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  Subjects -> DISABILITY (Total: 103 journals)
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Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.296
Number of Followers: 87  
 
Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal   * Containing 1 Open Access Open Access article(s) in this issue *
ISSN (Print) 2044-1282 - ISSN (Online) 2044-1290
Published by Emerald Homepage  [362 journals]
  • Screening and diagnosing dementia in people with Down’s syndrome:
           implications of using the DLD questionnaire

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      Authors: Bhathika Perera , Lukasz Kamieniarz , Mashal Iftikhar , Solomis Solomou
      Abstract: The Dementia Questionnaire for People with Learning Disabilities (DLD) is one of the main screening and monitoring tools for dementia in people with Down’s syndrome (DS). As part of a quality improvement project to improve the care for people with DS and dementia in an intellectual disability service, the authors studied the screening and monitoring process by retrospectively investigating the use of DLD and exploring clinicians’ experience of using it. DLDs completed in the service was retrospectively assessed. Changes in DLD scores were matched against people who received a clinical diagnosis of dementia. Data were analysed to estimate sensitivity, specificity and predictive values of DLD. A questionnaire was used to assess clinicians’ experience. Data for 20 service users was collected. DLD cognitive scores showed 80% sensitivity and 60% specificity for the diagnosis of dementia, with a positive predictive value of 40% and negative predictive value of 90%. Staff found DLD to be easy to perform but time consuming. This led to the preparation of a decision tool for appropriateness of performing a DLD. The results show that a negative DLD helps to exclude dementia where there is concern over cognitive decline, but a positive result is not specific enough to suggest the possibility of dementia. This shows that DLD may have limitations if used as a screening tool alone but could be used for the monitoring of the disease trajectory of those with a confirmed diagnosis as well as to establish a baseline DLD when a person is screened for dementia first.
      Citation: Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities
      PubDate: 2022-10-11
      DOI: 10.1108/AMHID-04-2022-0015
      Issue No: Vol. 16 , No. 4 (2022)
       
  • Community services during the COVID-19 pandemic in a Norwegian county:
           impact on users with multiple, complex needs and their service providers
           – a qualitative study

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      Authors: Linda Kristin Hørsrud , Trine Lise Bakken
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to investigate how users with particularly complex needs including intellectual disability (ID) reacted to the changes and restrictions during the COVID-19 pandemic in 2020. As few studies of changes during the pandemic include users with ID and multiple, complex needs, the authors adopted a qualitative approach, using a semistructured interview guide. Ten participants were leading ID nurses in residential facilities in community settings. The interviews were taped, transcribed and analyzed using a thematic analysis. The thematic analysis generated six main themes, including both user and staff perspectives: daily routines, activities, facilitation of tasks and well-being, from the users perspectives, and use of working hours and positive staff experiences, from the staff perspectives. Ten residential facilities constituted a convenience sample of services for users with multiple, complex needs. Thus, the authors do not know whether the findings are representative. Further research should include user opinions based on the findings of this study. The users represented in this study appeared to experience less stress during the pandemic, contrary to the expectations of professional caregivers. The findings indicated more well-being among users. It was noted that receiving services at home, largely flexible schedules, staying in bed a little longer in the morning and avoiding stressful situations, such as travelling in minibuses, was appreciated by the users. Daily schedules with activities throughout the day should be considered for users as represented in this study. Stressful events should also be considered. The knowledge about pandemic experiences of users with ID and additional complex conditions and hence comprehensive needs is still sparse. This study may add to this knowledge.
      Citation: Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities
      PubDate: 2022-09-08
      DOI: 10.1108/AMHID-12-2021-0049
      Issue No: Vol. 16 , No. 4 (2022)
       
  • An investigation into the factors which influence attendance rates for
           psychology appointments in an adult intellectual disability service

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      Authors: Luke Yates , Louise Brittleton , Nigel Beail
      Abstract: This study aims to investigate whether factors previously shown to influence attendance rates for appointments in general practice and general mental health services also influence attendance rates in services for people with intellectual disabilities (ID). Post hoc data from 452 psychology appointments, ID diagnostic and initial screening (triage) appointments were collected from the health-care files of a community adult ID psychology service. Demographic factors (age, sex) and clinical factors (waiting time, time between appointment invitation being sent and appointment being held, presence of prior telephone call or letter, type of appointment, weekday, month) were recorded along with the attendance outcome (attended/did not attend [DNA]). The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic was also explored by documenting whether the appointment predated March 2020. No significant associations were found between any variable investigated and attendance outcome when analysing appointment data as a whole and when splitting the data between appointment type. Weekday was found to significantly be associated with attendance outcome for appointments held during COVID-19, in which more DNA appointments occurred on a Wednesday compared to the other days of the week. No other associations were found for appointments held during the COVID-19 pandemic or for appointments held prior to the COVID-19 pandemic. These results suggest that factors which influence attendance rates in general health-care settings do not necessarily generalise to ID services. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this study is the first to examine whether certain demographic and clinical factors influenced attendance rates in an adult intellectual disability service.
      Citation: Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities
      PubDate: 2022-08-31
      DOI: 10.1108/AMHID-01-2022-0007
      Issue No: Vol. 16 , No. 4 (2022)
       
  • Do demographic, and clinical characteristics influence meeting NICE
           quality standards for young people transitioning to adult intellectual
           disability services'

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

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      Authors: Paul Soper , Alex G. Stewart , Rajan Nathan , Sharleen Nall-Evans , Rachel Mills , Felix Michelet , Sujeet Jaydeokar
      Abstract: This study aims to evaluate the quality of transition from child and adolescent services to adult intellectual disability services, using the relevant National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) standard (QS140). In addition, this study also identifies any differences in transition quality between those young people with intellectual disability with and without autism. Using routinely collected clinical data, this study identifies demographic and clinical characteristics of, and contextual complexities experienced by, young people in transition between 2017 and 2020. Compliance with the quality standard was assessed by applying dedicated search terms to the records. The study highlighted poor recording of data with only 22% of 306 eligible cases having sufficient data recorded to determine compliance with the NICE quality standard. Available data indicated poor compliance with the standard. Child and adolescent mental health services, generally, did not record mental health co-morbidities. Compliance with three out of the five quality statements was higher for autistic young people, but this only reached statistical significance for one of those statements (i.e. having a named worker, p = 0.02). Missing data included basic clinical characteristics such as the level of intellectual disability and the presence of autism. This required adult services to duplicate assessment procedures that potentially delayed clinical outcomes. This study highlights that poor compliance may reflect inaccurate recording that needs addressing through training and introduction of shared protocols. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study to examine the transition process between children’s and adults’ intellectual disability health services using NICE quality standard 140.
      Citation: Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities
      PubDate: 2022-08-19
      DOI: 10.1108/AMHID-12-2021-0051
      Issue No: Vol. 16 , No. 4 (2022)
       
  • Psychiatric symptoms influence the performance on the Screener
           Intelligence and Learning Disabilities in general mental health care in
           The Netherlands

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      Authors: Jeanet Nieuwenhuis , Eric Noorthoorn , Peter Lepping , Niels Mulder , Henk Nijman
      Abstract: A recently published study showed a 41% prevalence of mild intellectual disability (MID) and borderline intellectual functioning (BIF) in a large sample of Dutch psychiatric patients. This study aims to examine if the outcomes of the Screener for Intelligence and Learning Disabilities (SCIL) were affected by the severity of psychiatric symptoms during admission. The authors administered the SCIL and the Kennedy Axis V (domain psychological impairment) at two moments when patients were sufficiently stabilised and just before discharge. A total of 86% of the respondents had the same outcome regardless of the time of administration. The Kennedy score correlated modestly with changes in the SCIL scores, suggesting that the severity of psychiatric symptoms just modestly affected the performance. Recognising MID/BIF in mental health care is essential but challenging for clinicians. The authors concluded that screening with the SCIL allows clinicians to identify patients with MID/BIF at an early stage of their admission, which helps to individualise treatment and reduce the risk of aggression, coercive measures and prolonged admissions. However, the authors prefer to assess all patients on cognitive impairment as early as possible after referral at a more stable moment in time. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, there is no research concerning screening instruments on MID/BIF used at admission wards in Mental Health Care.
      Citation: Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities
      PubDate: 2022-06-16
      DOI: 10.1108/AMHID-12-2021-0052
      Issue No: Vol. 16 , No. 4 (2022)
       
  • Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT): the impact of service
           changes due to COVID-19 on people with learning disabilities

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      Authors: Caroline Rodhouse , Dave Dagnan , Richard Thwaites , Chris Hatton
      Abstract: Primary care psychological interventions for people with common mental health problems in England are primarily delivered through Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) services. People with learning disabilities within IAPT have poorer key clinical outcomes than people who do not identify as having a learning disability. During the global COVID-19 pandemic remote consultations have accounted for nearly 90% of all contacts in IAPT services; this paper aims to report the effects of these on outcomes for people with learning disabilities. Publicly available national data from the COVID-affected period are compared to the most recent available comparison periods that are not during the COVID pandemic. Data are presented graphically. People with learning disabilities differ little from those with no disabilities on several key process and outcome variables, although their clinical recovery is very much lower than those without disabilities. People with learning disabilities appear to have been affected by the changes in service delivery in a similar way to those without learning disabilities. Despite the shift to predominantly remote therapy delivery, outcomes for people with learning disabilities have not been differentially affected compared to those who have no recorded disability. The potential to learn what has worked and not worked in the delivery of remote interventions for people with learning disabilities is highlighted.
      Citation: Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities
      PubDate: 2022-06-09
      DOI: 10.1108/AMHID-01-2022-0002
      Issue No: Vol. 16 , No. 4 (2022)
       
  • Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities

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