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  Subjects -> DISABILITY (Total: 103 journals)
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Journal of Science Education for Students with Disabilities
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.129
Number of Followers: 6  

  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
ISSN (Print) 1940-9923
Published by Rochester Institute of Technology Homepage  [3 journals]
  • Call for Manuscripts

    • Authors: Todd Pagano
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Dec 2023 06:52:16 PST
       
  • Call for Manuscripts

    • Authors: Todd Pagano
      PubDate: Wed, 22 Nov 2023 06:56:48 PST
       
  • An Introductory Course in Electrical Circuits and Coding for Deaf and
           DeafBlind Middle School Students

    • Authors: Becca Leininger et al.
      Abstract: in is the first Deaf charter school in the United States, opening in 1993. The school serves students in the Twin Cities and Western Wisconsin from ages 2 to 21 who are primarily Deaf, DeafBlind and Hard of Hearing students, often being visual and/or tactile learners. All students who attend have Individualized Education Plans (IEPs) and fall under the special education category, defined by the Minnesota Department of Education as students who “have a disability and need specialized instruction” (Minnesota Department of Education, n.d.). At , students are instructed in American Sign Language (ASL) and English is primarily taught through print.The is an undergraduate student research lab at the University of in . Members of the come from a variety of majors such as education, engineering, and psychology. Student researchers collaborate to promote learning through play on projects such as Circus Science (Roche et al., 2020), The PLAYground (Monson et al., 2020), and OK GO Sandbox (Schumacher et al., 2020). The frequently collaborates with community partners such as The Minnesota Children’s Museum, Twin Cities Trapeze, and .The has been working with for over 8 years, starting with after-school STEAM workshops for students to engage in engineering projects outside their normal curriculum (Kasper et al., 2016). In 2020, the worked with to host an online PLAYground camp for students in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic (Monson et al., 2021). Ongoing research through this collaboration include teacher workshops exploring the Scratch programming language through videos presented in ASL and LEGO Spike Prime with their students.
      PubDate: Mon, 23 Oct 2023 13:27:07 PDT
       
  • Teaching Science to Students with Disabilities Using Socio-Scientific
           Issues

    • Authors: Rachel Juergensen et al.
      Abstract: Students with disabilities experience inequitable learning opportunities in science classrooms. To create equitable learning environments, science teachers must embed supports within their curriculum units. Teachers rely on their beliefs about the capabilities of their students, their role as science teachers, and the goals of science education to adapt their curriculum units. Curricular changes occur through their pedagogical design capacity (PDC) during lesson planning and enactments, in which their beliefs inform their PDC choices. Yet there is little research regarding science teachers’ beliefs about teaching students with disabilities and how they enact their science curriculum materials in general education science classrooms. This qualitative case study focused on one secondary biology teacher who taught a socio-scientific issues (SSI) based unit in a remedial biology classroom. Teacher beliefs and PDC served as the theoretical and analytical frameworks. Data included classroom observations and stimulated recall interviews. Findings show the teacher’s beliefs about her students’ capabilities, role as their science teacher, and goals for science learning drove her PDC. She scaffolded, adapted, and improvised to support learners, while not changing the rigor of the curriculum unit. This study illustrates a vision of equitable science instruction with implications for bringing this vision to life for students with disabilities in science classrooms.
      PubDate: Wed, 04 Oct 2023 11:47:23 PDT
       
  • The SCI – DOT: A new dimension of scientific innovation for persons
           with BLV.

    • Authors: Ashley N. Nashleanas Ph.D.
      Abstract: Throughout history, students with blindness and low vision (BLV) have been vastly underrepresented in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) disciplines with regards to both K-12 education and post-secondary endeavors (Burgstahler, 1994; Supalo, 2010). This underrepresentation of students with BLV in STEM is due to limitations in technology that allow them to access data in a laboratory setting, thus inhibiting their abilities to partake actively in data acquisition with their peers. The Sci-Dot, a multiline, refreshable braille and tactile graphics display capable of logging scientific data in real time with the support of Vernier Science Education’s (VSE) Go-Direct Bluetooth sensors, stands as a unique innovation for persons with BLV given its capabilities to output multiline, tactile data in real time. The Sci-Dot allows individuals with BLV to collect and analyze data by supplying them with tactile data at their fingertips. The author reports findings from a usability study to ascertain the technical feasibility of the device – its capability to produce interpretable tactile data in real time. Participants provided feedback that proved the Sci-Dot was technically feasible as a scientific data logger, and more. The Sci-Dot also has the potential to provide a wealth of independence and inclusivity for educational and social activities beyond the laboratory.
      PubDate: Wed, 04 Oct 2023 11:27:00 PDT
       
  • B/LV Laboratory Accessibility Technology Adapted for Neurodiverse
           Chemistry Students

    • Authors: Christin B. Monroe
      Abstract: Text-to-speech technology is a common accommodation available for students with disabilities. Despite the ubiquitous nature of text-to-speech, this technology has not been explored in laboratory settings for neurodiverse college students. This study explores the adaptability of laboratory accessible text-to-speech technology (originally developed for blind/low vision (B/LV) students) for neurodiverse students. Students were asked to provide general feedback about the usability and effectiveness of the technology using Likert surveys. The students also answered open-ended questions about how the technology could be adapted to be more neurodiverse friendly. Overall, more than 50% of the students found the technology useful but had specific feedback about adaptations that could make it even more universal.
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Sep 2023 05:01:54 PDT
       
  • Universal Design for Learning (UDL) in Inclusive Preschool Science
           Classrooms

    • Authors: Marla J. Lohmann et al.
      Abstract: Science instruction is a critical aspect of early learning. Teachers can support young children’s learning about scientific concepts through the use of the Universal Design for Learning (UDL) framework, which is a proactive approach to instructional planning that helps ensure success for all learners. This teaching techniques article offers preschool teachers practical solutions for implementing in the UDL framework for science instruction in their classrooms.
      PubDate: Mon, 24 Jul 2023 08:18:07 PDT
       
  • Overview of the proceedings of the 2022 Inclusion in Science, Learning a
           New Direction, Conference on Disability (ISLAND)

    • Authors: Cary A. Supalo et al.
      PubDate: Mon, 22 May 2023 12:31:49 PDT
       
  • Out-of-school STEM Program for Students with Visual Impairments:
           Adaptations and Outcomes During the COVID-19 Pandemic

    • Authors: Sunggye Hong et al.
      Abstract: Although previous research exists on making adaptations for students with visual impairments in online settings, there is limited research on the teaching and learning dynamics of students with visual impairments during the COVID-19 pandemic. Since responses to the pandemic made it difficult for students with visual impairments to participate in educational opportunities that require hands-on experiences, gaps have been identified in gaining access to educational opportunities. The current project was originally planned with programs based on in-person modes, aimed at increasing motivation and awareness of science, technology, engineering, and math of students with visual impairments. Due to limitations of in-person participation, substantial modifications and adaptations were required for the programs to be meaningful and effective when delivered in online environments. It was found that proficiency in the use of technology options, specific instruction and guidance for access of information, and program planning in advance were the three key elements for successful implementation of the programs. This article documents 1) existing research on the impacts of the pandemic, 2) meaningful adaptations and modifications, 3) essential elements for developing online programs in STEM, and 4) identified strategies in program transition for students with visual impairments. Some skills may not be most efficiently taught through online interactions, however participation of family members, careful modifications of existing activities, and sufficient level of technology support allows many skills to be acquired through online learning. Most importantly, strong collaboration of participating team members makes it possible for students with visual impairments to participate equitably in online environments.
      PubDate: Mon, 22 May 2023 08:42:23 PDT
       
  • From the Editors...

    • Authors: Todd Pagano
      PubDate: Mon, 22 May 2023 07:26:59 PDT
       
  • Alternative Techniques for Blind Low Vision Students Enrolled in Coding
           Courses

    • Authors: Robert Jaquiss
      Abstract: BLV (blind low vision) students face difficulties when taking coding classes. Individual Development Environments (IDE) can be inaccessible which make it difficult if not impossible for BLV students to complete coursework. Alternative techniques are described which will allow a BLV student to successfully complete coursework. The author has found the Command Line Interface (CLI) is often a recommended alternative to a Windows based IDE interface. Many blind computer programmers use the Windows and Linux command interfaces which are described as part of this discussion.
      PubDate: Tue, 21 Mar 2023 08:51:47 PDT
       
  • Interaction between students with and without disabilities in an inclusive
           schools from their teachers perspective.

    • Authors: Dr. Basmah Alshahrani
      Abstract: The success of the inclusion of students with disabilities substantially depends on the collaboration of various social agents, including non-disabled peers, who play a substantial role in the lives of students with disabilities. Peers, as social agent, are responsible for the creation of a favourable social environment, in which one of the key factors is a positive acceptance. This research examined the reality of interactions between non-disabled students and their acceptance to peers with disabilities. A qualitative research approach was employed using interviews with Nine special education teachers. An overall positive attitudes were reported with non-disabled peers being reported as positive and welcoming to including students with disabilities in the same schools and classrooms. The teachers’ responses also indicated that interactions between both student groups are generally positive and teachers believed that this has helped in facilitating the inclusion of students with disabilities.
      PubDate: Fri, 13 Jan 2023 13:36:54 PST
       
  • Adjusting/Modifying Assignments to Support Students with Learning
           Disabilities while Engaging in NGSS Science and Engineering Practices and
           Inquiry-Based Learning

    • Authors: Shannon Morago Dr.
      Abstract: Effective science instruction involves opportunities for all students to do science, including engaging in the NGSS Science and Engineering Practices through inquiry-based learning. Many students with learning disabilities have the accommodation of shortened or reduced assignments in their Individualized Educational Programs to allow them equal access to science learning. Science teachers struggle to provide this accommodation. This practice brief provides examples of supports and strategies for implementing this accommodation during an inquiry-based investigation. A vignette is used to follow a science teacher and her students through an investigation; it details how she provides equal access to the learning objectives as well as her evaluation techniques.
      PubDate: Fri, 13 Jan 2023 13:36:39 PST
       
  • One-Week Inquiry about Gravity Force with a Student Who is Blind

    • Authors: Mustafa Şahin Bülbül Dr.
      Abstract: This study was conducted with a student who is visually impaired and questioned the force of gravity. The different stages encountered in the process were specified as steps in the study and it was shared what kind of inquiry form was needed at each step. There are different activities such as waiting for a week and thought experiment in the inquiry activity. The basis of the activity is that three balls of different mass left on a sponge leave different traces on the sponge.
      PubDate: Wed, 21 Dec 2022 11:41:42 PST
       
  • STEM and High School Students with Disabilities: A Qualitative Review of
           the Research Literature

    • Authors: Scott Yamamoto Ph.D. et al.
      Abstract: We conducted a qualitative review of the research literature on STEM (science, technology, engineering, mathematics) related to high school students with disabilities (SWD). We selected and analyzed 53 articles to answer two questions: (1) How are high-school SWD prepared for careers in STEM' (2) How are educators prepared to support high-school SWD for opportunities in STEM' In answering the first question, four qualitative themes emerged: (a) barriers to STEM, (b) increasing STEM opportunities, (c) STEM readiness in college and career, and (d) STEM identity. In answering the second question, three qualitative themes emerged: (a) individualizing learning and supports for SWD, (b) using technology and collaboration among educators, and (c) professional development for educators. Limitations of this review related to search terms and inclusion criteria. Implications of this review related to the need for more research on STEM enrichment programs, STEM identity, and long-term outcomes.
      PubDate: Wed, 07 Dec 2022 10:11:14 PST
       
  • Using Markup Languages for Accessible Scientific, Technical, and Scholarly
           Document Creation

    • Authors: Jason J.G. White
      Abstract: In using software to write a scientific, technical, or other scholarly document, authors have essentially two options. They can either write it in a ‘what you see is what you get’ (WYSIWYG) editor such as a word processor, or write it in a text editor using a markup language such as HTML, LaTeX, Markdown, or AsciiDoc.This paper gives an overview of the latter approach, focusing on both the non-visual accessibility of the writing process, and that of the documents produced. Currently popular markup languages and established tools associated with them are introduced. Support for mathematical notation is considered. In addition, domain-specific programming languages for constructing various types of diagrams can be well integrated into the document production process. These languages offer interesting potential to facilitate the non-visual creation of graphical content, while raising insufficiently explored research questions.The flexibility with which documents written in current markup languages can be converted to different output formats is emphasized. These formats include HTML, EPUB, and PDF, as well as file formats used by contemporary word processors. Such conversion facilities can serve as means of enhancing the accessibility of a document both for the author (during the editing and proofreading process) and for those among the document’s recipients who use assistive technologies, such as screen readers and screen magnifiers. Current developments associated with markup languages and the accessibility of scientific or technical documents are described. The paper concludes with general commentary, together with a summary of opportunities for further research and software development.
      PubDate: Thu, 27 Oct 2022 11:01:14 PDT
       
  • Perceptions of Earth Science using assistive and supportive technologies
           by students who are blind or visually impaired

    • Authors: Rhea G. Miles et al.
      Abstract: Students with blindness or visual impairments (BVI) need to participate in scientific laboratory experiences at the K12 level to be successful in college-level science courses. These K12 level students need instruction to actively conduct science experiments and not only allow sighted students to conduct them. While it may be a challenge, with appropriate assistive and supportive technologies, students with BVI can be successful in conducting scientific investigations to address Next Generation Science Standards. The Discoveries in Earth Science (DES) program provides engaging accommodations adaptive to the needs of elementary, middle, and high school grade students with BVI to successfully prepare for careers in STEM.
      PubDate: Thu, 13 Oct 2022 08:18:06 PDT
       
 
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  Subjects -> DISABILITY (Total: 103 journals)
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Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


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