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  Subjects -> DISABILITY (Total: 103 journals)
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Disability Studies Quarterly
Number of Followers: 43  

  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
ISSN (Print) 1041-5718 - ISSN (Online) 2159-8371
Published by Ohio State University Homepage  [3 journals]
  • Origins, Objects, Orientations: New Histories and Theories of Race and
           Disability

    • Authors: Kelsey Henry, Anna Hinton, Sony Coráñez Bolton
      Abstract: No abstract available.
      PubDate: 2023-12-01
      DOI: 10.18061/dsq.v43i1.9719
      Issue No: Vol. 43, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • Holding On and Letting Go in Kia LaBeija’s Self-Portraiture

    • Authors: Hilary Rasch
      Abstract: No abstract available.
      PubDate: 2023-12-01
      DOI: 10.18061/dsq.v43i1.9689
      Issue No: Vol. 43, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • My Panalangin of (Un)Belonging: Encountering Still Gestures of Prayer,
           Improvising Still Movements through Depression

    • Authors: Jose Miguel Esteban
      Abstract: Through this article, this dance, I attempt to describe my encounters with an object from my past: a rosary. I return to the rosary as the inspiration for my dance, a dance that maps out the making of my bodymind through narratives of race, queerness, disability, and madness. Through irrational jumps between time and space, but always from the rosary, I release the stories of my (un)belonging within the Philippine diaspora as a Filipino-Canadian settler on Turtle Island. And as I repeatedly encounter this object and meditate on my prayer—my panalangin—I find myself continuously (re)interpreting the gestures of stillness through which I begin to embrace my movements through depression.
      PubDate: 2023-12-01
      DOI: 10.18061/dsq.v43i1.9655
      Issue No: Vol. 43, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • Bed/Life: Chronic Illness, Postcolonial Entanglements, and Queer Intimacy
           in the Stay

    • Authors: heidi andrea restrepo rhodes
      Abstract: In the conceptual sculpture titled, I Think We’re Alone Now (Host), Constantina Zavitsanos presents the bed as a site of desire, intimacy, and horizon for the sick/disabled queer body, bringing a multitude of meanings to the notion of “host.” This paper engages this artwork considering the politics and poetics of hosting and “the stay” as queer intimacies are formed in and with bodies—both in the chronicity of pathogenic presence effected through transnational flows of medical coloniality; and as an anti-colonial practice of disalienation, hospitality, and invitation into the erotic and social life lived in the space of the bed. I approach this work of disability scholarship through a feminist understanding that chronic illness is a condition of global entanglement within the colonial and postcolonial milieu of racial capitalism, its afterlives, and its historical traumas. To host challenges the notion that to be chronically sick and bedbound is an existence delimited by isolation and social death produced in the bedbound subject as one denied full entry into the western, liberal, public-political articulation of the human. I reflect on what it means to be a queer, brown, sick/disabled body and turn toward the possibilities of the bed as a material spacetime and hermeneutic for alternative expressions of aliveness through stillness and immobility as the entanglements of our histories and medical conditions also open space for our entangled practices of countermemory and ontological disobedience: how we refuse to be colonized objects of ruin. As settler colonial framings of illness evoke an always-already racialized diagnostic apparatus through which surveillance, impugnment, negation, and alienation are deployed via the medical industrial complex and the medical gaze as a subjugating mode of relation, bedlife is a vital counterpoint to this violence, a portal to crip fugitivity, existential and political affirmation, and connection. Finally, through encountering different artworks, this essay explores the linkages between intimacy and future-making, collapsing the space between queer desire for each other and one another’s bodies, and the particularly queer politics of desire for a world unbound by oppressive structures and the limitations of imposed binaries. Against what disability scholars Eli Clare and Eunjung Kim, among others, have critiqued as the hegemonic imperative toward cure, which seeks to get us out of bed and into capitalism’s racist and ableist coercive temporalities, this paper looks to the bed as a heuristic and material site for a radical politics of feminist carework, queer desire, crip time, and decolonial worldmaking. What it is to want — in all its senses, suggests there is a relevant kind of intimacy between what we are denied as sick and disabled queers in a heterosexist society founded on racial capitalism and colonial regimes of body, self and other—and how we share closeness, cultivating desire for each other and other possible worlds.
      PubDate: 2023-12-01
      DOI: 10.18061/dsq.v43i1.9664
      Issue No: Vol. 43, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • The Pedagogy of Waiting: A Reorientation to Time with Artists with
           Disabilities and Creative Growth Art Center

    • Authors: Min Gu
      Abstract: This paper is rooted in my investigation of the artistic processes and practices of artists with disabilities through field observations at Creative Growth Art Center in Oakland, California. Through this investigation, I develop the concept of a pedagogy of waiting, which allows for a consideration of embodied differences. This pedagogy of waiting is conceptualized by and with 1) the everyday artistic processes and practices of artists at Creative Growth; 2) my positionality of being a Chinese art educator and researcher in an art studio, Creative Growth, in the United States; and 3) my conceptual and theoretical exploration with philosophers and disability studies scholars. Among the artists who informed the pedagogy of waiting is Latefa Noorzai, a native Farsi speaker and immigrant to the United States. The temporalities demonstrated through Latefa’s art practice and the pedagogical practice at Creative Growth challenge the normative temporalities in art learning and art making. The pedagogy of waiting is both informed by people with disabilities and as an alternative to able-bodied and able-minded pedagogies.
      PubDate: 2023-12-01
      DOI: 10.18061/dsq.v43i1.9656
      Issue No: Vol. 43, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • What I have learned (fill in the blank)

    • Authors: Chanika Svetvilas
      Abstract: My artistic practice focuses on the intersectionality of my lived experience of mental health difference as a Thai American woman who has contended with the impacts of the stigma and inequities in mental health care and access. Having been diagnosed with bipolar, I explore my way of being through my art and seek to assess and illuminate my lived experiences through the lens of disability justice and mad pride. My “archive” consists of medication guides, prescription bottles, historical and psychiatric resource materials, and medical texts that discuss mental health conditions. I use these texts and artifacts in my art and investigate systemic and historical legacies to find strength in vulnerability. In my large scale drawings, I use charcoal because of its transformative origins from solid matter and to acknowledge that its activated form absorbs chemicals after a stomach is pumped following an overdose. The smeared charcoal emphasizes outlandishness and an unwillingness to conform, as I resist containment and being categorized. In affirming freedom and individuality, I reveal the human touch behind the marks and processes that spill off the page and ignore the margins. Created during the pandemic, my large scale series of over 80 drawings, “What I have learned. (Fill in the blank.)” on oversized lined paper, 36” x 24,” questions how we learn, who is the “educator” and how do we unlearn harm. I mine interactions, relationships and responses to my being from micro aggressions, to stigma, racism, and ableism as well as reflect on current anti-Asian violence. By sharing these texts and images, I allow others who might identify with these experiences to enter a safe space and connect to others to build a community in pursuit of disability justice.
      PubDate: 2023-12-01
      DOI: 10.18061/dsq.v43i1.9665
      Issue No: Vol. 43, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • Madness/Disability as “Spectral Presence” in The Woman Warrior:
           Confusing Hegemonic Categories Through a Mad Asian American Modality

    • Authors: Lzz Johnk
      Abstract: Following queer crip theorists like Sami Schalk, Aurora Levins Morales, and Leah Lakshmi Piepzna-Samarasinha, this piece roots genealogies and origin stories of Disability Studies and Mad Studies in women of color feminist scholarship-activism. I offer an analysis of Maxine Hong Kingston’s enactment of a Mad Asian American modality in The Woman Warrior to locate examples of how women of color feminisms shift conceptual, methodological, pedagogical, and activist frameworks on Madness/disability. By thinking together Nirmala Erevelles’ historical materialist perspective on haunting with Yen Li Loh’s conceptualization of The Woman Warrior’s Mad women as “inhuman ghosts” (2018, 231), I assert that Kingston’s Mad Asian American modality blurs distinctions between human/nonhuman, past/present/future, and discourse/matter. Through the stories of Maxine and her family, Kingston engages in what I read as a form of Mad/crip of color critique, calling attention to the failure of whitestream Mad/Disability Studies to examine the entanglement of race, gender, and Madness/disability under the white supremacist settler colonial state. Kingston’s method of blurring reveals that the radical potential of Madness/disability lies in the ways that marginalized bodymind difference generatively confuses binary categories of eurowestern worldview and creates alternative modalities for living, being, and relating outside of white supremacist colonial cisheteropatriarchy.
      PubDate: 2023-12-01
      DOI: 10.18061/dsq.v43i1.9678
      Issue No: Vol. 43, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • Milky Appetites: The Foods that Make Us Human

    • Authors: Athia N. Choudhury
      Abstract: This article follows American milk powder through its many iterations and afterlives: as domestic health food, militarized technology in Asia and its diaspora, and as a symbol of modern health on a global stage. What intimacies of empire might we find by following the shifting sentiments around powdered/skimmed milk consumption' Moreover, how does sifting through this minor history allow us to interrogate the politics of body sovereignty and surveillance as it is scaled transnationally. This article argues that an appetite for dairy was encouraged through various national public sensing projects that made eugenics principles accessible for ordinary audiences as an embodied science of the home. Analyzing the military and weight-loss circuits of powdered/skim demonstrates how government agencies, corporations, medical practitioners, home economists, and other public health workers conjured images of healthy nations and abled-citizens through dairy consumption---often targeting women, children, and racialized subjects as sites of reform through weight management. Bodies that were seen as undesirable–whether too fat or too thin, too sick or too feeble–could be fixed by reforming the appetite. Reading mid-20th century dietetics, U.S. Department of Agriculture archives, and Asian diasporic literature on dairy production and consumption, the case studies in this article elucidate how U.S.-led food literacy and foreign aid campaigns, bolstered by wartime experiments, sought to expand U.S. imperial soft power through wellness technologies. “Milky Appetites” offers a study of desire for national and individual health and wellness as structures of imperialism felt on the body.
      PubDate: 2023-12-01
      DOI: 10.18061/dsq.v43i1.9679
      Issue No: Vol. 43, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • Crip Life Amidst Debilitation: Medicalization, Survival, and the Bhopal
           Gas Leak

    • Authors: Jiya S. Pandya
      Abstract: In a textbook horror-story of global capitalism, on December 3, 1984, the U.S owned Union Carbide pesticide factory spewed forty tons of lethal toxic methyl isocyanate (MIC) on the city of Bhopal in India. Nearly 10,000 people died and 30,000 people were disabled overnight. Continued exposure to MIC at the factory site has disabled many more in the decades since. Yet, few disability scholars have considered the histories of the survivors of the leak as a key site of crip politics. Drawing on work by Nirmala Erevelles, Jina Kim, Jasbir Puar, and Alison Kafer, this paper explores how the long history of debilitation, disablement, and survivorship since the Bhopal Gas Leak provides essential ground for re-zoning disability studies in the Global South. Braiding the theory of debility with the methodology of critical disability studies, this article posits that it is insufficient to say that the most marginalized in the Global South experience debility. Rather, it is also necessary to focus on their modes of survival in the face of the constant material and intellectual reproduction of said debilitation. The article demonstrates how poor lower-caste and Muslim workers and city-dwellers in Bhopal were subject to the debilitating logics of transnational corporate negotiations, racialized environmental de-regulation, and governmental profit-seeking in the years leading up to the leak. Through crip readings of medical research published between 1985 and 2000, I argue that this debility has been compounded through knowledge production which did not pay heed to the ways in which its victims contended with their vulnerability. In contrast to these sources, this article further examines testimonies and organizational pamphlets to contend that survivors in Bhopal offer their own model of disability justice and crip survival in the face of debilitation. In an era of vibrant disability rights organizing in the United States, the survivors of the leak emerged in global media primarily as victims of a tragedy caught in an endless cycle of injustice. Moving past the stance of pity often deployed in discussions of Bhopal, I highlight efforts of survivance that center disabled futurity, even as these activists use a different vocabulary and thereby strive to channel attention and resources to the myriad forms of crip survival in postcolonial India.
      PubDate: 2023-12-01
      DOI: 10.18061/dsq.v43i1.9653
      Issue No: Vol. 43, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • Work Will Not Save Us: An Asian American Crip Manifesto

    • Authors: Mel Y. Chen, Mimi Khùc, Jina B. Kim
      Abstract: Drawing together disability justice, Asian American studies, and feminist/ queer-of-color labor analysis, this collaboratively authored essay forwards an anti-work manifesto shaped by our lived experiences as sick, disabled and queer Asian American scholars laboring in the academic-industrial complex. This essay offers a two-part intervention: first, it aims to expand nascent conversations on disability politics and its relationship to racial capitalism, and second, it puts forth a critique of the Asian American emphasis on achievement as an instrument of belonging and potential inoculation against racialized violence. It also unfolds in two parts: first, a section on why we refuse work, and second, a section on how to perform this refusal.   As we come to this essay from our respective positionalities in contingent, tenure-stream, and tenured academic loci, as well as from our shared investments in feminist and queer frameworks, the first section mobilizes feminist and queer disability analysis to interrogate the fraught investments in work shared across Asian American and Disability Studies, addressing the complexities of gendered, contingent, care, and service work within the academic landscape (and particularly as we have experienced them). The second section offers a survival guide for navigating the labor demands placed on racialized, queer, and/ or disabled scholars, channeling Asian American rage to move beyond saying “no” and toward saying “fuck off.”
      PubDate: 2023-12-01
      DOI: 10.18061/dsq.v43i1.9652
      Issue No: Vol. 43, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • The Keller Plantation and the Racial Plot of Disability History in the
           U.S.

    • Authors: Camille Owens
      Abstract: Between the popularization of Helen Keller’s autobiography, The Story of My Life (1903), and the cinematic dramatization of The Miracle Worker (1962), scenes of Keller’s early life and education have served as touchstones through which nondisabled Americans have imagined disability’s history and narrowed its political possibilities: toward the conditional dispersal of access based on individual acts of overcoming. Yet, if Keller’s story has played an outsize role in consolidating disability’s history and politics, it is also a site of profound racial occlusion. The context of Keller’s early life on the Keller plantation in Tuscumbia, Alabama is largely absent from her popular legacy. With the disappearance of this context, the black people who facilitated Keller’s disabled coming of age have also fallen away, as well as the history of slavery and Indigenous removal that made her life story possible. This void—at the locus of perhaps the most hegemonic origin story of American disability history—is cause for critical race inquiry. This essay traces the relationship between the material background of Keller’s autobiography and its imaginative foreground; from her family’s role in settler conquest and slavery in the Alabama Muscle Shoals, to Keller’s status as a transcendent icon of disability. Reading between the plantation and the plot of Keller’s Story while locating both beside the Tennessee River’s shoals, this essay turns to theories of cartography and narrative authored by Sylvia Wynter and Tiffany Lethabo King for insight into a critical paradox: the antiblack and anti-Indigenous structure of ableism, and the whiteness of disabled representation. By resituating Keller’s iconicity in relation to conquest, slavery, and their afterlives, this essay locates the problems and possibilities of narrating black and Indigenous disability history from the Keller plantation’s surround. Yet, while invested in unsettling the landscape, I neither recover these stories nor entomb them as untellable. Instead, I write toward further investment in black and Indigenous counter-archives that have complicated who has been—and who remains—the imaginable and politically traction-able subject of disability.
      PubDate: 2023-12-01
      DOI: 10.18061/dsq.v43i1.9649
      Issue No: Vol. 43, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • Blind and Deaf Together: Cross-Disability Community at Virginia's
           Residential School for Black Disabled Youth

    • Authors: G. Jasper Conner
      Abstract: Disability history has embraced the cultural model of Deafness which argues that residential schools fostered a common identity unified around the use of sign language. This article argues that this model was built on examinations of primarily (and exclusively) white institutions, resulting in scholarship that erases the distinct experiences of deaf African Americans. Cross-disability experiences were central to the lives of Black children at the Virginia State School, a residential school for deaf and blind African American youth. Far from a statistical outlier, the majority of Southern states used this cost saving measure to educate blind and deaf African Americans. Though not exclusively utilized for African Americans, the disproportionate use of combined schools reflects a Jim Crow approach to disability designed to reduce state expenditures at the cost of services rendered to the Black community. Relying on previously unused sources of the Virginia State School, including surviving records of administrators and a school bulletin with student contributors, this article explores a community where nearly every aspect of life involved cross-disability relationships. Oral histories with former students add to this narrative, revealing how young people who came to identify as culturally Deaf, communicated with partially blind students through sign language and with fully blind students through spoken English. This approach to deaf and blind education regularized cross-disability interactions among African Americans in Virginia, producing a community at the school defined by their categorization as disabled and Black, more so than by specific disabilities.
      PubDate: 2023-12-01
      DOI: 10.18061/dsq.v43i1.9647
      Issue No: Vol. 43, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • Mental Health vs Mutual Aid: Competing Visions of Care in Black-authored
           Films in the 1970s

    • Authors: Olivia Banner
      Abstract: This article considers two little-noted films from the early 1970s that took up a Black politics of "mental health." Both films intervened into racial-liberalist psychiatric and social scientific discourses of "Black pathologies" by drawing from Black radical and community-organizing models to envision how to care for people in distress outside of dominant psychiatric and psychological discourses and institutions. With shared production and institutional contexts yet differing articulations of what radical forms of care looked like both in practice, in narrative, and in mediation, these two films deepen our understanding of what form a Black disability politics of mental health took in this era. They also expand how disability studies as well as disability media studies frame the connections among anti-psychiatry and mad studies movements, Black radicalism and organizing, and cultural production.
      PubDate: 2023-12-01
      DOI: 10.18061/dsq.v43i1.9681
      Issue No: Vol. 43, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • Wolf Girls and Mechanical Boys: Whiteness and Assimilation in Bruno
           Bettelheim’s Narratives of Autism

    • Authors: Elizabeth Cady Maher
      Abstract: In March of 1959, public intellectual, principal of the Sonia Shankman Orthogenic School at the University of Chicago, and Jewish concentration camp survivor, Bruno Bettelheim published two articles that presented seemingly disparate narratives of autism. One of these narratives, that of the mechanical boy, has become ubiquitous in discussions of autism history. The other article centered on Bettelheim’s posthumous diagnosis of Kamala, who had been known as the Wolf Girl of Midnapore India due to claims that she was raised by wolves, as autistic. Bettelheim compared Kamala to other “wild” autistic children he had worked with, especially Anna, a Polish Jewish refugee who had spent her earliest years hiding in a dugout from Nazi persecution. This article argues that in order to understand Bettelheim’s portrayal of autism, it is necessary to read the narrative of the mechanical boy alongside Bettelheim’s other narratives of autism. Specifically, it is necessary to read it alongside Bettelheim’s narratives of the autistic child as “wild child/wolf girl,” as well as his comparison between autistic children and some of his fellow concentration camp inmates, who he referred to as “moslems.” While seemingly disparate, these narratives are actually deeply intertwined. These narratives of incurable “wild children” and “moslem” concentration camp inmates served as the necessary contrast to the rehabilitation/assimilation/cure narrative of the mechanical boy. Reading these narratives of autism alongside each other helps uncover the often-elided role of race in shaping professional and public understandings of autism. This article problematizes contemporary and historical formations of autism as a white, middle-class, male “disorder” by making explicit the role of race in the construction of early narratives of autism. This article will also argue that in the late 1950s and the 1960s Bruno Bettelheim used narratives of autism to promote a new model of white technocratic masculinity in the United States. The creation of this new model of white masculinity was bound up with the whitening of Ashkenazi Jewish identity. Bettelheim presented whiteness as something that Ashkenazi Jews in America could achieve through a process of rehabilitation/assimilation/cure that rid them of pathological “Jewish” traits.
      PubDate: 2023-12-01
      DOI: 10.18061/dsq.v43i1.9648
      Issue No: Vol. 43, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • Signs of Grace: Protestant Pro-slavery Rhetoric of Disability in the 19th
           Century

    • Authors: Calli Micale
      Abstract: This archival analysis of 19th-century Protestant pro-slavery rhetoric shows that positive evaluations of disability concealed debilitation practices on plantations. The examination complicates a narrative in disability histories that associates Christian teaching with only a negative evaluation of disability as indexing a state of sin. Instead, the article explains how positive and negative evaluations of intellectual deficiency coalesced within a theological imaginary to shore up white Christian consciences, allowing for and encouraging the violence perpetrated against the enslaved. The article concludes, following Jasbir Puar and Julie Avril Minich, to query whether re-inscribing a positive evaluation of disability does disability justice'
      PubDate: 2023-12-01
      DOI: 10.18061/dsq.v43i1.9663
      Issue No: Vol. 43, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • On the Question of Soul Wounding: Secular Debility, Biopolitics, and
           Canada's Right to Maim

    • Authors: Faye M. Fraser
      Abstract: Jasbir Puar has demonstrated that the targeted debilitation of entire racialized populations embodies a contemporary illustration of colonialism’s machine.  For Puar, colonizing states exist as biopolitical assemblages of control, the technologies of which instrumentalize a spectrum of debilities and capacities in the service of neoliberal colonialism, which requires maiming populations who are preconditioned for injury to secure sovereign power. This paper stages a conversation with Jasbir Puar to ask what additional insights might be gained about the relationship between colonialism and debility if critical disability scholarship went beyond a Foucauldian biopolitical analysis of the management of life, death, and debility when theorizing colonial violence. This paper thus reads across postcolonial and anti-colonial thought as well as Indigenous theories of trauma to encourage critical disability studies to expand the horizon of its reading practices when engaging these questions. These approaches, I maintain, provide critical insights into sovereign power that biopolitics cannot, including critical attention to non-secular configurations of settler colonial debility that biopolitical theory misses. I aim to show that a locus of Canada’s colonial sovereignty resides in targeted attacks, or “dis-membering,” forms of Indigenous non-secular transcendent self-consciousness—that is, the sanctioned maiming of Indigenous heterogeneous agencies in the service of neocolonial economic designs. In this sense, theories of metaphysics and violence must also be accounted for when attending to debility, colonialism, and sovereign power.
      PubDate: 2023-12-01
      DOI: 10.18061/dsq.v43i1.9661
      Issue No: Vol. 43, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • No Use to the State: Phrasing Escape and a Black Radical Epistolary of
           Disability in Early Twentieth-Century Alabama Prisons

    • Authors: Micah Khater
      Abstract: This article explores how Black women experienced and theorized disability from within Alabama’s prisons in the early twentieth century. Early-twentieth-century custodial prisons were a primary place in which disabled, southern Black women encountered the state. Some women entered prison disabled and many left with disabilities they had not had before. Indeed, disability was a condition of incarceration: a function of its punitive labor demands and the violence used to enforce disciplinary measures. Black women intimately understood and resisted this multifaceted violence and attempted to negotiate with the state for their release. Their handwritten letters, an archive that was unintentionally preserved by the state, demonstrate that incarcerated Black women’s articulation of uselessness was a profound critique of racial, carceral capitalism. Through close reading of recursive strategies, this article examines incarcerated Black women’s textual invocations of unproductivity as a disruption of the binary of metaphor and materiality in racial studies of disability.
      PubDate: 2023-12-01
      DOI: 10.18061/dsq.v43i1.9662
      Issue No: Vol. 43, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • Abnormal Abilities: Black Women and the Production of Able-Bodied Normalcy
           in Thylias Moss’s Slave Moth

    • Authors: Sarah L. Orsak
      Abstract: This article offers an alternative genealogy for disability accounts of normalcy by analyzing American poet Thylias Moss’s 2004 neo-slave narrative in verse, Slave Moth. While disability scholars have historically understood normalcy and able-bodiedness as synonymous, ability is not always normative for Black women. Although Slave Moth’s narrator Varl is putatively able-minded, her enslaver positions her as abnormal because she is literate. Drawing on Black feminist thought, I argue that normalcy describes multiple, seemingly contradictory, measures that operate through racialized standards of proper capacity. Moss illuminates how Black women and girls might inhabit a position of abnormality-ability because she situates abnormality within chattel slavery, making freak shows peripheral to the narrative. The anti-black formation of abnormality-ability mediates the boundaries of ability/disability and normal/abnormal. I address how this occurs in disability scholarship. Research on normalcy and the freak show has argued for the importance of disability as an analytic by relying on blackness as a fungible site of meaning. Ultimately, able-bodiedness becomes normative for white subjects, and disability abnormal, through their frictional relationship to and reliance on Black women’s abnormality-ability. However, Varl illuminates, critiques, and refuses this weaponization of abnormality. Through her embroidery, Varl develops technologies for living in the fissures of both abnormality and able-bodiedness.
      PubDate: 2023-12-01
      DOI: 10.18061/dsq.v43i1.9682
      Issue No: Vol. 43, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • Mules and Madmen: On the Disabling Habitats of Zora Neale Hurston and Jean
           Toomer

    • Authors: Liz Bowen
      Abstract: This essay reads the work of two major Harlem Renaissance authors as underacknowledged sites of disability politics and aesthetics, situating this moment in African-American artistic innovation as integral to the literary history of disability and illuminating the theories of disability that shaped these authors' experiments in literary form. Specifically, it argues that texts by Jean Toomer and Zora Neale Hurston were attuned to the intertwined vulnerabilities of Black people disabled by early-20th-century labor exploitation and more-than-human ecologies debilitated by the same industries. These works represent a serious challenge to the long-running myth in white disability studies that claims nonwhite authors have historically distanced themselves from disability for fear of racist pathologization. Toomer’s story “Box Seat,” for instance, positions its protagonist's atypical mental state—represented by voiceover-like internal monologues—as both aesthetically generative and materially responsive to the commercialization of racialized, disabled, and nonhuman spectacle. Meanwhile, Their Eyes Were Watching God’s oft-cited “mule of the world” metaphor finds literal representation in the form of a work-disabled mule, whose appearance in the narrative occasions one of Hurston’s most memorable aesthetic innovations: the incorporation of folklore into the realist novel. For both of these authors, disability represents not only vulnerability to the machinations of racial capitalism, but also creative invention and formal resistance to white-dominated narrative norms. They show that a capacious, ecologically oriented disability politics is central to the history of Black cultural production.
      PubDate: 2023-12-01
      DOI: 10.18061/dsq.v43i1.9680
      Issue No: Vol. 43, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • “Yanqui-man Put Roots on Her”: Afro-Religiosity and (Dis)abilities in
           Nelly Rosario’s Song of the Water Saints

    • Authors: Eun-Jin Keish Kim
      Abstract: This essay analyzes (dis)ability at the intersection of colonialism, afro-religiosity, and literary studies to reassess illness and (dis)ability under histories of racialization. I approach Nelly Rosario’s novel Song of the Water Saints (2002) as a “texto montado” (possessed text), following Lorgia García Peña (2016), to suggest an alternative reading of (dis)ability in diasporic texts, particularly in relation to Afro-religiosity and colonial violence. By bringing together the history of colonial erasure of Afro-religiosity and violence against Black and poor women, this essay examines the stages of syphilis on the protagonist’s, Graciela, body and life alongside the material impacts of U.S. occupation of the Dominican Republic (1916-1924). If readers are to take the story of Graciela’s life as one of the erased and unrecorded narratives in the colonial archives, how do we make sense of the otherworldly ontology accessed through (dis)abilities offered toward the end of Graciela’s life' Rosario’s novel is a practice of truth-telling and a resistance against the erasure of Dominican women’s stories of violence and power. Finally, this essay demonstrates the possibilities of bringing together Afro-religious ontologies and disability studies to expand our understanding of (dis)ability as a condition of becoming imbricated within colonial and imperial history.
      PubDate: 2023-12-01
      DOI: 10.18061/dsq.v43i1.9686
      Issue No: Vol. 43, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • Reading a legacy of black gay literature in/to Disability Studies and a
           Crip-of-Color Theory: Exploring the work of Joseph Beam, Essex Hemphill
           and Audre Lorde

    • Authors: Ally Day
      Abstract: This article reads works of Audre Lorde, Essex Hemphill, Joseph Beam, and other writers through what I name a palimpsestic practice of crip reading . The very way in which we must find and read the voices of Black gay men is by locating anthologies and reading those contributors in palimpsestic relationship to one another and to Black feminist writers and organizers. Although Black gay men and Black feminists of the 1980’s and 1990’s engaged with cancer and HIV in their writings, they are often considered as part of different political, cultural, and intellectual legacies than is often included in the field of Disability Studies. A palimpsestic reading of their works as entangled with each other reveals new genealogies of crip activist and cultural work. By this I mean that Black queer and/or feminist writing exist in a palimpsest relationship with Disability Studies; one can read the layers of thought through one another.  A palimpsestic reading also proposes that cultural workers presumed to be outside the sphere of Disability Studies are, in fact, central to creating a crip-of-color theory.
      PubDate: 2023-12-01
      DOI: 10.18061/dsq.v43i1.9654
      Issue No: Vol. 43, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • Cross-Coalitional Anti-Racist and Anti-Ableist Movements' Building on
           Maroon/Fugitive Knowledges and Global South Epistemologies

    • Authors: Alexis Padilla
      Abstract: The present essay interrogates cross-coalitional, anti-racist and anti-ableist movement building in the global north and in the global south through the perspectives of fugitive, maroon knowledges and global south epistemologies. The essay builds upon the theoretical grounding offered by LatDisCrit through its integrative bridging work across DisCrit and LatCrit theory and its prioritization of diasporic, sociopolitical engagements with sociohistorical manifestations of trans-Latinidades throughout U.S. imperial territorialities. As such, the essay relies on the use of counterstorytelling as a hermeneutic method which surfaces otherwise hidden dimensions of global south epistemologies that in this essay are operationalized as knowledges born in the struggle, regardless of whether the struggle in question takes place in global north, global south contexts, or both. The essay concludes with critical explorations on the concept of quilombo. This notion is proposed as a possibilitarian space for cross-coalitional resistance, emancipatory learning, radical agency and radical solidarity.
      PubDate: 2023-12-01
      DOI: 10.18061/dsq.v43i1.9660
      Issue No: Vol. 43, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • (Re)centering the Knowledge of Disabled Activists, Poverty Scholars, and
           Community Scholars of Color to Transform Education

    • Authors: Lydia X. Z. Brown, Brianna Dickens, Tiny (Lisa) Gray-Garcia, Saili S. Kulkarni, Lateef McLeod, Amanda L. Miller, Emily A. Nusbaum, Holly Pearson
      Abstract: This duoethnography weaves the experiences and perspectives of disabled activists, poverty scholars, community scholars of color, and university-based scholars partnering on a teacher preparation professional development project that (re)centers disability and its intersections by (a) reconsidering who creates knowledge, (b) positioning disabled activists, poverty scholars, and community scholars of color as experts with pedagogical authority, and (c) providing opportunities for teacher candidates (current and future teachers) to learn from activists and scholars in accessible, online spaces. The experiences and perspectives of multiply marginalized disabled youth and adults are often ignored and/or discounted in teacher preparation programs. However, one way to re-zone and re-people disability studies in teacher education is by teaching and learning at the intersections of critical race studies and disability studies through cross-coalitional community-university partnerships.
      PubDate: 2023-12-01
      DOI: 10.18061/dsq.v43i1.9693
      Issue No: Vol. 43, No. 1 (2023)
       
 
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School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


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