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  Subjects -> DISABILITY (Total: 103 journals)
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Ageing & Society
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.756
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 40  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0144-686X - ISSN (Online) 1469-1779
Published by Cambridge University Press Homepage  [353 journals]
  • ASO volume 42 issue 10 Cover and Front matter

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      Pages: 1 - 2
      PubDate: 2022-09-20
      DOI: 10.1017/S0144686X22001131
       
  • ASO volume 42 issue 10 Cover and Back matter

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      Pages: 1 - 2
      PubDate: 2022-09-20
      DOI: 10.1017/S0144686X22001143
       
  • Well-being Over the Life Course: Incorporating Human–Animal Interaction
           Regina M. Bures and Nancy R. Gee (eds), Springer, Cham, Switzerland, 2021,
           109 pp., pbk £44.99, ISBN 13:978-3-030-64084-2

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      Authors: Davison; Lisa
      Pages: 2471 - 2473
      PubDate: 2022-07-19
      DOI: 10.1017/S0144686X22000800
       
  • Navigating the choppy waters to Nirvana: A critical reflective account of
           caring for ageing parents in the fourth age

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      Authors: McInnes; Alison
      Pages: 2227 - 2243
      Abstract: This article revisits a paper and from an autoethnographic/critical reflective biographical approach re-examines seven cultural notions or myths, which may encourage ageism. It is framed within my experiential knowledge of caring for my ageing parents, with the tensions and challenges around problematising the value of expertise based on experience, communication, grief, and autonomy and freedom versus safety. The commentary emphasises that by analysing the impact of our personal life experiences, we can start to understand both the intended and unintended consequences of policy and practice affecting those in the fourth age. As a social work educator, I wanted to reflect upon how my tacit experiential knowledge, if made explicit, could impact upon my own and others’ learning. The recent death of my father has allowed for a period of reflection on my own caring and indeed my professional social work experience, knowledge, skills and practice. It is argued that the ageing process is unequal as class and socio-economic factors, i.e. geography, age, gender, religion and ethnicity, all play parts in determining how someone ages, and indeed upon the care an individual older person receives. A fuller understanding of negotiating the role of one stakeholder, that of a family carer in the ageing process, is elicited in this paper.
      PubDate: 2021-02-19
      DOI: 10.1017/S0144686X20001956
       
  • The global care network and its impact on sending and receiving countries:
           current knowledge and future directions

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      Authors: Ayalon; Liat
      Pages: 2244 - 2261
      Abstract: Research concerning the effects of migrants on elder care in affluent receiving countries has been substantial, but we know little about the effects of migrant care on elder care in sending countries. There also is limited research on elder care in the context of the return migration of migrant care workers. This theoretical article explores the potential relevance of a social network perspective, which views individuals and countries as being interconnected even when they are miles apart. A multi-level framework that considers macro-, meso- and micro-level perspectives is introduced to better account for current migrant care arrangements. The macro-level perspective takes into account country-level characteristics including policies, geography and cultural preferences; the meso-level perspective takes into account the characteristics of the entire network, which may spread over different countries; and the micro-level perspective concerns the unique characteristics of the individuals who make up the network. This approach proposes that the effects of migrant home care go way beyond the care recipient–care-giver dyads or triads to incorporate many individuals and countries that are transnationally interconnected via the work of care. This article also aims to increase public and scientific awareness to the potential impact of migrant care and return migration on elder care in the sending countries by stressing a transnational social network perspective.
      PubDate: 2021-02-18
      DOI: 10.1017/S0144686X21000027
       
  • A narrative review of literature on the use of health and social care by
           older trans adults: what can United Kingdom services learn'

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      Authors: Benbow; Susan Mary, Eost-Telling, Charlotte, Kingston, Paul
      Pages: 2262 - 2283
      Abstract: We carried out a narrative review and thematic analysis of literature on the physical health care, mental health care and social care of trans older adults to ascertain what is known about older trans adults’ contacts with and use of health and social care. Thirty papers were found: a majority originated in the United States of America. Five themes were identified: experience of discrimination/prejudice and disrespect; health inequalities; socio-economic inequalities; positive practice; and staff training and education. The first three themes present challenges for providers and service users. Experiences of discrimination/prejudice and disrespect over the course of their lives powerfully influence how older trans adults engage with care services and practitioners. Health and socio-economic inequalities suggest that older trans adults are likely to have greater need of services and care. The remaining two themes offer opportunities for service improvement. We conclude that more research is needed, that there is a strong argument for taking a lifecourse perspective in a spirit of cultural humility, and that contextual societal factors influence service users and providers. We identify positive trans-inclusive practices which we commend to services. More needs to be done now to make older adult services appropriate and welcoming for trans service users.
      PubDate: 2021-02-24
      DOI: 10.1017/S0144686X21000039
       
  • Intergenerational equity, equality and reciprocity in economically and
           politically turbulent times: narratives from across generations

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      Authors: Wildman; Josephine M., Goulding, Anna, Moffatt, Suzanne, Scharf, Thomas, Stenning, Alison
      Pages: 2284 - 2303
      Abstract: The concept of intergenerational fairness has taken hold across Europe since the 2008 financial crisis. In the United Kingdom (UK), focus on intergenerational conflict has been further sharpened by the 2016 ‘Brexit’ vote to take the UK out of the European Union. However, current debates around intergenerational fairness are taking place among policy makers, the media and in think-tanks. In this way, they are conversations about, but not with, people. This article draws on qualitative interviews with 40 people aged 19–85 years and living in North-East England and Edinburgh, Scotland's capital city, to explore whether macro-level intergenerational equity discourses resonate in people's everyday lives. We find widespread pessimism around young people's prospects and evidence of a fracturing social contract, with little faith in the principles of intergenerational equity, equality and reciprocity upon which welfare states depend. Although often strong, the kin contract was not fully ameliorating resentment and frustration among participants observing societal-level intergenerational unfairness mirrored within families. However, blame for intergenerational inequity was placed on a remote state rather than on older generations. Despite the precariousness of the welfare state, participants of all ages strongly supported the principle of state support, rejecting a system based on family wealth and inherited privilege. Rather than increased individualism, participants desired strengthened communities that encouraged greater intergenerational mixing.
      PubDate: 2021-02-22
      DOI: 10.1017/S0144686X21000052
       
  • Older workers imagining retirement: the collapse of agency, or freedom at
           last'

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      Authors: Grødem; Anne Skevik, Kitterød, Ragni Hege
      Pages: 2304 - 2322
      Abstract: Images of what retirement is and ought to be are changing. Older workers are being encouraged to work for longer, at the same time, older adults increasingly voice expectations of a ‘third age’ of active engagement and new life prospects. In this article, we draw on the literature on older workers’ work patterns and retirement transitions (noting push/pull/stay/stuck/jump factors), and on scholarship on the changing social meaning of old age, most importantly the notions of a ‘third’ and ‘fourth’ age. The analysis is based on qualitative interviews with 28 employees in the private sector in Norway, aged between 55 and 66 years. Based on the interviews, we propose three ideal-typical approaches to the work–retirement transition: ‘the logic of deadline’, ‘the logic of negotiation’ and ‘the logic of averting retirement’. The ideal-types are defined by the degree to which informants assume agency in the workplace, their orientation towards work versus retirement and the degree to which they expect to exercise agency in retirement. We emphasise how retirement decisions are informed by notions of the meaning of ageing, while also embedded in relationships with employers and partners.
      PubDate: 2021-03-24
      DOI: 10.1017/S0144686X20002044
       
  • Size matters: locality of residence and media use in later life

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      Authors: Rosenberg; Dennis, Nimrod, Galit
      Pages: 2323 - 2342
      Abstract: Various factors determine the use of media in later life. Nevertheless, spatial inequalities among older media users have been accorded little attention in academic research. This study aimed to explore differences in variety (number) and intensity (duration) of both traditional and new media use among older adults residing in various types of localities. Data were obtained from the second wave of the ACT (Ageing + Communication + Technology) cross-national survey, comprising 7,927 internet users aged 60 and over from seven countries. The statistical analyses used in the study were chi-square and analysis of variance tests, and linear regression as a multivariate technique. The results indicated that spatial differences concern variety of media use to a greater extent than its intensity, especially with regard to use of traditional media via new devices. Overall, residents of large cities exhibited greater variety and intensity of media use than did their counterparts from smaller localities, especially rural ones. These findings supported the social stratification hypothesis – according to which individuals from more-privileged social backgrounds have better media literacy, use media to a greater extent and benefit from its use more than people from disadvantaged groups. The findings should be considered by practitioners and policy makers.
      PubDate: 2021-02-22
      DOI: 10.1017/S0144686X21000143
       
  • Cognitive decline among European retirees: impact of early retirement,
           nation-related and personal characteristics

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      Authors: Carmel; Sara, Tur-Sinai, Aviad
      Pages: 2343 - 2369
      Abstract: Our study aimed to enhance understanding of memory decline (MD) in old age by evaluating longitudinal effects of personal and national contributing factors. We used data collected by the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe (SHARE) from 12 European countries and Israel. Our sample included 11,930 retirees aged 50+, interviewed at baseline and four years later. MD was evaluated by the change in the number of recalled words from first to second interview. Except for gender, all of our explanatory variables had a significant unique effect on MD – age, education, type of occupation, European geographical region, early retirement, time elapsed from retirement, reason for retirement, active lifestyle, re-employment, health/function status, depressive symptoms, and decline in physical and mental health – over the four years of the study. Our findings indicate that MD can be postponed by national policies such as those which prolong years of education and participation in the workforce, and by social interventions directed to promote active lifestyles in late life, especially in Mediterranean and Eastern European nations.
      PubDate: 2021-03-10
      DOI: 10.1017/S0144686X21000064
       
  • Does grandparental child-care provision affect number, satisfaction and
           with whom leisure activities are done'

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      Authors: Ates; Merih, Bordone, Valeria, Arpino, Bruno
      Pages: 2370 - 2392
      Abstract: This study investigates the impact of non-intensive and intensive supplementary grandparental child care on grandparents’ involvement in leisure activities. Three aspects of leisure activities are investigated: the number/frequency of activities, with whom they are carried out and the subjective satisfaction with them. Beside the possibility of a cumulation effect, the literature suggests that providing grandparental child care might compete with other activities, especially for women. Thus, we consider role enhancement and role strain theories to derive our hypotheses. We use longitudinal data from the German Ageing Survey (DEAS) which contains rich information on the leisure activities of people aged 40 and older. To account for selection into the provision of grandparental child care, we use a within-unit estimation approach (fixed-effects panel models). Our results show that both grandfathers and grandmothers tend to engage in more leisure activities when they provide grandparental child care. While care-giving grandfathers become more likely to engage in activities with family members without changing their engagement outside the family, we found no effect for women in this respect. Nevertheless, grandparental child-care provision modifies satisfaction with leisure activities only for women, reducing it, independently from with whom leisure activities are carried out. These findings suggest that a higher quantity of leisure activities does not necessarily imply higher quality.
      PubDate: 2021-03-08
      DOI: 10.1017/S0144686X2100009X
       
  • Changes of profession, employer and work tasks in later working life: an
           empirical overview of staying and leaving

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      Authors: Garthe; Nina, Hasselhorn, Hans Martin
      Pages: 2393 - 2413
      Abstract: Occupational change encompasses change of profession, employer and work tasks. This study gives an overview on occupational change in later working life and provides empirical evidence on voluntary, involuntary and desired occupational changes in the older workforce in Germany. The analyses were based on longitudinal data from 2,835 participants of the German lidA Cohort Study, a representative study of employees born in 1959 or 1965. Multinomial logistic regression analyses were performed in order to characterise the change groups in their previous job situation. The findings indicate that occupational change among older workers is frequent. In four years, 13.4 per cent changed employer, 10.5 per cent profession and 45.1 per cent work tasks. In addition, the desire for change often remains unfulfilled: the share of older workers who wanted to but did not change was 17.6 per cent for profession, 13.2 per cent for employer and 8.9 per cent for work tasks. The change groups investigated differ in terms of their socio-demographic background, health and job factors such as seniority and leadership quality. In times of ageing populations, the potential of occupational change among older workers requires more consideration in society, policy and research. Special attention should also be paid to the group of workers who would have liked to change but feel that they cannot leave.
      PubDate: 2021-03-08
      DOI: 10.1017/S0144686X21000088
       
  • Influence of socio-economic profile of neighbourhoods on the selection of
           home care strategies for older dependants

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      Authors: Julià; Albert, Escapa, Sandra, Gallo, Pedro
      Pages: 2414 - 2432
      Abstract: Care strategies for older dependants are determined by not only individuals or network characteristics, but also contextual factors. The objective of this study is to determine whether urban contexts (neighbourhoods) are linked to the use of family care (informal), public services or private care at home (formal). We applied logistic regression analysis to data from the Survey of People in a Situation of Dependence 2018. The sample was composed of 530 older people (55 years old and over) living in two types of socio-economic groups of neighbourhoods in Barcelona, Spain. The type of neighbourhood is relevant in explaining the home care that older dependants receive. In neighbourhoods with a high socio-economic level, dependants are more likely to use private services and less likely to use informal care services and public services, even after controlling for household income, degree of dependency, sex, age and the number of people in the household. Understanding the factors that determine the use of public care services, private care services or family care-giving is important due to the increment in the number of older people in the population. Our results suggest that differences in urban socio-economic contexts determine some inequalities in the use of services even after controlling for socio-economic individual differences. The characteristics of neighbourhoods should be considered to adjust care policies for older dependants.
      PubDate: 2021-02-22
      DOI: 10.1017/S0144686X21000040
       
  • Choice, needs or equality' Discursive struggles about defining home
           care for older people in Sweden

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      Authors: Peterson; Elin, Brodin, Helene
      Pages: 2433 - 2453
      Abstract: Focusing on Swedish home care for older people, this article explores the discursive (re)production of home care as an institution. Equality and universal service provision have been described as defining features of the Nordic care regime. At the same time, Nordic research has highlighted a shift in social care policy, from a focus on universalism and egalitarian ideals towards a focus on freedom of choice, diversity and individualised services. This article takes as a starting point that home care for older people is formed by different and potentially conflicting ideas. We understand home care as a contested formation and define institutional change in terms of ongoing discursive struggles. The analysis draws on qualitative semi-structured interviews with key informants, including politicians, local authority officials and representatives of interest organisations. Informants were engaged in policy making, implementation or advocacy related to care for older people. We examine the meanings attached to home care for older people and the analysis reveals three different discourses – on choice, needs and equality. By comparing and contrasting discourses, we reveal silences, conflicts and tensions, and highlight the politics involved in (re)creating home care as an institution.
      PubDate: 2021-02-26
      DOI: 10.1017/S0144686X21000131
       
  • The relation between older adults’ trust beliefs in nursing home carers
           and adjustment to residential care

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      Authors: Rotenberg; Ken J., Chmielowiec, Lucyna, Patel, Sanjay
      Pages: 2454 - 2470
      Abstract: The study examined the relation between older adults’ trust beliefs in nursing home carers (NHCs) and adjustment to residential care. Seventy-six older adults (mean age = 83 years, standard deviation = 7 years from UK nursing homes completed standardised scales of trust beliefs in NHCs and adjustment to residential care (satisfaction with care-giving, social engagement in the nursing home, loneliness and a latent measure). As expected, trust beliefs in NHCs were linearly associated with adjustment to residential care on all measures. There were quadratic relations between trust beliefs in NHCs and on given measures of adjustment to residential care (latent measure, satisfaction with care-giving and loneliness). Adults with very high and those with very low trust beliefs in NHCs showed depressed levels on those measures of adjustment to residential care relative to older adults with the middle range of trust beliefs. The research highlights the importance of older adults’ trust beliefs in NHCs for adjustment to nursing homes. The findings show though, that older adults who hold very high, as well those who hold very low, trust beliefs in NHCs are at risk for lower levels of adjustment.
      PubDate: 2021-03-29
      DOI: 10.1017/S0144686X21000301
       
 
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