongside the tasks and the difficulties or potential constraints of the context to understand the care experience.
      PubDate: 2020-11-09
      DOI: 10.1017/S0144686X20001567
       
  • ‘I'm old, but I'm not old-fashioned’: mealtimes and cooking practices
           among Danish widows and widowers

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      Authors: Andersen; Sidse Schoubye
      Pages: 1360 - 1377
      Abstract: Existing research on how older adults handle challenges associated with domestic housework, and in particular food work, almost invariably assumes that older adults are traditionalist, and that this affects the way they adjust to widowhood. This assumption is problematic, as decades of research have emphasised increasing gender equality in food work. In this paper, I explore how older adult men and women adjust to food preparation after the loss of a spouse. Interviews with 31 Danish widows and widowers aged between 67 and 86 years old suggest that the men have made culinary progress. However, I also show that the narratives around domestic food work among the older generations remain gendered: both men and women identify widowed men's domestic food work as something meriting acknowledgement, and men and women draw on traditional masculine and feminine ways of approaching domestic food work.
      PubDate: 2020-11-13
      DOI: 10.1017/S0144686X20001543
       
  • Retirement can wait: a phenomenographic exploration of professional
           baby-boomer engagement in non-standard employment

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      Authors: Niesel; Christoph, Buys, Laurie, Nili, Alireza, Miller, Evonne
      Pages: 1378 - 1402
      Abstract: This qualitative study explores the experiences of 23 professional baby-boomers in Australia who are challenging the traditional employment and retirement pathway through non-standard employment (NSE). We focus on professional part-time, casual and self-employed work within the kaleidoscope of various working arrangements that form NSE. Using a phenomenographic approach, we identified variations in how these older baby-boomers experience engagement in NSE. Our findings revealed five interrelated hierarchical categories of description, which posit a generally positive view of NSE and highlight financial stability, flexibility, continued activity, social ties and maintaining self-identity as key conceptions for work engagement. Our study suggests that NSE is an important and under-researched part of the labour market for baby-boomer professionals, that it can offer greater opportunities for engagement and that the traditional hard-boundary view of retirement as a defined lifestage is softening. It extends our understanding of baby-boomer engagement with NSE in the labour market and offers findings that may inform future policy and practice.
      PubDate: 2020-11-10
      DOI: 10.1017/S0144686X20001555
       
  • Determining the importance and feasibility of various aspects of healthy
           ageing among older adults using concept mapping

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      Authors: Howell; Britteny M., Seater, Mariah, Davis, Kathryn, McLinden, Daniel
      Pages: 1403 - 1421
      Abstract: Research shows that healthy ageing is defined differently by older adults and researchers, who may put more or less weight on the physiological, psychological, societal and personal aspects of ageing. Although there is growing interest in the research literature on lay models of healthy ageing in socio-cultural context, little work has been done to determine how important or feasible the various components of healthy ageing are viewed to be by older adults. This study asked a convenience sample of 54 older adults in the circumpolar North to rate the importance and feasibility of 36 previously identified components of healthy ageing in their community. Results indicate that seniors in the sample place the most importance on aspects of the social and physical environment, while least important concepts included psychological and individual behaviours. However, most feasible aspects were individual behaviours and least feasible were aspects of the social and physical environment. Although older adults are able to construct a model of what healthy ageing should look like in their community, they do not always view the most important aspects of healthy ageing to be the most feasible to achieve, providing ample opportunity for public and social policy change.
      PubDate: 2020-11-16
      DOI: 10.1017/S0144686X20001580
       
  • Downward transfer of support and care: understanding the cultural lag in
           rural China

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      Authors: Qiu; F. X., Zhan, H. J., Liu, J., Barrett, P. M.
      Pages: 1422 - 1447
      Abstract: The Chinese culture of filial piety has historically emphasised children's responsibility for their ageing parents. Little is understood regarding the inverse: parents’ responsibility and care for their adult children. This paper uses interviews with 50 families living in rural China's Anhui Province to understand intergenerational support in rural China. Findings indicate that parents in rural China take on large financial burdens in order to sustain patrilineal traditions by providing housing and child care for their adult sons. These expectations lead some rural elders to become migrant workers in order to support their adult sons while others provide live-in grandchild-care, moving into their children's urban homes or bringing grandchildren into their own homes. As the oldest rural generations begin to require ageing care of their own, migrant children are unable to provide the sustained care and support expected within the cultural tradition of xiao. This paper adds to the small body of literature that examines the downward transfer of support from parents to their adult children in rural China. The authors argue that there is an emerging cultural rupture in the practice of filial piety – while the older generation is fulfilling their obligations of upbringing and paying for adult children's housing and child care; these adult children are not necessarily available or committed to the return of care for their ageing parents. The authors reveal cultural and structural lags that leave millions of rural ageing adults vulnerable in the process of urbanisation in rural China.
      PubDate: 2020-12-09
      DOI: 10.1017/S0144686X2000152X
       
  • Perceived barriers and contributors to sense of purpose in life in
           retirement community residents

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      Authors: Lewis; Nathan A., Reesor, Naomi, Hill, Patrick L.
      Pages: 1448 - 1464
      Abstract: Despite the growing use of retirement communities and ageing care facilities, little is known about how residing in retirement residences may impact aspects of older adult wellbeing. Living in these communities may hold particular influence on residents’ sense of purpose, if they feel limited in their opportunities for individual action, or could serve to promote purposefulness depending on the social connections available. The current study sought to explore contributing factors as well as barriers to purpose in older adults living in three continuing care retirement communities. Using brief semi-structured interviews, 18 older adults were asked to describe their purpose in life, community-related activities and any perceived challenges limiting their ability to pursue this purpose. Thematic analysis was used to examine themes common across interviews. Interviews presented a mixed picture of the nature of purposefulness in retirement facilities. Residents espoused several benefits of community living such as social and leisure opportunities, while also noting several obstacles to their purpose, including health concerns and the belief that purpose in life was not relevant for older adults. These findings provide insight into how older adults can derive a sense of purpose from activities within their retirement community and how facilities can better tailor programmes to promote purposefulness and support personally valued roles for residents.
      PubDate: 2020-12-21
      DOI: 10.1017/S0144686X20001749
       
  • Characterising older adults’ engagement in age-friendly community
           initiatives: perspectives from core group leaders in the Northeast United
           States of America

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      Authors: Greenfield; Emily A., Reyes, Laurent
      Pages: 1465 - 1484
      Abstract: Researchers and programme champions alike have identified older adults as key contributors to age-friendly community change efforts. There has been very little scholarship, however, to characterise the nature of older adults’ engagement in age-friendly community initiatives (AFCIs). To help address this gap, we drew on five waves of data from semi-structured interviews with core group members of eight AFCIs in a Northeast region of the United States of America. Interviews were conducted as part of a multi-year, community-engaged study on the development of philanthropically supported AFCIs. We iteratively coded segments of the interviews in which core group members described the involvement of older adults, as well as their efforts to engage older adults in the initiatives. This analysis resulted in an inductive-analytic typology with five qualitatively distinct categories, including older adults as: (a) consumers (receiving information, goods and services through the AFCI), (b) informants (sharing perspectives on ageing in the community with the core group), (c) task assistants (assisting with project-oriented tasks under the direction of the core group), (d) champions (contributing ideas and implementing action on their own initiative), and (e) core group members (holding primary responsibility for driving the work of the AFCI forward). We discuss implications of the typology for research on AFCI implementation and evaluation, as well as opportunities for AFCIs to enhance the engagement of older adults from historically marginalised groups.
      PubDate: 2020-12-11
      DOI: 10.1017/S0144686X2000166X
       
 
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