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  Subjects -> DISABILITY (Total: 103 journals)
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Music and Medicine
Number of Followers: 2  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1943-8621 - ISSN (Online) 1943-863X
Published by International Association for Music and Medicine Homepage  [1 journal]
  • Tempora mutantur et nos mutamur in illis-or what'

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      Authors: Ralph Spintge, Joanne V. Loewy
      Abstract: Those who expected that our general global health care system situation would improve or seem under control after the COVID pandemic have learned that it isn´t...
      PubDate: 2023-01-30
      Issue No: Vol. 15, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • Best practice recommendations for using music with children and young
           people with disorders of consciousness

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      Authors: Anna Menén Sánchez, Jonathan Pool, Janeen Bower, Valerie Paasch , Wendy Magee
      Abstract: Children and youth with Disorders of Consciousness (DoC) present with highly complex medical, physical, and behavioral needs. Additionally, involving such children and young people in meaningful activities with caregivers can be challenging due to the combined motor, sensory, cognitive and communication impairments. Authoritative guidelines for engaging children and youth in meaningful sensory experiences that can enhance social and emotional experiences are lacking due to the minimal research with this population. Music is a medium that optimizes sensory stimulation using salient stimuli in the auditory modality. Furthermore, music experiences require minimal physical demands and offer opportunities for social interactions in line with developmental milestones. The primary objective of this paper is to offer best-practice recommendations for musical stimulation with children and youth with DoC, including its use in leisure and relaxation activities. These recommendations are synthesized from the existing evidence and combined with expert opinion. They are intended for caregivers of children and young people with DoC, which include paid healthcare professionals and providers, as well as non-paid caregivers such as family, friends, and volunteers. These practical suggestions may be applicable in a variety of settings, including hospitals, educational and residential care settings, family homes, and rehabilitation units.
      PubDate: 2023-01-30
      DOI: 10.47513/mmd.v15i1.885
      Issue No: Vol. 15, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • Use of music videos in the treatment of complex trauma

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      Authors: Diana Christine Hereld, Marissa Yoshizawa
      Abstract: A single case study is presented of an 11-year-old biracial female residing in foster care. The client was referred for a history of pervasive and complex developmental trauma and was seen in the context of community-based psychological services for approximately one year. In addition to the provision of Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (TF-CBT), the utilization of music videos proved uniquely effective in the delivery of psychoeducation, emotion identification and regulation, and ultimate creation of the trauma narrative. As trauma-informed arts-based therapies rise in popularity, this case study examines some advantages and special considerations for the use of music videos in the treatment of complex developmental trauma.  Keywords: Music, Complex Trauma, Emotion Regulation, Music Videos
      PubDate: 2023-01-30
      DOI: 10.47513/mmd.v15i1.856
      Issue No: Vol. 15, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • Music educators’ and students’ views on participating in a
           music and medicine program

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      Authors: Roma Subramanian, Mary Perkinson
      Abstract: Using semi-structured interviews and participant observation, this study investigated the experiences of student musicians and faculty participating in a Music and Medicine program in the United States. The program is a partnership between a midwestern university school of music and a local cancer center. Results revealed that in contrast to traditional concert settings where musicians are centered, in the non-traditional environment of a healthcare setting, the listeners were centered; this instilled in performers a sense of humility and made them attune to the humanity of the transient audience around them. The program cultivated professionalism and joy by providing students real-world performance opportunities in a low-stress environment. Finally, it fostered artist citizenship by encouraging performers to reflect on how their art can serve the larger community.
      PubDate: 2023-01-30
      DOI: 10.47513/mmd.v15i1.887
      Issue No: Vol. 15, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • Better Together: Interprofessional Collaborations between Music Educators
           and Music Therapists

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      Authors: Amy Clements-Cortes, Hope Pascoe, Nicholas Bridi
      Abstract: This paper provides an overview of the potential benefits of interprofessional collaboration between music educators and music therapists in elementary and high school settings. An overview of the role of interprofessional collaboration is shared, followed by a discussion of potential gains specific to collaboration between music educators and music therapists. Examples of various interprofessional programs implemented in the school system are noted alongside suggestions for developing future collaborations between these fields.
      PubDate: 2023-01-30
      DOI: 10.47513/mmd.v15i1.900
      Issue No: Vol. 15, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • A Systematic literature review of the effect of music therapy on
           psychological outcomes in aphasia

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      Authors: TingYi Lu, Rachel Goff-Albritton, Alice-Ann Darrow, Elizabeth Madden
      Abstract: Aphasia is a language disorder caused most commonly by a stroke or traumatic brain injury, affecting approximately two million Americans in the United States.  Impaired language function hinders one’s ability to communicate and interact with others, leading to psychological changes, such as post-stroke depression. Music Therapy has been integral in post-stroke rehabilitation. Music-based interventions not only improve motor and cognitive functions but have also been shown to improve psychological outcomes. The purpose of this systematic literature review is to describe current research on psychological outcomes from music-based interventions for persons with aphasia, summarize therapy outcomes, and evaluate the quality of the research. Eight studies meeting criteria were included in this review. The participant characteristics, interventions, and formal and informal assessments were described for each study. The methodological quality across studies was highly varied. Overall, gains in psychological outcomes were demonstrated; however, outcomes varied within and among therapy approaches. We suggest that future research focus on continued attention to investigate the psychological impact of music-based interventions and improve overall methodological rigor through standardized protocols and assessments.
      PubDate: 2023-01-30
      DOI: 10.47513/mmd.v15i1.876
      Issue No: Vol. 15, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • The 50-year proliferation of music medical science research: A
           bibliometric review

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      Authors: Zachary Levine, Mackenzie Campbell, Abeer Adil, Shaul Kruger, David Alter
      Abstract: The extent to which music research has penetrated the medical science literature relative to other forms of research remains unclear. We sought to explore temporal changes in the number of music related publications relative to all medical literature as well as prespecified research subdomains of drug therapy, alternative therapy, and neuroscience between 1970 and 2019. We conducted a bibliometric review in which we quantified the number of annual publications between 1970 and 2019 using MEDLINE (PUBMED) search engine and mesh terms of “Music”; “Drug therapy”; “Alternative Medicine”; “Neuroscience”. The number of publications were quantified relative to all publications within their corresponding years. We also examined the types of journals, geographical location of publication (Based on corresponding author), and journal impact factors. To ensure appropriate content, we conducted a hand review of a random 400 abstracts to ensure they met appropriate criteria for music-medical research. We used log-linear regression, to test differences in growth rates. We determined that the relative growth in the number of music publications accelerated at a rate higher than all medical related publications or those confined to drug therapy. The proliferation of music research was attributable to higher rates of neuroscience, alternative therapy, and music therapy research. In conclusion, the temporal growth in number of music research publications relative to other comparators over the past 50 years underscores the importance, relevance, and maturation of music as an evolving discipline of contemporary medical science.
      PubDate: 2023-01-30
      DOI: 10.47513/mmd.v15i1.903
      Issue No: Vol. 15, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • The Effects of environmental music therapy on anxiety and waiting in
           radiation oncology

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      Authors: andrew rossetti, Joanne Loewy, Zachary Fischer, Saarang Deshpande, Manjeet Chadha
      Abstract: A randomized control trial investigated perceived waiting time in patient and caregivers, and live music’s effects on anxiety levels prior to daily radiation therapy (RT). Environmental Music Therapy (EMT) is a live music intervention by music therapists meant to modify perception of potentially stressful environments through constructing dynamic soundscapes to provide enhanced comfort and safety. This study (a) rated participants’ state anxiety and distress experienced in the waiting area pre-RT, (b) determined if the EMT protocol moderated baseline treatment experience-related anxiety and (c) evaluated EMT’s affects on perceived waiting time pre-treatment, versus actual waiting time.  We hypothesized EMT would reduce state anxiety, distress, and regulate distortion of waiting time, ultimately changing overall RT perception. 160 randomized patients and caregivers were accrued- 82 receiving EMT, 78 randomized to control.   Assessment pre/post intervention measured anxiety and distress with the STAI 6 and Visual Analogue Distress Scale. A time survey assessed waiting perception. Data collected and recorded by research assistants naïve to treatment conditions found EMT interventions showed significantly reduced perceived incidences of anxiety and distress, significantly shortening perceived waiting times in the EMT arm compared to controls. Reduced anxiety, distress, and temporal distortion can enhance patients’ and caregivers’ perception of hospital environments.
      PubDate: 2023-01-30
      DOI: 10.47513/mmd.v15i1.911
      Issue No: Vol. 15, No. 1 (2023)
       
 
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