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  Subjects -> DISABILITY (Total: 103 journals)
Showing 1 - 200 of 310 Journals sorted alphabetically
Advances in Autism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 85)
Advances in Mental Health and Learning Disabilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Aequitas : Revue de Développement Humain, Handicap et Changement Social     Full-text available via subscription  
African Journal of Disability     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Ageing & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
American Annals of the Deaf     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 54)
Aphasiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 58)
Assistive Technology: The Official Journal of RESNA     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Audiology Research     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Augmentative and Alternative Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46)
Autism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 157)
Autism & Developmental Language Impairments     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Autism in Adulthood     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Autism Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
Autism's Own     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
British Journal of Learning Disabilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 101)
British Journal of Special Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
British Journal of Visual Impairment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Canadian Journal of Disability Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 35)
Deafness & Education International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Developmental Disabilities Research Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Disability & Rehabilitation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 82)
Disability & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 84)
Disability and Health Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Disability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
Disability Compliance for Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Disability Studies Quarterly     Open Access   (Followers: 38)
Disability, CBR & Inclusive Development     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Distúrbios da Comunicação     Open Access  
Early Popular Visual Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
European Review of Aging and Physical Activity     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Health Expectations     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Hearing, Balance and Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Intellectual Disability Australasia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
International Journal of Audiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
International Journal of Developmental Disabilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
International Journal of Language & Communication Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 57)
International Journal of Orthopaedic and Trauma Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
International Journal of Technology Assessment in Health Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal for Healthcare Quality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal of Accessibility and Design for All     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Adult Protection, The     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Aging and Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 53)
Journal of Assistive Technologies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 82)
Journal of Deaf Studies and Deaf Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Disability & Religion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Disability Policy Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Journal of Disability Studies in Education     Open Access  
Journal of Early Hearing Detection and Intervention     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Elder Abuse & Neglect     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Enabling Technologies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Gerontological Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Integrated Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Intellectual & Developmental Disability     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 63)
Journal of Intellectual Disabilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 56)
Journal of Intellectual Disability - Diagnosis and Treatment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Intellectual Disability Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 67)
Journal of Learning Disabilities and Offending Behaviour     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Journal of Occupational Therapy, Schools, & Early Intervention     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48)
Journal of Policy and Practice In Intellectual Disabilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Journal of Science Education for Students with Disabilities     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Social Work in Disability & Rehabilitation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 92)
Journal of Spinal Cord Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Visual Impairment & Blindness     Hybrid Journal  
Learning Disabilities : A Multidisciplinary Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Learning Disability Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Mental Health Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Music and Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Physical & Occupational Therapy in Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 67)
Physical Disabilities : Education and Related Services     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Public Policy and Aging Report     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Quality in Ageing and Older Adults     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
Research and Practice in Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Revista Espaço     Open Access  
Revista Española de Discapacidad     Open Access  
Revista Herediana de Rehabilitacion     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Revue francophone de la déficience intellectuelle     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Scandinavian Journal of Disability Research     Open Access   (Followers: 26)
Sexuality and Disability     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Siglo Cero. Revista Española sobre Discapacidad Intelectual     Open Access  
Sign Language Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Society and Mental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Speech Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Stigma and Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Stress     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Technology and Disability     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Tizard Learning Disability Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49)
Topics in Language Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Visual Cognition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Visual Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Visual Communication Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Visual Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Working with Older People     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)

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Advances in Autism
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.222
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 38  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 2056-3868 - ISSN (Online) 2056-3876
Published by Emerald Homepage  [360 journals]
  • Increasing incidence of autism spectrum disorder: are we
           over-diagnosing'

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      Authors: Lance Vincent Watkins , Heather Angus-Leppan
      Abstract: In 2016, 1 in 54 children were estimated to have autism in the USA compared to 1 in 2,500 in 1955. This study aims to consider whether there has been a worldwide rise in incidence over time that is contributing to the rise in prevalence. A systematic review of the literature with strict inclusion criteria was performed to identify large population-based studies that include raw incidence rate data with clearly defined diagnostic criteria. The data from the included studies were pooled and analysed descriptively to compare incidence rates by decade. Seven studies were included in the final quantitative analysis including incidence rate data from 1988 to 2015 with 29,026 cases, over a total of 69,562,748 person years. Considering the most robust data, the incidence rate ratio between the decade 1990–1999 and 2000–2009 provides an estimated relative risk of 4.21 (95% CI; 4.11–4.32). If we compare the limited data available in 1988–1989 and 2010–2015, there is an estimated 75 times (95% CI 49.56–115.04) increased rate of diagnosis. The broadening of diagnostic criteria and its increasing application in clinical practice needs further consideration to ensure individuals receive the most appropriate personalised support. A true rise in the incidence of autism will influence the level of service provision required in future with the potential for significant under resourcing. More detailed assessment of the clinical characteristics of those diagnosed will help predict risk factors for specialist service involvement in future.
      Citation: Advances in Autism
      PubDate: 2022-03-21
      DOI: 10.1108/AIA-10-2021-0041
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • “Iranian family caregivers of autistic children: the experience of
           stigma”

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      Authors: Nastaran Poorkhorshidi , Sima Zohari Anboohi , Jamile Mohtashami , Hamid Alavi Majd
      Abstract: Autistic children and their family caregivers are impacted widely by the social arrangements, which bring up a variety of problems and make their caregiving duties even more difficult. One of the main troubles family caregivers struggle with is the “Autism stigma” that eventually leads to social exclusion. This study aims to identify shreds of evidence of Autism stigma experienced by family caregivers of autistic children. The study also aims to present some general comparison between the findings in Iran and a few other countries’ available respective data to the “Autism stigma.” This study is an inductive qualitative content analysis. Twelve family caregivers were purposefully selected. Data were gathered exercising semi-structured, in-depth interviews and scrutinized using content analysis method. In the interviews with the participants, a new category called “Autism stigma” was discerned. This category includes three subcategories: “Diagnosis process,” “Lack of awareness” and “Presence in the society.” In Iran, Autism is considered a kind of social stigma. It mainly happens due to a lack of public awareness about this psychological disorder. The family caregivers in the community suffer from the stigma of autism, which leads them to distance themselves from society. This paper aims to improve the social awareness in regard to the negative impacts of Autism stigma.
      Citation: Advances in Autism
      PubDate: 2022-01-28
      DOI: 10.1108/AIA-08-2021-0037
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Suspected feigning of autism in adults: a clinician survey, indications
           and proposed guidelines

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      Authors: David Murphy , Josephine Grace Broyd
      Abstract: This paper aims to provide a discussion and summary of a clinician survey exploring the experiences of suspected feigned autism. This study is an online survey targeting a range of autism professionals, with varying levels of experience, working in different clinical settings. Approximately half of the professionals who completed the survey reported experiencing situations of suspected feigning of adult autism across a range of clinical contexts and with various motivations. In terms of best indications of potential feigning, most clinicians reported “textbook” self-descriptions of problem behaviours with vague examples, as well as inconsistent presenting problems and mismatch with any known developmental history. Approximately half of clinicians expressed the view that autism was more difficult to feign than a psychiatric disorder and had experienced situations involving differences in professional opinion as to an individual autism diagnosis. The survey is limited by a potential sample bias and no information regarding the clinical characteristics of those suspected to have feigned autism. However, these initial findings offer further questions for future research to pursue. As an initial examination of practicing clinicians’ experiences of suspected feigned autism, the survey highlights the complexities of an autism diagnosis and suggests feigning is a potential clinical scenario. Some guidance as to when to suspect possible feigned autism is also offered, as well as a provisional assessment protocol.
      Citation: Advances in Autism
      PubDate: 2022-01-21
      DOI: 10.1108/AIA-11-2021-0044
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Differential diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder, intellectual
           disability and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)

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      Authors: Michelle Heyman, Megan Ledoux Galligan, Giselle Berenice Salinas, Elizabeth Baker, Jan Blacher, Katherine Stavropoulos
      Abstract: Professionals working with community populations are often presented with complicated cases where it is difficult to determine which diagnosis or diagnoses are appropriate. Differentiating among neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism spectrum disorder (ASD), attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and intellectual disability can be a complex process, especially, as these disorders have some overlapping symptoms and often co-occur in young children. This series of case studies aims to present commonly overlapping symptoms in children who present to clinics with developmental concerns. This paper presents three case studies that were completed at a free community ASD screening clinic in Southern California. The case studies have common presenting behaviors and symptoms (e.g. social communication difficulties) that often co-occur across diagnoses; explanations for the final diagnoses are given in each case. Conclusions from these three cases cannot generalize to all children being seen in clinics for neurodevelopmental concerns. This series of case studies highlights commonly overlapping symptoms in children who present for differential diagnosis with social and/or behavioral concerns. Implications for educational placement and intervention are discussed. These cases highlight the challenges involved in the differential and dual diagnostic process for young children with developmental concerns. Diagnostic considerations can affect later educational placement and opportunities for socialization. This series of case studies provide practical information for clinicians about how to effectively differentiate between commonly occurring neurodevelopmental disorders, particularly given recent changes to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual, 5th edition (DSM-5).
      Citation: Advances in Autism
      PubDate: 2021-07-05
      DOI: 10.1108/AIA-01-2021-0002
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Emotion transformation: a grounded theory for uncovering painful triggers
           and repairing relational connection for parents of autistic children

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      Authors: Anna Robinson , Ennie Yong
      Abstract: It is often voiced that parents of autistic children are the expert of their child, whereas parenting programmes target them as effective mediators for change. This paper aims to explore this unchallenged heuristic to develop an understanding of both emotional and relational needs of parents through trainers’ experiences of delivering emotion-focused and autism parent training. This qualitative study used a constructivist approach of grounded theory to gain an in-depth understanding of trainers’ experiences from their encounters when delivering parent training. Six expert trainers were interviewed, and a two-phased coding of ground theory and an adapted thematic analysis was used. An overarching theme emerged: emotion transformation from painful triggers, to enhanced attunement and relational repair. Four main themes containing 13 subthemes were identified. The interaction of these themes and subthemes are presented in a three-phase process model. Phase 1: uncovering painful emotions from a shared journey contained one theme: parent painful triggers. Phase 2: uncovering interpersonal rupture cycle contained one theme: relational rupture cycle within non-synchrony of attunement. Phase 3: parent–child relational repair contained two themes: repairing attachment bonds and therapist’s prizing stance. The authors challenge the parent as expert heuristic and propose that not all parents feel expert in neurotypical-neurodivergent intersubjectivity. The authors are curious to see whether trainers/therapists can guide parents through unprocessed emotions and non-synchrony of attunement to promote healing and relational repair, which requires further investigation. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first emotion-transformation process model grounded in humanistic principles of relational acceptance and emotion theory. The authors propose that a focus on process rather than outcome is more likely to result in higher parenting self-efficacy.
      Citation: Advances in Autism
      PubDate: 2021-12-20
      DOI: 10.1108/AIA-12-2020-0070
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Effect of training program on sexual knowledge and social skills of
           adolescents with high-functioning autism in puberty

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      Authors: Leila Akrami , Mokhtar Malekpour , Salar Faramarzi , Ahmad Abedi
      Abstract: Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) refers to a group of complex neurodevelopmental disorders characterized by repetitive and characteristic patterns of behavior and difficulties with social communication and interaction. Puberty is an important period for teenagers with ASD. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of educational program on increasing social skills (SS) and sexual knowledge (SK) in adolescent boys with high-functioning autism (HFA) disorder. This study was conducted using a single-subject design. Participants were three boys diagnosed with HFA disorder, selected using purposive sampling. The social skills improvement system scale and the sexual knowledge questionnaire were used to measure SS and SK. The training program consisted of 49 sessions. Results showed that, given the comparison of scores before and after the intervention, the training program was effective in improving SS and SK. With regard to the importance of puberty, training programs for parents and adolescents play an effective role in increasing SS and SK of adolescents with HFA disorder.
      Citation: Advances in Autism
      PubDate: 2021-11-29
      DOI: 10.1108/AIA-07-2020-0045
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Assessment and treatment of anxiety in children and adolescents with ASD:
           a systematic review

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      Authors: Celal Perihan , Mack D. Burke , Lisa Bowman-Perrott , Joel Bocanegra
      Abstract: The purpose of this study was to investigate the quality of current studies that assess and treat anxiety symptoms in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). More specifically the study aimed to answer the following questions: What are the qualities of the current studies using cognitive behavioral therapies (CBTs) to treat anxiety symptoms in children with ASD' Did studies make necessary modifications and adaptations to CBTs according to the evidence-based strategies and implement these versions of CBTs with precise fidelity' Were the selected measurements appropriate for assessing the anxiety symptoms in children with ASD' A systematic review protocol was developed from the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (Moher et al., 2009). A rubric was adapted based on the CEC (Council for Exceptional Children; Cook, 2014) group comparison studies standards and the Evaluative Method for Determining EBP in Autism (Reichow et al., 2007). The 3-point Likert Scale (Chard et al., 2009) was adapted to score each study based on the rubric. CBT is a first-line treatment with significant mixed results. Current studies use adapted versions of existing CBTs for children with ASD without reporting empirical evidence to these adaptations and changes. Reporting of the implementation fidelity is still an issue in the treatment of anxiety. Anxiety measurements that were designed for typically developing children failure to detect unusual anxiety symptoms in children with ASD. The first limitation of this study was including a variety of studies across CBT programs and types of anxiety symptoms. Types of anxiety and CBT treatments may require separate analyses with specific indicators. Due to the limited studies, reviews could not be analyzed across types of CBT programs. The second limitation was the types of studies. Most of the studies were pilot studies. Pilot studies might use various instruments and CBTs components for making selections to produce the best effects and results. The final limitation was the lack of examination of the data analysis process. These findings are important because due to the variety of changes or adaptation to CBTs, inappropriate implementations and failure to detect unusual anxiety symptoms of children with ASD may cause significant differences in treatment responses and outcomes. The study demonstrated that the majority of the studies used adapted versions of existing CBTs without reporting empirical evidence for these adaptations and changes. The findings have shown that reporting of the implementation fidelity is still an issue. Moreover, the majority of studies had used anxiety measurements that were designed for typically developing children, not for children with ASD.
      Citation: Advances in Autism
      PubDate: 2021-11-23
      DOI: 10.1108/AIA-03-2021-0016
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • The experiences of autistic adults during the COVID-19 pandemic in the UK
           and implications for autism services development

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      Authors: Bettina Riese , Raja A.S. Mukherjee
      Abstract: COVID-19 has been challenging for many in the UK. This is no different to many with autism spectrum disorder. Based on the experiences and issues raised by a small group of autistic women in an ongoing support group, consideration if this holds true for the wider adult autistic community across further lockdowns and restrictions to public life was explored. An online questionnaire was created based on the issues raised. Participants indicated the degree to which they agreed or disagreed with each statement. Autistic adults experienced an increase in anxiety and poor mental health, which in turn has exacerbated autistic features, such as rigidity. The data indicates that autistic adults can adapt to change provided there is support in maintaining routines. The research is limited due to the small number of participants (N = 120), as well as national variations in service provision. Our data raises wider questions about the nature of support for autistic adults without cognitive impairments during times of crises and how services can respond and may even be shaped in the future to provide support that is cost-effective and relevant to autistic adults. To ensure that services have an awareness of how crises impact on autistic adults and how relatively simple changes may avert poor mental health. That the creation of local support networks, and the ability to access these, is a key feature of autism-specific support.
      Citation: Advances in Autism
      PubDate: 2021-11-15
      DOI: 10.1108/AIA-06-2021-0026
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Chemiluminescence analysis of saliva for the assessment of emotional
           stress in autistic children undergoing a medical examination

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      Authors: Elena Proskurnina , Galina Portnova , Maria Ivanova , Svetlana Sokolova
      Abstract: An electroencephalography (EEG) examination may cause psychological stress in children with autism that can interfere with the examination results. The objective information on the presence or absence of psycho-emotional stress in patients can help interpret electroencephalograms. This paper aimed to demonstrate the potential of noninvasive objective diagnostics of emotional stress in autistic children undergoing an EEG examination based on analysis of saliva. This study involved 19 children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) (ICD-10 F84.0); the mean age was seven years. During EEG examination of the children, behavioral parameters were assessed. The activity of cytochrome P450 reductase (CYPOR) in saliva was measured before and after the EEG procedure using lucigenin-enhanced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-stimulated chemiluminescence assay. Significant differences in CYPOR activity were found between the children who were distressed during an EEG examination and the children without behavioral disturbances (Mann–Whitney test, p = 0.002). Thus, the EEG examination resulted in an increase in CYPOR activity in saliva cells, which may prove the stressful effect of this procedure on autistic children. The chemiluminescent indices reflecting the activity of microsomal CYPOR in cells presenting in saliva correlate with the absence or presence of psychological stress in children; this phenomenon can be explained by an increased metabolism of the stress hormone, cortisol, by the cytochrome P450 microsomal system. Furthermore, the proposed method is completely safe, noninvasive, rapid (recording time is 20 min), inexpensive and promising for an objective assessment of psycho-emotional stress in autistic children undergoing medical examinations.
      Citation: Advances in Autism
      PubDate: 2021-11-03
      DOI: 10.1108/AIA-09-2020-0056
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • The mediating role of parental playfulness on parent–child relationship
           and competence among parents of children with ASD

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      Authors: Rini Grace Roy , Aneesh Kumar
      Abstract: The difficulties of a child diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) can lead to behaviours that are quite challenging for parents to understand and address. Most of the parental studies of ASD focus on the challenges faced by the parents. This study aims to adopt a strength-based model that investigates the mediating role of parental playfulness in the association between parent–child relationship and parental competence. This study is a quantitative study that adopts a correlational research design. The mediation analysis explores the role of parental playfulness as a mediator in the association between parent–child relationship and parental competence. The sample consisted of 120 parents of children diagnosed with ASD from India, selected using a purposive sampling technique. The mediation analysis results indicate that playfulness among parents of children with ASD was found to function as a partial mediator in the relationship between parent–child relationship and parental competence. This could suggest that more playful parents have better parent–child relationships and are competent in parenting. These findings have importance in understanding the role of playful interaction on parent–child relationships and parenting competence, having implications for further research. Enabling playfulness in parenting will enhance children and parents to promote their relationship and thus feel competent to bring positive light in their lives. Most often, the clinicians are concerned with addressing only the autistic symptoms; it is also essential to look into parental well-being. Practical playful interaction training should help parents establish a rapport, understand, adjust and adapt with their child. Practical intervention and training plans can be suggested to all family members to improve the condition of the child and the family’s general well-being. As the study focused on the clinical population, the findings could provide useful inputs for mental health professionals and counsellors. There are some theoretical and empirical evidence that support positive outcomes of playfulness on personal well-being (Atzaba Poria, in press; Yue et al., 2016; Proyer, 2014). Although there has been some interest in the impact of children’s playfulness on their development (Bundy, 1997), little is known about the influence of parental playfulness on parents and children. Therefore, addressing these gaps, this empirical study focusses on investigating the role of parental playfulness in parent–child relationship and parental competence, rather than considering external challenges of parents based on the ASD child’s behavioural challenges and autistic features.
      Citation: Advances in Autism
      PubDate: 2021-10-25
      DOI: 10.1108/AIA-02-2021-0010
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • An evaluation of the online post-diagnostic groups facilitated by the
           autism spectrum condition service at Gloucestershire Health and Care NHS

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      Authors: Victoria Anne Hatton , Ming Xuan Lee
      Abstract: Autism spectrum condition (ASC) is a lifelong developmental condition. According to research, it is recommended that those diagnosed with ASC should be offered post-diagnosis support to explore their diagnosis (Punshow, Skirrow and Murphy, 2009). The ASC Diagnostic Assessment Service at Gloucestershire Health Care (GHC) NHS Foundation Trust offers an assessment service to adults (18+) located within Gloucestershire. All those who receive a diagnosis are then invited to a 7-week post-diagnostic group facilitated by the multidisciplinary team. This service evaluation aimed to evaluate the aforementioned group so that it can be improved upon and thus provide a better service for future clients. In total, 14 participants (6 males, 8 females) were interviewed for the purpose of this evaluation following their attendance at these groups. The interview transcripts then underwent thematic analysis with four themes identified; “Autistic Community”, “Experience of Being Part of an Online Group”, “Opportunity for Consolidation”, and “Design Considerations and Improvements”. Further sub-themes were also identified. Overall, the service evaluation identified that the group provided a platform for sharing experiences and gaining a sense of belonging. It also highlighted that individuals have different preferences for whether groups should be facilitated online or face-to-face, and also different preferences for the duration of sessions. Further analysis also revealed the suggestion that the final session, for family and friends, should be optional so that those without a support network, do not need to attend as this caused unease in some. Further findings were also identified. To the authors’ knowledge, existing articles have only focused on the evaluation of the availability of post-diagnostic provision and autistic individuals’ general impression of it rather than an in-depth evaluation of a specific type of support.
      Citation: Advances in Autism
      PubDate: 2021-10-25
      DOI: 10.1108/AIA-08-2021-0035
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Overlap of anxiety, depression, irritability and aggressiveness in autism
           spectrum disorder: an exploratory study using cluster analysis

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      Authors: Francois A.M. Jean , Ali Jouni , Manuel P. Bouvard , Guillaume Camelot , Anita Beggiato , Isabelle Scheid , Alexandru Gaman , Celine Bouquet , Myryam Ly-Le Moal , Josselin Houenou , Richard Delorme , Marion Leboyer , Anouck Amestoy
      Abstract: This study aims to explore the overlap between symptoms of depression, anxiety, irritability and aggressiveness in autism spectrum disorder (ASD), to measure specific and idiosyncratic emotional responses. A total of 42 high functioning adolescents and adults, between 12 and 39 years old, meeting the diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders – 5 criteria for ASD were selected from the InFoR Autism cohort. Data were analyzed in an exploratory way using Hill and Smith and K-medoids cluster analysis. The authors found an aggregation of anxiety, depression, aggressive behaviors and irritability. Cluster analysis was maximized for two groups with 17 and 25 participants, respectively. The first group was characterized by high levels of symptoms of irritability, aggressiveness, hyperactivity and intermediate levels of anxiety and depression. In the first group, participants had significantly higher levels of autistic symptoms considering the social responsiveness scale and repetitive behavior scale-revised scales (relatives’ reports) suggesting that a particular group of subjects with a high level of ASD specific symptoms may express anxiety and depression in a specific way based on externalizing behaviors in addition to the common mood and anxiety symptoms. Improved understanding of the aggregation of externalized symptoms with symptoms of anxiety and mood disorders in ASD should lead to a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms related to emotion dysregulation in ASD. Improved knowledge of the symptoms could lead to enhanced detection of psychiatric comorbidities in ASD. The study was based on a transdiagnostic approach of psychiatric symptoms in individuals with ASD. Aggregation and clustering analysis was used to explore naive patterns of these psychiatric symptoms.
      Citation: Advances in Autism
      PubDate: 2021-09-27
      DOI: 10.1108/AIA-08-2020-0048
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • The creation of a specializedmedical-dental clinic for adults with
           developmental disabilities in Montreal, Canada

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      Authors: Melody Blessing Ng , Malvina Klag , Carrie Mazoff , Samantha Sacks , Chantal Czerednikow , Kathryn Borbridge , Terry Broda , Jonathan Lai
      Abstract: There is inadequate health care for patients with developmental disabilities (DD), due to a number of systemic issues. This case study describes the establishment of a medical-dental clinic in Montréal, Québec for adults with DD. The purpose of this paper is to describe the model of interdisciplinary care based on best practices, as an example to encourage a growing community of trained health professionals to serve this population. Interviews with all the clinic staff and leadership were conducted on-site at the clinic, followed by document review and discussions with an embedded researcher in the organization. The clinic was established through a series of events that led to public and government interest to act, the timely emergence of major donors, and bringing together several dedicated individuals and organizations. The core team engaged in consultation with clinics, followed by extensive billing analyses and iterative process mapping as a learning organization. Prior to patient visits, the clinic conducted detailed intake processes to adequately plan for each patient interaction. Desensitization visits were undertaken to improve patient tolerance for examination and treatment. The continual collection of data fed into an evaluation framework to facilitate continuous improvement and articulate a model for replication. To the best of the authors knowledge, there is not a clinic of this nature serving this population in Canada. This work can serve to inform the efforts of other care providers looking to create a medical – dental home for this population.
      Citation: Advances in Autism
      PubDate: 2021-09-16
      DOI: 10.1108/AIA-08-2020-0050
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Psychometric properties of the Persian version of social responsiveness
           scale-second edition (SRS-2)

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      Authors: Navid Mirzakhani Araghi , Mehdi Alizadeh Zarei , Shafagh Saei , Parvin Dibajnia
      Abstract: To quantitatively measure the subtle and general symptoms of autism spectrum disorder (ASD), one of the instruments that have been designed and used is the social responsiveness scale (SRS). The purpose of this study is to translate the second edition of the SRS into Persian and to examine its psychometric properties in school and preschool children with ASD. The present study is a methodological study of the psychometric type; the study population consisted of school and preschool children from 3 to 12 years of age with ASD and an intelligence quotient of approximately 70. In total, 10 professors and occupational therapists with research and clinical experience in the field of children, were selected for the translation and content validation stages by expert sampling. To determine the validity of the instrument, the content validity index (CVI) and the content validity ratio (CVR) were used; in addition, to determine the reliability, the internal consistency determination method with Cronbach’s alpha number report and inter-rater reliability method within-class correlation coefficient report were used. The calculated CVI and CVR of the instrument for all instrument items were 0.82 and 0.86, respectively. The intra-class correlation coefficient performed by different raters was 0.80 and Cronbach’s alpha for all items was 0.93. The reliability and validity of the Persian version of the social responsiveness scale-second edition are appropriate and acceptable so that this instrument can be used to assess the social performance skills of 3–12-years-old children with ASD for research and clinical study.
      Citation: Advances in Autism
      PubDate: 2021-09-02
      DOI: 10.1108/AIA-06-2021-0027
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Health status of people with autism spectrum disorder

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      Authors: Antonio Koceski , Vladimir Trajkovski
      Abstract: The aim of this study is to determine what changes occur in the health status of people with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) compared to neurotypical controls. The authors performed a comparative analysis of data collected from 72 subjects with ASD and 75 neurotypical controls aged 3–24 years using the Rochester Health Status Survey IV (RHSS-IV). A structured individual interview was conducted to compare the health status of subjects in Macedonia. A majority of people with ASD take vitamins, supplements and use recommended drug therapies compared to the neurotypical population and experience a larger number of side effects (p = 0.000). Compared to people with neurotypical development, children with ASD have a higher prevalence of oral ulcers (31.9% vs 17.3%; p = 0.039), changes in neurological health status – epilepsy (19.4% vs 2.7%; p = 0.001) and ADD/ADHD (only persons with ASD-19.4%; p = 0.000); respiratory diseases – angina (30.5% vs 8%; p = 0.000), rhinitis and/or sinusitis (40.3% vs 17.3%; p = 0.02); changes in the gastrointestinal system – constipation (31.9% vs 10.6%; p = 0.02), intestinal inflammation (19.4% vs 8%; p = 0.043), permeable intestines (only persons with ASD – 13.9%; p = 0.000) and the presence of the fungus Candida albicans (19.4% vs 4%; p = 0.043); psychiatric disorders – sleep problems (only in people with ASD – 18%; p = 0.000) and tics (6.9% vs 2.6%; p = 0.25) and skin diseases – eczema/allergic skin rash (36.1% vs 18.7%; p = 0.02). Many children with ASD have health problems. These findings support and complement the professional literature on their mutual causality.
      Citation: Advances in Autism
      PubDate: 2021-08-23
      DOI: 10.1108/AIA-01-2021-0005
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Using digital social stories to improve social skills in children with
           autism: a pilot experimental single-subject study

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      Authors: Mohammed F. Safi , Maitha Alnuaimi , Abdelaziz Sartawi
      Abstract: Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) face difficulty with educational attainment because of to their inability to interact with others. One intervention that is used to increase social skills in individuals with ASD is social stories. This study aimed at exploring the impact of digital social stories in improving social skills of two students with ASD in the UAE. An experimental AB single-subject study was conducted to investigate the impact of digital social stories on nonverbal communication, targeting two specific behaviors: raising hands before leaving one’s seat (TB1) and playing and sharing toys with peers (TB2). Two digital social stories (DSS1 and DSS2) were developed for the purpose of this study and transformed using a digital platform to be displayed on an iPad (tablet). This study involved two male participants with ASD (10 and 11 years old). Participant one demonstrated improvement in TB1 (mean of 1.11) because of DSS1 in the intervention phase. Participant two demonstrated improvement of 18% in TB2 ( mean of 0.18) as a result of DSS2 in the intervention phase. Both students that participated in the study showed a positive change in their target behaviors during the intervention phase intervention at different levels. Using an ABA study design would have been stronger in establishing a more valid causal relation in this single-subject design study. However, due the COVID-19 closures and curfews, the researchers had to switch to the AB design. This study demonstrated how social stories had a positive impact on ASD social skills. Further, it indicated the potential effectiveness of using digital social stories to reduce undesirable behaviors or increase a desirable behaviors in children who have ASD.
      Citation: Advances in Autism
      PubDate: 2021-08-19
      DOI: 10.1108/AIA-02-2021-0013
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • “We are different, that’s a fact, but they treat us like we’re
           different-er”: Understandings of autism and adolescent identity
           development

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      Authors: Sue Mesa , Lorna G. Hamilton
      Abstract: A key development in early adolescence is the active construction of individual identity; for autistic young people, integrating the idea of “being autistic” forms part of this process. The purpose of this paper is to explore identity development from a contextualist perspective, foregrounding young people’s experiences within mainstream educational settings. A longitudinal, qualitative methodology was used: semi-structured interviews were conducted annually with 14 autistic young people, their parents and teachers between school years 6 and 9. Young people felt different from their neurotypical peers and their acceptance of their diagnosis changed over time as they managed their developing personal and public identities. In pursuit of being treated “normally,” many camouflaged their differences at school, which sometimes involved opting out of school-based support. Adults described their own understandings of autism and discussed the responses of others in the school environment to autistic differences. The influence of sociocultural discourses of autism on young people’s identity development is discussed and implications for both school based and post-diagnostic support for young people and their families explored.
      Citation: Advances in Autism
      PubDate: 2021-08-17
      DOI: 10.1108/AIA-12-2020-0071
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • AAA screening in adults with ASD: a retrospective cohort study

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      Authors: Marios Adamou , Sarah Louise Jones , Stephanie Wetherhill
      Abstract: The Adult Asperger Assessment (AAA), comprising the Autism Questionnaire, the Empathy Quiotient and the Relatives Questionnaire is a commonly used screening tool designed to identify adults who may benefit from a further clinical assessment for autism spectrum disorder. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the usefulness of this screening measure in a clinical setting. This retrospective cohort study comprised of 192 service users referred for diagnostic assessment of Autism by a specialist service of the National Health Service. The authors evaluated the diagnostic accuracy of the AAA by investigating if the Autism Questionnaire, the Empathy Quiotient and the Relatives Questionnaire were able to predict the diagnostic outcome of Autism in a clinical setting. Scores from the Relatives Questionnaire can accurately predict diagnostic outcome. No evidence of accuracy for the Autism Questionnaire or the Empathy Quotient was apparent. Based on the findings, the authors recommend clinicians are cautious when interpreting results of the AAA. It should be acknowledged that the results may not be generalisable to whole populations. Also, the authors used the full item versions of the scales; therefore, the findings are most applicable to studies which did similar. This study highlights the need for investigation into the lack of validation of commonly used screening measures in autistic populations.
      Citation: Advances in Autism
      PubDate: 2021-08-09
      DOI: 10.1108/AIA-10-2020-0059
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Portrayals of autism and social awareness: a scoping review

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      Authors: Rosa Fontes , Margarita Pino-Juste
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to look at recent trends in scientific literature on the portrayal of autism in published and broadcast media and social awareness of the subject. A bibliometric analysis of content of such publications was performed. Results show that portrayals of autism from books, newspapers, news broadcasts, films and TV series are being scrutinized. Research focuses on the social categories of resulting stereotypes, the quality of such depictions, the benefits and downsides, stigmatization of individuals (with autism) and how society responds to these portrayals. It is important to understand if media portrayals of autism are creating a realistic and constructive awareness of autism in society.
      Citation: Advances in Autism
      PubDate: 2021-08-04
      DOI: 10.1108/AIA-02-2021-0014
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Autistic traits in Indian general population and patient group samples:
           distribution, factor structure, reliability and validity of the
           Autism-Spectrum Quotient

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      Authors: Asmita Karmakar , Manisha Bhattacharya , Susmita Chatterjee , Atanu Kumar Dogra
      Abstract: The Autism-Spectrum Quotient (AQ) is a widely used tool to quantify autistic traits in the general population. This study aims to report the distribution, group differences and factor structure of autistic traits in Indian general population. The work also assesses the criterion validity of AQ across three patient group samples – autism spectrum disorder (ASD), obsessive-compulsive disorder and social anxiety disorder. In this study, psychometric properties of the adapted AQ were assessed among 450 neurotypical university students matched for age. Confirmatory factor analysis was done to see if the adapted AQ fits the original factor structure. Test–retest, internal consistency reliability and criterion validity were found out. Group differences (gender and field of study) in AQ were also assessed. Autistic traits were found to be continuously distributed in the population, and patterns of group differences were consistent with previous studies. The adapted AQ had five factors resembling the original factor structure with a good fit, and 38 items instead of the original 50 items. Acceptable reliability coefficients were demonstrated along with criterion validity across clinical groups. This work is the first to present the pattern of distribution and factor structure of autistic traits among neurotypical adults from Eastern India, a culturally different population, as well as a reliable and valid tool to assess autistic traits in Bengali, a language with 300 million speakers. The findings add to the growing literature on AQ measurement and the concept of autism as a quantitative trait, examined outside of the western samples.
      Citation: Advances in Autism
      PubDate: 2021-07-26
      DOI: 10.1108/AIA-08-2020-0049
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Variables predicting the association between autistic traits and
           externalizing symptoms among young adults

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      Authors: María Álvarez-Couto , Domingo García-Villamisar , Gema P. Sáez-Suanes , María d'Orey Roquete
      Abstract: Considering the high comorbidity of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) with externalizing disorders and that ASD is considered as a continuum, which implies the identification of it features in the whole population, the purpose of this paper is to know the characteristics of the association of externalizing symptoms in the population with ASD traits. One hundred and seventeen postsecondary students participated in the study, providing responses to a battery of self-reported tests. The existence of a significant association between ASD and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) (0.519; p < 0.01) was proved. Regression analyses showed that problems in executive functioning, working memory deficits and difficulties in the use of emotion regulation strategies predicted the presence of ADHD traits (F = 36.757, R2 = 62.3%, p < 0. 01) and impulsivity behavior (F = 18.249, R2 = 45.1%, p < 0.01). Externalizing symptomatology in people with higher ASD traits is extended to the general population. Future research should study other problematic behaviors, such as aggression or self-harm, to continue generating appropriate interventions. The results reported reinforce the study of ASD as a dimensional disorder, in line with the latest advances in the classification of psychopathology. Considering which variables are behind the problematic behaviors allows interventions to be focused on these factors, contributing to their reduction and to the improvement of professional practices.
      Citation: Advances in Autism
      PubDate: 2021-09-10
      DOI: 10.1108/AIA-06-2020-0036
      Issue No: Vol. 8 , No. 2 (2021)
       
  • Case study: impact of interdisciplinary interventions in a 9-year-old male
           child with autism spectrum disorder

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      Authors: Vinita Berry , Chavi Bhargava Sharma
      Abstract: This study aims to highlight the need for an interdisciplinary intervention approach to bring noteworthy changes in children with an autism spectrum disorder. It proposes to study how holistic individualized therapeutic plans can promote functionality even in the adolescent age. This study aims to channelize the restricted abilities in a positive manner and make it, a strength for the child. Social-emotional development along with academic goals is also proposed. The paper is based on an exploratory study where participant observation was the main tool. Unstructured interviews with the therapists were conducted and the background history was taken. Documents and assessments related to the case were referred. The paper provides empirical insight into the impact of an interdisciplinary intervention on autism spectrum disorder. It suggests that speech therapy, occupational therapy, special education and counseling taken up as a holistic approach and modified as per the needs and competence of the child prove to be effective. It also becomes evident that intervention can help the child to become functional and meaningful even if the intervention is started a little late in life. Consistency and intensity of interventions along with compassion play a very positive role in the life of children with autism. As the approach taken describes one case in depth, there is less probability of generalization of results. Therefore, it suggests a wide scope of testing the proposed propositions further. This paper includes implications for the children with autism spectrum disorder, who: are not able to get early intervention for some reason and the ones who have special restricted abilities. It also is an inspiration for the service providers to develop comprehensive and interdisciplinary plans of intervention. This will help parents who somehow miss providing interventions at an early age to be hopeful and to seek help. The results are encouraging so as to make children with autism spectrum disorder more functional and acceptable in their lives. This paper worked on the identified needs of children with autism but found that their restricted abilities that are commonly found can be used and channelized positively to become a strength. There is a scope and hope to guide these children toward a functional life where they can connect with others around them and are accepted and included in society. Individualized and interdisciplinary interventions prove to make these children happier and confident.
      Citation: Advances in Autism
      PubDate: 2021-07-19
      DOI: 10.1108/AIA-06-2020-0041
      Issue No: Vol. 8 , No. 2 (2021)
       
  • Usefulness of current autism diagnostic or screening assessment tools in
           

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      Authors: Solomon Shatananda , Abimbola Oyedokun , Mahesh Odiyoor , Sujeet Jaydeokar , Saman Shahzad
      Abstract: The purpose of the study is to identify and ascertain if there were any validated tools for diagnosing or screening autism spectrum disorder in adults with ID. The estimated prevalence of intellectual disability (ID) in the general population is about 10.37/1,000 population (Maulik et al., 2011). In total, 1 out of 4 individuals with ID suffers from an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) (Sappok et al., 2010). Early diagnosis and support for ASD is key to having a good quality of life. The diagnosis of ASD in people with an ID presents its own challenges and it is likely under-identification of ASD amongst adults with ID by about 20% to 30% (Emerson and Baines, 2010). Studies were selected based on the following criteria: studies that reported either screening or diagnostic tools for ASD, participants had an ID i.e. a mean IQ of 18 years of age at the time of entry to the study and articles reported either sensitivity, specificity or area under the curve. Relevant studies that were published up to January 2020 were identified from EMBASE, PsychINFO, CINAHL and PubMed. In total, 75 papers were identified of which 15 papers met the criteria. The screening or diagnostic tools currently in use is dependant on the degree of ID. A number of the tools had good psychometric properties and utility when used in people with specific degrees of ID or when used in combination with another screening or diagnostic tool. The authors could not identify a diagnostic tool that could be used across all levels of severity of ID unless used in combination. Hence, concluded that there is a need for a diagnostic tool with good psychometric properties for the assessment of ASD in adults with all degree of ID within a reasonable time period without the need for an additional tool to be used in conjunction. Currently, the “gold standard” for diagnosing ASD is a lengthy and time-consuming process carried out by trained multi-disciplinary team members who assess historical, behavioural and parent/carer report to arrive at a diagnosis. There are a number of tools that have been developed to aid diagnosis. However, it is important to identify the tools that can optimise the procedures and are also time-efficient.
      Citation: Advances in Autism
      PubDate: 2021-07-09
      DOI: 10.1108/AIA-01-2021-0008
      Issue No: Vol. 8 , No. 2 (2021)
       
  • Parental perspectives on support needs and availability of autism services
           in South and South-Eastern Europe

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      Authors: Ivana Vasilevska Petrovska , Anastasia C. Giannakopoulou , Vassiliki Tsecoura , Angela Winstanley , Roberto Miletto , Georgeta Constanţa Roşca , Biserka Ivanova , Vasiliki Kaisa , Vladimir Trajkovski
      Abstract: Amid the expanding demand on the autism service delivery system, little knowledge is accumulated regarding access and availability of support and services in the region of Southern and South-Eastern Europe – critical for improvement of individual outcomes, as well as family quality of life. The purpose of this paper is to explore how service delivery systems are responding to the specific needs of autistic individuals with autism, as perceived by parents. A qualitative exploratory descriptive method was used. Thematic analysis was used as a pragmatic method to report on the experiences of parents (92% mothers, n = 55) of children, youth and young autistic adults (76% male) across six South and South-Eastern European counties that participated in a survey involving a combination of qualitative and quantitative data collection. Thematic analysis revealed three broad themes: challenging pathways to service utilization, insufficient service options and providers’ competences and lack of continuous and meaningful support across life span. The findings from this study add to the small body of literature specific to South and South-Eastern Europe, by exposing problems related to meeting the needs of autistic children and youth and potential ways to strengthen services, as perceived by parents. The findings have potential policy ramifications for the region in which the research was conducted.
      Citation: Advances in Autism
      PubDate: 2021-07-09
      DOI: 10.1108/AIA-11-2020-0066
      Issue No: Vol. 8 , No. 2 (2021)
       
  • The concept of autism spectrum disorder: a study on knowledge sharing
           protocol among parents with autistic children in Ghana

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      Authors: Bernard Kissi-Abrokwah , Kwame Kodua-Ntim
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to identify knowledge sharing practices used among parents with children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The study was based on qualitative philosophical foundations, where phenomenological case study design was used to make an in-depth understanding of how parents whose children are diagnosed with ASD shared knowledge among themselves. The population for this research consists of parents whose children have been diagnosed with ASD in Ghana. The study sampled for the study was 12 parents and was selected from 4 autism awareness centres in Ghana to obtain data through the use of focus group discussion and analysed with the aid of thematic analysis. The study showed that the dimensions of knowledge sharing practices used by parents with autistic children were after-action review/lesson learnt, brainstorming, mentoring, coaching system, discussion forum, face-to-face meeting, documentation, peer assistance and storytelling. Finally, the study also revealed that knowledge sharing practices used by parents with autistic children help them in their daily engagement. An aspect of the training of social workers should focus on how to assist parents, family and neighbours of children with ASD. The government through the needed ministries and agencies should create a social support system to assist parents and families with children with ASD. Counsellors should avail their services to parents with children with ASD as early as possible to avoid or ameliorate some of the emotional and psychological challenges of these parents. The paper offers a comprehensive overview on how knowledge sharing transforms the individual to learn and accept autistic condition in Ghana.
      Citation: Advances in Autism
      PubDate: 2021-07-09
      DOI: 10.1108/AIA-12-2020-0074
      Issue No: Vol. 8 , No. 2 (2021)
       
  • An individualized life-skills coaching program for adults with autism

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      Authors: Ashleigh Hillier , Nataliya Poto , David Schena II , Abigail Buckingham , Alice Frye
      Abstract: The lack of services for adults on the autism spectrum is of growing concern. Given the huge variation in how autism impacts people, individualized approaches might be particularly effective. The purpose of this paper is to present an overview of a community-based life-skills coaching program for adults with autism “LifeMAP.” LifeMAP is structured around individualized meetings between a client and their coach where they identify, prioritize and make progress toward self-selected goals. LifeMAP was established in 2008 and has since served around 2,600 clients. This paper provides an outline of the LifeMAP program, how sessions with clients are structured, goals that adults with autism prioritize and preliminary data on progress toward goal attainment. Findings indicated that the LifeMAP program model was effective in supporting progress toward goals, increasing confidence toward goals and reducing anxiety. Given the scope of the LifeMAP program, this overview is unique in providing pertinent information to others looking for effective and authentic strategies to support autistic adults and those transitioning from high school. This study provides a realistic perspective on how programs are applied in community-based settings, outside a structured, formal lab setting. It is concluded that individualized intervention approaches might be key to successful outcomes for adults with autism.
      Citation: Advances in Autism
      PubDate: 2021-06-01
      DOI: 10.1108/AIA-08-2020-0051
      Issue No: Vol. 8 , No. 2 (2021)
       
  • Advances in Autism

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