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  Subjects -> DISABILITY (Total: 103 journals)
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Journal of Early Hearing Detection and Intervention
Number of Followers: 7  

  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
ISSN (Print) 2381-2362
Published by Utah State University Homepage  [8 journals]
  • An Assessment of 50 State Early Hearing Detection and Intervention
           Websites: Is Needed Information Being Provided for Parent Decision
           Making'

    • Authors: Nichole Westin et al.
      Abstract: Growth of the Internet as an information resource has provided expanded opportunities for families to easily gather information on a range of topics, including health related topics. State Early Hearing Detection and Intervention (EHDI) websites and other electronic data sources are an important opportunity to support families seeking information on options for their children who have been identified as deaf or hard of hearing. A review was undertaken between August and September 2021 of the 51 US EHDI (state and DC) websites and related information (such as links to others’ sites) to determine if information that is specifcally discussed in the Federal legislation is provided in a manner that is comprehensive, somewhat helpful, or inadequate.
      PubDate: Tue, 22 Nov 2022 10:07:52 PST
       
  • “It’s About Walking Alongside a Family”: Practitioner Perspectives
           on Caregiver Coaching With Families of Children Who Are Deaf or Hard of
           Hearing

    • Authors: Dorie Noll et al.
      Abstract: Practitioners utilize caregiver coaching in early intervention services, but coaching principles and practices are not well understood in the context of listening and spoken language (LSL) services with families of children who are deaf or hard of hearing. The purpose of this study was to examine practitioners’ experiences with coaching, including definitions, training, and practices they utilize in their work with families. Using semi-structured, qualitative interviews and video observation discussions, this study examined the perspectives of 14 practitioners providing LSL services to families at three intervention sites in the US and Canada. Results indicate that practitioners’ underlying beliefs about their coaching proficiency and caregivers’ capacity impact their coaching practices and how they engage with caregivers. Results highlight practices such as mentoring and accountability that supported practitioners’ coaching skills. This study contributes to the understanding of caregiver coaching in LSL practice and has implications for practitioners working to improve their coaching skills, which may improve LSL services and optimize child outcomes.
      PubDate: Tue, 22 Nov 2022 10:07:38 PST
       
  • Application of Intervention Mapping to Address Lost to Intervention in
           Early Hearing Detection and Intervention

    • Authors: Torri Ann Woodruff-Gautherin et al.
      Abstract: AbstractPurpose: Detail the application of intervention mapping as a protocol for developing a novel way to address lost to intervention within the early hearing detection and intervention systems.Design: Intervention mapping (IM) is an approach to behavior change that is typically utilized in public health initiatives. This six-step process walks health program developers, researchers, and policy makers through a rigorous research and community-based approach to understanding why a health concern or problem is present in a community. While using IM to address lost to intervention in Early Hearing Detection and Intervention programs, the focus is on why families, after identification of their child as D/deaf or hard of hearing, choose to not enroll in early intervention services covered by part C of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act of 2004.Results: This process culminated in the development of “Swaddling Ear to Ear” as a novel approach to the implementation of behavior change theory and early intervention access.Conclusion: Intervention Mapping is posed to support policy makers, care providers, and families with the requisite tools to navigate early intervention services and begin a systemic line of research working to access barriers to care and access inequality for newborns identified via Early Hearing Detection and Intervention programs across the United States. The educational program designed and described here is currently under evaluation.
      PubDate: Tue, 22 Nov 2022 10:07:28 PST
       
  • A Systematic Review of the Effects of LENA-based Feedback on Parent-Child
           Language Interactions in Families with Young Children

    • Authors: Beula M. Magimairaj et al.
      Abstract: Enhancing parent language interactions with children beginning in infancy is important because it results in better language abilities, social skills, and academic outcomes in children. A number of researchers have suggested that parent language interactions with children could be enhanced by giving parents feedback about their language interactions using the Language Environment Analysis (LENA) system. The LENA system records communication exchanges between a child and the adult caregiver and provides an automated analysis of adult word count, child vocalization count, and conversational turn count. We did a systematic review of the studies that investigated the use of LENA-based feedback to enhance parent language interactions with children. Although most previous studies have concluded that LENA-based feedback improves parental language interactions with children, methodological factors and confounding of treatment components in almost all of these studies make it impossible to know whether quantitative feedback from interactions recorded by the LENA system enhances parent language interactions with children. The designs and results of previous studies are discussed to suggest how future research can better address this important issue.
      PubDate: Tue, 22 Nov 2022 10:07:15 PST
       
  • Nurses’ Perceptions of the Universal Newborn Hearing Screening
           Program

    • Authors: Aaron Michael Roman et al.
      Abstract: This study explores the knowledge and perceptions of the newborn hearing screening (NBHS) program from the perspective of nurses and nursing support staff. Registered nurses and nursing support staff (n = 84) completed a digitally administered survey that queried their understanding of JCIH guidelines, perceptions around NBHS administration, and parental anxiety. The results demonstrated that while most respondents felt comfortable and confident about NBHS administration, there was a significant difference in their understanding of appropriate screening milestones compared to JCIH recommendations. Participants further demonstrated an interest in additional learning opportunities related to the NBHS.
      PubDate: Tue, 22 Nov 2022 10:07:05 PST
       
  • Impact of Social Determinants of Health on Early Hearing Detection and
           Intervention Screening/Diagnosis Outcomes

    • Authors: Nannette Nicholson et al.
      Abstract: PurposeWe reviewed how Social Determinants of Health relate to health inequities and disparities for Early Hearing Detection and Intervention (EHDI) programs. Then, we examine links between specific sociodemographic factors (maternal age, maternal education, ‘race’/ethnicity) and hearing screening and diagnostic audiology follow-up for newborns in the U.S. and its territories. MethodsMaternal demographic, hearing screening and diagnostic data extracted from publicly available Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) records were reported to CDC by personnel responsible for EHDI programs. Data were subjected to statistical analysis using analysis of variance and multiple regression techniques. ResultsResults showed no significant differences in screening follow-up outcomes for maternal age, education, or ‘race’/ethnicity. There was a significant difference for maternal education and 'race'/ethnicity for diagnostic follow-up outcomes, but not for age. ConclusionResults of this study are consistent with the findings of previous studies regarding hearing screening follow-up and diagnostic audiologic follow-up outcomes. Maternal education and ‘race’/ethnicity were linked to hearing diagnostic audiologic follow-up for newborns in the US and its territories. Suggestions for future research, policy, and practice to improve the effectiveness of EHDI efforts are provided.
      PubDate: Tue, 22 Nov 2022 10:06:52 PST
       
  • Assessing Impact of COVID-19 Pandemic on Receipt and Timeliness of Newborn
           Hearing Screening and Diagnostic Services Among Infants Born in Four
           States

    • Authors: SUHANA EMA et al.
      Abstract: The study compares receipt and timeliness of newborn hearing screening and follow-up diagnostic services between the pre-pandemic birth cohort and the pandemic birth cohort in four participating states. Findings from this study will help inform state Early Hearing Detection and Intervention (EHDI) programs in the future should major public health event occur again.
      PubDate: Tue, 22 Nov 2022 10:06:44 PST
       
  • Likely Impact of the COVID-19 Pandemic on Newborn Hearing Screening and
           Follow-up Services in the United States in 2020

    • Authors: Kelly Dundon et al.
      Abstract: This perspective aims to highlight aspects of the Early Hearing Detection and Intervention (EHDI) newborn hearing screening and follow-up processes that were impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic and considers factors that likely impacted follow-up after newborn hearing screening among infants born in the United States during 2020. Efforts to minimize the potential impact of missed or delayed identification of hearing loss in infants and young children will also be discussed to help guide future program improvement activities.
      PubDate: Tue, 22 Nov 2022 10:06:23 PST
       
  • The Journal of Early Hearing Detection and Intervention: Volume 7 Issue 3,
           Pages 1-98

    • PubDate: Tue, 22 Nov 2022 10:06:18 PST
       
  • Tele-Intervention Resources

    • Authors: Pam Dawson M.Ed. et al.
      Abstract: The restrictions of the COVID-19 pandemic forced many early intervention (EI) providers and families to adopt an emergency virtual service delivery model. The exigent nature of the pandemic necessitated the rapid transition to virtual early intervention, often without the benefit of training and guidance for both providers and caregivers regarding the use of virtual platforms, objectives, procedures, and the overall dynamics of the virtual session. As restrictions begin to ease and in-person home visits once again become possible, many providers and caregivers may be wondering how tele-intervention (TI) services might fit in ongoing early intervention for children who are deaf or hard of hearing. It will be necessary to review desired family outcomes and the components of high-quality TI services as caregivers and providers determine their intervention plan forward together. The purpose of this article is to highlight resources pertaining to the provision of high-quality TI services in keeping with recommended family-centered early intervention practices.
      PubDate: Tue, 02 Aug 2022 13:18:06 PDT
       
  • Achieving Successful Outcomes In a TeleIntervention Program

    • Authors: K. Todd Houston et al.
      Abstract: For well over a decade, family-centered early intervention services have been delivered through models of teleintervention (TI) to children who are Deaf and Hard of Hearing (DHH) and their families. Ongoing outcome data continue to demonstrate the viability, effectiveness, and positive impacts these services provide to both the service providers and the families served. However, to establish a successful TI program, careful planning is required, and barriers and potential roadblocks must be reduced or eliminated. When these challenges are adequately addressed, TI programs are more likely to achieve its primary goal of delivering appropriate family-centered early intervention.
      PubDate: Tue, 02 Aug 2022 13:17:57 PDT
       
  • Training the Next Generation of Practitioners In Early Intervention and
           Telepractice: Three University Models

    • Authors: K. Todd Houston et al.
      Abstract: The COVID-19 pandemic continues to shape the provision of family-centered early intervention services for children who are Deaf or Hard-of-Hearing and their families. In programs, schools, and centers, direct in-person contact with families have been significantly curtailed as a means to limit the exposure to and spead of the virus. Emergency remote learning has lead to an increase in telepractice, also referred to as teleintervention, as the designated model of service provision. Most early interventionists, speech-language pathologists, and teachers of the Deaf were not sufficiently trained to suddenly implement emergency remote teaching or telepractice services, but service providers had no option but to forge ahead, often with limited or no prior knowledge and experience with the provision of services using only telecommunications technology. Fortunately, however, some university training programs have integrated telepractice into their curricula and practica experiences for many years, and three of those programs are profiled here.
      PubDate: Tue, 02 Aug 2022 13:17:46 PDT
       
  • Frequently Asked Questions about Receiving Tele-Intervention Services

    • Authors: Ronda Rufsvold et al.
      Abstract: The purpose of this article is to provide resources related to parent perceptions and needs in receiving tele-intervention (TI) services.
      PubDate: Tue, 02 Aug 2022 13:17:39 PDT
       
  • Telepractice-Based Assessment of Children who are Deaf/Hard-of-Hearing:
           Focus on Family-Centered Practice

    • Authors: Kristina M. Blaiser et al.
      Abstract: Ongoing assessment and progress monitoring is considered best practice to serve children who are Deaf/Hard-of-Hearing (DHH) yet logistics related to provider shortages, distances between families, and illness make regular assessment difficult if not impossible. In the last ten years, telepractice has become a more commonly used service delivery model for serving children who are DHH and their families, however, many providers lack the training needed to adequately assess this population (Behl & Kahn, 2015). With explicit planning of the assessments and tools needed on both sides of the camera, providers can create a shared framework to collect the information needed to create a family-centered, comprehensive assessment plan that empowers families to engage collaborative decision-making needed to optimize the outcomes of their child. This paper outlines a tutorial of provider considerations to incorporate family-centered practices as a central aspect of assessment via telepractice and provides an example of how assessments can be administered with the use of technology.
      PubDate: Tue, 02 Aug 2022 13:17:27 PDT
       
  • A Review of Current Pediatric Tele-Audiology eHealth Platforms

    • Authors: Alex Meibos
      Abstract: Purpose: The purpose of this study was to identify current pediatric tele-audiology hearing technology platforms for young children with hearing loss and their families.Method: An exploratory, descriptive design was used to evaluate features of available pediatric tele-audiology platforms for parents and audiologists to implement for young children. The study explored internet resources including hearing industry websites, for information related to specific eHealth platform features designed to support pediatric hearing devices currently available to audiologists and families.Results: Of the websites reviewed, only four major technology companies were found to have pediatric tele-audiology ready platforms designed to support young children and their families.Conclusions: Tele-audiology technology platforms for young children are available but limited in comparison to what may be available to older children and adults. A need for more consistency across platforms was identified based on the inconsistent features observed in the available platforms that could be hinderance to pediatric recipients of tele-audiology services. Future research directions to move eHealth applications forward and determine efficacy are discussed.
      PubDate: Tue, 02 Aug 2022 13:17:17 PDT
       
  • Provider Perspectives in Serving Children Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing
           and Their Families using Tele-Intervention

    • Authors: Lauri H. Nelson et al.
      Abstract: Purpose: In the second of a two-part survey series, this cross-sectional survey study explored professionals’ perceptions of tele-intervention (TI) services for young children who are deaf or hard of hearing. Using Likert rating scales and open-ended questions, the survey queried professional’s confidence in providing TI services, including their views and recommendations. Data were collected March-May 2020, not realizing the survey release would coincide with the Covid-19 pandemic and the influx of unexpected virtual services. For this reason, data were stratified between those who had been providing TI services for more than versus less thanthree months. Responses for in-person providers were also evaluated for additional context.Methods: Responses from 123 participants who provided TI and 21 participants who provided in-person services (n=144) were analyzed using descriptive statistics. Cronbach’s alpha showed high internal consistency for all Likert scales; items of each subscale were sum-scored to examine relationships across queried areas of service delivery.Results: Provider perceptions of TI services were largely favorable. However, providers with more than three months’ experience were significantly more confident in coaching and supporting parents through TI, including more overall favorable views of a TI delivery than providers with less than three months of TI experience. There were no differences in provider confidence in coaching and supporting parents between providers with more than three months’ TI experience using TI delivery and in-person providers using in-person delivery.Conclusions: Experienced providers reported confidence in service delivery and positive views of the TI model. Programs seeking to implement virtual services should consider TI training, with a commitment to TI longevity to improve provider efficacy and confidence in TI services.
      PubDate: Tue, 02 Aug 2022 13:17:09 PDT
       
  • Parents’ Perspectives about Tele-Intervention Services for their
           Children who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing

    • Authors: Lauri H. Nelson et al.
      Abstract: Purpose: In the first of a two-part survey series, this cross-sectional survey study explored parent perceptions of tele-intervention (TI) services for their young children who are deaf or hard of hearing. Using Likert rating scales, the survey queried parent confidence in understanding their child’s language development, perceptions of the coaching and support they received, the parent-professional partnership, and overall views and recommendations. Data were collected March-May 2020, not realizing the survey release would coincide with the Covid-19 pandemic and the influx of unexpected virtual services. For this reason, data were stratified between those who had received TI services for more than versus less than three months. Responses for in-person services were also evaluated for additional context.Methods: Responses from 48 participants who received TI and 18 participants who received in-person services (n=66) were analyzed using descriptive statistics. Cronbach’s alpha showed high internal consistency for all Likert scales; items of each subscale were sum-scored to examine relationships across queried areas of service delivery.Results: Ninety-six percent of all respondents were highly or mostly satisfied with their TI services and 90% would definitely or probably recommend TI to other families. Overall positive findings were found across Likert scale queries, with no differences between parent perceptions of TI and in-person services, nor between TI for more than versus less than three months. However, findings also highlighted areas in which TI and in-person providers could improve intervention effectiveness, including coaching and supports to optimize parent confidence in understanding and facilitating their child’s language and communication goals.Conclusions: Parent perceptions of the TI delivery model were favorable. Implications and recommendations for both TI and in-person providers are discussed.
      PubDate: Tue, 02 Aug 2022 13:17:08 PDT
       
  • Working with Families of Young Children who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing
           Through Tele-Intervention

    • Authors: Amanda M. Rudge PhD et al.
      Abstract: Tele-intervention services have been utilized for many years to serve families of young children, in addition to or in lieu of traditional in-person intervention services. Recently, the COVID-19 pandemic cultivated urgent dependence on access to effective services via a distance connection. As such, the need for information, guidance, and resources related to tele-intervention as a primary service model has increased. This article serves as the introduction to a monographic series aiming to describe practices, circumstances, and perceptions surrounding tele-intervention services for families of children aged birth to five who are deaf or hard of hearing. Topics include: (a) a brief history of tele-intervention as a service delivery model, (b) an overview of tele-intervention for families of children who are deaf or hard of hearing, including the impact of COVID-19 on emergency virtual services, (c) a description of the components of a tele-intervention session with families of infants and toddlers, and (d) a discussion of the challenges implementing services via tele-intervention. Figures containing information related to state funding and ideal session components for tele-intervention services are provided.
      PubDate: Tue, 02 Aug 2022 13:16:55 PDT
       
  • The Journal of Early Hearing Detection and Intervention: Volume 7, Issue 2
           Welcome

    • PubDate: Tue, 02 Aug 2022 13:16:50 PDT
       
  • The Journal of Early Hearing Detection and Intervention: Volume 7 Issue 2,
           Pages 1-73

    • PubDate: Tue, 02 Aug 2022 13:16:44 PDT
       
 
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